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Black eyed peas with New Years dinner?
traditional food | Uncle George

Posted on 12/31/2001 6:01:00 PM PST by Uncle George

A family tradition in millions of homes the humble black eyed peas are eaten as a symbol of a prosperious coming year. Not a lot of people like the taste of them but some inventive recipes make them delicious. My wife and I and family have had them every New Years for our 49 years of marriage so why tinker with success? What is your favorite recipe for the humble little black eye?


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: food; happynewyear; thewholecow; thewholepig; tripe
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Heres our familys favorite recipe.---BLACK EYED PEAS MEXICAN STYLE. --1 lb. dried black eyed peas,6C water,1/4 lb. salt pork sliced,1ts salt,1/4 ts pepper,1/4 ts oregano, 1 clove garlic.---In crockpot combine peas and water. Soak over night. cook soaked peas and water on high for 21/2 hours. set to low temp. Stir in salt pork, garlic, salt, pepper and oregano. Cover and cook on low 8-10 hours. Drain and serve with the dinner.
1 posted on 12/31/2001 6:01:01 PM PST by Uncle George
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To: Uncle George
Well UNK I wish I had my mothers recipe for her black eyed peas. We lived in Fresno County (I left in 54) and the folks had a big garden and always had BEP. I remember it had bacon but the thing that stands out was she used dried, green and tender cut beens,(like small string beans). I'll have the First Wife try your recipe if we can ever find the beans.
2 posted on 12/31/2001 6:10:51 PM PST by tubebender
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To: Uncle George
I love black-eye peas. We used to eat them on New Years when we lived down south. (Now I serve up clam chowder and shrimp cocktail.) I just cooked those peas on the stove top and ate as is.
3 posted on 12/31/2001 6:10:55 PM PST by Boxsford
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To: Uncle George
Change the salt pork to ham hock and you've got our recipe. Cornbread on the side.

MmmmmmmmmMmmmm!

"Not a lot of people like the taste of them but some inventive recipes make them delicious."

I thought everybody liked black-eyed peas with pig meat. Personally, I prefer pintos. Or lentils. But black-eyes are plenty good enough.

No black-eyed peas on New Year's Day, expect a full year of bad luck. And we're not takin' any chances...

4 posted on 12/31/2001 6:11:19 PM PST by okie01
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To: Uncle George
This thread is not getting much action so I will just tell you that I like your recipe. Compliment that with some good old cornbread and I can get by all day just munching on that, if munching is the proper description. Actually, I am a pig for that stuff.
5 posted on 12/31/2001 6:12:39 PM PST by Mind-numbed Robot
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Comment #6 Removed by Moderator

To: Uncle George
We just eat them plain, along with some sauerkraut, for extra prosperity ;-)
7 posted on 12/31/2001 6:13:00 PM PST by inflorida
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To: Uncle George
Been there, done that, but not superstitious. Just like southern cookin. Even squirrel, gator, snake and henway. :)
8 posted on 12/31/2001 6:13:14 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Uncle George
"BLACK EYED PEAS MEXICAN STYLE"

Try garnishing those with fresh cilantro. And add a dash of Tabasco or pepper vinegar...

9 posted on 12/31/2001 6:14:10 PM PST by okie01
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To: okie01
Black-eyed-peas and hog jowl. Half and onion, hank of cilantro, some hot sauce. Mmmmmmmmm. Good New Year to you and yours.

/john

10 posted on 12/31/2001 6:14:15 PM PST by JRandomFreeper
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To: Uncle George
I've been on both sides. In Florida we ate black eyed peas, collard greens, turnip greens, with chicken necks and smoked hocks. In SW Texas and New Mexico we fed them to the hogs/horses/cows. Good either way.
11 posted on 12/31/2001 6:14:16 PM PST by thatsnotnice
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To: Boxsford
I like to cruise the meat case at Winn Dixie.

A full selection of tripe, tongue, hoofs, pigs knuckles and jowls. Yum (NOT)

12 posted on 12/31/2001 6:14:29 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: okie01
Beat me by that much! LOL!

/john

13 posted on 12/31/2001 6:15:38 PM PST by JRandomFreeper
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To: Uncle George
The tradition here in our neck of the woods (Southern New Jersey) is sourkraut for New Years.
14 posted on 12/31/2001 6:16:54 PM PST by mware
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To: Uncle George
Copied the recipe for my wife. To late for this New Years Dinner. But later. I like those peas and beans.

Happy new year to you and yours.

15 posted on 12/31/2001 6:16:55 PM PST by RAY
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To: kd5cts
I mix them with rice in a rice cooker.
16 posted on 12/31/2001 6:17:04 PM PST by Doctor Stochastic
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To: Uncle George
I love the southern style black eyed peas, but for all you pea haters out there make them into a salsa with fresh tomato, corn, onion, and cilantro. You'll never know you're eating black eyed peas and you'll have the advantage of a prosperous new year. Happy new year to all!!
17 posted on 12/31/2001 6:17:25 PM PST by volchef
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
tripe

Oh come on now, tripe is great in pepper pot soup (a Phladelphia dish).

18 posted on 12/31/2001 6:17:50 PM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla
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To: Uncle George
dry, in a little bottle in the medicine cabinet. one each day at vitamin time.

dep

19 posted on 12/31/2001 6:18:08 PM PST by dep
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To: Lucius Cornelius Sulla
Tripe is great in a grocers case and can stay that way ;)
20 posted on 12/31/2001 6:18:34 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Uncle George
New Year's meal:

Black eyed peas with hog jowl means good luck. You MUST ear a piece of jowl, even if you don't like it. Greens (turnips, collards, or mustards) cooked with backbone means prosperity (money). I prefer turnips and mustards cooked together. Cornbread used to sop up pot liquor (juice from greens).

21 posted on 12/31/2001 6:19:56 PM PST by Pokey78
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To: Uncle George
Uncle:
My wonderful wife of 57 years and I have had BLACKEYED peas for every New Years's day from the first day. She makes it with a big prime rib and lots of veges. UMMMMMMMMMM GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOD!!!!!

You have a nice evening and the very best to you and yours during the new year.

Semper Fi
Tommie

22 posted on 12/31/2001 6:21:33 PM PST by Texican
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To: Doctor Stochastic
That's just so wrong in so many ways.(grin!) Well, to each their own, and Happy New Year!

/john

23 posted on 12/31/2001 6:21:45 PM PST by JRandomFreeper
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
"I like to cruise the meat case at Winn Dixie. A full selection of tripe, tongue, hoofs, pigs knuckles and jowls. Yum (NOT)"

I've always thought it was funny how you could re-assemble a pig at the grocery store! Might be missing teeth and eyeballs (unless they are included in head cheese), but otherwise, you pretty much can build a piggie!

Oh... and we have black eyed peas (no hog jowl this year, using smoked sausage) in the crock pot and turnips and collards ready to go in the morning :)

24 posted on 12/31/2001 6:22:40 PM PST by sweet_diane
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To: Uncle George
Thanks for this post Uncle George! I knew I couldn't be the only one whose family did the black-eyed pea thing for luck. I'm a transplanted southern girl living in CA but even if I have to get canned, I always still eat them on New Year's Day.

Here's to the end of 2001. Happy New Year everybody.

25 posted on 12/31/2001 6:25:36 PM PST by americalost
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To: okie01
"BLACK EYED PEAS MEXICAN STYLE"

Try garnishing those with fresh cilantro. And add a dash of Tabasco or pepper vinegar...

and a pinch of cumin with some diced green chilis.
Raised on Irish boiled dinners. Developed a taste for southwestern/sonoran cooking and I've got the "habit". yum

HAPPY NEW YEAR FREEPERS...WHAT A GREAT GROUP OF DEDICATED PEOPLE SHARING THE TRUTH. HERE'S (CHEERS) TO A GREAT 2002!!!!

26 posted on 12/31/2001 6:28:02 PM PST by madfly
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To: tex-oma
Just cook them with bacon and jalapenos!

I've never had them that way. Went to the grocery store today to buy some black eyed peas and they only came dried or canned with jalapenos, bought the dried along with some smoked hamhocks, they are on the stove now. Cornbread is essential.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

27 posted on 12/31/2001 6:29:38 PM PST by UnBlinkingEye
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
A full selection of tripe, tongue, hoofs, pigs knuckles and jowls. Yum (NOT)

Hey, you forgot the chitlins. I don't eat them myself, but my grandpa used to like them. He was born in 1879, and I guess the old-timers ate every part of the pig except the squeal. Grandma made him cook them outdoors because they stunk up the house so bad you couldn't stay in it.

Actually the only thing on your list that I like are the hog jowls. The Rath meat packing company used to sell them smoked like bacon, and sliced and fried they were better than any bacon I ever ate. I don't think you can get them that way anymore.

Anyway, I'm not eating BEP tomorrow. I ate so many of those things growing up that I don't care if I never see another one. I'm planning on going out to a steakhouse for a nice ribeye.

28 posted on 12/31/2001 6:33:21 PM PST by epow
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To: epow
Thats what I am doing; Roadhouse Grill for a prime rib :)

Chitlins and gizzards are more common around here. Its the other stuff you only see at certain stores.

29 posted on 12/31/2001 6:35:12 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Uncle George
We normally just follow the recipe that's on the back of the pea bag.

On a side note, does anyone else have cabbage with their peas for a financially-prosperous New Year? The idea is cabbage is green, so is money. My wife's family never did it, but mine does. And we both grew up in Texas. Just curious if this is a cultural thing...

30 posted on 12/31/2001 6:35:12 PM PST by BP2
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To: Uncle George
10 - 12 hours of cooking after soaking over night?.... dang you gonna boil all the poots out of them.... LOL.
31 posted on 12/31/2001 6:35:56 PM PST by deport
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To: Uncle George
Just who are these people who don't like blackeyed peas? ;9)
32 posted on 12/31/2001 6:39:16 PM PST by Ditter
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Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: Uncle George
Not a lot of people like the taste of them

They don't???? I love them!

We cook ours with the hambone left over from Christmas ham. Or whatever other pork might be available.

Also, gotta have greens (for money in the New Year). Add a little chopped Vidalia onion to the peas, some pepper juice to the greens, and some cornbread to sop all the juice with - now, that's dinner.

34 posted on 12/31/2001 6:46:06 PM PST by Amelia
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To: Uncle George
Use one of those 10, 11, 25, 27.... or whatever bean packs. Soak them two or three days in cold water. Change it every 6 hours or so.

At about 6 AM on New Year's Day get up and turn on the pot. Cook them from 4 to 8 hours, depending on bean count and amount of water.

Take about a dozen fresh green onions. Clean them. Chop everything into little green or white onion circles.

Use salt and pepper to taste. Put in bowl. Put on onions. Eat!

BTW, what are black eyed peas?

35 posted on 12/31/2001 6:46:41 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: Uncle George
I don't know how they did them in The Old Days (great-grandmother's time) but 'round here we have blackeyed peas with a piece or two of bacon, straight out of a can into a pot and eat em up. pops is from Louisiana and hates peas, mums is from alabama and we love em. Always have cabbage and some form of Pig (tm) Usually ham.
36 posted on 12/31/2001 6:47:47 PM PST by roachie
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To: Uncle George
Never had black eyed peas. I would like to try them sometime though. Up here about 70 miles north of the Mason-Dixon line, we have pork, sauerkraut, and baked beans for New Years dinner.
37 posted on 12/31/2001 6:49:02 PM PST by Dane
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To: Uncle George
My family loves 'em ..... I cook them with some fat back or ham pieces, add some salt and pepper to taste .... hubby likes raw diced onion on his. We usually have collards and some form of pork, though I've never been able to get up any enthusiasm for hog jowls.

I grew up in a moderate-sized town in NC, then as a newlywed moved to a very small town in the middle of hog-raising country. I nearly fainted the first time I walked in the grocery store and saw whole hog's heads, wrapped in heavy plastic wrap, staring up at me ...... YIKES! Well, technically, they weren't staring .... their skin and eyes were about the only parts missing ..... GROSS!

38 posted on 12/31/2001 6:52:24 PM PST by kayak
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Tripe is great in a grocers case and can stay that way ;)

Obviously you are unfamiliar with that most Heavenly of all soups Menudo. It is made from tripe and pesole(hominy) and is the finest breakfast food known to humankind.

39 posted on 12/31/2001 6:54:52 PM PST by carpio
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To: okie01
"BLACK EYED PEAS MEXICAN STYLE"

Try garnishing those with fresh cilantro. And add a dash of Tabasco or pepper vinegar...

and a pinch of cumin with some diced green chilis.
Raised on Irish boiled dinners. Developed a taste for southwestern/sonoran cooking and I've got the "habit". yum

HAPPY NEW YEAR FREEPERS...WHAT A GREAT GROUP OF DEDICATED PEOPLE SHARING THE TRUTH. HERE'S (CHEERS) TO A GREAT 2002!!!!

40 posted on 12/31/2001 6:58:56 PM PST by madfly
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To: Uncle George
Should one be in a rush---

Fry cooked ham pieces, fat side down in a pot with butter.
Open canned blackeyed pea bean cans.
Add water, canned beans, and hot sauce.

"Serve."

41 posted on 12/31/2001 7:00:09 PM PST by shetlan
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Okay, I'll bite! I know the punchline already, but some folks may not.... What's a henway? uh......about 2 or 3 pounds..... ROFLM!!! Happy New Year to All!
42 posted on 12/31/2001 7:05:49 PM PST by gorio
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To: epow
Grandma made him cook them(chitlins) outdoors because they stunk up the house so bad you couldn't stay in it.

The only time I smelled chitlins was when I was working down south in a hotel. A cook during the late hours was cooking chitlins and I walked into the kitchen. I swear the subliminal meaning of the Lynard Skynard song "Ooh That Smell", is that they were talking about chitlins.

43 posted on 12/31/2001 7:06:08 PM PST by Dane
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To: Uncle George
I prefer field peas. We will have hoppin' john tomorrow which is very good.

Title: Hoppin' John
Categories: Vegetables, Main dish
Yield: 6 servings

1 c Frozen black-eyed peas
4 c Water
2 ts Salt
1 c Uncooked rice
4 ea Slices fried bacon
1 ea Medium onion

Fry bacon; remove from skillet. Chop onion and fry in bacon grease.
Crumble bacon.

Boil peas in salted water until just barely tender. Drain peas, reserving 1 cup of liquid.

Place rice, peas, 1 cup of pea liquid, onion, bacon grease and crumbled bacon in top of rice steamer. Cook until rice is done.

Tip: Rice will cook quicker if pea liquid is heated to boiling before adding to other ingredients in top of rice steamer.

44 posted on 12/31/2001 7:07:54 PM PST by PhilSC
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To: Uncle George

  Black-Eyed Peas  
Black-Eyed Peas
Black-eye Peas
One inch of a ruler.
Black-eyed peas are actually a small, almost white bean with a black spot along their side. Originally brought to the United States by slave traders, this bean has been a popular food in the Southern US for hundreds of years. These beans, sometimes referred to as cowpeas, are also popular in Africa in different fermented dishes. In India they are often eaten like lentils.
        Thin skinned black-eyed peas cook up in only 30 to 60 minutes and require no presoaking. Traditionally served with rice or corn bread, they remain a popular Southern cuisine. On New Year's Day in the South there's a tradition of black-eyed peas being made into Hoppin' John which has the reputation of bringing good luck. Black-eyed peas cooked with onion, garlic and tomato sauce make a delicious dish.

Source: http://waltonfeed.com/self/beans.html#blackeyepea

45 posted on 12/31/2001 7:08:31 PM PST by Cultural Jihad
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To: gorio
ya know, i wait ALL FREAKIN YEAR to say that, and then WHAM someone has to SPOIL ALL MY FUN. I *hate* when that happens.

Happy New Year to you, too

46 posted on 12/31/2001 7:08:33 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Uncle George;Billie;Snow Bunny
Add some crushed red pepper, a few jiggers of Worcestershire and tabasco, cilantro, and the secret ingredient...epazote'....yeah I know...try finging that in Virginia...got hooked on it in SoCal when I was stationed there...

Annual

Erect stem, 1-3 feet, average

Popular with Mexican cooks, Epazote is used as a spice in many dishes. It is most prized for its gas-reducing qualities in bean-cookery.

A leaf or two of the fresh herb, or a teaspoon (to start) will impart a slight and distinctive flavor to a pot of beans.

47 posted on 12/31/2001 7:10:32 PM PST by g'nad
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To: Uncle George
Does anyone know why or how the tradition came about of eating Blackeyed Peas for luck on New Years?

This is the story I grew up with and I think there is some truth to it. My grandma was the daughter of a sharecropper from Tennessee. She always told us this story as we sat around and ate our blackeyed peas.

“During the war of Northern Aggression, Sherman burned the south. They left the cowfeed or horsefeed (Blackeyed Peas). So to keep from starving during the winter months, the Southerners lived off Blackeyed peas. So “cowfeed” saved their lives”.

I think this was especially true for Vicksburg during the siege. Anyway, I loved that story. Blackeyed peas ARE lucky.

Please don’t anyone attack me or start an 800+ thread over the civil war. My grandmother was biased for obvious reasons growing up in the south, and I could care less. I’m just sharing a story from my childhood, which I think is true, after I did some quick research on Google.

Anyway, Happy New Year, and I thought you might enjoy knowing why we eat Blackeyed Peas on New Years for good luck. We have an old uncle from Buffalo who refuses to eat what he calls “horsefeed”. ROFL

Oh, and by the way. I’ve got my Blackeyed Peas cooking on the stove right now, with a ham hock and I’ll put a small amount of hot pepper sauce in it later. Then I’ll cook some corn bread. Sorry but we don’t do collard greens in this house. GROSS!!! That was the one thing I could not STAND of my southern grandma’s. YUK! Blech!

48 posted on 12/31/2001 7:12:44 PM PST by SpookBrat
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To: Uncle George
Oh my .. thank you for this Thread .. This YANKEE Girl had no idea about blackeye peas till I married a southern boy .. lol

We have been doing this since we were married and I haven't found a good way to serve them yet .. I think I may try your suggestion ..

You saved my day .. lol

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

49 posted on 12/31/2001 7:16:06 PM PST by Mo1
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
A full selection of tripe, tongue, hoofs, pigs knuckles and jowls. Yum (NOT)

LOL, if you've been eating hotdogs, balogna or salami you've been eating either pig or beef pieces-parts like that all your life anyway...

: D

50 posted on 12/31/2001 7:17:35 PM PST by piasa
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