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Incarceration Cost for Federal inmates: $21,601 per inmate.
Federal Register ^ | 3/19/02 | None

Posted on 03/19/2002 1:50:22 PM PST by Lockbox

[Federal Register: March 19, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 53)] [Notices]
[Page 12586]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr19mr02-113]

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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Bureau of Prisons

Annual Determination of Average Cost of Incarceration

AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates is $21,601.

EFFECTIVE DATE: March 19, 2002.

ADDRESSES: Office of General Counsel, Federal Bureau of Prisons, 320 First St., NW., Washington, DC 20405.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sarah Qureshi, (202) 307-2105.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 28 CFR part 505 allows for assessment and collection of a fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates. We calculate this fee by dividing the number representing Bureau facilities' obligation (excluding activation costs) by the number of inmate-days incurred for preceding fiscal year, and then by multiplying the quotient by 365 (or, since 2000 was a leap year, by 366).

Under Sec. 505.2, the Director of the Bureau of Prisons has reviewed the amount of the fee and has determined that, based upon fiscal year 2000 data, the fee to cover the average cost of incarceration for Federal inmates is $21,601.

Kathleen Hawk Sawyer,
Director, Bureau of Prisons.
[FR Doc. 02-6592 Filed 3-18-02; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4410-05-P


TOPICS: Government
KEYWORDS: govwatch; incarceration

1 posted on 03/19/2002 1:50:22 PM PST by Lockbox
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To: Lockbox
Tie them up to a treadmill/generator. No walk, no eat. Great excercise, keeps em out of trouble and they might generate enough juice to offset their cost of incarceration.
2 posted on 03/19/2002 1:57:04 PM PST by umgud
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To: Lockbox
...Federal inmates is $21,601

So at 21,601 each we payed $15,120,700,000 (that's 15 billion, 120 million, 700 thousand dollars) last year to incarcerate pot smokers. Yeah-hooooooo. Great use of tax dollars if you ask me. (I know you didn't "ask" but I couldn't resist)

EBUCK

3 posted on 03/19/2002 2:03:01 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: Lockbox
MARICOPA COUNTY, Arizona (CNN) -- The tent city looks like a military camp in the desert, with thick canvas sleeping quarters spreading out in a remote area of Arizona.

The inhabitants, however, are not soldiers, but residents of an unusual, some say brutal, prison run by legendary lawman Joe Arpaio, called the toughest sheriff in the West.

For the Maricopa County sheriff, who opened the nation's largest tent prison in 1993, saving taxpayer pennies matters more than comforting convicted felons.

"We took away coffee, that saved $150,000 a year. Why do you need coffee in jail?" says Arpaio, patrolling the dusty, barren grounds. "Switched to bologna sandwiches, that saved half a million dollars a year."

Arpaio makes inmates pay for their meals, which some say are worse than those for the guard dogs. Canines eat $1.10 worth of food a day, the inmate 90 cents, the sheriff says. "I'm very proud of that too."

Critics rail against harsh conditions in the prison, where temperatures can top 100 degrees.

"We still have rights, but they act like we're scum," one inmate complains.

Adds Eleanor Eisenberg of the ACLU: "Sheriff Arpaio has conditions in his jail that are inhumane, and he's proud of it."

Arpaio boasts of his chain gangs for men and women, which "contribute thousands of dollars of free labor to taxpayers each month," according to his Web site.

4 posted on 03/19/2002 2:21:51 PM PST by ijcr
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To: EBUCK
Is that the pot smokers who murder, or the pot smokers who rape, or even the pot smokers who steal? Sorry, I couldn't resist replying.
5 posted on 03/19/2002 2:25:40 PM PST by ijcr
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To: ijcr
Hmmmmm. How many NON-pot smokers are in prison. Why are they there? Perhaps if they had chilled out with a doobie, they may not have committed violent crimes.
Needs to know....
6 posted on 03/19/2002 2:30:22 PM PST by Diverdogz
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To: ijcr
Nope, just the folks that were caught with pot. 700,000 people last year alone were arrested for possession. I don't really know how many were incarcerated for any length of time but even at 20% you've still got a $3,024,140,000 tab to pick up for housing pot smokers.

EBUCK

7 posted on 03/19/2002 2:32:23 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: Lockbox
As far as habitual real criminals (burglers, muggers, armed robbers), the cost of having them on the street is higher than the cost of keeping them locked up. For some of them, a .45 bullet would be even cheaper
8 posted on 03/19/2002 2:34:04 PM PST by SauronOfMordor
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To: Lockbox
We should subcontract this out to the Mexicans...If would be criminals knew they would be spending time down on the old Stony Lonesome Hacienda, I bet they might think twice about committing their crimes...
9 posted on 03/19/2002 2:34:54 PM PST by antaresequity
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To: EBUCK
Are dem pots in the fed pokey or state facilities?
10 posted on 03/19/2002 2:39:56 PM PST by deport
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To: deport
When I read it I read it to be Federal. I may be wrong. I'll look the article up for ya.

EBUCK

11 posted on 03/19/2002 2:42:08 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: EBUCK
Nope, just the folks that were caught with pot.

Just caught with pot? The guys that stole my ramset also were charged with possession, does that count them? According to our LEO’s it does. According to them, the reports they submit to state and fed cannot be culled by potheads to make a distinction between a robbery with pot possession vs. possession only.

I’ve never heard of anyone “just caught with pot” being in a federal prison. It’s always the guy who kills someone evading arrest and *just happens to be in possession of pot* that gets that sentence. Or the guy who shot a passenger on an AC transit bus in our town for smoking crack on the bus - when he was apprehended, he was found to possess pot. Surprise.

12 posted on 03/19/2002 2:43:03 PM PST by thatsnotnice
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To: antaresequity
Yeah, if more of them resisted arrest, we could cutdown the number we have to house. I suggest in the meantime, we house them on San Clemente Island. Drop them off with a few tents and tell them to catch the wild goats to eat.

For those who might be unaware, San Clemente Island is a Naval Gunnery Range. That would give the pilots practice on their strafing and bombing runs to really see how accurate they are.

The inmates that are deserving of such treatment would be child molesters, murderers, serial rapists and of course those we are holding at Guantanamo. After questioning, they can be sent to San Clemente Island.

13 posted on 03/19/2002 2:43:54 PM PST by stumpy
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To: deport
Here is the article from a coupla months ago. Looks like both fed and state combined.

EBUCK

14 posted on 03/19/2002 2:45:03 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: thatsnotnice
You never heard of the guy transporting a pound of pot getting federal time. Or the guy that gets busted in the ATF led raid, he gets federal time too. I'm not too sure about the numbers of crime+PCS to PCS by itself. Did you want to include the speeding+illegal-search+PCS too?

EBUCK

15 posted on 03/19/2002 2:47:39 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: ijcr
"Sheriff Arpaio has conditions in his jail that are inhumane, and he's proud of it."

Maybe then more folks will do something to stay out of prison - like OBEYING the law.

16 posted on 03/19/2002 2:53:55 PM PST by 4CJ
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To: Lockbox
That's $21K per year.
17 posted on 03/19/2002 2:54:03 PM PST by subrosa sam
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To: *Gov_Watch
Check the Bump List folders for articles related to and descriptions of the above topic(s) or for other topics of interest.
18 posted on 03/19/2002 3:03:52 PM PST by Free the USA
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To: EBUCK
Reality is that it doesn't matter if it is fed or state. Still costs us taxpayers about the same amount and is a major waste of taxpayer money. Perhaps it would have been much better for our country had Plymouth Rock landed on the Puritans, instead of the reverse.
19 posted on 03/19/2002 3:09:02 PM PST by eaglewatch
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To: eaglewatch
HaHaHa. Then we'd all be speaking German right now. Spreken zi Doitch (SP?)

EBUCK

20 posted on 03/19/2002 3:10:14 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: EBUCK
Nope, just the folks that were caught with pot. 700,000 people last year alone were arrested for possession. I don't really know how many were incarcerated for any length of time but even at 20% you've still got a $3,024,140,000 tab to pick up for housing pot smokers.

If you think that 20% of the federal inmate population is there for pot possession, you're smoking some of the extra powerful stuff.

21 posted on 03/19/2002 3:10:49 PM PST by Castlebar
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To: EBUCK
thanks.... I suspect most of those serve time in state/county/city facilities rather than federal facilities.

I was looking for Texas cost and the following is the per day cost for facilities in fiscal yr 2000.. Which appears to be well below federal cost.

State Jails...

Institutional Division

In either case Fed or State it isn't cheap.
22 posted on 03/19/2002 3:11:31 PM PST by deport
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To: Castlebar
What part of "I don't know the numbers" didn't you get out of that. Not much I'm going assume.

Guess I should change my tune tho. I don't know so I shouldn't have posted those numbers.

All I know is that the cost of tracking down, arresting, booking, incarcerating and trying pot smokers is too damn much.

EBUCK

23 posted on 03/19/2002 3:13:50 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: Lockbox
(excluding activation costs)

That's bureaucrat-speak for construction costs.

It's just another attempt by the government to cover their asses, just like they do with education. I assume that you all realize that when a city/county/state gives you the average cost per child for education, they exclude the "activation costs", that is, the construction costs, as well as the major repair costs.

24 posted on 03/19/2002 3:21:44 PM PST by jackbill
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To: EBUCK
Go easy on those things...
All pot smokers aren't Federal prisoners.

and they don't believe it kills brain cells...

25 posted on 03/19/2002 3:26:17 PM PST by Publius6961
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To: deport
734,498 x 28.64 = 21,036,022.72 per day spent in jail. (at the cheapest)

According to this report there were an estimated 14,453 federal marijuana prisoners at the end of 1997 (12.7% BTW). I'm not sure what the conversion of 1997 dollars to today dollars would be so I'll just use today dollars. At 21,601 times 14,453 each and an average sentance of 3.25 years (also in the link) we come up with a grand total of 1,014,647,572.25. Just over a billion to cover the total incarceration of mj smokers every three years.

EBUCK

26 posted on 03/19/2002 3:27:13 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: Publius6961
Yah, I tried to withdraw my blanket statement. I was defiantely too hasty in posting the first "few" times.

EBUCK

27 posted on 03/19/2002 3:28:18 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: Lockbox
It costs considerably less to incarcerate them in a cemetary. A few bucks each year to keep the grounds mowed, I guess, though just scattering the ashes would be essentially free, and might even make some good fertilizer.

I see no good reason why people should be looked up for decades or for life. Secure the violent ones while they are awaiting trial, appeals, & execution -- all on an expedited fast track. Impose restitution, community service, & probation for the non-violent criminals. This would keep the non-violent ones from being trained to become violent ones, and would make them productive citizens instead of a net drain on society. The violent ones need to be eliminated, period. This needs to be done for the sake of the potential future victims, for no jail can be made 100% escape-proof.

28 posted on 03/19/2002 3:29:10 PM PST by Stefan Stackhouse
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To: EBUCK
Weel, had fun folks, later.

EBUCK

29 posted on 03/19/2002 3:36:04 PM PST by EBUCK
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To: deport
Meatless Menus for Prisons Make Dollars and Sense By Jerry Vlasak, M.D., and Bernie Fischlowitz-Roberts

Simply put, typical prison meals have long constituted cruel and unusual punishment. With October 2000's good news that the U.S. Bureau of Prisons will provide healthy vegan options at every meal at all federal prisons, that's about to change.

This progress comes just weeks after the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine filed an affidavit to support the lawsuit by Keith Maydak, an inmate at Pennsylvania's Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary trying to ensure that he and other prisoners could get such meals. In May 2000, a federal judge encouragingly ruled that Mr. Maydak's lawsuit is "substantially likely to succeed."

Surely, only the most vindictive would force prisoners onto bread and water. However, most current fare is actually worse, both for the long-term health of inmates and society.

In Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio feeds inmates donated bologna sandwiches and ham. Some Maryland inmates make processed meats such as beef patties, stew meats, and turkey loaf. In Iqualuit, Nunavat, Canada, Inuit inmates undertake hunting expeditions. Prisoners don't just do time, they do cholesterol.

Enough already. The time is right to dramatically improve prison meals by taking meat off the menus: in with the bean burritos, out with the beef burgers. That could shrink prison budgets, prisoner waistlines, and some prisoners' violent tendencies. Who would argue against that?

Recently, Sheriff Michael Hennessey had the San Francisco Jail join county jails in Oregon and jails and prisons in the Atlanta area by regularly serving vegan meals. He did so after receiving hundreds of letters and e-mails from concerned doctors, dietitians, and activists worldwide, to accommodate the ethical beliefs of vegan then-inmate Gerard "Jerry" Livernois.

As of mid-1998, the United States incarcerated a staggering 1.8 million people, double the number from 12 years earlier, according to the U.S. Justice Department. At three meals per day, that's more than 1.9 billion meals served annually. With more inmates, reducing costs counts more than ever. Switching from a meat-based diet to a health-promoting vegan menu can save lots of money.

Consider the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, the second-largest U.S. prison system, which serves state inmates VitaPro, a vitamin-rich, texturized, soy-based, meat-flavored alternative from Montreal. Texas prisons cut weekly meat consumption by 70,000 pounds, a 50-percent reduction. (Some federal prisons also serve this alternative to beef and chicken.) Texas reports a 43-percent cost savings over meat, and inmate reaction has been overwhelmingly positive. As an added bonus, vegan meals can easily satisfy requirements for such special health concerns as diabetes. And VitaPro products are kosher and halal, meeting religious needs.

On New York City's 10-jail Rikers Island, some of the 16,000 inmates tend gardens that in 1998 produced 30,000 pounds of fresh vegetables, worth more than $8,100—and bestowed psychological benefits as well as practical skills—with virtually no trouble reported. It's an experiment being tried in too few places.

Besides saving money, vegan diets also mean healthier inmates, decreasing hospital and infirmary expenses. Vegan diets cut the risk of heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, some cancers, and other chronic illnesses. (According to a 1995 PCRM study published in the journal Preventive Medicine, meat consumption may cause $61 billion annually in direct U.S. health care costs for just seven disease groups.)

Other practical reasons support dropping animal products from prison menus.

The surge of U.S. school and workplace shootings has again spotlighted societal violence. Most people, rightly horrified, ask "Why?" And discovering what causes horrendous behavior certainly has value. But often overlooked is how to transform the violent-oriented portion of the current prison population—almost all of whom will eventually rejoin society.

Medical research links consumption of meat (and sugar) to aggravated mood swings and violent outbreaks among prisoners. In 1992, a study in the British medical journal The Lancet linked men's blood-serum triglyceride levels (raised by meat-eating) to hostile acts and domineering attitudes. By contrast, results from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study, published in 1991 in Psychosomatic Medicine, indicate hormone changes coming from plant-based diets can check aggressive tendencies.

Such findings suggest plant-food diets not only lessen health problems, but also can foster safer prisons. Furthermore, many vegetarian inmates ethically object to eating animal products.

Reducing violence, improving inmate health, and saving money are all important goals. Making prison menus vegan can further those ends and help bring about a more peaceful society for all.

30 posted on 03/19/2002 5:08:20 PM PST by ijcr
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To: ijcr
States pay far more per inmate. TN it's $27,000. Lots of PERKS cost LOTS of MONEY. According to one article written by Dr. John DiIluio 40% of the amount it cost to house an inmate is inmate AMENITIES! Not a thing to do with security.

A few years ago there was a riot at the Memphis Federal prison. They destroyed MILLIONS of dollars in government property including the musical instruments we provided them.

WE the TaxSerfs had to replace them at $2,500 per month so they wouldn't have to go out to bids. We bought them mandolins, guitar strings, a piano, mike stands, etc. Took several months for the order to be completed so as not to bump the bid thing.

Before gov taxquist became governor the death row inmates had ALL their meals catered from a high class hotel in Nashville. That is the only thing he's done right as gov is to stop it and sign one death warrant on a child killer.

31 posted on 03/19/2002 5:32:29 PM PST by GailA
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To: GailA
Cut deals. Send some to Zimbabwe and the rest to France. This would raise the average IQ and income of America, Africa and Europe even if we had to pay $22K per jailbird to bring about this most excellent and humane solution.
32 posted on 03/19/2002 6:13:33 PM PST by mathurine
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To: mathurine
Mexico would be a good place to export our predators. On another thought. Most of the drug bust I think were for possession of LARGE amounts of the stuff, not nickle bags. These were big time pushers not your everyday pot user.
33 posted on 03/20/2002 5:56:54 AM PST by GailA
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