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Pope reported set to give Law Vatican posting
Boston Herald online ^ | Friday, April 26, 2002 | Jack Sullivan and Eric Convey

Posted on 04/26/2002 11:03:22 AM PDT by history_matters

PHILADELPHIA - Embattled Boston archbishop Bernard Cardinal Law, under siege from the epic sex scandal threatening his 18-year legacy, will likely be replaced and sent to the Vatican by the beginning of June, according to sources.

Law, who arrived in Newark, N.J., yesterday after the historic two-day conclave of American cardinals at the Vatican, will be reassigned by Pope John Paul II to an as-yet determined position prior to a scheduled deposition of Law in a legal suit against the archdiocese, according to church officials.

``There will be a promotion by June at the latest,'' said one source. ``They will not have him subjected to a recorded deposition.''

One source said the pope is trying to rescue Law, who has been one of the Holy Father's favorite appointments, according to observers. Much of the public attention during the meetings in Rome was focused on Law and whether he should resign.

By reassigning Law, church officials and Law would avoid the stigma attached to a resignation under fire as well as continue to deny the resignation was considered.

``(The pope) genuinely likes him,'' said one church official. ``(Vatican officials) are still trying to find a place for him. They don't want to see him getting hammered like this.''

Moving Law to Rome by June would also take some of the pressure off American bishops who are scheduled to meet in Dallas that month to debate national standards for dealing with pedophile priests.

``(Law) would be the 500-pound gorilla'' in Dallas, said one official. ``With him gone to Rome, the discussions can be much more frank and direct.''

Law avoided reporters during the extraordinary cardinals' meeting in Rome earlier this week as well as yesterday. But as he departed Rome yesterday morning, he quashed rumors that his ``resignation'' was part of the discussions with his colleagues or the aging pontiff.

``You mentioned my resignation. That never came up,'' said Law, who has been under pressure Both in Boston and nationally to step down. ``I particularly was grateful for the Holy Father's talk. I think it was excellent. Very good spirit. Very frank, very open.''

The Herald reported earlier this month that Law offered his resignation, but was rebuffed for fear of causing a domino effect among other cardinals and bishops swept up in the growing cleric sexual abuse tempest. Law confirmed he made a secret trip to the Vatican where he discussed his resignation with his mentor, John Paul, but no action was taken.

The Los Angeles Times earlier this week reported that an unnamed cardinal would lobby the pope's inner circle to accept Law's resignation, but all the cardinals at the conclave publicly denied asking for Law to step down. The Times reported yesterday that an unidentified cardinal delivered a message during the meetings to the pope's deputies asking for Law's resignation.

William Cardinal Keeler of Baltimore said in Newark yesterday that Law was animated and ``very engaged'' during the closed meetings.

``I was delighted with the contributions he made,'' said Keeler. But, he added, Law has been deeply affected by the anger over his handling of priests who molest.

``He has taken it hard,'' said Keeler.

The outcry over Law's handling of the scandal, which shows no signs of abating, has begun to have an effect on church-related fund-raising. At least three corporations that have given to Catholic Charities' Boston branch in the past rejected its requests for a total of $800,000 within the past month specifically because of the scandal.

The not-for-profit, the state's largest private social service agency, has also seen a 10 percent drop in donations to its spring fund-raising campaign.

Law, whose only public appearance in Boston in the past several weeks was celebrating Mass last Sunday at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, is expected at a fund-raising dinner in Philadelphia tonight hosted by Anthony Cardinal Bevilaqua.

Law, who apologized to his fellow cardinals for being the cause of the historic gathering, did not attend the final press conference announcing the meeting's conclusions Wednesday evening.

``It was rather late, you know,'' he told reporters at Rome's airport. ``I had other things to do.''

Law is slated to celebrate Mass in Boston on Sunday.

Criticism of the summary of the cardinals' meetings continued to flow yesterday, many decrying the lack of a zero-tolerance policy. The cardinals instead proposed an expedited process for ``notorious . . . serial'' pedophiles and recommended adherence to canon law for first-time offenders.

At the start of the conclave, the pope issued his strongest statement about sexual abuse of minors, calling it a ``crime'' and saying there is no place in the church ``for those who would harm the young.'' But that did little to mollify those looking for swifter and stronger action against molesters.

``What came out of Rome was two revelations: sexual abuse of children is a crime and it won't be tolerated,'' said Massachusetts Attorney General Thomas Reilly. ``That's not news to law enforcement. These are crimes. Where have they been?''

Marie Szaniszlo and Herald wire services contributed to this report.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cardinallaw; catholic; catholicchurch; catholiclist; chickenhawkgate; johnpaulii; pope
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``What came out of Rome was two revelations: sexual abuse of children is a crime and it won't be tolerated,'' said Massachusetts Attorney General Thomas Reilly. ``That's not news to law enforcement. These are crimes. Where have they been?''

1 posted on 04/26/2002 11:03:23 AM PDT by history_matters
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To: *Catholic_list; goldenstategirl; american colleen; ken5050; Slyfox; rose; ClearBlueSky...
Indexing and ping.......
2 posted on 04/26/2002 11:04:38 AM PDT by history_matters
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To: oremus; AmericaninTokyo
ping
3 posted on 04/26/2002 11:09:05 AM PDT by history_matters
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To: history_matters
will be reassigned by Pope John Paul II to an as-yet determined position prior to a scheduled deposition of Law in a legal suit against the archdiocese, according to church officials.

So, the coverup continues.

Poor Cardinal Law flees the United States for the rest of his natural life to avoid the process servers.

I wonder if he will hang out with Marc Rich?

This is what has become of the moral majesty of the Catholic Church.

Where is Bill Clinton with the pardon pen when Teddy's good buddy needs him?

4 posted on 04/26/2002 11:09:19 AM PDT by 07055
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To: history_matters
These guys just don't get it. They simply don't know how to punish a person. The only thing they know is to reassign and relocate their problems and hope that they go away.
5 posted on 04/26/2002 11:10:48 AM PDT by billybudd
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To: history_matters
If this is true (that Cdl Law may remove himself from the jurisdiction of Massachusetts courts), this is dangerous.

I've read that his deposition has been scheduled and postponed before.

I don't know about Massachusetts, but in some states, a person's deposition may be scheduled by a notice from a party, or by a court order, if the notice is unsuccessful.

Further, some courts have the authority to make orders to aid a party in that party's discovery (depositions, written questions, etc.).

If Cdl Law is about to leave the jurisdiction, and I was the attorney for someone suing him (or 'his' archdiocese), I would make an emergency application to the court to order Cdl Law not to leave until his deposition is taken. Part of the application would be to order him to deposit his passport into the court's custody.
6 posted on 04/26/2002 11:10:51 AM PDT by Mike Fieschko
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To: Mike Fieschko
I agree with you, Mike. The parties need to do something to prevent him from leaving.

However, if the suit is Boston, might not the judges be bought and paid for by the Catholic Church? Or the Democratic Party (and Senator Kennedy)?

7 posted on 04/26/2002 11:13:20 AM PDT by 07055
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To: history_matters
``(The pope) genuinely likes him,'' said one church official

I guess a Friend of the Pope can get away with most anything.

8 posted on 04/26/2002 11:19:25 AM PDT by xm177e2
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To: 07055
I can guarantee you that if charges are filed against Cardinal Law he will be extradited back to Taxachusets.
9 posted on 04/26/2002 11:20:08 AM PDT by kellynla
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To: 07055
However, if the suit is Boston, might not the judges be bought and paid for by the Catholic Church? Or the Democratic Party (and Senator Kennedy)?

Well ... I had a professor once who asked us 'what is the term for what the grand jury hands up when it fails to indict?'

An ignoramus.
10 posted on 04/26/2002 11:21:10 AM PDT by Mike Fieschko
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To: 07055
I have no pity for Law. I don't understand how he can stand at the front of a church and say a mass when he covered up these acts of perverts by sending them to another area to perform them to a new group of children.

I believe that the Pope did Law a favor that Law was unwilling to do for the people to whom he was required to serve.

Maybe he will have unending nightmares about those little children who were molested by the perverts he sent to them.

I doubt that we will ever know, but we can dream of this type of reward for his efforts.

11 posted on 04/26/2002 11:21:45 AM PDT by chiefqc
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To: Mike Fieschko
Just to make it obvious: I'm the ignoramus on this question.
12 posted on 04/26/2002 11:24:41 AM PDT by Mike Fieschko
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To: history_matters
I see -- he can't handle his current job correctly, so they're promoting him. No (St.) Peter Principle here -- this is the Dilbert Principle at work.
13 posted on 04/26/2002 11:55:48 AM PDT by ellery
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To: 07055
This will NOT happen as reported. The CHURCH has NOT lost it'ss moral high ground, but the LIBERALS in it have almost seen to it's destruction.

This is what you get when you allow homosexuals into the priesthood and Cardinals suck up to the Kennedy's.

14 posted on 04/26/2002 12:03:27 PM PDT by Ann Archy
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To: Mike Fieschko;07055
The point of the move to Rome is to get him out the position of archbishop, not to remove him from the jurisdiction. Don't be dense, if, at any time, after he leaves Boston, he is required for any legal matter, he will be in the U.S.
15 posted on 04/26/2002 12:21:31 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway
The point of the move to Rome is to get him out the position of archbishop, not to remove him from the jurisdiction. Don't be dense, if, at any time, after he leaves Boston, he is required for any legal matter, he will be in the U.S.

I respectfully disagree.

Remember that Church official who was captured on tape telling the bishops how to deal with sexual misconduct claims?

And remember how he said if a bishop came across really bad stuff, he could always send it to the Church agency with diplomatic immunity so that it would never be disclosed (the Apostolic See?).

That is exactly what the Pope is doing here.

They don't need to send him to Rome to remove him from his position. They can just tell him to retire---maybe they can even support a claim of a health condition which mandates retirement.

And, remember, the Church has been fighting this deposition for a long period already.

The Church needs him outside the jurisdiction of the local courts. If he makes a clean getaway, there is no way the Church flies him back to Boston for depositions. He knows too much.

16 posted on 04/26/2002 12:57:34 PM PDT by 07055
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To: 07055
Another reason the Church does not want Cardinal Law to testify:

How will it look when a Cardinal of the Catholic Church is forced to repeatedly invoke the Fifth Amendment just like a common criminal?

17 posted on 04/26/2002 1:16:11 PM PDT by 07055
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To: 07055
I respectfully disagree. That is exactly what the Pope is doing here. They don't need to send him to Rome to remove him from his position. They can just tell him to retire---maybe they can even support a claim of a health condition which mandates retirement.

They don't need to send him to Rome, but if you've been following, they don't want to look like the general public can decide who shoulf be an archbishop. They're moving him to Rome to avoid making it look like public pressure forced him to resign. I guarantee he will be back for any legal matter. (Law himself propbably thought until the last minute he could remain archbishop. Maybe he still does.)

18 posted on 04/26/2002 1:20:55 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: history_matters
So, Law is skipping out to evade a deposition. Like a common criminal. It's time for AG Reilly to invoke the RICO act, and possibly arrest the Cardinal before he goes on the lam.
19 posted on 04/26/2002 1:22:48 PM PDT by Palladin
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To: history_matters; dighton; aculeus
`(The pope) genuinely likes him,'' said one church official. ``(Vatican officials) are still trying to find a place for him. They don't want to see him getting hammered like this.''

Unbelievable statement. Does anyone have anything for a pounding headache?

20 posted on 04/26/2002 1:23:10 PM PDT by Orual
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To: 07055
He knows too much.

What does he know? That the Pope personally planned 9/11? To whatever extent Cardinal Law ignored perpetrators and moved them around, he is guilty, but I think these conspiravy theories are going overboard. Where any of the victims secretly assasinated?

21 posted on 04/26/2002 1:24:22 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway
Time will tell if he comes back for his deposition. I seriously doubt he will (I believe that the Vatican will claim diplomatic immunity even if the plaintiff's offer to go to Vatican City). But, hey, I can be wrong. Hope I am.
22 posted on 04/26/2002 1:24:22 PM PDT by 07055
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To: nickcarraway
What does he know? That the Pope personally planned 9/11?

No, but what if the Pope knew all about the NAMBLA guy and did nothing about it?

And, as I said, if Law testifies, he either has to lie, take the Fifth Amendement, or open himself up to criminal prosecution. Talk about a PR disaster for the Church.

Does Vatican City have an extradition treaty with the US for crimes of this type? If not, that is another reason for him to join Marc Rich on the lam.

23 posted on 04/26/2002 1:29:03 PM PDT by 07055
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To: Ann Archy
What does it feel like to have your head in the sand perpetually?
24 posted on 04/26/2002 1:30:49 PM PDT by Palladin
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To: 07055
Law will become a prisoner of the Vatican, like that other American Cardinal who was involved in the money scandals in the 60's. I can't recall his name. It was after that Italian banker was thrown off a bridge. Anyone else remember that case?
25 posted on 04/26/2002 1:36:38 PM PDT by Palladin
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To: 07055
Talk about a PR disaster for the Church.

Nothng would be worse PR than hiding Law in the Vatican. It won't happen.

26 posted on 04/26/2002 1:36:47 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: history_matters
Law had a spokesperson deny this story a bit ago on one of the cable news networks. Spokesperson said he isn't going anywhere anytime soon.
27 posted on 04/26/2002 1:43:14 PM PDT by Endeavor
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To: Palladin
A google search turned up dozens of articles on Cardinal Marcinkus. Quite a "colorful" clergyman. As crooked as Marcinkus seems to have been, I think Law's sins are greater--allowing young boys to be defiled and robbed of their innocence by predatory sharks like Geoghan and Shanley for decades.

Here's an article on Marcinkus, where he is studied as a suspect in the possible murder of Pope John Paul I:

Paul Casimir Marcinkus (nickname: The Gorilla)

He was born January 15, 1922 in Cicero, Illinois, and ordained a priest in 1947. He received a Doctorate in canon law from Gregorian University, Rome and was posted to the English section of the Vatican Secretary of State's office, Rome.

After tours of duty in Canada and Bolivia, in 1959 he was appointed to the Secretary of State's department, Rome.

In 1964 he became the bodyguard to Pope Paul VI, acquiring the nickname, "The Gorillla." After accompanying the pope on several trips he had become also a personal translator and security advisor. Marcinkus became personal friends with the pope's secretary, Father Pasquale Macchi.

Several years later, he was made a bishop by Pope Paul VI and immediately made secretary of the Vatican Bank. Marcinkus had no previous banking experience! Pp. 102-105.

In 1973 he was investigated by the F.B.I. for direct involvement in money laundering of mafia money through the Vatican Bank.

On Sept. 28, 1978 Marcinkus found that he was to be replaced as head of the Vatican Bank by Msgr. Abbo on September 29.

Sept. 29. 6:45 a.m. Marcinkus in the courtyard near the Vatican Bank is told that Pope Jean Paul I had been found dead. Marcinkus's residence was not inside the Vatican; it's a 20 minute drive away. He was not known to be an early riser. His presence in the Vatican at that hour was never explained.

On Sept. 28, 1981, Pope John Paul II promoted Marcinkus to archbishop and pro-president of the Pontifical Commission for the State of Vatican City (a virtual governorship). He retained his post as head of the Vatican Bank.

Despite motive and access, Yallop does not place Marcinkus high on the suspect list.

28 posted on 04/26/2002 1:49:06 PM PDT by Palladin
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To: history_matters
First of all, Law should be made available for the deposition since he was directly or indirectly responsible for the damage done to the Victims and the Catholic Church should see to it that he is there.

Whatever happen to "Render unto Caesar"?

If this "High Priest" doesn't have to answer up for his shortcomings and offenses and can be saved and promoted by the "Capo de Tutti Capo", why should any catholic be required to go to Confession for their sins.

I am a Lifelong Catholic and I am starting to lose respect for the Pope on this one.

It only shows how One evil Man (Law) can drag the whole bunch down.

NO MORE DONATIONS.

29 posted on 04/26/2002 1:49:39 PM PDT by chatham
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To: history_matters
Odds are that the reason Law didn't act against the perverts is that he is one himself. The perverts likely threatened to out him if he disciplined them more than he did. Given the number of gay and pedophile priests, there are likely quite a few in the heirarchy -- likely in the college of cardinals. Just think about it -- guys wearing what amount to red dresses ... and the pointy hat (you know the erotic significance of that!!!)
30 posted on 04/26/2002 1:53:48 PM PDT by Lessismore
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To: chatham
Right, chatham! If we can't throw the rats out, we can starve them out! No more money in the basket until Law is behind bars, where he belongs as an aide and abettor of NAMBLA priests.
31 posted on 04/26/2002 1:59:17 PM PDT by Palladin
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To: history_matters
The Los Angeles Times earlier this week reported that an unnamed cardinal would lobby the pope's inner circle to accept Law's resignation, but all the cardinals at the conclave publicly denied asking for Law to step down. The Times reported yesterday that an unidentified cardinal delivered a message during the meetings to the pope's deputies asking for Law's resignation.

Why don't they just put Cardinal Mahony's name in the story; it's pretty clear that he's the "unnamed cardinal" here.

32 posted on 04/26/2002 2:00:07 PM PDT by NYCVirago
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To: history_matters
Law, who apologized to his fellow cardinals for being the cause of the historic gathering, did not attend the final press conference announcing the meeting's conclusions Wednesday evening. ``It was rather late, you know,'' he told reporters at Rome's airport. ``I had other things to do.''

What a self-righteous, arrogant prig. What "other things to do" could possibly be more important than showing up at that press conference?

33 posted on 04/26/2002 2:01:20 PM PDT by NYCVirago
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To: NYCVirago
Law is an insufferable narcissist. He has lost all moral authority. He is unfit to head the faithful of the Boston archdiocese.

I have little respect for obsequious enablers like Keeler of Baltimore, who feels more empathy for Law than he does for the 1000 victims of the vile Boston pedophile priests.

Right now, all American and Vatican Cardinals are on my list of least-trusted persons, somewhere on the scale below used car salesmen and defense attorneys.

34 posted on 04/26/2002 2:09:54 PM PDT by Palladin
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To: history_matters
b
35 posted on 04/26/2002 2:28:54 PM PDT by PayNoAttentionManBehindCurtain
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To: history_matters
The prosecutor should ask for a hearing and then file a motion requesting the court seize Laws' passport, since he is a flight risk.
36 posted on 04/26/2002 2:47:48 PM PDT by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: history_matters
Better known as "kicking one upstairs".

Law will not resign, and he can't be forced to resign unless found guilty, which will take months or years of appeals. But you can be kicked upstairs to a "higher" post, and if you refuse to follow it, you can be forced out.

They do this in business all the time.

Sounds like the pope is REALLY pissed at Law over this.

37 posted on 04/26/2002 3:06:38 PM PDT by LadyDoc
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To: history_matters
``What came out of Rome was two revelations: sexual abuse of children is a crime and it won't be tolerated,'' said Massachusetts Attorney General Thomas Reilly. ``That's not news to law enforcement. These are crimes. Where have they been?''

I hate to tell this guy, it's tolorated all the time. I see a lot of girls who are abused or have been abused in the past, and no one has put the bastard in jail. Ever listen to Dr. Laura where a woman calls and asks if she should keep in contact with her relative who abused her, or allow him contact with her kid? Nearly every week there is a case.

My last case was three days ago: The "father" of the girl got counselling,not jail, and still lives with her mother. The girl is now 21 and came in for pills because she is depressed...

38 posted on 04/26/2002 3:10:45 PM PDT by LadyDoc
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To: history_matters
, will be reassigned by Pope John Paul II to an as-yet determined position prior to a scheduled deposition of Law in a legal suit against the archdiocese, according to church officials.

Let me guess......... in charge of ethics?

I've been very supportive of the Catholic Church, even though I'm not Catholic, but the Church is really dropping the ball here.
Their logic looks very much like politicans in Washington. Completely out of touch with reality.

What they need to declare is.. ONE STRIKE AND YOU'RE OUT

39 posted on 04/26/2002 3:20:42 PM PDT by Vinnie
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER; nickcarraway; RobbyS; Endeavor; LadyDoc; patent
I would expect that Cardinal Law has a Vatican passport and would be able to leave under diplomatic immunity.

I believe what we have in this "announcement" is what Andrew Greeley describes as directing the Vatican from abroad. Someone puts forward the idea that the Vatican is going to do something; the story makes its way to the Vatican, and in short order it becomes a done deed.

(Before all this I never thought I'd refer to Andrew Greeley at all. Strange times...)

40 posted on 04/26/2002 3:23:06 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: Vinnie; LadyDoc
What they need to declare is.. ONE STRIKE AND YOU'RE OUT

I agree with you on this statement, and I cannot for the life of me understand what Cardinal McCarrick and Mahony are up to except CYA.

"One Strike and Your Out" is precisely what Anthony Cardinal Bevilacqua declared today for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Cardinal Bevilacqua already had a strict policy weeding out homosexuals from the ranks of seminarians.

41 posted on 04/26/2002 3:26:16 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: history_matters
. . . will be reassigned by Pope John Paul II to an as-yet determined position . . .

It should be as scrubber-out of the Holy septic tank; it seems Law has forgotten his vows regarding humility and now he believes he's above such menial tasks as disposing of the Church's sewage. Well, I've got news for him: He's not. And I hope the Pope gives him the same message.

42 posted on 04/26/2002 3:31:45 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: Lessismore
By reassigning Law, church officials and Law would avoid the stigma
attached to a resignation under fire as well as continue to
deny the resignation was considered.

How is this any different from what Law did
in reassigning the pedophile priest?  And if
that made Law a pervert, what does this
make the pope?

43 posted on 04/26/2002 4:02:30 PM PDT by gcruse
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To: Orual;dighton
`(The pope) genuinely likes him,'' said one church official. ``(Vatican officials) are still trying to find a place for him. They don't want to see him getting hammered like this.''

Unbelievable statement. Does anyone have anything for a pounding headache?

Giving someone a 'kick upstairs' is an old bureaucratic maneuver, a way of covering up the removal of an incompetent executive with a pseudo-promotion.

In any event Law is now denying that such a deal is in the works.

44 posted on 04/26/2002 4:15:39 PM PDT by aculeus
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To: history_matters
``(The pope) genuinely likes him,'' said one church official. ``(Vatican officials) are still trying to find a place for him. They don't want to see him getting hammered like this.''

Oh, brother. Don't even go there with me.

45 posted on 04/26/2002 4:17:54 PM PDT by Saundra Duffy
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To: aculeus
Yup. That was my reaction. "Promote" him to the Vatican, give him an office with a name that sounds really posh in Latin, and keep a close eye on him.
46 posted on 04/26/2002 4:22:32 PM PDT by Poohbah
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To: Endeavor
Law had a spokesperson deny this story a bit ago on one of the cable news networks. Spokesperson said he isn't going anywhere anytime soon.

That same spokesperson last week said that Law was in prayerful seclusion when, in reality, he was in Rome.

47 posted on 04/26/2002 4:46:02 PM PDT by yikes
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To: Palladin
Yes, I remember that case. I believe the priest you referred to was actually only a priest or at best a Bishop. If I remember correctly, he hailed from Chicago and his name was Gervasius or something like that.
48 posted on 04/26/2002 5:00:55 PM PDT by appleton14
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To: history_matters
IF TRUE....

This would yet another great sign of leadership from the Pope.

What a total embarrassment to the Christian community.

In effect, this would be a promotion.

Weak-kneed!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

49 posted on 04/26/2002 5:06:28 PM PDT by AlGone2001
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To: history_matters
``(The pope) genuinely likes him,'' said one church official. ``(Vatican officials) are still trying to find a place for him. They don't want to see him getting hammered like this.''

This speaks volumes to me.

50 posted on 04/26/2002 5:09:15 PM PDT by AlGone2001
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