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U.S. Plan Addresses Homelessness (Bush Administration strategy to end chronic homelessness)
FindLaw/AP ^ | 7/19/02 | Genaro C. Armas

Posted on 07/21/2002 6:40:01 PM PDT by Sandy

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Bush administration outlined a $35 million initiative Friday to stamp out chronic homelessness, targeting people with addictions or disabilities, who have lived on the streets for over a year.

The effort reallocates existing funding from three federal agencies - Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services and the Veterans Administration - into programs that provide permanent housing and social services for the homeless.

HUD Secretary Mel Martinez said he would like to eliminate chronic homelessness within 10 years.

"This joint collaboration on homelessness has never been tried before. Yet it makes perfect sense," Martinez said in a speech Friday at a conference of the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

"The Bush administration's commitment to America's homeless men, women and families has new breadth and new depth, and this gives me new hope that we will suceeed," he said.

The iniative was coordinated by the federal Interagency Council on Homelessless, which on Thursday met for the first time in six years.

Currently, 14 federal programs totaling $2.2 billion a year help the homeless in America. HUD provides nearly half of that funding.

Martinez's speech got a mixed reaction from homeless advocates attending the conference.

"It's a good initiative. Hopefully in the next year we can make great strides," said Hilary Eversol of Bowling Green, Kent.

Shawnel Lee, of Meadville, Pa. said the situation has worsened in her area in the last two years because of economic unrest.

"I think (Martinez) was blowing smoke," she said. "We have more people who are one paycheck away from being homeless."

The government estimates that about 2.5 million Americans experience homelessness every year, with 10 percent who are chronically homeless.



TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: compassionate

1 posted on 07/21/2002 6:40:01 PM PDT by Sandy
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To: Sandy
"" "I think (Martinez) was blowing smoke," she said. "We have more people who are one paycheck away from being homeless."""

She should know about blowing smoke. This is a never-ending argument for the Feds to pay people to not work.
2 posted on 07/21/2002 6:45:21 PM PDT by jimtorr
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To: Sandy
I really don't understand why the Dems dislike Bush. He spends our money on boondoggle socialist programs as fast as Ted Kennedy spends money in a bar.
3 posted on 07/21/2002 6:47:57 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: jimtorr
Martinez sounds like a peach. Basically, she's saying that the situation has been getting worse for the past two years, and therefore, this new proposal is phony.

Translation: The situation started to go downhill under Clinton and I'll be damned if I let the Republicans actually solve the problem.

4 posted on 07/21/2002 6:50:06 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: Sandy
The effort reallocates existing funding from three federal agencies - Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services and the Veterans Administration - into programs that provide permanent housing and social services for the homeless.

Does "permanent housing" mean they are going to buy them houses, with MY tax dollars?

5 posted on 07/21/2002 6:50:33 PM PDT by Mulder
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MARTINEZ OUTLINES BUSH ADMINISTRATION STRATEGY TO COMBAT CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS
Speech to Homeless Advocates Outlines Coordinated Federal Response to Homelessness

WASHINGTON - One year after he declared a national goal to end chronic homelessness within a decade, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Mel Martinez announced the Bush Administration's plan to better coordinate the nation's response to homelessness. Included in the comprehensive plan is a unique collaboration between three federal agencies that would provide $35 million in permanent housing and critical services to end chronic homelessness.

The funding will include $20 million from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), $10 million from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and $5 million from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Today's speech to the annual meeting of the National Alliance to End Homelessness comes a day after the White House hosted the first meeting of the Interagency Council on Homelessness in six years. Last year, President Bush reactivated the Council, which will coordinate the activities of 18 federal agencies that assist homeless individuals and families and will concentrate more effort into the prevention of homelessness.

"President Bush has made it a top priority to confront the root causes of homelessness," said Martinez, HUD Secretary and chairman of the Interagency Council on Homelessness. "The Administration's new vision places a greater emphasis on coordinating our assistance and preventing individuals from becoming homeless in the first place."

A critical component of addressing the needs of homeless persons is to provide an opportunity for individuals and families to find a permanent place to live. The funding announced today will be directed to provide permanent housing and support services to ending chronic homelessness.

In addition to the funding proposed today, the Bush Administration is announcing a multi-faceted approach toward meeting the goal of ending chronic homelessness in America.

Prevention

For decades, the common strategy toward helping homeless persons was to move those in need through a system of care and toward permanent housing. Since 1987, for example, nearly $11 billion from HUD's homeless assistance programs have helped hundreds of thousands of men, women and families to leave homelessness while thousands of others have come into homelessness. Modern research confirms prevention is critical if this nation is to have a comprehensive, holistic approach to the homeless problem.

In another example of interagency collaboration, HUD is joining the Department of Justice, HHS, VA and the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Education and Labor in Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative to identify at-risk persons and provide services BEFORE they become homeless. The purpose of this $100 million program is to prepare offenders for life outside of prison and youth correctional facilities. This initiative provides approximately $2 million to states to create a reentry strategy that reduces homelessness among ex-offenders. The costs associated with prevention and early intervention are significantly lower than the cost of providing emergency services once a person becomes homeless.

Greater Access to Mainstream Services

Research confirms that approximately 10 percent of the nation's homeless are so-called chronically homeless - often suffering from mental illness or addiction. Though a fraction of the overall homeless population, the chronically homeless account for more than half the resources designed to meet the needs of the entire homeless population.*

Currently 14 federal programs totaling $2.2 billion a year help homeless persons in America, including more than $1 billion annually from HUD. Only a fraction of homeless individuals and families, however, have sufficient access to approximately $500 billion in mainstream services including Medicaid, TANF, Food Stamps, and mental health and drug/alcohol addiction programs.

To provide greater access to these significant mainstream services, HUD, HHS and VA are sponsoring a series of regional "policy academies" across the country for state and local governments. These policy academies will now be offered to every state to provide local leaders the technical assistance they need to direct these necessary services toward homeless persons.

Education

While homelessness impacts entire communities, children are especially affected. Homeless children often do not receive the proper education that comes from a stable home environment, often moving from classroom to classroom as their families' circumstances change.

As part of the President's "No Child Left Behind" initiative, the Department of Education is creating a liaison for homeless children in every school district in America. By having a dedicated person to assist homeless families, local schools can better serve children who have heretofore been underserved in schools. These liaisons will be responsible for ensuring these children have the access to the educational resources they will need to break the cycle of homelessness.

Community and Faith-Based Involvement

Recognizing that grassroots community and faith-based organizations are already providing a network of social service to meet the needs of the homeless, President Bush is charging HUD and four other federal agencies to remove existing barriers that preclude the participation of these important groups in federal funding opportunities. By rallying these "armies of compassion," the Administration hopes to tap into a crucial resource that, when leveraged with federal and other public-private resources, will further assist individuals and families without a home.

Background on the Interagency Council

Congress established the Interagency Council in 1987 with the passage of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act. Over the past six years, however, the Council was relatively dormant. Last year, President Bush reactivated the Interagency Council to better coordinate the activities of 18 federal agencies that currently involved in assisting the homeless. In addition, HUD, HHS and VA formed a joint task force to study and improve the way these agencies respond to the various needs of homeless individuals and families. Learn more about the work of the Interagency Council on Homelessness.

HUD is the nation's housing agency committed to increasing homeownership, particularly among minorities, creating affordable housing opportunities for low-income Americans, supporting the homeless, elderly, people with disabilities and people living with AIDS. The Department also promotes economic and community development as well as enforces the nation's fair housing laws. More information about HUD and its programs is available on the Internet.

Read Secretary Martinez's Remarks to the National Alliance to End Homelessness

# # #

* May 2001, Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, University of Pennsylvania. Dennis Culhane, Stephen Metraux and Trevor Hadley



6 posted on 07/21/2002 6:52:46 PM PDT by Sandy
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To: Sandy
Where does the Constitution delegate to the Federal government the power to do this?

I don't find it in the copy I just looked at.

7 posted on 07/21/2002 6:59:10 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: Sandy
Puhleeze! Why does the GOP continue to co-opt Dem issues? Such an obvious ploy.
8 posted on 07/21/2002 7:03:10 PM PDT by varina davis
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To: Ken H
I don't find it in the copy I just looked at.

I looked too.

It ain't there.

9 posted on 07/21/2002 7:05:49 PM PDT by carenot
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To: Ken H
Hush. Get back in line.
10 posted on 07/21/2002 7:09:50 PM PDT by Sandy
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To: Sandy
Good post. Let's see now, when I go to a veteran's hospital they can only give me an outdated anti-inflammation pill, Naposym(sp),for my back. I injured it in jump school. They only give the latest meds to active duty personnel. They can't afford to give the latest meds to vets, but they can give 5 mil to some guy running a home for drunks and junkies. Figures.
11 posted on 07/21/2002 7:40:03 PM PDT by PolishProud
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To: Sandy
This is all part of GW Bush's grand plan. You'll see. Somehow spending all this money will result in spending less money. Least that's what I keep hearing.
12 posted on 07/21/2002 8:14:47 PM PDT by Jonathon Spectre
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To: Sandy
There is a level of instability, insanity, incoherence -- whatever you want to call it -- that will always have some homeless present with us.

There is no reason in today's America for anyone to go to bed hungry for more than a day or two. There are simply too many locations with food and means of obtaining food. However, some hunger will continue. Why? Because there is a "class" of mentally deficient who are unstable, insane, incoherent. There are little ones who depend on the THESE KINDS of people.

You won't wipe it out.

13 posted on 07/21/2002 8:27:40 PM PDT by xzins
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To: Ken H
Where does the Constitution delegate to the Federal government the power to do this? I don't find it in the copy I just looked at.

The Cons-ti-too-shun? Ha! Where have you been? That old-out of date document hasn't mattered for 60-70 years! Besides, it was written by old white guys! that alone makes it bad!

(standard response of 95% of kollege stoodents/future voters)

14 posted on 07/21/2002 8:59:52 PM PDT by Captainpaintball
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To: Sandy
Throwing money at social problems is what Dems do, isn't it? The fact is, you will never eliminate homelessness because many people (I've known some personally) CHOOSE to be homeless by their actions. My former best friend had a nice apartment, a good job with a stable company, a hefty inheritance, and a nice car. She blew it all... her own choice.. she spent most of the money on home shopping club.. she got pregnant out of wedlock and lost the job (she got sick because she wouldn't believe she was pregnant and missed too much work), started dating a convicted child molester, lost custody of her child, sold her car for money, lost the apartment. Now she lives in a group home, works about 20 hours a week and has to ride bus. All her choice. She's about to lose this job, and if she does, she'll end up on the street.
15 posted on 07/21/2002 9:10:23 PM PDT by goodieD
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To: Ken H
Where does the Constitution delegate to the Federal government the power to do this?

Does your copy of the Constitution not include Section 8, Article 1?

Is not eliminating homeless "promoting the general welfare" of the people?

16 posted on 07/21/2002 9:32:19 PM PDT by Hardy Harhar
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To: Hardy Harhar
Is not eliminating homeless "promoting the general welfare" of the people?

That is one way you could interpret Article I Section 8.

LBJ, for example, would have agreed with such an outlook. The Great Society was one massive promotion of the general welfare for the people.

So are the EPA and the Department of Education.

17 posted on 07/21/2002 10:08:36 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: Hardy Harhar
That is certainly one way to read that section.

However, it's interesting that Madison touches on exactly that construction in Federalist 41, where he writes that a construction like that would vest in congress "a power to legislate in all cases whatsoever." It's not clear why the framers would enumerate specific powers for the congress and yet also include a clause which grants virtually limitless legislative power. That construction essentially indicates that Section 8 can be deleted after "provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States" and still provide the same grant of power to congress.

Further in Federalist 41 Madison indicates that the general welfare power imparted to congress in Section 8 is to be interpreted in a manner consistent with the general welfare power imparted to congress at that time through the Articles of Confederation, which clearly conferred no such blanket authority.

Looking forward to your comments...

Regards,

j271
18 posted on 07/21/2002 10:25:59 PM PDT by j271
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To: Sandy
Bush really has been on coke too long if he thinks he can end homelessness. Three prior presidents of every conceivable ideology - Reagan, Bush Daddy, and the Klintons - haven't succeeded in ending homelessness. What makes him think he can?
19 posted on 07/21/2002 10:31:37 PM PDT by glc1173@aol.com
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To: xzins
>there is a "class" of mentally deficient who are unstable,

>insane, incoherent...You won't wipe it out.

Definitely true. Lots of interesting books on the subject, like this one.

20 posted on 07/21/2002 11:21:57 PM PDT by j271
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To: j271
In case the link doesn't work it's:

Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass
21 posted on 07/21/2002 11:24:46 PM PDT by j271
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To: Sandy
In another example of interagency collaboration, HUD is joining the Department of Justice, HHS, VA and the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Education and Labor in Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative to identify at-risk persons and provide services BEFORE they become homeless. The purpose of this $100 million program is to prepare offenders for life outside of prison and youth correctional facilities. This initiative provides approximately $2 million to states to create a reentry strategy that reduces homelessness among ex-offenders.

How about preventing homelessness among serious and violent offenders by keeping them in prison? Have any objective studies been done, I wonder, that show exactly how many repeat offenders were homeless when they robbed, murdered or raped again, after being released in the "at risk" general population?

We all know that "mo money" is the solution for all society's ills -- just look at our education system.

22 posted on 07/22/2002 6:52:05 AM PDT by browardchad
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