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FATHER TELLS OF TRAGEDY (Daughter Killed by Husband at Fort Bragg)
The Canton Repository (Ohio) ^ | Tuesday, July 30, 2002 | By ED BALINT Repository staff writer

Posted on 07/30/2002 4:05:43 AM PDT by ResistorSister

ALLIANCE -- Leroy Zeigler spoke softly and calmly about his daughter, Andrea Zeigler Floyd, who was shot and killed near an Army base about a week ago.

He remembered her raising goats for 4-H.

He remembered her as a standout athlete at Marlington High School.

And he remembered her kind gestures. Like when she became a surrogate mother.

“If she’d do that for those people she didn’t even know,” Zeigler said at his home in Columbiana County’s Knox Township, “you could imagine what she’d do for the people she knew.”

Zeigler Floyd, 29, formerly of Alliance, was among four women who were murdered within the last six weeks in the Fort Bragg, N.C. area. In Zeigler Floyd’s case, Army Sgt. 1st Class Brandon Floyd, killed her, then himself, on July 19, according to authorities.

But Zeigler becomes angry when discussing whether his late daughter’s husband should be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

“There’s no way he should ever be buried in Arlington Cemetery,” the grieving father said. “There are too many (other soldiers) who would be dishonored by putting him in Arlington Cemetery.”

Floyd’s funeral at the cemetery has been postponed until the Army’s Criminal Intelligence Division and the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department complete an investigation into the deaths, said Jack Harrison, spokesman for the Army for the district of Washington at Fort McNair.

Harrison said he did not know how long the investigation would take.

Zeigler is a Vietnam veteran.

ANDREA’S FATHER. Leroy Zeigler talks about the recent death of his daughter, Andrea Zeigler Floyd, formerly of Alliance. Zeigler Floyd’s husband, Brandon, shot and killed her, then turned the gun on himself, according to investigators. The incident occurred near an Army base in North Carolina, where Brandon Floyd was stationed.

ANDREA’S FATHER. Leroy Zeigler talks
about the recent death of his daughter,
Andrea Zeigler Floyd, formerly of Alliance.
Zeigler Floyd’s husband, Brandon, shot
and killed her, then turned the gun on
himself, according to investigators. The
incident occurred near an Army base
in North Carolina, where Brandon Floyd
was stationed.

“I think it would be a disgrace,” he said of burying his son-in-law in Arlington. “He’s a murderer. He murdered my daughter, and he took the easy way out by shooting himself.

“There’s no place in Arlington Cemetery for anybody like that.”

Generally, the next of kin or a representative from the military can apply to have a soldier buried in the national cemetery, the Associated Press reported. Most active-duty soldier’s applications are accepted, Arlington Cemetery spokeswoman Barbara Owens said.

There are no policies prohibiting soldiers involved in murder-suicides from being buried in the cemetery, Owens told the Associated Press. Soldiers involved in murder-suicides have been buried in Arlington before, she said.

Zeigler said he wants the military to do more to help other soldiers who may be in similar situations.

“They make these guys the way they are,” he said of special operations soldiers. “And then they don’t want to take responsibility when something happens.”

“The thing they know best is what they revert to,” Zeigler said of the recent cases. “And that’s violence.”

“You have to remember you have to be a father and a husband, too,” he said, pounding his finger on the dining room table. “You can’t just be a hero all the time.”

FAMILY PORTRAIT. This photo of Brandon Floyd, Andrea Zeigler Floyd and their three young children was part of a video memorial for the mother. Her husband, Brandon, shot and killed her in a murder-suicide, according to authorities. The incident occurred near an Army base in North Carolina, where Brandon Floyd was stationed.

FAMILY PORTRAIT. This photo of Brandon Floyd,
Andrea Zeigler Floyd and their three young children
was part of a video memorial for the mother. Her
husband, Brandon, shot and killed her in a murder-
suicide, according to authorities. The incident occurred
near an Army base in North Carolina, where Brandon
Floyd was stationed.

Fort Bragg officials said the military offers extensive family counseling programs. The base will re-examine those programs because of the slayings, officials told the Associated Press Friday.

Fort Bragg officials said soldiers face stress when they are deployed in Afghanistan and other countries. Stress and anger management sessions have increased at the post since the terror attacks on Sept. 11, said Henry Berry, manager of family advocacy programs at the post.

Floyd served in Afghanistan as part of the Delta Force, the secretive anti-terrorism unit based at Fort Bragg, The Fayetteville Observer reported. He returned in January.

The husbands are suspected in all four cases, which includes another murder-suicide, investigators said.

“Not one (unmarried) guy had a problem,” Zeigler said. “They’re all married men. Something has to be connected there — it can’t just be the stress of the war.

“I was in Vietnam for one year, and I got shot at every day.”

“There is something they’re not doing for these soldiers somewhere along the line,” he said. “They need to single out these guys that are married and pay more attention to them.”

Zeigler said he doesn’t want other women to end up like his daughter.

He said the couple’s three children, ages 4, 5 and 8, were staying with Andrea’s mother, Penny Flitcraft, when the incident occurred. Flitcraft also lives in Knox Township in Columbiana County.

Zeigler said Flitcraft was in North Carolina on Monday to get the children. She plans to adopt them, he said.

“She deserves a lot of credit,” Zeigler said.

Flitcraft could not be reached for comment.

Zeigler wishes he would have kept in closer contact with Andrea.

Zeigler and Flitcraft divorced when Andrea was about a year old.

He last saw her about 18 months ago when she visited the area. She stopped by and showed him a bicycle she used in triathlons.

He laughed, recalling its hefty price and light weight.

Andrea and her husband last visited the area about three weeks ago. She dropped off their children at her mother’s home.

Zeigler said he found it odd that the couple left a short time later.

They had been married for several years, he said

“I guess she was in the process of getting a separation from him,” Zeigler said. North Carolina law requires a one-year separation before a divorce.

After graduating from Marlington, Andrea completed a three-year stint in the Army.

“Whoever knew her, she brought joy to their lives,” her father said. “She was a self-made woman. She’s refused to quit on anything she’s ever done ... and I’m sure she tried everything she could to make that marriage work.”

Zeigler said he has no hard feelings toward his son-in-law’s parents. He met them at his daughter’s funeral service in Alliance Saturday.

“They’re wonderful people,” he said. “And I feel sorry for them. My heart just bleeds for them. They’re suffering. They loved my daughter. They really did.

“They acted like it was their fault,” Zeigler said. “(Their son) did that, and it was not their fault. You can’t be responsible for your kids 24 hours a day, especially when they’re adults.”

You can reach Repository writer Ed Balint at (330) 580-8315 or e-mail:

ed.balint@cantonrep.com


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; US: Ohio
KEYWORDS: fortbragg; murdersuicide
Andrea Zeigler Floyd was an Army vet, a triathlon athlete, had been a surrogate mother, and was a mother of three children.
1 posted on 07/30/2002 4:05:43 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ResistorSister
A surrogate mother? Babyselling is shocking to me. V's wife.
2 posted on 07/30/2002 4:11:19 AM PDT by ventana
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To: ventana
Who said she sold the baby?

She carried the baby for another couple.

3 posted on 07/30/2002 4:17:33 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ResistorSister
Oh, she didn't donate the egg? Where does it qualify that? If it's the husband and wife's sperm and egg doesn't the invitro take place between them? I thought surrogacy had to involve what a third party could contribute, besides a womb.
4 posted on 07/30/2002 4:24:01 AM PDT by ventana
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To: ResistorSister
If I'm correct, Sgt. Floyd was in Delta. Those guys gi through rigorous psycological screening. You can be assured that the Special Forces command is looking at this very carefully...
5 posted on 07/30/2002 4:26:58 AM PDT by ken5050
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To: ventana
The woman is dead..take your rant somewhere else.
6 posted on 07/30/2002 4:32:45 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ken5050
I hope so. I grew-up in a military home...it is not easy for the regular guys to just come home and be part of the family, I cannot imagine how difficult it must be for a Special Forces guy.
7 posted on 07/30/2002 4:34:53 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ResistorSister
A comment is not a rant.
8 posted on 07/30/2002 4:37:08 AM PDT by ventana
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To: ResistorSister
"...and I’m sure she tried everything she could to make that marriage work"

This is a quote from Andrea's father in the article.

Maybe and maybe not. Marriage is a tough row to hoe even when the husband isn't frequently absent. Some wives have a low tolerance for absences. Some grin and bear it. I think a lot of career navy wives actually resent it when hubby returns because they have been running the whole show without assistance. Her willingness to be a surrogate mother (the article doesn't say when) is outside of my experience. I'm sure it introduced a dynamic into the marriage but I can't explain the effects of that particular dynamic.

9 posted on 07/30/2002 4:39:12 AM PDT by Movemout
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To: ken5050
Delta Force seemed to have no problem shooting up Christian women and children at Waco so frankly, it does not surprise me that a few loose cannon slipped through the screening process.
10 posted on 07/30/2002 4:39:55 AM PDT by JohnGalt
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To: Movemout; ResistorSister
Interesting points....the comments about Navy wives are well documented. It's often the biggest complaint they have when their husbands return. And she sound like a strong, confident, independent woman.

Do we have details as to just how long the soldiers had been back home before the murders were committed? Also, from what I recall of reading in the original articles, in every case the children were NOT in the house...they were with relatives. Did this occur to allow the couples some time alone, or wass it planned by the soldiers so the kids wouldn't be at the scene...??

11 posted on 07/30/2002 4:45:13 AM PDT by ken5050
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To: Movemout
Speaking of introducing a dynamic into the marriage.

My husband thought that the expensive bicycle Andrea used in triathlons could have introduced a negative dynamic into the marriage.

Arguements? Sure; but not murder.

12 posted on 07/30/2002 4:45:52 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ken5050
The kids were left in Alliance, Ohio with Andrea's mother about three weeks ago.

Her husband, Brandon, came home in January (at least that is what I remember reading in another article.)

13 posted on 07/30/2002 4:48:08 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ken5050
Oh, I don't think this can be blamed on either duty in Afghanistan nor duty in the Special Forces. RE:

The husbands are suspected in all four cases, which includes another murder-suicide, investigators said.

“Not one (unmarried) guy had a problem,” Zeigler said. “They’re all married men. Something has to be connected there — it can’t just be the stress of the war.

Sounds like a marriage problem. If divorce and domestic abuse is common in the US, why should the military be any different? Compare this to the thousands who come home from war and lead normal, loving married life. Even many of them experience the tradegy of infidelity and divorce, and do not resort to killing their spouse. So, is this an anectodal problem, or are there statistics to show this is a greater problem for returning married GI's?

14 posted on 07/30/2002 4:59:51 AM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: ResistorSister
"Arguements? Sure; but not murder. "

Your husband may have a point. Those lightweight bikes can get pretty expensive. Lots of couples, particularly young couples, argue about money. Throw in having somebody else's baby and you might have a humdinger of an argument.

Anyway arguments lead to bad communication which can lead to bitterness, separation, and even murder.

15 posted on 07/30/2002 5:06:47 AM PDT by Movemout
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To: ken5050
Lets face a little obvious reality here: why only the married guys? Because the bachelors don't have wives who shack up with other guys. If you think this is not most likely the case then you live in a little fluff pseudo reality.
16 posted on 07/30/2002 5:17:28 AM PDT by Stavka2
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To: ResistorSister
"North Carolina law requires a one-year separation before a divorce".

Although I know the reason for this law, it's not a good one. After the one-year separation, a divorce can take another year or even longer. This limbo time is a period of great danger for individuals with unstable spouses. Better to cut the cord as quickly as possible.

Since the father stated that she was "in the process of getting a separation", it sounds to me like this may have prompted the murder. Sort of a "if I can't have her, no one will" sort of thing.

Leni

17 posted on 07/30/2002 5:17:37 AM PDT by MinuteGal
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To: ResistorSister
“Not one (unmarried) guy had a problem,” Zeigler said. “They’re all married men. Something has to be connected there — it can’t just be the stress of the war.

OK. This is pure speculation, not to mention terribly insensitive, but...single guys don't have to worry about cheating wives. Married guys do--sometimes it’s all in their own head, but they still worry. I know from very personal experience that having a wife cheat (or worse, get pregnant) can drive guys to suicide and/or murder.

18 posted on 07/30/2002 5:22:06 AM PDT by TankerKC
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To: TankerKC
This is pure speculation, not to mention terribly insensitive, but...single guys don't have to worry about cheating wives. Married guys do--sometimes it’s all in their own head, but they still worry.

I suspect you're on to something here. This guy's been home SINCE JANUARY! Did he discover some evidence, or did she slip and call him by someone else's name?

No single guys killing girlfriends, are there?

19 posted on 07/30/2002 5:30:49 AM PDT by sinkspur
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To: TankerKC
I don't know if she was cheating on her husband...but my husband (ex Marine) told me not to get into this arguement because it is true that many men have come home from service and found their wives were seeing another/other men.

But I will say this...not all women cheat on their military husbands...sometimes marriages just don't work.

20 posted on 07/30/2002 5:32:22 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: MinuteGal
This limbo time is a period of great danger for individuals with unstable spouses. Better to cut the cord as quickly as possible.

I agree!

Cut the cord and RUN!

21 posted on 07/30/2002 5:34:36 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ResistorSister
But I will say this...not all women cheat on their military husbands...sometimes marriages just don't work.

Correct.

22 posted on 07/30/2002 5:35:57 AM PDT by TankerKC
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To: ResistorSister
Her husband, Brandon, came home in January (at least that is what I remember reading in another article.)

Whoops, I read it in this article.

23 posted on 07/30/2002 5:56:31 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: Stavka2
..... why only the married guys? Because the bachelors don't have wives who shack up with other guys. If you think this is not most likely the case then you live in a little fluff pseudo reality.

And military guys don't cheat on their wives while away from home? Especially in Afghanistan! Those burkas are awfully sexy.

24 posted on 07/30/2002 7:54:19 AM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot
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To: Mind-numbed Robot
Those burkas are awfully sexy.

You're Mind-numbed...for sure! ;-)

25 posted on 07/30/2002 8:21:57 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: ResistorSister
ping for a later read
26 posted on 07/30/2002 8:27:26 AM PDT by Iowa Granny
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Comment #27 Removed by Moderator

To: TankerKC
In the military, cheating was a two way street. Having been overseas with men that were not cheating, and see them come home to find out about their wives was devastating. There were no murders, many beatings and a lot of kids were left into one parent familiies.
28 posted on 07/30/2002 8:35:44 AM PDT by cynicom
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To: MinuteGal
North Carolina law requires a one-year separation before a divorce".

Although I know the reason for this law, it's not a good one. After the one-year separation, a divorce can take another year or even longer

I agree, it should take longer if necessary. The army base wants to offer counseling that's actually worth a d#mn and not just pandering to the masses? Offer counseling to the wives while the husbands are gone to maintain, whatever it takes to explain the reason for the husband being gone, what the wife should be doing while he is gone.

But of course this won't happen will it? That's limiting the wife's 'freedoms'. We have to be concerned with the most base human needs don't we? Clinton wanted the army to be his little proving ground for what society was to become? Well, the bastard got his wish. The army is no different from what society has become.

29 posted on 07/30/2002 8:55:37 AM PDT by billbears
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To: edmund929
Amen.
30 posted on 07/30/2002 8:58:22 AM PDT by ResistorSister
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To: MinuteGal
"This limbo time is a period of great danger for individuals with unstable spouses. Better to cut the cord as quickly as possible."

and then dissapear. Separation can cause some serious, usually temporary, psycological problems, but as they say time heals all wounds.

31 posted on 07/30/2002 10:04:35 AM PDT by monday
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To: ResistorSister
And more.

Wife of Army officer arrested in Fort Bragg shooting death

Associated Press

Published Jul 31, 2002

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. -- The wife of an Army Special Operations officer has been charged in his shooting death, the latest in a string of domestic violence incidents that have shaken Fort Bragg.

Joan Shannon, 35, was charged Tuesday with first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder in the July 23 fatal shooting of Maj. David Shannon, 40.

``We believe financial gain is one of the primary motives of the crime,'' said police Lt. Tom Guilette. He did not elaborate.

Shannon's slaying if the fifth domestic-related slaying linked to the base since June 11. Four Fort Bragg wives have been killed, allegedly by their husbands, and Fort Bragg officials say they are looking at the cases to determine if the stress of military life was a contributing factor.

In the Shannon slaying, three of his four children and a teenage friend were at home when the soldier was shot in the chest and head as he slept, police said.

Joan Shannon told police she awoke to gunshots about 3 a.m. and saw an intruder, and followed him from the bedroom down a hallway. She was unable to give police a description.

David Shannon had served in the Army since 1987 and was assigned to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. He had been at Fort Bragg two years. The family lived off the base.

His wife worked as a loan receptionist at the Fort Bragg Credit Union about a year, said her supervisor, Mae Davis. Davis said workers there raised about $500 for her and her family after her husband's death.

32 posted on 07/31/2002 6:56:29 AM PDT by Valin
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