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Wildfire News, Successful burnout diminishes threat to Illinois Valley, Oregon homes
Oregon Live/ AP ^ | 2 August 2002 | Jeff Barnard

Posted on 08/02/2002 7:59:19 AM PDT by Grampa Dave

Wildfire News! Successful burnout diminishes threat to Illinois Valley, Oregon homes

By JEFF BARNARD The Associated Press 8/2/02 3:43 AM

SELMA, Ore. (AP) -- A shift in the wind allowed firefighters to torch miles of brush in an effort to save thousands of homes in southwest Oregon.

Hotshot crews poured fire from drip torches, burning a black swath of safety for the 17,000 people of the Illinois Valley. With each mile of burnout added along the 30-mile front of fire, the threat to the towns of Selma, Kerby, Cave Junction and O'Brien diminished.

"I certainly feel better today," Illinois Valley Fire Chief Kyle Kirchner told those who attended a community meeting Thursday night on the Illinois Valley High School football field.

"We're close to turning a corner, but we're not out of the woods yet."

The Florence and Sour Biscuit fires have burned 200,000 acres since lightning started them two weeks ago. Together, they have become the nation's top firefighting priority because of their size, behavior, and the threat to people.

Throughout Oregon, nearly 13,000 firefighters battled major wildfires burning 452,000 acres.

The burnout, which removes brush and other fuels that could feed the wildfire, comes just as the Siskiyou National Forest begins the season of most intense wildfire -- the month of August. Firefighters expect the Florence and Sour Biscuit fires will smoke until the fall rains come.

Firefighters wanted to start the burnout earlier this week, but had to wait for the winds to shift so the fires they ignited would not spread toward town.

"Ma Nature does it on her own schedule," said Erik Christiansen, fire behavior analyst on the Florence Fire, as he watched the burnout from a pickup truck. "We can predict it, but she's still in control."

The fire was only 5 percent contained, but each new mile of burnout eased the threat.

The burnout of the strip one to two miles wide was expected to take three days, and the weather through the weekend was predicted to be favorable -- cooler, moister air with gentle winds. One complication was a chance of rain on Monday. The burnouts must be done before then, or they can't be finished until the ground dries again, said Incident Commander Tom Lohrey.

With the threat diminishing, most local residents are staying, rather than heeding fire commanders' advice to evacuate. The Red Cross reported that only 950 people have left their homes.

Brian and Stephanie Pfeiffer still have their bags packed in case they have to flee, but they looked forward to a calm night.

"I think we'll be able to sleep tonight," Stephanie Pfeiffer said after the meeting. "I feel better now that (the firefighters) are feeling more optimistic."

While wildland firefighters concentrated on the burnout, structural firefighters finished mapping and assessing the hundreds of homes closest to the fire, burning about five miles west of U.S. Highway 199.

Meanwhile, fire commanders began building forces to combat the northern and western flanks of the fire. Bulldozers, hand crews and structural firefighters worked on the north end of the Florence Fire, to protect the community of Agness, which is a center of whitewater rafting river on the Rogue River.

Also high on commanders' priority list was the Timbered Rock fire about 20 miles north of Medford. It had burned about 20,000 acres, was 20 percent contained and was being battled by about 1,000 firefighters. Officials had urged the residents of 40 homes to evacuate.

Here are some of the other major wildfires that were burning Thursday in Oregon:

----The Cache Mountain fire, burning on 4,200 acres 15 miles northwest of Sisters, has destroyed two homes but was 100 percent contained.

----The Tiller Complex, east of Canyonville off Interstate 5, has burned 26,850 acres and was 25 percent contained.

----The Toolbox Fire, which has scorched 86,794 acres in Lake County, was 75 percent contained.

------

On the Net:

National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

Florence/Sour Biscuit Fires website: http://www.pnw-team2.com/florence/index.html


TOPICS: Breaking News
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This sounds like good news. Lets hope so.

Again, would the local Freepers in this area please post what you have heard or seen.

1 posted on 08/02/2002 7:59:20 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: AuntB; EBUCK; Granof8; Species8472; Archie Bunker on steroids; wanderin; thirst4truth; meadsjn; ...
Appears to be some good news finally for those innocents in the Illinois Valley area.

The live report on the hour (8 am) on Lars Station confirmed this potential good news.

If you have any more news, please post it.
2 posted on 08/02/2002 8:08:46 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: madfly; brityank; farmfriend; WaterDragon; Ernest_at_the_Beach; JohnHuang2; backhoe
This if FYI.

Please use your magic Pinger List to let this potential good news go out.
3 posted on 08/02/2002 8:11:31 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave; All
Rick Hartigan, USFS information officer for West Florence fire, reports at 7:30 a.m. on August 2: Fire in very much the same area as yesterday, did not advance toward Agness. Very little change in the weather forecast, winds will swing back and forth, upper level low coming in for the weekend, offshore flow with higher humidity. Chance of RAIN in four days. Showing good recovery at night. Activity yesterday, completion of triage work at Agness, more to be done. Dozers still working on line. Wilderness Retreat (14 miles up Chetco) work expected to be done today. Bringing in helicopters today, portable 10,000 gallon tank being set up at (Curry County's) Oak Flat for helicopters to dip from. Helicopters capable of dropping 150 to 2500 gallons at one time. No percentage of containment of fire, no containment date.

Sheriff Kent Owens advises any evacuation notice will come through his office which will provide security. Road closure at the North Bank of Chetco at the South Fork bridge except for residents.

Mike Murphy, emergency services director, said Curry General Hospital is prepared to treat those with smoke related problems or injuries from the fire lines. A Red Cross shelter is ready at the high school.

Coos Forest Protection agency reports Florence and Biscuit fires not yet merged as of 5 p.m. August 1. Fire continues to burn primarily in the Siskiyou National forest.

KURY Radio reports a lot of smoke in Brookings-Harbor this morning. Some of the best marijuana gardens have burned with the forests. Great progress with Shelley Creek fire - 50% contained since yesterday (August 1). Highway 199 remains closed through Sunday.

ALERT FOR CALIFORNIA: Authorities on Tuesday were searching for Brookings resident Billy Gene Preuitt, who is suspected of murdering his neighbor Carol Zimmerman. Anyone who has any information about Preuitt, or who has seen Zimmerman's red 1990 Toyota Corolla with Oregon license plate VXG 212, is asked call the Brookings Police Department at (541) 469-3118, or the Crime Stoppers hotline (800) 974-0000. Preuitt, who lives in the next door apartment, is being sought in connection with her murder. He was reported to be driving Zimmerman's 1990 red Toyota Corolla when last seen at a motel in Redding, Calif.


4 posted on 08/02/2002 8:16:08 AM PDT by Granof8
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To: Granof8; All
Folks, here is a great new update from our Granof8, who is in Gold Beach.

Again, we see the power of Freepers when it comes to getting the news and what is really happening out for the rest of us.
5 posted on 08/02/2002 8:19:27 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Free the USA; Libertarianize the GOP; Stand Watch Listen; freefly; expose; Fish out of Water; ...
ping
6 posted on 08/02/2002 8:26:21 AM PDT by madfly
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To: All; madfly
This is a timely thread.

Sounds like other Senators want the same exemptions to manage the forests/wildlands in their states that Mullah Shorty Da$$hole wants: (If It's Good Enough for Da$$hole's Voters, It's good enough for the other states)

7 posted on 08/02/2002 8:28:43 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: All
ATTENTION: Watch ABC's 20/20 tonight! Here is an email from him on tonight's segment:

This Friday's "Give Me A Break" about the "missing" lynx. The Canada lynx is getting some people very excited. An environmental group burned down a ski lodge in Vail because they thought it might threaten the lynx.

There are tens of thousands of lynx throughout North America, but because the bureaucrats weren't sure there were any in southern Washington state-they commissioned a million dollar study to find out. They placed pieces of carpet soaked with a catnip mixture on trees hoping the lynx would then rub up against them and leave some fur. Sure enough--samples the biologists sent to the lab contained hairs from a Canada lynx!

This is a frightening prospect for people who like using the land. Finding a threatened species can set in motion a series of events that can wreck your life if you're a rancher or farmer or just someone who wants to drive in the woods. It's a reason lots of people in southern Washington are scared of the government's environmental police. As land rights activist Mike Paulson put it, "We basically say if you have an endangered species in your area, we are going to take your livelihood away, we're going to destroy your communities, and we're going to make it very difficult for your families to survive."

That didn't happen this time because it turned out the government's biologist were caught cheating! The lynx hair sent to the lab came from a lynx that lives in a cage, miles away from where the biologists claimed they found the hair. How could this happen? Jim Beers, a Fish and Wildlife biologist for 31 years, says his agency changed from promoting science to pushing what some believe is fanatical environmentalism. Now he says the agency is " staffed with environmental radical activists" who will twist facts until they get the results they want; and what they really want...is to ban people from forests. "Once you establish that there are any lynx in the area, ...the areas in between suddenly become very urgent to not allow road to be built, not allow the ski slopes to come in... not allow grazing... ultimately, not to let you or I drive our wives and kids in for a picnic."

The biologists do have an explanation; they weren't trying to cheat, they say, they were just testing the labs to make sure they could actually identify lynx fur. Beers replies: "That's the same as you telling me that you caught them walking out of the bank with money and they said oh, we were just seeing if the system works here, we were going to return it tomorrow."

Were the biologists fired for cheating? No. How often do governments fire anyone? They were "verbally counseled," but they are still on the job. It makes me wonder what other parts of their science we don't know the truth about.

If we now have the extremists giving orders with the power of government, everyone's freedom is at risk.

Give me a break.


8 posted on 08/02/2002 8:34:16 AM PDT by madfly
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To: madfly; Grampa Dave
According to the article the burnout removed 'brush and debris' from the path of the fire, depriving it of fuel.

That this brush and debris has not been regularly cleaned out all along is entirely due to the Democratic Party/Enviromentalist Socialists forestry policies preventing it, and preventing thinning the forests with logging as well.

All the tree-huggers and those they have deceived in Oregon need to take a good hard look at these fires. Nothing beautiful about forests denuded with such hot fires. Nothing there for the precious spotted owl, either.
9 posted on 08/02/2002 8:37:58 AM PDT by WaterDragon
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To: WaterDragon
The biggest threat to the environment is the Environmentalist mowvement.
10 posted on 08/02/2002 8:41:38 AM PDT by Clive
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To: madfly
BTTT!!!!!
11 posted on 08/02/2002 9:02:33 AM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: Clive
Bump
12 posted on 08/02/2002 9:04:26 AM PDT by calawah98
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To: Grampa Dave
This is better news than we've had for quite a while.

Thank heaven for Hotshots, and thank YOU for all the hard work in bringing us updated information, Grampa.

Adding all the links to your related posts is a GREAT idea, especially for those who haven't been following the situation out there as closely as some have.

13 posted on 08/02/2002 9:15:41 AM PDT by cake_crumb
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To: Grampa Dave
Thanks for your daily update, Grampa. Sounds like things are looking up a bit. Continued prayers for our Oregon FReepers...
14 posted on 08/02/2002 9:16:13 AM PDT by nutmeg
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To: Grampa Dave
More fire news in the times-standard this morning. The weather should give them a break unless it contains more lightning.
15 posted on 08/02/2002 9:18:41 AM PDT by tubebender
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To: Grampa Dave
You know...thinning forests and eliminating the overabundant fuel shouldn't require an act of congress. It's a common sense policy which Forestry ought to be allowed to impliment...WITHOUT FEAR OF ENVIRONAZI LAWSUITS!!
16 posted on 08/02/2002 9:23:08 AM PDT by cake_crumb
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To: cake_crumb; WaterDragon; madfly; brityank; farmfriend; countrydummy; sauropod; AAABEST; All
Thanks for your kind words.

You posted this, "Adding all the links to your related posts is a GREAT idea, especially for those who haven't been following the situation out there as closely as some have."

Here is how our great group can help here. Please link any related enviral issue thread to this thread, and then provide a link on this thread to get to that thread.

All of this is tied in together, and we need to make it easy for those following this fire to link to another enviral thread with a tie in.

Even if it is enviral whacko news that is happening on the East Cost, it has a tie in to those of us on the West Coast.

Conservatives across the Freeper Nation need to realize that if envirals are causing a problem in Oregon/Kali, that problem will have a direct relationship to their state even if it is 3,000 miles away.

Every federal tax payer will be paying billions for these Enviral related wild fires due to their agendas.

This is plea to all good enviralists to link this thread to other enviral threads and vice versa. It is all part of the enviral attempt to destroy America in the name of the environment.
17 posted on 08/02/2002 9:29:07 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: madfly
Thanks for the heads up!
18 posted on 08/02/2002 9:34:05 AM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: Grampa Dave; madfly
Lots of good info here, Gramps.

"One complication was a chance of rain on Monday."

The weather is cooling down quite a bit. I hope the cool weather makes it all the way down there. We are supposed to have rain up here on Sunday, but I understand that the firefighters don't want rain as it would hinder their backfires and, possibly, may contain more lightening.
So, here's hoping that they get the cooler weather, and no rain.
I, also, saw on the news last night that they are considering changing from a 30 minute evacuation to a 24 hour evacuation. The firefighters seem to be cautiously optimistic.

Thanks for the ping, madfly!

19 posted on 08/02/2002 9:43:25 AM PDT by dixiechick2000
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To: Grampa Dave
My Brother just left this morning for Shady Cove to build another house. G*d help them evnirals is something happens to him while down there.

Thanks so much, again, for your vigilence!! We Oregonians appreciate your efforts!

EBUCK

20 posted on 08/02/2002 9:47:08 AM PDT by EBUCK
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To: tubebender; MadIvan; brityank; farmfriend; Ernest_at_the_Beach; EBUCK; All
Thanks, Tubebender for letting me know that this new story on the California Fires just south of the Illinois River Valley, Oregon:

Eureka Times-Standard
Firefighters battle unwieldy Del Norte fires
By John Driscoll The Times-Standard


Friday, August 02, 2002 -

GASQUET -- The effort to battle two fires only a few miles from here continues to grow, but a big, restless wildfire has kept about 30 evacuated families from getting back to their homes.

Burning debris and rocks on the roadway has kept U.S. Highway 199 closed to all but some locals, though complete closures have been in effect at times.

The size of the fires burning in the Smith River National Recreation Area remains the same as was reported Thursday, but authorities are only now getting their first glimpses of how big the fires are. Unpredictable winds have kept firefighters guessing, but generally the progress of the largest blaze -- called the Sour Biscuit Fire -- has been toward the northeast, away from Gasquet.

"One day it's OK, one day it's not," said Emma Young, a cashier at the Hiouchi Store. "It depends on the wind."

Hundreds of people have stopped to look at maps and fire information set out at the store in the past two days.

Hiouchi, like Gasquet, is on 24-hour evacuation alert. About 30 families who live in the Low Divide area north of Hiouchi were evacuated earlier this week as the Sour Biscuit Fire approached after blowing into California from its origin in Oregon.

The Sour Biscuit Fire is now 33,000 acres, with about 20,000 acres on the California side of the border.

But it is the smaller Shelly Creek Fire, which stands at 700 acres, that is getting the most attention. The fire is being fought by more than one firefighter per acre, and crews burned away vegetation along the highway to halt any advance of the main fire.

From the ground on Fish Hatchery Road Thursday, wielding two walkie-talkies, U.S. Forest Service Division Supervisor Michele Tanzi guided a Coulson Pacific helicopter with a 1,000-gallon water bucket to spots on the fire's front. The pilot doused a single burning tree with pinpoint accuracy, snuffing a blaze that could have send embers flying to another area, before returning to dip the bucket into the Smith River.

Within 10 minutes at the site, the wind could be felt shifting directions again and again, giving a clear picture of what the fire crews are up against. It's tough flying too, with low-lying smoke keeping an aerial assault on the blaze timid.

"It's so smoky they can't see each other or what they're dropping on," said Forest Service Battalion Chief Syndy Heidt.

A plethora of agencies has set up a base at the Del Norte County High School. The force of more than 1,000 camped there is expected to grow over the next few days.

New crews from the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, the California Department of Forestry and other agencies were getting outfitted at the camp Thursday. After getting clothed, they picked up lunches that weigh about 6 pounds each. California Conservation Corps crews doled out huge quantities of water and food at lunchtime, while later, cooks grilled and baked massive amounts of high-calorie comfort food like chicken breast and apple crisp.

There were lots of people about, but resources are slim.

"Well, we could be working on it all summer," said Six Rivers National Forest Supervisor Lou Woltering.

The threat of more wildfires on Six Rivers this summer is not lost on Woltering, who said teams that handle big wildfires are in short supply during this busy fire season. Storms are expected to move up the Sacramento River Valley later this week, and with them could come lightning. Woltering said crews at the Six Rivers ranger districts would respond to new fires, but larger forces often needed to snuff them are scattered around the west.

"We're scrambling," Woltering said.

Indeed, the Forest Service allowed the fires that have become the Sour Biscuit Fire to burn after lightning sparked them on July 13 or 14 in Oregon. On July 27, the fire burned into California. On the following day it made a run that burned 5,000 acres in California, but pilots couldn't see the fire because of the intense smoke from it and another fire to the north now burning more than 150,000 acres.

That fire, called the Florence Fire, and the Sour Biscuit Fire are only about a mile from merging into an even larger fire.

"It's the first fire I've seen like this in the 34 years I've been here," said 50-year-old Jim Schlotter, a student living in an area near Hiouchi.

The smaller Shelly Fire is about 50 percent contained, and is expected to be under control by Saturday. Highway 199 should also be open then. Forest Service Branch Director Kent Swartzlander said that winter months are likely to take their toll on the already landslide-prone cliffs above the highway into Oregon.

The Patrick Creek Lodge past Gasquet toward the northeast was only days ago looking like it would be burned to the ground by the Shelly Fire. It's situation somewhat less tenuous now, the lodge's owners have begun serving meals and coffee to firefighters coming off fire lines sometimes only a stone's throw away.

"They've been very grateful," said 19-year-old Tami Hanover, a waitress at the lodge. "They're really putting their all into it."

The Sour Biscuit Fire burning outside of Gasquet and Hiouchi is still a wild card, with no containment at all. Like Wednesday night, fire officials will be holding another meeting -- this time in Hiouchi -- to keep residents apprised of the fires' progress.

"People really desire information," said Forest Service spokesman Ken Wilson. "It's pretty understandable. It's their homes, their lives, their families."




This totally burns me, and I don't live in this area.

Did the Clintoonian Pink Panty Wearing Enviralist Florists playing Forestry Service set back and allow this fire to burn as per the Green Agenda, they work 24/7 to serve?
21 posted on 08/02/2002 9:51:24 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
There's a bump list...or there used to be. It was called "enviral" list? I can't remember....we need a way to archive all the pertinant info in one spot. Like a seperate "folder"...or a seperate FR category.
22 posted on 08/02/2002 9:54:36 AM PDT by cake_crumb
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To: cake_crumb; *Enviralists
List of bump lists....Enviralists is the correct bump list.

EBUCK

23 posted on 08/02/2002 9:59:10 AM PDT by EBUCK
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To: cake_crumb; backhoe; *Enviralists
Maybe you and backhoe can get together and compare notes.

I'm the world's worse organizer in stuff like this.

Backhoe has done a great job.

If a wheel has been invented and used, never make another one. Just use that one.
24 posted on 08/02/2002 10:06:14 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: All
More feedback on the fire from the California Side:



Line holding at Shelley Creek Fire

Published: August 2, 2002

By Kent Gray

Crescent City, California: Triplicate staff writer

A full-blown assault on the Shelley Creek Fire paid dividends Thursday as fire crews refused to give ground along Highway 199.

Fire spotters lined the highway about every 50 yards keeping tabs on smaller fires while helicopters dropped hundreds of gallons of water on interior blazes – heavy enough to snap branches off the trees. A few fires jumped the highway but were quickly extinguished, said officials with the U.S. Forest Service yesterday.

"By early evening we should be done securing the line," said Kent Swartzland, the branch director of the Shelley Creek Fire. "The only problem we still have is with the Cedar Rustic Campground, we've had spotting (fires) all around there."

Swartzland estimated the 700-acre fire was at 50-percent containment at noon yesterday and said full containment is expected by this weekend. "At that point it will just be a matter of mopping up. That should finish it for this fire," Swartzland said.

Approximately 850 people were assigned to fight the Shelley Creek Fire – compared to 144 assigned to fight the 19,513 acres of the Sour-Biscuit Fire burning in California.

Fire Commander Wally Bennett said Wednesday battling the Shelley Creek blaze would be a first priority because of the terrain and nearby structures. The Shelley Creek Fire is the blaze responsible for closing Highway 199.

Caltrans trucks escorted fire vehicles between Patrick Creek and Monkey Creek yesterday on Highway 199, scooping rocks and other debris from the road that the fire had dislodged from the steep hills above.

An unidentified explosion that rumbled through the area in the afternoon launched a flurry of radio calls, but officials ultimately dismissed it as a falling tree or an emptied and discarded fuel can.

Officials said the Sour-Biscuit Fire grew very little on Wednesday and Thursday. This allowed a fire break to be built on the west side of the fire near Low Divide Road, where approximately 30 residences were evacuated last weekend.

"It's looking great," said Ann Garland, the liaison officer with the Forest Service. "We're working on a burnout along the line there and making really good progress."

According to Forest Service maps, the fire jumped Low Divide Road east of Copper Creek Mine and burned about a quarter-mile west of the road. The Forest Service maps designate the road as Wimer Road in the area north of the Rowdy Creek Road intersection.

Garland said most of the northern portion, up to the Oregon border, is secured now but a small area on the southwest perimeter is currently being doused with water by helicopter.

"We hope to have it done by today," Garland said about securing the southwest portion. "The west is essentially secured but not contained. There is no containment yet on this fire."

The southern and eastern perimeters of the fire have been difficult to define, officials said, because of heavy smoke and "dirty" burns.

"A dirty burn is where you have low brush that has been burned through but surrounding brush and leaves have only been dried out by the blaze," said Dave Webb, fire management officer. "These areas can potentially come back and reburn, so you have to keep a close eye on them."

Favorable weather might help the effort this weekend.

"The temperature is expected to drop five to 10 degrees this weekend and we have a possibility of showers on Sunday – but a very low probability," Garland said.
25 posted on 08/02/2002 10:11:26 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: WaterDragon; Grampa Dave
That this brush and debris has not been regularly cleaned out all along is entirely due to the Democratic Party/Enviromentalist Socialists forestry policies preventing it, and preventing thinning the forests with logging as well.

Thank you both for telling it like it is. Enviro-nazis are to blame for what is the two year total now? over 8 million acres torched?

26 posted on 08/02/2002 10:14:03 AM PDT by BOBTHENAILER
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To: Grampa Dave
Essay Of The Week

Quote of the Day by by Libloather

27 posted on 08/02/2002 10:16:24 AM PDT by RJayneJ
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To: Grampa Dave
Sounds like good news, but we still need to fight the envirowackos.
28 posted on 08/02/2002 10:22:10 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: WaterDragon
You posted:

All the tree-huggers and those they have deceived in Oregon need to take a good hard look at these fires. Nothing beautiful about forests denuded with such hot fires. Nothing there for the precious spotted owl, either.

Any conservative or moderate who still supports these Green Enviralists after these fires, is not a conservative nor a moderate. They are dangerous liars to themselves, their family and those who live around them. They are the enablers of these criminals. They enable them to harm America/Americans on a 24/7 basis.

Supporting these Green Enviralists is the same mental illness of any American supporting the al Qaeda terrorists and blaming 9/11 on the innocent Americans killed on 9/11!

Enablers of criminals are worse than the actual criminals. Without the enablers, most criminals/terrorists would not be able to do their vile evil deeds.

29 posted on 08/02/2002 10:22:33 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
August 2, 2002

Wildfires torch illegal marijuana gardens in southern Oregon

CAVE JUNCTION - A wildfire raging through southern Oregon has burned more than trees - illegal marijuana gardens are going up in expensive puffs of smoke, police say.

"We're getting reports from some of the firefighters out there of (marijuana) grows," said Lt. Lee Harman of the Josephine County sheriff's office. "But we're not gonna put our Marijuana Eradication Team (ahead) of the firefighters."

Some of the world's highest-grade marijuana is grown in the Siskiyou National Forest and the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, where the Florence and Sour Biscuit fires have consumed about 183,000 acres.

It's unclear how much marijuana is burning as the two fires move through the mountains.

Lt. Brian Anderson, who once headed the sheriff's Marijuana Eradication Team, said he couldn't begin to guess how the burning of marijuana plants on federal lands might affect the local economy.

But some people familiar with growing cannabis said wildfires this late in the summer could have a devastating impact on serious growers' gardens.

Marijuana has been a cash crop in the southwestern Oregon county since at least the mid-1960s. But by 1976, new methods of growing the plants caught hold in and around the verdant Illinois Valley, once hailed as the Italy of Oregon for its abundant agriculture.

(Copyright 2002 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

30 posted on 08/02/2002 10:24:44 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: madfly; All
Here is the link to Madfly's new thread about John Stossel's program tonight re the Planted Lynx Hairs: (Missing Lynx Are Animals More Important Than People? Commentary By John Stossel )

All of this ties in. These green eco terrorists are liars, they plant evidence, they manipulate data to achieve their eco terrorist agendas.

It is time for America to put a choke chain on these Green Pit Bulls and choke them down to simpering little puppies.

31 posted on 08/02/2002 10:37:08 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: EBUCK
Ah....ENVIRALISTS!!! Thanks...I can never remember what the thing is called...which is why I can never find it, I guess
32 posted on 08/02/2002 10:42:34 AM PDT by cake_crumb
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To: Grampa Dave
I don't know if this has been posted before, if it has, it won't hurt to post again.

Scientists chastise Forest Service chief 07/27/02

MICHAEL MILSTEIN

A group of top Northwest scientists has fired back at U.S. Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth, saying the agency has only itself to blame for years of inaction that have turned Western forests into tinderboxes.

In a scathing letter to a congressional committee that earlier heard from Bosworth, the six scientists said the forest chief misrepresented their work to Congress and falsely implied that the Forest Service is bogged down by unwieldy policies and questionable science.

"Why the chief did it, only he knows," said Robert Beschta, an Oregon State University forestry professor who signed the letter.

Since becoming chief last year, Bosworth has blamed "analysis paralysis" for slowing agency projects, from Northwest timber sales to bridge repairs. A new Forest Service report titled "The Process Predicament" says procedural tangles have held up projects to thin clogged, flammable forests left from decades of fire suppression.

But the scientists from the University of Washington, Oregon State, Idaho State University, Pacific Rivers Council and the Center for Biological Diversity said the Forest Service is mired in conflict because it pushes logging but neglects such pressing issues as decaying roads and the desperate need to thin forests ripe for fires.

"The agency often strives to ignore or deny the vast body of knowledge that has accumulated in recent decades, and instead favors antiquated policies," the scientists said in the letter to the House Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health.

Such direction "is not only a recipe for controversy, but also a recipe for the continued deterioration of forested landscapes," they said. "Humans, too, suffer when these resources are degraded, as will often happen if the forest practices advocated by the chief and 'The Process Predicament' report are continued."

The rebuke of Bosworth, a forester, contrasts with the broad support that former Chief Mike Dombeck, a fisheries biologist, claimed among many scientists. So far it has drawn no response from Bosworth or the subcommittee.

The letter was prompted by Bosworth's June testimony about the "procedural knot" that he says binds the Forest Service, driving up costs and delaying decisions. Bosworth said he could not think of a better example of the "costly, complex and time-consuming" demands than a 1995 report by eight Northwest scientists.

The Beschta Report, named for the Oregon State professor who was its lead author, recommended ways to avoid environmental damage while salvaging leftover wood from burned forests. Three of the authors were based at the time at Oregon State, with others from the University of Montana, University of Washington, Idaho State, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission.

The report said fires play a vital ecological role in Western forests and advocated a "conservative approach" to logging or reseeding of burned terrain. It found little evidence that logging charred stands would slow future fires and said such cutting might do more damage than the fires.

"In this light, there is little reason to believe post-fire salvage logging has any ecological benefits," said the report, written at the behest of the Eugene-based Pacific Rivers Council, a conservation group.

Speaking to Congress, Bosworth called the report "an unpublished document of questionable science proposed for an advocacy group that has never been peer-reviewed."

Environmental groups have blocked salvage logging projects, including some in Oregon and Washington, by alleging in appeals and lawsuits that the Forest Service had not weighed the principles in the Beschta report.

It is, Bosworth said, a "powerful example of the incentive for land managers to fill, or overstuff, (decision) documents with excessive amounts of information -- even if the information is of questionable relevance and does not illuminate the reasons for the decision."

But scientists who wrote the report said Bosworth distorted their work and misled Congress, blaming them for the failings of the Forest Service's outdated thinking.

"The chief is in serious error to lay it back at the doorstep of scientists, who are saying, 'Pay attention to the ramifications of what you do,' " said David Perry, an emeritus professor of ecosystem studies at Oregon State who is a member of the National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry.

Bosworth's testimony "just flies in the face of the facts," said James Karr, a professor of aquatic sciences and zoology at the University of Washington.

"The problem is that the Forest Service used to make decisions based on limited understanding of the consequences, and nobody questioned that," he said. "When they continue to ignore the consequences, and what science tells them, they don't get to do what they want, and they blame it on 'analysis paralysis.' "

The Beschta Report was peer-reviewed by researchers at Oregon State and more than 50 others who endorsed it in a letter to the president, its authors said. Federal courts have upheld the findings, and the Forest Service itself directed field offices to consider the report when planning projects.

"It was peer-reviewed more than most peer-reviewed papers are," Karr said, "and far more than the Forest Service's own work is peer-reviewed."

Beschta, the lead author, said the Forest Service never introduced any studies to counter the report's conclusions. "If the chief thinks the science is questionable, they've had seven years to provide a response, but there's been none."

Deteriorating forest roads and overgrown, flammable stands pose the most immediate threats to forests, the scientists told Congress.

"Despite widespread recognition of these facts, the (Forest Service) diverts staff and money to extraordinarily costly salvage logging projects at the expense of reducing the . . . the road network or undertaking needed fine-fuels reductions in unburned forests," they said.

"There's this huge need to do fuel reduction, yet they seem to have this huge interest in doing salvage logging," Beschta said. "They could have been aggressively thinning forests over the last decade, and I don't know if they could have made a dent, but they certainly could have gotten further than they have." Reach Michael Milstein at 503-294-7689 or at michaelmilstein@news.oregonian.com.

Copyright 2002 Oregon Live. All Rights Reserved.'t hurt anything to post again.

33 posted on 08/02/2002 10:53:43 AM PDT by joyce11111
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To: Grampa Dave
DEATH IN WILDLAND FIRES 2001

DeFour wildland firefighters were killed in July when they were trapped by rapid-fire progress in a forest fire in Washington State.

Three firefighters were killed in the crash of a firefighting helicopter in Montana during August.

Two firefighters were killed when two firefighting aircraft collided in midair while fighting a wildfire in California during August.

A total of 14 firefighters died in association with wildfire incidents in Wildland fires 2001

34 posted on 08/02/2002 10:58:47 AM PDT by joyce11111
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To: joyce11111
There have been 14 deaths this year from the Green Agendas driven fires.

However, the way that the fires in SW Oregon are now being fought, the way those 4 innocent young people were murdered last year due to the Green Agendas, appears to be out of the system now.

They are now using bull dozers and all resources available to them. They are quietly letting the sacred Green Wilderness East of the Illinois River just burn instead of placing fire fighters at peril. Instead of sending in fire fighters to be in harm's way in areas without roads, any logging or clearing for the last decade.

However, when this over, there needs to be an investigation into what appears to be the old Clintoonian Pink Panty Florist Service maggots allowing these fires in SW Oregon and NW California just burn out of control. That is the usual tactic of the Florists pretending to be florists.

I was warning two weeks ago that these fires were being allowed to burn and would cause tremendous problems due to the tinder box conditions due to the ONRC and Andy Kerr's agendas for the wilderness area.
35 posted on 08/02/2002 11:09:37 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: All
Well, Grampa Dave is going to his local river to practice fly casting and to drown some of his ugly hand tied fishing flies.

I don't like to fish this crummy river, but stripers are in it. Last Saturday my oldest son and I had a ball casting from his boat anchored 100' for an outside pub/restaurant right in our hometown.

Every time we hooked a fish, the patrons at the pub would cheer. Then, some would boo when we returned the fish (catch and release). It was the first time that we fished in that area. My son has a new 25' River buster that he uses in the California Delta to fish for Stripers. We made the 5 miles upstream from the boat launch about as fast as you can drive. Sure beats my old 15 hp engine that he has now on his spare boat.

One of his best fishing buddies is a professional Bass Fisher and has a 200 hp matched set. They were on the Delta a couple weeks ago going 75 mph from fishing spot to fishing spot. My son said that if a bug smacked you in the face, it felt like being shot by a bb gun. His bones were sore for a week after that ride. In the future they will use his slower 40 mph boat.

Have a good day and keep us posted on what's happening.
36 posted on 08/02/2002 11:56:30 AM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave; All
Fire Information Update
Florence Fire
Friday, August 2, 2002 08:00 am
Fire Information Center: (541) 592-1029


Status: 164,000 acres Start: July 13, 2002 Cause: Lightning
Location: Five miles west of Selma, Ore., on the Siskiyou National Forest within the Kalmiopsis Wilderness.
Percent Contained: 5 Cost to date: $7.1 million Fire Line to Build: 61 miles
Structures Lost: 3 residences and 8 outbuildings
Personnel: 1,313 Injuries: None Expected Containment: Unknown
Today’s Resources: Eleven helicopters (four Type 1, five Type 2 and two Type 3), 35 handcrews (six Type 1 and 29 Type 2), 44 engines, 21 water tenders, 34 dozers. In addition, structural task forces from many Oregon cities and counties are providing fire protection to residences within the fire area and along Highway 199.
At Risk: Portions of Cave Junction, Kerby, Agness, Gardner Ranch and Selma, private residences in the Oak Flat area and McCaleb Ranch, private inholdings east of McCaleb Ranch, Late Successional Reserve, Illinois and Rogue National Wild and Scenic River, campgrounds.
Closures: Galice and Illinois Valley ranger districts on the Siskiyou National Forest west of State Highway 199 are closed to all public access due to extreme fire conditions. The Bear Camp road #2300 is exempt from this closure.
Cooperating Agencies: Oregon Department of Forestry; Oregon National Guard; Illinois Valley Fire District; Oregon State Police; Josephine County Sheriff’s Dept; American Red Cross; Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office; U.S. Forest Service; Bureau of Land Management; Josephine County Emergency Operations Center.
What’s New: Burnout operations between Selma and Kerby, west of Highway 199, are proceeding as planned and are going well. The fire is highly visible at night from these communities and from the highway. Heavy smoke and some flame will be seen in this area throughout the day and into the night. Structural protection engines are in place in Selma and Kerby during the burnout operations.

Telephone traffic, land line and cellular, in the Illinois Valley is exceptionally heavy, causing problems for fire managers who need to call out of the area. To relieve this problem, residents are asked to reduce the number of phone calls they make. Questions to the fire information center may be asked via e-mail. Send messages to pnwteam2@hotmail.com. Also, current information about the Florence Fire is posted on the World Wide Web at www.pnw-team2.com.

An additional information center is open at the Selmac Lake fire camp. News reporters and photographers interested in visiting the camp are asked to check in at the front gate for parking instructions, then are asked to visit the fire information tent. An incident information officer will escort media representatives on tours of the camp, and will arrange interviews.

A new incident management team is setting up today to take control of the west side of the Florence Fire. This team is based in Gold Beach.

Fire danger remains extreme, and area residents are asked to be extra careful with fire.

There will be a second public meeting Saturday, 7:00 p.m., at the Illinois Valley High School in Cave Junction.

The entire Illinois River Valley remains under a 30-minute evacuation notice. The communities of Agness, Gold Beach, and Brookings are not currently at imminent risk.

The American Red Cross shelter is located in Grants Pass at the South Middle School (541-890-0612). Residents who have voluntarily left their homes are asked to call or check in at the shelter; this will help shelter staff locate these people if necessary.

Pacific Northwest National Incident Management Team 2
Mike Lohrey, Incident Commander

37 posted on 08/02/2002 11:57:18 AM PDT by Granof8
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To: Grampa Dave; All
Fire Information Update
Florence Fire
Friday, August 2, 2002 08:00 am
Fire Information Center: (541) 592-1029


Status: 164,000 acres Start: July 13, 2002 Cause: Lightning
Location: Five miles west of Selma, Ore., on the Siskiyou National Forest within the Kalmiopsis Wilderness.
Percent Contained: 5 Cost to date: $7.1 million Fire Line to Build: 61 miles
Structures Lost: 3 residences and 8 outbuildings
Personnel: 1,313 Injuries: None Expected Containment: Unknown
Today’s Resources: Eleven helicopters (four Type 1, five Type 2 and two Type 3), 35 handcrews (six Type 1 and 29 Type 2), 44 engines, 21 water tenders, 34 dozers. In addition, structural task forces from many Oregon cities and counties are providing fire protection to residences within the fire area and along Highway 199.
At Risk: Portions of Cave Junction, Kerby, Agness, Gardner Ranch and Selma, private residences in the Oak Flat area and McCaleb Ranch, private inholdings east of McCaleb Ranch, Late Successional Reserve, Illinois and Rogue National Wild and Scenic River, campgrounds.
Closures: Galice and Illinois Valley ranger districts on the Siskiyou National Forest west of State Highway 199 are closed to all public access due to extreme fire conditions. The Bear Camp road #2300 is exempt from this closure.
Cooperating Agencies: Oregon Department of Forestry; Oregon National Guard; Illinois Valley Fire District; Oregon State Police; Josephine County Sheriff’s Dept; American Red Cross; Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office; U.S. Forest Service; Bureau of Land Management; Josephine County Emergency Operations Center.
What’s New: Burnout operations between Selma and Kerby, west of Highway 199, are proceeding as planned and are going well. The fire is highly visible at night from these communities and from the highway. Heavy smoke and some flame will be seen in this area throughout the day and into the night. Structural protection engines are in place in Selma and Kerby during the burnout operations.

Telephone traffic, land line and cellular, in the Illinois Valley is exceptionally heavy, causing problems for fire managers who need to call out of the area. To relieve this problem, residents are asked to reduce the number of phone calls they make. Questions to the fire information center may be asked via e-mail. Send messages to pnwteam2@hotmail.com. Also, current information about the Florence Fire is posted on the World Wide Web at www.pnw-team2.com.

An additional information center is open at the Selmac Lake fire camp. News reporters and photographers interested in visiting the camp are asked to check in at the front gate for parking instructions, then are asked to visit the fire information tent. An incident information officer will escort media representatives on tours of the camp, and will arrange interviews.

A new incident management team is setting up today to take control of the west side of the Florence Fire. This team is based in Gold Beach.

Fire danger remains extreme, and area residents are asked to be extra careful with fire.

There will be a second public meeting Saturday, 7:00 p.m., at the Illinois Valley High School in Cave Junction.

The entire Illinois River Valley remains under a 30-minute evacuation notice. The communities of Agness, Gold Beach, and Brookings are not currently at imminent risk.

The American Red Cross shelter is located in Grants Pass at the South Middle School (541-890-0612). Residents who have voluntarily left their homes are asked to call or check in at the shelter; this will help shelter staff locate these people if necessary.

Pacific Northwest National Incident Management Team 2
Mike Lohrey, Incident Commander

38 posted on 08/02/2002 11:57:30 AM PDT by Granof8
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To: All; madfly; brityank; farmfriend; WaterDragon; Ernest_at_the_Beach; backhoe; *Enviralists
I just got a heads up on this great thread/oped:(Daschle's Green Lobby and WorldCom Executives Belong in the Same Jail Cell )

So I had to link it before I went out to soak ugly hand tied fishing flies. This very timely and dynamite: :(Daschle's Green Lobby and WorldCom Executives Belong in the Same Jail Cell )

39 posted on 08/02/2002 12:04:24 PM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
BTTT
40 posted on 08/02/2002 12:49:08 PM PDT by hattend
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To: Grampa Dave
Thanks for posting link to Stossel thread and your help on it. :)
41 posted on 08/02/2002 12:59:10 PM PDT by madfly
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To: Grampa Dave
August 2, 2002

Crews light fires to fight fires
By BILL BISHOP
The Register-Guard

CAVE JUNCTION - Fears about having to evacuate thousands of people from the Illinois River Valley calmed along with the winds Thursday, and firefighters were able to widen fire lines protecting the community of Selma from the 164,000-acre Florence fire.

More calm winds and cool, moist air are predicted for the weekend, with rain possible Monday. Despite the favorable forecast, the Florence fire will burn for months, a fire official said Thursday.

Smoke rises to about 12,000 feet Thursday west of Selma.
Firefighters were able to widen fire lines, protecting the community from the 164,000-acre Florence fire.

"Obviously, we'll continue to have fire within the established containment lines until we have significant rain in the fall," fire information officer Mike Ferris said.

Bulldozers had carved lines linking a twisting network of logging roads into the primary line of defense Tuesday, but firefighters had to wait until late Wednesday night for the wind to shift so the fires they ignited would not spread toward town.

``Ma Nature does it on her own schedule,'' said Erik Christiansen, fire behavior analyst on the Florence fire, as he watched the burnout from a pickup truck. ``We can predict it, but she's still in control.''

Burnouts are fires that are lit between a wildfire and a bulldozed containment line to eliminate fuel for the advancing wildfire. Firefighters completed about five miles of burnouts overnight Wednesday.

Ferris saw the results at first light Thursday. "It was doing exactly what we planned it to do," he said. "It was actually pretty."

By the weekend, three separate firefighting operation centers will be working to surround and contain the Florence fire and the Sour Biscuit fire, which extends into Northern California from about two miles south of the Florence blaze.

Scott Hall, a firefighter from Prospect, works on an oak that was blocking a road west of Selma on Thursday.

Fire officials expect that the two fires, both started by lightning during a July 13 storm, eventually will join. However, they don't expect that to cause any significant new control problems.

The present Cave Junction-based operation will continue working on the critical east and north sections of the fire while new operations centers will be established in California for the southern end, and probably at Gold Beach to contain the western flank, Ferris said.

Less than 5 percent of the Florence fire was reported contained as of Thursday night. More than 1,300 firefighters are currently working the fire, which to date has cost more than $6 million to fight. And additional manpower and machinery poured into the valley Thursday.

If the favorable weather continues, officials said crews may be able to finish their burnouts by Sunday. That would widen the 35-mile-long bulldozed fire line protecting the populated area east of the fire.

When that critical work is done, residents of Selma, Cave Junction, Kerby and O'Brien will literally be able to breathe easier while crews work to contain both the Florence and the Sour Biscuit fires, Ferris said.

"It (containment) goes pretty fast once you get it going," Ferris said. Mop-up operations, where crews work by hand to extinguish smoldering fires within containment lines and monitor the fire for new flareups, will likely continue for several weeks, he said.

With the threat diminishing, most local residents are staying rather than heeding fire commanders' advice to evacuate. The Red Cross reported Thursday that only 950 people had registered as having left their homes since Sunday.

``I certainly feel better today,'' Illinois Valley Fire Chief Kyle Kirchner told a community meeting on the football field of Illinois Valley High School. ``We are close to turning that corner to relief.''

At the edge of a bulldozed fire line north of Eight Mile Mountain on Thursday, Dave Huber of Eugene waited for a burnout to round a nearby hill and descend to the line under his fire engine, where Huber and his co-workers were assigned to stop it.

Over the past two days - after initial public alarm over an evacuation notice that gave 17,000 residents 30 minutes to clear out if the fire reached the populated parts of the valley - Huber said he had noticed a change among local residents.

"They're starting to calm down now. They're finally starting to realize what we're doing is preventing that (evacuation) from happening," he said. "You always have to think about the worst-case scenario."

Local residents certainly had a lot to think about, he added.

Huber said he was surprised by how fast the fire moved through tinder-dry manzanita brush that hugs the trunks of Ponderosa and Sugar pines on the southern slopes in the area, and the tall, dense stands of fir that carpet the north slopes.

He said he watched as individual trees turned to torches, shooting brief but dramatic flames 200 or more feet into the air.

Local residents in lawn chairs lined Highway 199 at nightfall to watch the fireworks from a distance, he said.

The smoke column earlier this week rose to 20,000 feet as the fire raced toward the Illinois Valley communities, Huber said, adding, "It's done some things that were pretty amazing." Yet, with concerted effort, firefighters were able to orchestrate equally amazing counterattacks, said Huber's co-worker, Bob Mortensen, who was working his 13th day Thursday on the Florence Fire.

Last week, for example, Mortensen was with more than 80 other firefighters who worked 18 miles up the Illinois River Trail Road to prepare 10 isolated residences deep in the forest to survive the fire's path.

As fire approached through tall trees, it roared so loud firefighters had to yell to be heard even when standing next to one another, Mortensen said, adding that the fire was so hot they could feel it a half-mile away.

As it closed in on one residence, a fire boss from Arizona stayed behind with a pistol-like device that fired mini-flares.

When the fire began sucking air toward itself, the fire boss fired the device into nearby underbrush to create a back burn - a fire that burns back toward a fire, eliminating fuel and stopping the fire's advance.

"The wind was blowing it this way, but it was pulling air the other way, creating its own weather," Mortensen said.

The tactic worked and the fire burned around the residence, sparing it.

"Initially, we saved all of them," Mortensen said. "Then the fire whipped around on us and we lost a couple. We felt bad about that.

"But we saved most of them. You feel good about that."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

To see the pics, click here:
http://www.registerguard.com/cgi-bin/printStory.py?name=1a.illinoisfire.0802&date=20020802


42 posted on 08/02/2002 1:25:13 PM PDT by blackie
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To: madfly
Thanks for the ping madfly...sounds like some good news for the folks out there that live under the thumb of environazis.

FMCDH

43 posted on 08/02/2002 1:34:09 PM PDT by nothingnew
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To: Grampa Dave
Updated summary.

Fire Information Summary

Oregon Fire Information

Unit Fire Name Agency Location

Acres

Crw-1

Crw-2

Engs.

Hel-1

Hel-2

Hel-3

Team

People

Injuries

% Contained

Cause Remarks

OR-MAF

Flagtail-Malheur Complex

USFS

8 to 25 miles from Prairie City, OR 26,400 1 46 64 3 3 2 Type 1 1,367   80% Lightning Observed multi-tree torching and many spot fires outside the line on the south end of the fire. Due to limited available fuels, spot growth was minimal.  (1800, 7/31)

OR-UPF

Tiller Complex

USFS

Tiller R.D. 26,850   31 48 1 1 1 Type 2 1,051   25% Lightning Light morning inversion lifted over the complex before noon, fire spread is anticipated to increase around 1430. Anticipated fire growth will continue on all staffed and unstaffed fires

Road closures still in effect for the South Umpqua Road starting at mile marker 6 east of Tiller. (1800, 7/31)

OR-MAF Monument USFS

9 miles SW of Unity, OR

24,378 1 27 21 3 1 2 Type 1 1,054   80% Lightning

Interior continues to burnout. Rehabilitation of existing hand and dozer line is ongoing. Patrolling all divisions.(1800, 7/31)

OR-FRF Tool Box Complex USFS 10 miles S of Silver Lake, OR 86,794 4 40 106 2 4 1 Type 1 1,768   75% Lightning Fire activity was restricted to individual torching of trees within fire perimeter and burnout of fuel islands within the fire perimeter. Night time recoveries will help slow fire activity. Torching and spotting may be expected until inversion layer sets in around midnight. (1700, 7/31)
OR-ORS97 Winter ODF 10 miles NW of Paisley, OR 35,779   40 43 1 2 1 ODF 814   100% Lightning The fire is quiet, but IR shows concentrations of heat that will be mopped up. Mopping up hot spots. Patrolling and extinguishing spot fires inside the lines.  (1700, 7/31)

OR-SIF

Florence USFS 26 miles west of Grants Pass, 17 miles southwest of Cave Junction 150,000 9 30 46 5 6 2 Type 1

Type 1

Type 2

1,546   5% Lightning

High to very high fire behavior intensities, with some convection columns and group tree torching. Mostly a backing fire today. Continueing to develop strategy in response to further fire spread, prepare indirect line, planning for structure protection, burn out, hold.

The entire Illinois River Valley is under a 24- or 48-hour evacuation advisory. .(1800, 7/31)

OR-SIF

Sour Biscuit USFS 17 Miles SW of Cave Junction 33,287   13 10   6   Type 1

Type 2

436   0% Lightning The fire continued creeping in all directions. Torching, spotting, and moderate runs also occurred. Coordinated agency planning efforts continued, including emphasis on contingency structure protection. (1800, 7/30)
  OR-UPF North Umpqua Complex USFS 25 Miles east of Glide near town of Dry Creek 1,749 2 13 12 1 2 1 Type 2 537   80% Lightning Fire activity in Limpy and Johnson Butte Fire was limited to burning in interior islands of fuels. Little or no fire activity in Calf 2 and Horse Prarie Fire.  (1700, 7/31)
OR-OCF 747 USFS 12 miles south of Dayville 16,856   18 19 1   1 Type 1 519   90% Lightning Smoldering and creeping behavior was observed over portions of the fire area once again today. Continue with mop up and rehabilitation activities. Transition to a Type 3 organization is scheduled for 1800 hours tomorrow, 8/1. (1800, 7/31)
OR-DEF Cache Mtn. USFS 15 miles NW of Sisters, OR 4200 2 32 54 1 1   Type2 1,179   95% Lightning Some torching in isolated areas inside the control line. Low RH did not cause spotting problems. Significant mop up progress made in all divisions. This effort was supported by helicopters. The Structure Protection Group was staged to respond to any spots outside the dozer line or across Highway 20. The area adjacent to the fire was gridded to locate and extinguish any spot fires, none were found.

Residents were allowed back into Black Butte Ranch Subdivision. (1800, 7/31)

OR-WNF Skunk USFS N of Sprague River 2,544 2 7 17     2 Type2 357   100% Lightning

Observed fire behavior was creeping and smoldering. Continue with extensive mop up on the fire perimeter to meet the objective of being mopped in at least 600 feet prior to transition to the Type3 organization. Continue with suppression rehabilitation and equipment removal from the fire perimeter. (1800, 7/31)

OR-ORS Sheldon Ridge State 7 miles S of Moser 12,761   18 24 2 4 2 ODF 558   100% Lightning More active burning today due to lower humidities and wind exposure. Continued progress today in securing lines and starting mop up.

Conflagration Declaration ended at 1200 today.(1800, 7/31)

OR-ORS Timbered Rock State 15 miles N of Shady Cove 16,925   45 34 8 3 2 ODF 1,145   20% Lightning Active fire behavior began in late afternoon after inversion lifted. Major burnout planned for tonight.

Evacuation of Elk Creek and Sugarpine area are still in place due to potential fire activity. (1800, 7/31)

OR-WIF Lucky USFS 6 miles S of Detroit, OR 87   4     1   Type 2 168   70% Lightning Moderate fire spread with occasional torching. Line construction continues at a good pace. Primary control problems are steep terrain and difficult access. Fire located in area with 100 to 200 foot cliffs on E and SE fire flanks. (1600, 7/31)
Oregon Totals       438,610 21 364 498 28 34 17   12,505        

Washington Fires

Unit Fire Name Agency Location

Acres

Crw-1

Crw-2

Engs.

Hel-1

Hel-2

Hel-3

Team

People

Injuries

%     Contained

Cause Remarks
WA-WEF Deer Point USFS 27 miles N of Chelan 37,588 8 20 38 4 2 2 Type 1 884   55%

Unattended Camp Fire

Fire behavior consisted of high intensity surface fire with torching in small trees and short range spotting. Fire will continue to make upslope runs and spot as it runs to Cooper Ridge and Parrish Peak. Interior islands and fingers will continue to burn out and spread until contingency lines are burned out. (1800, 7/31)

Washington Totals       37,588 8 20 38 4 2 2   1,045        
2-State totals       476,198 29 384 536 32 36 19   13,550        
                                 

This site last updated:    08/02/02 02:25 PM  (NOTE: not every fire is updated each time the site is updated, but only as new information is received. Call the Information Desk with questions.)  This website is provided as assistance to media outlets requiring statistical information related to the wildland fires in the states of Oregon and Washington.  Active fire behavior, especially during period of increased wind conditions will cause increase burned acreage that may not reflect accurately " on the ground situation".  Please note that the data and situation reports are based on formal incident summaries and situations reported locally may not yet be included or has not been validated for this summary.  Evacuation questions should be directed to state or local Emergency Operation Centers (EOC) for verification. It is advised that media consult the data provided and then call the Information Desk for more specific, detailed information on the fire situation, It will be periodically updated by the Public Information staff at NWCC.  Specific information may be gained through calling the NWCC Information Desk at (503) 808-2764.


44 posted on 08/02/2002 2:51:13 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: blackie
Thanks, a rather dramatic picture as the smoke rises to 12,000 feet high.


45 posted on 08/02/2002 3:05:33 PM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Salvation
Thanks for the update. They don't seem to do as well on the weekend with their updates.

46 posted on 08/02/2002 3:08:21 PM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: EBUCK; AuntB; madfly; farmfriend; Archie Bunker on steroids; cake_crumb; Salvation; *Enviralists
Lars Larson on the air right now re the Floristry Service and their Clintoonian Pink Panty rules on the helicopter service trying to put out the fires faster. Here are some quotes as I listen:

The GD enviralists in and out of the forestry service are keeping the helicopter pilots from doing their job effectively.

Home owners have had static about using a bull dozer to knock down trees and cross over a 12 inch stream.

The GD Clintoon Pink Panty Maggots in the Florist Service playing foresters are dangerous and expensive.

He has Greg Walden on the air with him.

The state of Oregon Forestry people have made the job easier for the helicopter pilots where as the Pink Panty Maggots in the Federal Florist Service. These maggots delayed the fire fighting for two days because a Federal Forester Helio manager was not available.

One manager per helicopter with Feds. The State of Oregon has one experienced helio manager running 15 helocopters.

Maybe we should just fire and chase away every federal florist service person pretending to a forester. There is no salvaging these Druid Clymers.

Every Florist with a phoney degree in Forestry in the last 12 years, should be fired on the spot and forced to walk home.
47 posted on 08/02/2002 3:24:55 PM PDT by Grampa Dave
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To: Grampa Dave
I've heard it called the Forest Circus and the greenies Forest Circus pisswillies. Perhaps it should be the Florist Circus? Caught the tail end of something on KURY radio this morning indicating the California Dept. of Forestry could have had one of the fires out the first day but couldn't get permission from the FS. Didn't hear if it was opinion or fact. Costs running at over $7 million as of this morning on the Florence fire alone.
48 posted on 08/02/2002 4:41:39 PM PDT by Granof8
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To: Grampa Dave
The smoke in Grants Pass is not bad today. The temperature is down, I think that will help slow the fires a bit. Here are some pictures I took last night from Grants Pass, and today of the Florence fire along the I 99 from the Selma to Kerby areas.

Flames visible from Grants Pass the evening of 8-1-02

8/01/02 sunset in Grants Pass. The smoke made great colors.

Back burn at Selma OR.

Back burning between Selma & Kerby

Hummingbird sitting on a flower in Kerby with the burn in the background

The Selma Post Office where the Babbit protest was held. The back burn fire is approx 1 mile (maybe a bit more)behind the town.

I99 sign that says "get US out of the U.N." with fire in the background...

Selma gas station

49 posted on 08/02/2002 7:05:40 PM PDT by wanderin
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To: Grampa Dave
Radio news out of Euraka at 5PM said the Shelly fire was 95% contained this evening. The weather is turning favorable for a few days. I would think that would mean hiway 199 may open soon.

The KAEF ABC affiliate out of Redding Cal has good fire coverage. I haven't checked their web site for updates.
50 posted on 08/02/2002 7:47:42 PM PDT by tubebender
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