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Grim Discovery Near U.S. Air Base (Police-Missing UK girls believed found dead)
UK Guardian ^ | August 18, 2002 | Paul Harris

Posted on 08/18/2002 10:03:51 AM PDT by cabral

Police believe the two bodies found yesterday in a Suffolk field are those of missing 10 year old Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman.

The find came hours after detectives arrested school caretaker Ian Huntley 28, on suspicion of abduction and murder. Huntley's girlfriend Maxine Carr, 25 was arrested on suspicion of murder.

The bodies were discovered at around 1 PM (London Time) by three people out walking near the village of Mildenhall and RAF Lakenheath, which is used by the United States Air Force.

The site lies close to the A1065 road to Swaffham, around 10 miles east of the girls home village of Soham in Cambridgeshire. The girls have been missing since 4 August when they vanished after a barbeque.

(Excerpt) Read more at observer.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Breaking News; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: holly; jessica; murder; schoolcaretaker
A nation mourns as we have been doing lately..
1 posted on 08/18/2002 10:03:51 AM PDT by cabral
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To: cabral
And now, the UK newspapers will try to pin this on an American!

Of course, only an American is capable of this! (sarcasm)

2 posted on 08/18/2002 10:11:27 AM PDT by Tom Pain
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To: Tom Pain
Well, they seem to mention in the article that it was a school caretaker, but the insinuation in the article title caught my attention before I opened it...

Maybe I'm just too cynical when it comes to the media...

3 posted on 08/18/2002 10:14:59 AM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: Chad Fairbanks
And the woman in custody was girls teaching assistant for the previous year in school.
4 posted on 08/18/2002 10:16:10 AM PDT by cabral
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To: Tom Pain
You got that right. . .the Guardian is a rag.

"Holly and Jessica: two bodies found in woods
· Two held on suspicion of murder
· Grim discovery near US air base"

If all you have is the headline (above) then you would link/infer American involvement.
5 posted on 08/18/2002 10:18:44 AM PDT by Gunrunner2
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To: cabral
Sick people... people who do this stuff are not fit to breathe our air...
6 posted on 08/18/2002 10:28:48 AM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: Gunrunner2
If all you have is the headline (above) then you would link/infer American involvement.

Bingo! When I saw the headline, my first thought (which makes me ashamed) was, "Oh crap! This is worse than Okinawa..."

7 posted on 08/18/2002 10:30:22 AM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: cabral
Shouldnt the articles title read:

"Grim Discovery Near village of Mildenhall"

???

8 posted on 08/18/2002 10:35:30 AM PDT by VaBthang4
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To: VaBthang4
And it's not even a U.S. Airbase - it's an RAF base that they let us use portions of...
9 posted on 08/18/2002 10:37:56 AM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: VaBthang4
And the article doesn't say how close the scene was discovered to the USAF base. From reading the article it could be on the border, but wouldn't military investigators be called in with Scotland Yard?
10 posted on 08/18/2002 10:44:37 AM PDT by cabral
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To: Chad Fairbanks
Well, they seem to mention in the article that it was a school caretaker, but the insinuation in the article title caught my attention before I opened it...

This is so crass, to use the tragic death of two young girls, to take a swipe at the U.S.

11 posted on 08/18/2002 10:49:00 AM PDT by Selara
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To: Selara
I've visited England several times, and I really enjoyed it... unlike the treatment I received in France (where my Quebecois French didn't go over well), I was treated well... I really can't believe that the media there is representative of the average Brit... we have some lobsterbacks (just kidding, guys) here on FR that are pretty decent sorts, after all... :0)
12 posted on 08/18/2002 11:02:17 AM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: cabral
I've been to both RAF lakenheath and Mildenhall numerous times. They both share a common series of runways, Lakenheath on one side and Mildenhall on another. Lakenheath has F-15's, the big BX and Commisary and the hospital. Mildenhall has a Special Ops Group, KC-135's and KC-10s, and other cargo aircraft. Swaffam to Lakenheath is not close at all: About 10-15 miles apart.
13 posted on 08/18/2002 11:20:43 AM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: Chad Fairbanks
It is impossible to be too cynical about the media.
14 posted on 08/18/2002 11:30:24 AM PDT by Fracas
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To: Fracas
:0)
15 posted on 08/18/2002 11:32:09 AM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: Selara
This is not a swipe at the US - and I'm no friend of the Guardian.

All Air Force Bases in the UK are known as "RAF whatever" as they are owned by the UK government. Mildenhall and Lakenheath are used solely (apart from very rare visits by the RAF) by the USAF. They are universally known in the UK as US bases. The USAF has a huge airshow at Mildenhall each year.

The two bases are by far the largest economic activities in the local area and anything - good or bad - would be referred as happening "near the US base."

16 posted on 08/18/2002 11:47:13 AM PDT by Haymarket
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To: cabral
We can only pray that no evil firearm was involved.

If it was just a good old clubbing or strangling or knifing, the murderers will be "rehabilitated" and released in a decade or two.

If they used an evil gun, they will get double life sentences.

17 posted on 08/18/2002 11:51:48 AM PDT by Travis McGee
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To: Haymarket
OK, but the headline did give the impression of linking the US base to the two dead children. Thanks.
18 posted on 08/18/2002 12:03:13 PM PDT by Selara
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To: Chad Fairbanks
I've visited England several times, and I really enjoyed it... unlike the treatment I received in France (where my Quebecois French didn't go over well), I was treated well...

Thanks. Glad to hear you were treated in a friendly manner in the UK. My niece has a life long friend, that went to France to study for an extended period. He is an active, practicing Christian, is from Louisiana, and is not afraid to share his opinions...heheheh. He has visited us twice since his return, and he said he was often ridiculed. He was called redneck because he was from the south. He was called stupid because he was a Christian. He told us that he voted "reluctantly" for George W. Bush in the last election, but in the next election, he will vote for George W. Bush wholeheartedly. So, the ridicule, seems to just have solidified his beliefs.

19 posted on 08/18/2002 12:10:15 PM PDT by Selara
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To: Haymarket
>>This is not a swipe at the US - and I'm no friend of the Guardian.<<

It was not a direct swipe, but a backhanded slap.

The Guardian should have made no reference to the US air bases, period, and for them to do so is gratuitous and unfair, as the US bases have nothing to do with the murders. The Guardian, again, is showing their unreasonable bias and calls into question the honesty of their reporting.

>>All Air Force Bases in the UK are known as "RAF whatever" as they are owned by the UK government. Mildenhall and Lakenheath are used solely (apart from very rare visits by the RAF) by the USAF.<<

That is true.

>>They are universally known in the UK as US bases.<<

And with regular gnashing of teeth over having armed American SP’s guarding our bases or traveling armed for short distances between bases.

>>The two bases are by far the largest economic activities in the local area and anything - good or bad - would be referred as happening "near the US base."<<

So, using that logic, if, say, a murder happened near the Ford Motor Company in Michigan, then the headlines should read, “Two bodies found in woods, Two held on suspicion of murder, Grim discovery near Ford Motor Company.” See the unfair association. That is the problem with the Guardian, they do this sort of thing knowingly and with intent. Other British media do not routinely engage in this sort of biased nonsense, there is no reason the Guardian should do so, unless they are advancing an anti-American agenda.

As far as being the largest economic activity in the area, one wishes the locals would appreciate that fact. When I was stationed at RAF Bentwaters/RAF Alconbury in the mid-to-late 80’s, the locals (and the local paper) always complained about American presence, with reports of crime and accidents all the time. But when the base was shut down and the local economy tanked, news reports were full of whining businessmen crying over their economic misfortune. These were the same businesses that took advantage of American servicemen by charging outrageous prices for everything, from rents to antiques to cars.

Out of the past 20-yrs, I lived 5-yrs in the UK (RAF Bentwaters, RAF Alconbury, RAF Bentley-Priory, RAF Waddington). During one assignment I lived in an RAF Officers Mess for two years while serving as an exchange officer “in” the RAF. In addition, I also spent a lot of time with the British Army and on-board the Royal Navy’s HMS Invincible.

As a result of my direct experience, I have tremendous respect for the UK military forces. They are as every bit as dedicated, skilled and professional as the American forces. Together the UK and US could civilize the world.

I always told my British friends the best thing the UK did was take over the world, the worst thing they did was give it up (America excepted, of course).
20 posted on 08/18/2002 12:48:00 PM PDT by Gunrunner2
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To: Gunrunner2
Actually, what I meant to say,

"So, using that logic, for every murder that happened in Detroit (home for the Ford Motor Company), then the headlines should read, “Two bodies found in woods, Two held on suspicion of murder, Grim discovery near Ford Motor Company.” See the unfair association. . .
21 posted on 08/18/2002 12:51:15 PM PDT by Gunrunner2
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To: Chad Fairbanks
http://www.lakenheath.af.mil/

http://www.mildenhall.af.mil/
22 posted on 08/18/2002 3:43:55 PM PDT by bok
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To: cabral
Murder On The Moors: The Ian Brady and Myra Hindley Story by Fiona Steel

Witness To Murder

Superintendent Talbot was to be leaving on a much-needed vacation on the morning that he received an unexpected call from Detective Inspector Wills.Wills had been reluctant to make the call, but this was important.

Sitting in the Inquiry room at Hyde Police Station, were 17-year-old David Smith, and his young wife. They had called the police early that morning with an incredible story. Talbot assured his wife that he would soon return and they would begin their two-week vacation as planned. What Superintendent Talbot did not know then was that he was about to become involved in one of Britain's most notorious criminal cases, The Moors Murders. The date was October 7, 1965.

When Talbot arrived at Hyde Police Station, he was shown into the Inquiry room where the distressed couple sat drinking tea. David Smith, with the help of his wife Maureen, proceeded to tell his story.

The previous night his sister-in-law, Myra Hindley, had visited the home where he lived with Maureen, his bride of little more than a year, and her mother. Myra had told him that she was afraid to walk home alone in the dark so he agreed to walk with her. When they arrived at Myra's home, at 16 Wardle Brook Avenue, Manchester, she asked him to come inside as her live-in boyfriend, Ian Brady, had some miniature bottles of wine for him. He agreed and after entering she left him standing in the kitchen with the wine.

As he read the label on one of the bottles, Smith heard a long, loud scream. Myra yelled to him from the living room. When he first entered the room, he saw Ian Brady holding what David initially thought was a life-size rag doll. As it fell against the couch, not more than two feet away from him, the realisation dawned upon him that it was a young man and not a doll at all. As the young man lay sprawled, face down on the floor, Ian stood over him, his legs apart, holding an axe in his right hand.

The young man groaned. Ian lifted the axe into the air, and brought it down upon the man's head. There was silence for a couple of seconds, and then the man groaned again, only it was much lower this time. Lifting the axe high above his head, Ian brought it down a second time. The man stopped groaning. The only sound he made was a gurgling noise.

Ian then placed a cover over the youth's head and wrapped a piece of electric wire around his neck. As he repeatedly pulled on the wire, Ian kept saying "You fucking dirty bastard," over and over again. When the man finally stopped making any noise, Ian looked up and said to Myra, "That's it, it's the messiest yet."

As Myra made them all a cup of tea, she and Brady joked about the look on the young man's face when Brady had struck him. They laughed as they told David about another occasion when a policeman had confronted Myra while they had been burying another of their victims on Saddleworth Moor. Ian had told David that he had killed some people before but David thought it was just a sick fantasy. This was real. He was horrified and scared for his own safety. He decided that the best thing he could do was to keep calm and go along with them. He helped them to clean up the mess, tie up the body and put it in the bedroom upstairs. It was not until the early hours of the morning that he had been able to escape, promising to return in the morning to help dispose of the body. Safely back at home, he was violently sick. He told Maureen everything and together they went to a public phone box to call the police.

Immediately upon hearing this bizarre story, Superintendent Talbot and Detective Sergeant Carr went over to 16 Wardle Brook Avenue. Two-dozen additional officers were called to the area, just in case. Any concerns that there may be a confrontation were quickly put to rest. Myra reluctantly gave him a key to the upstairs bedroom, the only room in the house that was locked, where the body of a young man was found wrapped in a grey blanket. The axe described by Smith as the murder weapon was found in the same room.

Ian Brady was arrested immediately. At the police station, Brady told police that there had been an argument between himself, David Smith and the victim, 17-year-old Edward Evans. A fight had ensued which soon got out of control. Smith had hit Evans and kicked him several times. There had been a hatchet on the floor, which Brady said he had used to hit Evans. According to Brady, he and Smith alone had tied up the body. Myra had nothing to do with Evans's death.

When Myra was questioned, she supported Brady's story, describing how she had been horrified and frightened by the ordeal. She was not arrested until four days later, after police had found a three-page document in her car that described in explicit detail how she and Brady had planned to carry out the murder.

The investigation would probably have gone no further if Smith had not told police of Brady's claim that he had buried other bodies on Saddleworth Moor. Other references to the same area confirmed Smith's story. A twelve-year-old girl, Pat Hodge, told police that she had often gone with Hindley and Brady up to the moors on picnics, and numerous photos of the moors were found in their home.

Once the area where Brady and Hindley frequented was pinpointed, the digging began. Police believed that the bodies of four children who had mysteriously disappeared over the past two years might have been buried in the moors. They were proved right on 10 October 1965 when the body of 10-year-old Lesley Anne Downey was found. Lesley had disappeared without a trace on 26 December 1964. Eleven days after the first discovery, the body of 12-year-old John Kilbride was found. John had disappeared without a trace, on November 11, 1963.

In 1965, a case such as this was unique. It was the first time in British history that a woman had been involved in a killing partnership that had involved the serial sex murders of children. The public could not comprehend how any woman could take part in such a horrific crime; her involvement made the crimes seem even more evil and unforgivable.

Update of the Myra Hindley Story by Patrick Bellamy

Campaign for freedom

In 1997, 31 years after she was convicted and sentenced to life in prison, Myra Hindley began a campaign for her early release. A news story, featured in BBC’s Online Crime Archive, detailed how Hindley believes she has “atoned” for her crimes and should be released from prison.

A month earlier, Sir Frederick Lawton, a former Appeals Court judge, had said the Home Secretary Jack Straw was wrong in his decision that Hindley should never be released as he did not take into consideration the parole board's view that Hindley had “confronted her offending behavior and was no longer a risk to the public.”

Her original sentence, set in 1985 by the British Home Office, was for 30 years, which meant she would have been due for release in 1996.

However in 1990, the then Conservative Home Secretary, David Waddington, decreed, "Life should mean life," meaning Hindley would die in prison. ,p.In 1994, Waddington’s decision was confirmed by the then Home Secretary, Michael Howard, and again when Jack Straw took office after Labor’s election victory in May 1997.

Lawton also said he believed that if the decision had been left to the judges, justice would have been done and Myra Hindley would be free, regardless of the outcry such a decision would have caused.

Based on these and other comments, Hindley's lawyers launched an appeal against the original ruling but on Thursday, December 18, 1997, the appeal was rejected.

Following the decision Hindley was placed on a “suicide watch” at Durham Prison.

Life Behind Bars

Although Hindley continues to fight for her release she is aware that her life would be far from normal outside of prison as relatives of her victims have vowed vengeance if she is ever released. She has gained a degree in humanities, spends most of her time reading and studying languages and, according to her prison counselor, “deeply regrets her involvement with Brady.”

Since “rediscovering” her faith in Catholicism during the 70’s, Hindley continues to express sorrow and remorse for her crimes. "I ask people to judge me as I am now and not as I was then," she has stated.

During her years in prison she has attracted a long list of supporters including Lord Longford, solicitor Andrew McCooey, the Reverend Peter Timms, and David Astor, a former editor of The Observer.

Regardless of their varying backgrounds they all believe that Hindley has served more than double the usual sentence for murder, has been on good behavior for the duration of that sentence and therefore is overdue for release. "She had shown no criminal tendencies until her involvement with Brady, and she has shown none since," David Astor has said.

Her lawyers have also argued that she has been assessed by psychiatrists, doctors, prison officials and chaplains who all agree she is no longer a threat to society. This, together with the guidelines set up under the parole system of the 1960’s means she has more than qualified for early release.

A public poll, conducted by BBC Radio 5Live, disagrees, with 66% of listeners voting that she should never be released, compared to 34% who believe that Hindley should have some chance for freedom. The mother of Keith Bennett, one of Hindley’s victims, agrees with the poll results: "The Government must listen to what the people are saying and never let her go."

Failing Health

On Friday, December 19, 1997, according to the {BBC Online} archive, Hindley was taken to Dryburn hospital in County Durham for undisclosed tests. During her stay in hospital she was kept in a single room under armed guard.

A month later she was moved to Highpoint medium security prison in Suffolk which has the reputation of being more like a holiday camp than a prison.

Hindley, who is classed as a category ‘A’ prisoner as she is considered to pose the greatest risk of escape, is normally subject to the most stringent security measures.

Her supporters saw the move to the lower security prison as a “breakthrough in her quest for release.”

In September 1999, Hindley was diagnosed as having angina, a direct result of years of heavy smoking. According to a report in the Sun newspaper, the doctor who examined her considered her heart condition as “advanced” and warned that it “could kill her at any time.”

The British Prison Service made no comment following the report, but a prison source confirmed that Hindley is a very heavy smoker. "She has been told on numerous occasions that if she's suffering from angina and smokes as heavily as she does, then she's bound to be putting herself at risk."

Hearing the news of Hindley’s failing health, Winnie Johnson, mother of victim Keith Bennett, called on Hindley to tell authorities where her son's body was buried “before it’s too late.” She added that she hoped Hindley suffered before she died.

On Friday, 7 January, 2000, after two further trips to hospital, Myra Hindley was scheduled for emergency surgery at a specialist brain center, to cure a cerebral aneurysm, a potentially fatal brain swelling.

Her condition was described as “serious” with doctors saying that, without treatment, it could prove fatal.

Three days later, Hindley asked doctors to “let her die” if the operation on her brain failed. The request came after she had asked her lawyers to draw up a will.

The surgery was later deemed a success but doctors continued to describe Hindley’s condition as “fragile.”

On Tuesday, 29 February 2000, BBC TV announced it would air a documentary that depicted Hindley saying she wished she had been hanged for her crimes. The documentary, titled Modern Times showed Hindley asking, "whether some crimes are so terrible that the people who commit them should die behind bars".

The program also features an actress reading from the hundreds of letters that Hindley sent to the show’s producer telling the story of her meeting and relationship with Ian Brady.

One letter states: "I knew I was a selfish coward but I could not bear the thought of being hanged, although over the years I wish I had been. It would have solved so many problems. The family of the victims would have derived some peace of mind and the tabloids would not have been able to manipulate them as they do to this day.

I would have made a total confession to the priest before I hanged and would not still be half crippled by the burden of guilt that will not go away. But I didn't hang."

In the letters Hindley also detailed how the strength of her love for Ian Brady had been part of the reason she allowed herself to be pushed into murder. She described him as having "such a powerful personality, such an overwhelming charisma. If he'd told me the moon was made of green cheese or that the sun rose in the west I would have believed him."

The victims' families objected to the program being screened describing it as "a disgrace and an insult". Alan West, father of Hindley victim Leslie Ann West, was interviewed and asked, "Why can't the families be spared the constant indignity of Hindley's continuous publicity seeking?"

Alex Holmes, BBC Executive producer, defended the programme, saying: "This film is not a platform for Hindley but an attempt to reach some understanding of the terrible crimes that happened. It's investigating whether life should mean life, an important and current debate that is going on.”

On Thursday, 30 March 2000, Hindley’s bid for freedom suffered a serious set back when an appeal to the House of Lords for her early release was defeated. A panel of five lords ruled that her life sentence "must mean life" in view of her "exceptionally wicked and uniquely evil" crimes. Commenting on the ruling Lord Steyn said, "Even in the sordid history of crimes against children the murders committed by Hindley, jointly with Ian Brady, were uniquely evil."

On hearing the decision, Hindley’s lawyers said they planned a further legal challenge in the European Court of Human Rights.

On Monday, 23 April, 2001, media outlets throughout the U.K. carried reports that Myra Hindley was suffering from advanced lung cancer and had only weeks to live. Prison officials later denied the claims.

23 posted on 08/18/2002 4:05:58 PM PDT by ijcr
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To: Tom Pain
Nah, I think they've got the perps already in custody. No one has attempted to say otherwise.

Don't look for trouble.

24 posted on 08/18/2002 5:00:34 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: Selara
What are you talking about? What swipe? Where? Point it out to me?

Tin-foil hat on a bit tight this P.M.?

25 posted on 08/18/2002 5:01:47 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: Selara
Well, does that mean that anytime something nefarious happens in "New England," we should infer a swipe at the "evil British"?
26 posted on 08/18/2002 5:03:18 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: Illbay
Selara is not the only one misled by the title of the article. Maybe we all expect the worst, maybe we expect to be misled by the press but Selara was not alone if you read the other posts.
27 posted on 08/18/2002 5:06:39 PM PDT by johniegrad
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To: ijcr
The public could not comprehend how any woman could take part in such a horrific crime; her involvement made the crimes seem even more evil and unforgivable.

The public has since become more familiar with that singular social malady known as "Feminism," however.

28 posted on 08/18/2002 5:11:47 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: Tom Pain; cabral; Chad Fairbanks; Selara; Travis McGee
Actual title: Holly and Jessica: two bodies found in woods

Perhaps you could’ve checked the actual article before you deemed this to be an anti-American piece?. It’s truly repulsive to see how you’ve turned this from the reprehensible murder of two innocent 10 year old girls, into an assumption that Americans will be blamed for their murder.

I can understand how sensitive you are about anti-Americanism, especially from the Guardian. But, to put your pride and feelings above the lives of these two girls indicates low moral standards. Now I am sorry if you find my assumptions about your morals an insult, but that’s the price to pay for your self-importance and self-indulgence.

If you have children who use the internet, now would be a good opportunity to reinforce the dangers.

29 posted on 08/18/2002 5:47:43 PM PDT by spitz
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To: Chad Fairbanks
"...but the insinuation in the article title caught my attention before I opened it..."

There is only one reason for the gratuitous use of "U.S. Airbase" in the headline.

And it is not to precisely identify the location for the reader's benefit.

One might complain. But this was, after all, The Guardian.

30 posted on 08/18/2002 6:18:59 PM PDT by okie01
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To: cabral
The bodies were discovered ... near RAF Lakenheath, which is used by the United States Air Force.

And the point of this is? Since the arrest was of an Englishman from and English school I know of no relevance other that an attempt to link death to the American military. Yellow journalism.

31 posted on 08/18/2002 6:19:07 PM PDT by pfflier
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To: pfflier
Is the Guardian that much of a rag that they use this horrible case to take shots at USAF?
32 posted on 08/18/2002 6:20:59 PM PDT by cabral
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To: Alas Babylon!
The happiest day of my life was at Mildenahll. I was 16 and we were leaving England for the land of the big BX.

My dad was stationed at High Wycombe, it was 1965. England was so run down by WII that it's standard of living was far below Germany. The air was unbreathable, the butcher had unrefrigerated meat hanging in the window, the Morris Minor was an Englishman's "pony car" and the sun shined about three days in three years.

33 posted on 08/18/2002 6:26:55 PM PDT by pfflier
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To: Illbay
When you are out shopping...and come across a newspaper vending machine...don't you ever glance at the headlines without being able to read the whole story?

Grim Discovery Near U.S Air Base. That is the headline. The subheadline would be Missing UK girls believed found dead.

When I first posted, it was to wonder why the term, "U.S Air Base" was put into the headline, when it was not necessary. Giving the amount of British negativity in the print, lately, I don't think it was an unreasonable question.

Another poster, kindly gave me an alternative view.

Well, does that mean that anytime something nefarious happens in "New England," we should infer a swipe at the "evil British"?

Well, I would not infer that, because I know where New England is.

34 posted on 08/18/2002 6:49:20 PM PDT by Selara
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To: spitz
I'm sorry to see that you equate love of country with low moral standards, self-importance and self-indulgence... From now on I will most certainly make an effort to clear my thoughts with you before posting, that way I can be assured of being 'moral'...
35 posted on 08/18/2002 7:56:02 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: Gunrunner2
If all you have is the headline (above) then you would link/infer American involvement.*

When I saw the headline that*s exactly what I thought. I*m sure they dumped the bodies next to the base, so it would look like someone in the military did it. I hope those are the killers in custody, and I hope they zap them. They don*t deserve to live.

36 posted on 08/18/2002 8:33:22 PM PDT by NRA2BFree
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To: Selara
Grim Discovery Near U.S Air Base. That is the headline. The subheadline would be Missing UK girls believed found dead.

If you saw it read "grim discovery near McDonald's on Fry Road," would you consider that a slap at McDonald's?

Or, if it read, "Bodies discovered near Random Air Base," would that be a slap at the Air Force? Would you take that as an insinuation that USAF personnel had something to do with it?

Also, please bear in mind that the entire U.K.--not to mention we in the U.S.--have been following this story, and all know that the likely perps have been apprehended, so that part isn't a mystery.

If you WANT to see this as nefarious, you are within your legal rights to do so. But it takes a very thin skin to interpret it the way you're doing.

37 posted on 08/18/2002 9:04:39 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: spitz
...an assumption that Americans will be blamed for their murder.

How can this be? The perps are in custody, and they are U.K. civilians. I think only folks who haven't been paying attention can possibly come up with this line.

38 posted on 08/18/2002 9:06:21 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: okie01
There is only one reason for the gratuitous use of "U.S. Airbase" in the headline.

Bullsh*t. You purposefully discount the OTHER reason: As a means of familiar location; i.e. "everyone knows" where this base is located.

Really, your imagination is working overtime. And the fact that ANYONE who has been following this story knows that the likely murderers are already in custody, have been for a few days, and they are British civilians, REALLY punches a hole in your conspiracy theory.

Loosen your hat-band, for the sake of your wife and loved ones.

39 posted on 08/18/2002 9:08:57 PM PDT by Illbay
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To: Chad Fairbanks
Love of country is a commendable attribute for anyone to have. Unfortunately the majority of posts indicate the paranoia of ‘everyone hates us’. So any foreign article (especially from the Guardian) that mentions the U.S. must have some hidden anti-American meaning.

I’m not condoning the sewer journalism that this rag employs, not at all. No matter what the source, this is about two murdered children, and the unspeakable ordeal and fear they must have endured, and what their families are going through. But, from the posts, I guess that isn’t worthy of any comment?.

40 posted on 08/18/2002 9:35:28 PM PDT by spitz
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To: Illbay
This whole post has lost its way, one suggestion it’s a Guardian set-up and the whole thing comes down like a straw house.
41 posted on 08/18/2002 9:49:00 PM PDT by spitz
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To: Illbay
"Bullsh*t. You purposefully discount the OTHER reason: As a means of familiar location; i.e. "everyone knows" where this base is located."

If so, then why did it not specify which U.S. airbase? There are more than one in the UK...

As you yourself suggest in another response:

"If you saw it read "grim discovery near McDonald's on Fry Road," would you consider that a slap at McDonald's?"

Of course not. The site is located accurately and specifically for the benefit of the reader.

The headline under discussion, however, did not specify "U.S. airbase near Mildenhall", so as to provide the same kind of specificity you cite.

It is The Guardian's headline writers who have their hats on too tight. The headline was either a.) intentional or b.) sloppy work. Neither commends them.

What the hell brings you to the defense of The Guardian, anyway? It's not like I'm impugning the UK or the British media. Or even British cuisine...

42 posted on 08/18/2002 9:57:50 PM PDT by okie01
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To: Illbay
If you WANT to see this as nefarious, you are within your legal rights to do so. But it takes a very thin skin to interpret it the way you're doing.

Peace...as I said another poster gave me the reasoning. I admit I have have become a bit dubious of Euro speech on the US. Forgive me, and I am glad this was not a swipe at the US.

43 posted on 08/18/2002 9:59:22 PM PDT by Selara
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To: spitz
While the loss of any child is tragic, I was merely posting the first thought I had about the article... maybe I'm cynical, maybe not, but if you will also notice, I mentioned that I was ashamed of what my first thought was upon seeing the headline...
44 posted on 08/18/2002 10:01:08 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks
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To: NRA2BFree
Not necessarily. According to one of the Sunday newspapers, the arrested guy was a very keen aviation enthusiast. The US base is very close to where he lives. In the UK, plane fans can hang around the outside of military bases with very little hassle. Some even have public viewing areas.

Is it not likely then that the area outside the base was the part of the countryside with which he was most familiar, knowing the roads and chances of discovery?

45 posted on 08/19/2002 2:08:12 AM PDT by Haymarket
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To: cabral
RAF Lakenheath is currently in: FPCON BRAVO
46 posted on 08/19/2002 2:15:11 AM PDT by ATOMIC_PUNK
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To: Chad Fairbanks
". . .but the insinuation in the article title caught my attention before I opened it..."

. . .the insinuation stands as it was intended regardless that an American was not involved.

So very Liberal media in it's slimy tactics. . .

47 posted on 08/19/2002 9:06:58 AM PDT by cricket
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To: Chad Fairbanks
I lived at RAK Lakenheath from '64-'67 while in Jr. High School. RAF Mildenhall and RAF Lakenheath are just about five miles apart. the village of Mildenhall at that time was just a village.
48 posted on 08/19/2002 10:20:06 AM PDT by connectthedots
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