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Membership Origins, Augusta National
The Story of the Augusta National Golf Club, 1976 Doubleday and Company ^ | 1976 | Clifford Roberts

Posted on 09/03/2002 7:55:42 PM PDT by groanup

"One of the early policy decisions was to take in as members only those who were acquainted with one or more members of our Organization Committee. In practice, this meant that Bob (Jones) and I were the ones who were active in the membership effort, nearly everyone who came being a friend of Bob's or mine, a circumstance which remained substantially true for the next twenty-five years. Fortunately, both Bob and I ahd rather large acquaintanceships for young men. Bob then being twenty-eight and I thirty-six years of age. Our contacts were located in a number of states. Bob's friendships were quite largely based on golfing associations, including the USGA, on whose Executive Committee he had served for three years. The majority of these committeemen occupied leadership positions in their home communities. My friends were largely business and banking people, many of whom liked to play golf. As the Augusta National grew in stature, Bob's and my acquaintanceship with golfers of desirable membership types continued to expand. That is why it is probably accurate to say that, during the first twenty-five years of the club's existence, practically all new members were already on a first-name basis with one or both of us.

At the start, the mechanics of taking in a new member involved the usual proposal by a member, plus endorsements by other members. It soon became apparent, however, that this procedure was not the right one for our club. Numbers of individuals asked members to sponsor applications for membership and, if they were not accepted, were unhappy ta a degree that made things unpleasant for all concerned. Every golfer in the country liked Bob Jones to an extent of almost considering themselves to be personal friends of "The Emperor." If such an admirer were turned down for membership in Bob's club, it was a tragedy, not just a disappointment. Accordingly, the club was obliged to adopt an "invitation only" policy with respect to new members.

(Excerpt) Read more at masters.org ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Extended News; US: Georgia
KEYWORDS: augustanational; burk; hootiejohnson; masters
Only those who have been there can understand. I once belonged to a very exclusive club simply because it was bought-out, improved and made exclusive while I reamained a member. Once the membership became privileged the entire tone of the club changed. Courtesy became rampant. Proper behavior became the norm. But, most importantly, the game became a ritual. You always knew that on the first tee you would be able to find a game with a gentleman who would prefer to see you make a good stroke than he win ten dollars on the hole. In this type of situation it is not neccesarily a woman's game. It is a battle of proper men who's real war is waged in the private arena Monday thru Friday. I have always been amazed at what the game will tell you about someone. On many occasions I have played the game with someone who would be very intimidating in the field of business only to find that they are weak-kneed on the links. I have been there and done it. It's true. Women don't always identify with this. God help me for the wrath I am about to receive.
1 posted on 09/03/2002 7:55:42 PM PDT by groanup
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To: groanup
The link is to the Masters web site. The book from which I gleaned the post is "The Story of Augusta National Golf Club" by Clifford Roberts (Doubleday 1976). Mr Roberts committed suicide many years ago while standing on one of Augusta's greens in the early morning.
2 posted on 09/03/2002 8:02:12 PM PDT by groanup
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To: groanup
BTTT I'd like some comments if it's ok with the moderators.
3 posted on 09/03/2002 8:09:37 PM PDT by groanup
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To: groanup
They have every right to be exclusionary and everyone else who is a United States citizen has a 1st Ammendment right to criticize them publically if he/she chooses.
4 posted on 09/03/2002 8:25:49 PM PDT by Lorianne
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To: Lorianne
They have every right to be exclusionary and everyone else who is a United States citizen has a 1st Ammendment right to criticize them publically if he/she chooses.

Absolutely!

Of course, I would not limit the 1st Amendment right to free speech to only citizens. ButI would limit the right to offer criticism to people who would not complain if the tables were turned and it was THEIR private organization that was being coerced.

5 posted on 09/03/2002 9:35:21 PM PDT by Frohickey
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To: groanup
Didn't someone commit suicide in the Butler Cabin?
6 posted on 09/03/2002 10:50:51 PM PDT by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: groanup
Hang in there Hootie, tell the feminazis to go to hell.
7 posted on 09/04/2002 1:44:03 AM PDT by Joe Boucher
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To: Lorianne
"They have every right to be exclusionary and everyone else who is a United States citizen has a 1st Ammendment right to criticize them publically if he/she chooses."

I don't know how this is provocative to the conversation. I think we all agree with your statement.

8 posted on 09/04/2002 4:16:50 PM PDT by groanup
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