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To: Hoplite
Oh! Give me a break! Do you expect us to believe that pile of camel dung?!? Everyone and his uncle knows that the Beaked Vicuna was a denizen of riparian environments, not coastal environments. The Beaked Vicuna and Alces Aquatica never crossed paths.

And as for the Tamil Tigers, their greatest fear is of the Sea Cheese, which, as I mentioned previously, is a myth.

30 posted on 10/22/2002 8:59:59 AM PDT by Redcloak
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To: Redcloak
Of course they never crossed paths - Alces is derived from the Indo-European word for "Also", as in, "when you see the intrepid Llama (Blessed be thy name!), you will soon also see the lowly Moose", bereft as it is of any higher instinct save to follow it's better around the globe (and ruin the neighborhood - it cannot be denied).

I ask you:

Does the base tail ever cross paths with the seat of intellect, the head?
Of course not.

Has Sri Lanka, centuries after the property depreciating Moose was finally driven off, regained it's former desirability from the heydey of the visiting Llama?
Of course not.

Simple logic confounds your position (Llama be praised!). Thank goodness the Andean gentrification project's long term viability was protected from your ever encroaching sub-ruminant (the dark shame of the family Cervidae) by the shark infested waters of the Panama moat - and since the vache trebouchets no longer have to drive off mossy-antlered interlopers, the bounty of the Pampas drives the economic heart of South America - truly a shining example of what freedom from the threat of the Moose can bring.

What more is there to say of a lowly beast that lacks the refinement of even a distinct plural form?

31 posted on 10/22/2002 11:51:37 AM PDT by Hoplite
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