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The Miracle At Lepanto...
unknown ^ | October 24, 1998 | unknown

Posted on 11/26/2002 6:25:02 PM PST by Sparta

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Almost from the very beginning of Islam, there were wars upon wars between Christians and Moslems. We remember the Crusade wars, seven major and several minor, which lasted for centuries. This is the story of the Battle of Lepanto, which marked the end of the Crusades and was a turning point in the history of Christianity.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Charles Martel's victory at Poitiers definitely stopped the Moslem invasion of western Europe. In the east Christians held firm against attacks of the Moslems until 1453. In that year, Mohammed II threw huge assaults against Constantinople and by the evening of May 29 the Byzantine capital fell. By 1571 the Moslems were firmly installed in Europe. Their ships ruled the Mediterranean Sea from the Strait of Bosporus to the Strait of Gibraltar and constantly preyed on Christian vessels unless they flew the French flag.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Pope Pius V, in the last year of his papacy in 1571, tried to rally the nations of Europe to join in a Holy League to stop and roll back the Moslem enemy which threatened the entire continent. Spain, whose King Philip II was also King of Austria, responded favorably. The Moslems were then engaged in the conquest of Cyprus, an island belonging to the Republic of Venice. Leading Venetian officials would have preferred to have worked out some peaceful-coexistence agreement with the Sultan, but under the crusading influence of Saint Pius V, they decided to join the Holy League along with the republics of Genoa and Lucca and the dukes of Savory, Parma, Ferrara and Urbino.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Papal fleet was of course part of the Holy Alliance. Pius V asked Philip to appoint Don John of Austria, the 25-year old son of Emperor Charles V, as commander-in-chief of a planned expedition against the Moslems. After receiving the banner of the Holy League from the Pope, through Cardinal Granvalla, Don John's fleet set sail from Genoa for Naples on June 26, 1571. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Few historians mention that just before the departure, Philip II presented Don John with a picture of Our Lady of Guadalupe which she had caused to be miraculously imprinted on the cloak of the Indian peasant Juan Diego in Mexico 40 years before. Don John placed the picture in the chapel of the admiral-vessel, the Genoese John Andrew Doria, asking for Mary's protection of his expedition.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- On September 16, the Christian fleet put to sea. Don John anchored off of Corfu where he learned that the Moslems had leveled entire towns and villages and then retreated to the coast of Lepanto in the Gulf of Corinth. At dawn on October 7, at the entrance to the Gulf of Patras, the Christian and Moslem fleets finally came face to face for the battle of Lepanto.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The wind and all military factors favored the Moslems, but Don John was confident. He boarded a fast ship for a final review of his fleet. He shouted encouraging words to the men and they shouted back. After Don John returned to his own position, the wind mysteriously changed to the advantage of the Christian fleet. First-hand witnesses wrote about this moment as a most dramatic turn-of-events resulting from an "unknown factor".

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- At that very moment, at dawn on October 7, 1571--as Vatican Archives later revealed--Pope Pius V, accompanied by many faithful, was praying the Rosary in the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore. From dawn to dusk the prayers continued in Rome as the Christians and the Moslems battled at Lepanto. When it was all over the Moslems had been defeated. Of some 270 Moslem ships, at least 200 were destroyed. The Turks also lost 30,000 men while Christian casualties numbered between 4,000 and 5,000.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rosary had won a great military victory. Like all truly great military leaders who hate war and love peace, Don John retired after his victory at Lepanto. He died a few years later at the age of 31. Another who took part in the great battle of Lepanto, Miguel de Cervantes, lived longer to write his famous tribute to Christian chivalry, Don Quixote.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Following the great Christian victory at Lepanto, Pope St. Pius V declared that henceforth a commemoration of the Rosary would be a part of the Vatican's Mass on every October 7. His successor, Pope Gregory XIII, went further. In 1573 he established the Feast of the Most Holy Rosary--to be celebrated at all Churches which had specific altars dedicated to the Rosary.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- In 1671 Pope Clement X extended observance of the feast to all of Spain. Only 12 years later in 1683 the Moslems again swept into Europe. With 200,000 men, they laid siege to Vienna. After months of valiant resistance by a small garrison, the city was relieved by an army under John Sobieski, King of Poland. The Rosary, to which the King was dedicated, was again instrumental in a military victory. Pope Innocent XI consecrated September 12 of that year to the Holy Name of Mary. The Moslem hordes were hurled back yet again at Peterwardein in Hungary by Prince Eugene on the Feast of Out Lady of the Snows, August 5, 1716. As a result of this victory, Pope Clement XI extended the Feast of the Rosary to the Universal Church.

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TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Free Republic; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: crusades; lepanto
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If you want on or off the Western Civilization Military History ping list, please let me know.
1 posted on 11/26/2002 6:25:02 PM PST by Sparta
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To: Sparta
The Crusades didn't last for centuries. Only one of them had any success and it held on for about 128 years. In the end the knights were allowed by Salaldeen to return to their ancestral homes in France.

The Reconquista, which happened in Spain, and which was not a Crusade, did last for centuries. It ended in 1492.

2 posted on 11/26/2002 6:30:26 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: sphinx; Toirdhealbheach Beucail; curmudgeonII; roderick; Notforprophet; river rat; csvset; ...
West vs the Religion of Peace ping!!

Battle of Lepanto.
3 posted on 11/26/2002 6:35:27 PM PST by Sparta
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To: Sparta
Bump
4 posted on 11/26/2002 6:37:42 PM PST by SAMWolf
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To: Sparta
What most people forget is that the Islamic war machine conquered most of what is now Islam militarily. One either converted to Islam or faced death.

Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown

5 posted on 11/26/2002 7:04:10 PM PST by harpseal
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To: Sparta
Another who took part in the great battle of Lepanto, Miguel de Cervantes, lived longer to write his famous tribute to Christian chivalry, Don Quixote.

It would perhaps be more accurate to describe Don Quixote as a parody of Christian chivalry. Cervantes would have been quite at home on Saturday Night Live.

6 posted on 11/26/2002 7:32:28 PM PST by Restorer
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To: Sparta
bump
7 posted on 11/26/2002 7:56:16 PM PST by Diago
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To: Sparta
Would you add me please? Thanks.

Victor Davis Hanson has a fine chapter on Lepanto in His Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Civilization.

8 posted on 11/26/2002 8:53:36 PM PST by onedoug
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To: onedoug
Victor Davis Hanson has a fine chapter on Lepanto in His Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Civilization.

He was the inspiration for the ping list. The man truly is America's best historian.
9 posted on 11/26/2002 8:56:04 PM PST by Sparta
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To: Sparta; Restorer; BlackElk
A little bit of useless trivia here:If memory serves me correctly, Cervantes lost his hand during the battle of Lepanto, and became known as the man of le mancha(sp?). I believe it's translated into the man with one hand in english.
10 posted on 11/26/2002 9:06:58 PM PST by MattinNJ
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To: onedoug
Excellent book.

Highly recommended.

Don't mess with Westerners.

The same qualities that make us effective in commerce make us remarkably effective killers.
11 posted on 11/26/2002 9:28:38 PM PST by Restorer
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To: Sparta
Viewing the world today in light of this article,it is no wonder Pope John Paul II is trying so hard to exhort, suggest,request,encourage and convince Catholics to pray the Rosary more often.

It seems far more likely that prayers to God will be more effective than planning or threatening to enter every Moslem nation that appears to pose a threat or house some band of terrorists. I cannot imagine a more certain way to ensure that terrorist attacks will increase than to try to show over a billion Muslims,spread all over the world,including our own country, who's boss.I call this present plan,MAD;mutually assured destruction.

I prefer the Lepanto Plan!!

12 posted on 11/26/2002 10:02:54 PM PST by saradippity
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To: MattinNJ
"If memory serves me correctly, Cervantes lost his hand during the battle of Lepanto, and became known as the man of le mancha(sp?)."

He may have lost his hand, but "de la Mancha" means (literally) "Of The Stain", and in this case I believe it refers to the region Cervantes was from (at least that's what it mean in "Don Quijote de la Mancha"). Perhaps you are thinking of "de la MANO" which would mean "of the Hand".

13 posted on 11/27/2002 12:46:21 AM PST by Lizard_King
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To: Restorer
It depends on how you see Don Quijote and at what level of introspection. I spent much of my educational career in Costa Rica studying Spanish literature, and one of the ongoing debates in our class was whether the portrayal of the noble knight tilting at windmills was meant as a criticism of idealistic Christian knighthood or as a criticism of the cruel world that appeared to leave no place for noble sentiments to exist. I believe it is the latter perspective that is far more significant in the meaning of the work, and part of what made it so epic in literary history (appalling Hollywood sing-along versions aside).
14 posted on 11/27/2002 12:50:52 AM PST by Lizard_King
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To: Lizard_King; Restorer
I agree with the latter perspective, the morale being that the world is better for the attempt at nobility, no matter how frail the human who undertakes it. Edmund Rostand illustrates this in his Cyrano de Bergerac, a play about an equally Quixotic character:

(Cyrano, an impoverished soldier/poet, is speaking with de Guiche, a powerful nobleman. De Guiche makes Cyrano an offer he thinks he cannot refuse:)

de Guiche: Poets are fashionable nowadays to have about one. Would you care to join my following?
Cyrano: No, sir. I do not follow.
de Guiche: Your duel yesterday amused my uncle the Cardinal. I might help you there...
He is himself a dramatist; Let him rewrite a few lines here and there, and he'll approve the rest.
Cyrano: Impossible. My blood curdles to think of altering one comma.
de Guiche: Ah, but when he likes a thing, he pays well.
Cyrano: Yes -- but not so well as I -- When I have made a line that sings itself so that I love the sound of it -- I pay myself a hundred times.
de Guiche: You are proud, my friend.
Cyrano: You have observed that?
....
de Guiche: Have you read Don Quixote?
Cyrano: I have -- and found myself the hero.
de Guiche: Be so good as to read once more the chapter of the windmills.
Cyrano (gravely): Chapter Thirteen.
de Guiche: Windmills, remember, if you fight with them --
Cyrano: My enemies change, then, with every wind?
de Guiche: -- May swing round their huge arms and cast you down into the mire.
Cyrano: Or up -- among the stars!

15 posted on 11/27/2002 3:04:38 AM PST by pariah
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To: onedoug
I am currently reading Hanson's Carnage and Culture...an excellent book!
16 posted on 11/27/2002 3:16:39 AM PST by Cuttnhorse
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To: Sparta
Please add me to your list. Thanks!
17 posted on 11/27/2002 4:39:31 AM PST by TxBec
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To: pariah
Nice. I've only ever come across the Depardieu version, and was not too impressed...French lit has never been one of my strengths. I'll be sure not to pass that one up.
18 posted on 11/27/2002 5:16:29 AM PST by Lizard_King
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To: Sparta
Add me to your list, please.
19 posted on 11/27/2002 5:33:27 AM PST by RightOnline
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To: Sparta
Sign me up too.

Our Lady of Guadalupe bump!

20 posted on 11/27/2002 5:33:30 AM PST by Aquinasfan
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To: Lizard_King
Don Quixote is obviously a work of multiple levels.

One of those, however, is a parody of centuries of European "romances," which as a literary form had become absolutely ridiculous. Cervantes blew the entire genre out of the water with a gust of fresh air.
21 posted on 11/27/2002 5:40:43 AM PST by Restorer
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To: Lizard_King
Thanks. I think you are right.
22 posted on 11/27/2002 7:39:51 AM PST by MattinNJ
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To: Restorer
True, but the satire is not really of the Christian aspect of chivalry but rather the more fantastic notions of distant lands and beings. Cervantes was also captured at Lepanto and was held prisoner for some time before he was ransomed.
23 posted on 11/27/2002 8:36:12 AM PST by justshutupandtakeit
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To: Sparta
Please add me to the list.

Thanks.
24 posted on 11/27/2002 9:40:55 AM PST by profmike23
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To: Sparta
Their ships ruled the Mediterranean Sea from the Strait of Bosporus to the Strait of Gibraltar and constantly preyed on Christian vessels unless they flew the French flag.

The more things change.....

25 posted on 11/27/2002 9:41:29 AM PST by r9etb
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To: dd5339; cavtrooper21
historical battle ping
26 posted on 11/27/2002 9:45:58 AM PST by Vic3O3
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To: saradippity
It seems far more likely that prayers to God will be more effective than planning or threatening to enter every Moslem nation that appears to pose a threat or house some band of terrorists. I cannot imagine a more certain way to ensure that terrorist attacks will increase than to try to show over a billion Muslims,spread all over the world,including our own country, who's boss.I call this present plan,MAD;mutually assured destruction.

I prefer the Lepanto Plan!!

Good thing neither Pope Pious V nor Don John shared your view, or they wouldn't have fought the muslims. The muslim aim hasn't changed in the last 600 years--they still intend to force you to convert or kill you. I think just standing around waiting for them is a mistake...and if a country is harboring terrorists that struck our citizens, then that country SHOULD and WILL pay a price.

27 posted on 11/27/2002 9:51:02 AM PST by power2
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To: Sparta
in 1683 the Moslems again swept into Europe. With 200,000 men, they laid siege to Vienna. After months of valiant resistance by a small garrison, the city was relieved by an army under John Sobieski, King of Poland. The Rosary, to which the King was dedicated, was again instrumental in a military victory. Pope Innocent XI consecrated September 12 of that year to the Holy Name of Mary

The battle was won on September 11th--adn 318 years later, the Muslims took their revenge at New York City.

28 posted on 11/27/2002 10:21:02 AM PST by ninenot
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To: saradippity
It is also clear why the Vatican has made such an effort to work WITH Moslem mullahs rather than AGAINST them on a variety of fronts. JPII wants them to understand that they and Christians have many common understandings (certainly a number of differences....but)...
29 posted on 11/27/2002 10:23:55 AM PST by ninenot
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To: Sparta
Read Chesterton's poem, "Lepanto

Excerpt, about Don John of Austria, the leader of the fleet attacking the Turkish Moslems:

It is he that saith not 'Kismet'; it is he that knows not Fate;
It is Richard, it is Raymond, it is Godfrey at the gate!
It is he whose loss is laughter when he counts the wager worth,
Put down your feet upon him, that our peace be on the earth."
For he heard drums groaning and he heard guns jar,
(Don John of Austria is going to the war.)
Sudden and still--hurrah!
Bolt from Iberia!

Lots of good analogies to today, as well as some of the most glorious, blood-thumping, adventure-laden language in all of poetry.

Full text at: http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/Alley/5443/leppoem.htm

30 posted on 11/27/2002 11:18:49 AM PST by BohDaThone
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To: power2
I wonder if Pope Pius would have sent Don Juan off to battle if he thought that Don Juan's crews were infiltrated with unidentified Muslims,who were ready to die as they blew up Don Juan's ships at the onset of the battle.What do you think?

Or would Pope Pius have sent him into battle if he knew that the Muslims carried innocent women and children,Christian and Muslim,that would be killed with every hit Don Juan scored?

What about if both conditions existed?

We are looking to use old techniques in a much changed world. The old world is no more,why can't every one see that. Please understand that I am not advocating buckling to evil or a "peace at any cost" position. I am only asking that we take a close careful look at "cui bono",and reassess our operations in the light of reality.

31 posted on 11/27/2002 11:26:45 AM PST by saradippity
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To: Sparta
Lepanto bump, and Jan Sobieski bump too!

Without him and his winged hussars, who knows how things would have turned out?

32 posted on 11/27/2002 3:16:32 PM PST by Da_Shrimp
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To: Sparta
BUMP
33 posted on 11/27/2002 3:25:04 PM PST by Publius6961
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To: MattinNJ
Cervantes lost his hand during the battle of Lepanto, and became known as the man of le mancha(sp?). I believe it's translated into the man with one hand in english.

Ummm.... no.

He was from the province of La Mancha in Spain.

His Spanish nickname "El Manco de Lepanto" has no direct equivalent in English and, yes, it does mean "missing one hand".

34 posted on 11/27/2002 4:24:19 PM PST by Publius6961
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To: Sparta
And here they are again, 9.11.01!
35 posted on 11/27/2002 5:34:54 PM PST by desertcry
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To: Publius6961
La Manche, "The Sleeve," back when Spanish and French were more closely related. But he didn't lose his arm, did he ...
36 posted on 11/27/2002 7:16:21 PM PST by Tax-chick
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To: saradippity
The Turkish galleys were largely rowed by Christian slaves (See the Chesterton poem, noted above), so part of your scenario of innocents being killed by the Christian attack was certainly true -- many of the slaves were killed, though many others were freed.
37 posted on 11/27/2002 7:20:17 PM PST by BohDaThone
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To: Lizard_King
I've only ever come across the Depardieu version

The translation is by Brian Hooker, Bantam Books, first Edition, 1950.

38 posted on 11/27/2002 10:55:25 PM PST by pariah
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To: BohDaThone
That's reminiscent of the Amercan POWs in the Hanoi Hilton cheering as the complex was targeted by B-52s.
39 posted on 11/27/2002 11:27:58 PM PST by Jarhead_22
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To: nutmeg
bump to read later
40 posted on 11/27/2002 11:29:17 PM PST by nutmeg
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To: harpseal
Most of what is now Christendom was also conquered militarily. That's true of all civilizations - ancient and modern. A sad human reality.
41 posted on 11/28/2002 8:58:08 AM PST by liberallarry
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To: Lizard_King
La Mancha means "the sleeve" does it not?
42 posted on 11/28/2002 2:39:34 PM PST by sheik yerbouty
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To: Sparta
what is needed is another El Cid.
43 posted on 11/28/2002 2:40:13 PM PST by sheik yerbouty
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To: liberallarry
If you mean the former Roman empire, the conquests were all done while it was pagan.
44 posted on 11/28/2002 2:44:13 PM PST by Jacob Kell
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To: Sparta
Some food for thought...

"4. Reform under Grand Vezir Mehmed Sokullu (1565-1579). Sokullu's devsirme party allied with Harem party led by Roxelana (Hurrem Sultan) and party of Jewish bankers led by Dona Gracia Mendes and Don Joseph Nasi. Manages to get Suleyman Kanuni to execute capable son Mustafa and bring to throne incompetent degenerate son Selim II 'the sot'-Sari Selim (Selim the Yellow), Sarhos Selim (Selim the Drunkard). Don Joseph gets Selim II and Sokullu to conquer Cyprus to provide home for Jews fleeing from persecution in Europe. Settlement of East Anatolian Turkomans instead. Leads to formation of new Holy League fleet led by Don Juan of Austria, defeats Ottoman, fleet at Battle of Lepanto (1571). Sokullu rebuilds fleet during winter, regains control of Mediterranean in 1572. Makes major administrative reforms, restores tax system, eliminates corrupt officials. Ottomans complete conquest of Yemen, Gulf fleet restores International trade routes from Far East through Middle East. Ottomans complete conquests of Caucasus, Georgia and Armenia. Successes lead to fall of Sokullu, resumption of decay."

HISTORY OF THE TURKS

45 posted on 11/28/2002 3:43:26 PM PST by F-117A
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To: Sparta
"Occupied by the Turks in 1498, Lepanto is chiefly celebrated for the victory which the combined papal, Spanish, Venetian, and Genoese fleets, under Don John of Austria, gained over the Turkish fleet on 7 Oct., 1571. The latter had 208 galleys and 66 small ships; the Christian fleet about the same number. The crusaders lost 17 ships and 7500 men; 15 Turkish ships were sunk and 177 taken, from 20,000 to 30,000 men disabled, and from 12,000 to 15,000 Christian rowers, slaves on the Turkish galleys, were delivered. Though this victory did not accomplish all that was hoped for, since the Turks appeared the very next year with a fleet of 250 ships before Modon and Cape Matapan, and in vain offered battle to the Christians, it was of great importance as being the first great defeat of the infidels on the sea."

Lepanto

46 posted on 11/28/2002 4:10:06 PM PST by F-117A
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To: muawiyah
Actually, that is not correct. Anything that the Pope declared to be a crusade is obviously a crusade, and the Pope authorized crusades which did not involve attempts to conquer or hold on to Jerusalem and the Holy Lands.

For instance, there was a crusade against the Cathars, or Albigensians, which took place in what is now Southern France. It was a crusade which the Pope declared against a heretical sect which was growing in that particular region.

Also, I am not sure if we can limit the word "crusade" just to those authorized by the Pope; the word has a more generalized usage for any holy war engaged by Christians for religious reasons against non-Christians.

I do believe the Pope declared crusades against the Muslims in Spain; but whether authorized by the Pope or not, the reconquest of Spain was considered by Christians at the time to be just as much a crusade as the attempts to take back the Holy Land from the Muslims.

47 posted on 11/28/2002 5:07:16 PM PST by Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
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To: Sparta
Lepanto 

        G.K.Chesterton 
 

White founts falling in the Courts of the sun, 
And the Soldan of Byzantium is smiling as they run; 
There is laughter like the fountains in that face of all men feared, 
It stirs the forest darkness, the darkness of his beard; 
It curls the blood-red crescent, the crescent of his lips; 
For the inmost sea of all the earth is shaken with his ships. 
They have dared the white republics up the capes of Italy, 
They have dashed the Adriatic round the Lion of the Sea, 
And the Pope has cast his arms abroad for agony and loss, 
And called the kings of Christendom for swords about the Cross. 
The cold queen of England is looking in the glass; 
The shadow of the Valois is yawning at the Mass; 
From evening isles fantastical rings faint the Spanish gun, 
And the Lord upon the Golden Horn is laughing in the sun. 

Dim drums throbbing, in the hills half heard, 
Where only on a nameless throne a crownless prince has stirred, 
Where, risen from a doubtful seat and half attainted stall, 
The last knight of Europe takes weapons from the wall, 
The last and lingering troubadour to whom the bird has sung, 
That once went singing southward when all the world was young. 
In that enormous silence, tiny and unafraid, 
Comes up along a winding road the noise of the Crusade. 
Strong gongs groaning as the guns boom far, 
Don John of Austria is going to the war, 
Stiff flags straining in the night-blasts cold 
In the gloom black-purple, in the glint old-gold, 
Torchlight crimson on the copper kettle-drums, 
Then the tuckets, then the trumpets, then the cannon, and he comes. 
Don John laughing in the brave beard curled, 
Spurning of his stirrups like the thrones of all the world, 
Holding his head up for a flag of all the free. 
Love-light of Spain--hurrah! 
Death-light of Africa! 
Don John of Austria 
Is riding to the sea. 

Mahound is in his paradise above the evening star, 
(Don John of Austria is going to the war.) 
He moves a mighty turban on the timeless houri's knees, 
His turban that is woven of the sunsets and the seas. 
He shakes the peacock gardens as he rises from his ease, 
And he strides among the tree-tops and is taller than the trees; 
And his voice through all the garden is a thunder sent to bring 
Black Azrael and Ariel and Ammon on the wing. 
Giants and the Genii, 
Multiplex of wing and eye, 
Whose strong obedience broke the sky 
When Solomon was king. 

They rush in red and purple from the red clouds of the morn, 
From the temples where the yellow gods shut up their eyes in scorn; 
They rise in green robes roaring from the green hells of the sea 
Where fallen skies and evil hues and eyeless creatures be, 
On them the sea-valves cluster and the grey sea-forests curl, 
Splashed with a splendid sickness, the sickness of the pearl; 
They swell in sapphire smoke out of the blue cracks of the ground,-- 
They gather and they wonder and give worship to Mahound. 
And he saith, "Break up the mountains where the hermit-folk can hide, 
And sift the red and silver sands lest bone of saint abide, 
And chase the Giaours flying night and day, not giving rest, 
For that which was our trouble comes again out of the west. 
We have set the seal of Solomon on all things under sun, 
Of knowledge and of sorrow and endurance of things done. 
But a noise is in the mountains, in the mountains, and I know 
The voice that shook our palaces--four hundred years ago: 
It is he that saith not 'Kismet'; it is he that knows not Fate; 
It is Richard, it is Raymond, it is Godfrey at the gate! 
It is he whose loss is laughter when he counts the wager worth, 
Put down your feet upon him, that our peace be on the earth." 
For he heard drums groaning and he heard guns jar, 
(Don John of Austria is going to the war.) 
Sudden and still--hurrah! 
Bolt from Iberia! 
Don John of Austria 
Is gone by Alcalar. 

St. Michaels on his Mountain in the sea-roads of the north 
(Don John of Austria is girt and going forth.) 
Where the grey seas glitter and the sharp tides shift 
And the sea-folk labour and the red sails lift. 
He shakes his lance of iron and he claps his wings of stone; 
The noise is gone through Normandy; the noise is gone alone; 
The North is full of tangled things and texts and aching eyes, 
And dead is all the innocence of anger and surprise, 
And Christian killeth Christian in a narrow dusty room, 
And Christian dreadeth Christ that hath a newer face of doom, 
And Christian hateth Mary that God kissed in Galilee,-- 
But Don John of Austria is riding to the sea. 
Don John calling through the blast and the eclipse 
Crying with the trumpet, with the trumpet of his lips, 
Trumpet that sayeth _ha_! 
    Domino gloria! 
Don John of Austria 
Is shouting to the ships. 

King Philip's in his closet with the Fleece about his neck 
(Don John of Austria is armed upon the deck.) 
The walls are hung with velvet that is black and soft as sin, 
And little dwarfs creep out of it and little dwarfs creep in. 
He holds a crystal phial that has colours like the moon, 
He touches, and it tingles, and he trembles very soon, 
And his face is as a fungus of a leprous white and grey 
Like plants in the high houses that are shuttered from the day, 
And death is in the phial and the end of noble work, 
But Don John of Austria has fired upon the Turk. 
Don John's hunting, and his hounds have bayed-- 
Booms away past Italy the rumour of his raid. 
Gun upon gun, ha! ha! 
Gun upon gun, hurrah! 
Don John of Austria 
Has loosed the cannonade. 

The Pope was in his chapel before day or battle broke, 
(Don John of Austria is hidden in the smoke.) 
The hidden room in man's house where God sits all the year, 
The secret window whence the world looks small and very dear. 
He sees as in a mirror on the monstrous twilight sea 
The crescent of his cruel ships whose name is mystery; 
They fling great shadows foe-wards, making Cross and Castle dark, 
They veil the plume graved lions on the galleys of St. Mark; 
And above the ships are palaces of brown, black-bearded chiefs, 
And below the ships are prisons, where with multitudinous griefs, 
Christian captives sick and sunless, all a labouring race repines 
Like a race in sunken cities, like a nation in the mines. 
They are lost like slaves that sweat, and in the skies of morning hung 
The stair-ways of the tallest gods when tyranny was young. 
They are countless, voiceless, hopeless as those fallen or fleeing on 
Before the high Kings' horses in the granite of Babylon. 
And many a one grows witless in his quiet room in hell 
Where a yellow face looks inward through the lattice of his cell, 
And he finds his God forgotten, and he seeks no more a sign-- 
(But Don John of Austria has burst the battle-line!) 
Don John pounding from the slaughter-painted poop, 
Purpling all the ocean like a bloody pirate's sloop, 
Scarlet running over on the silvers and the golds, 
Breaking of the hatches up and bursting of the holds, 
Thronging of the thousands up that labour under sea 
White for bliss and blind for sun and stunned for liberty. 

Vivat Hispania! 
Domino Gloria! 
Don John of Austria 
Has set his people free! 

Cervantes on his galley sets the sword back in the sheath 
(Don John of Austria rides homeward with a wreath.) 
And he sees across a weary land a straggling road in Spain, 
Up which a lean and foolish knight for ever rides in vain, 
And he smiles, but not as Sultans smile, and settles back the blade.... 
(But Don John of Austria rides home from the Crusade.)


48 posted on 11/28/2002 5:12:50 PM PST by SauronOfMordor
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To: onedoug; Sparta
For an excellent history of the Battle of Lepanto, and also an excellent example of the art of narrative prose, read "The Galleys at Lepanto" by Jack Beeching. I believe it is out of print, but you can find used copies for sale at amazon.com and other places. It's a riveting read.
49 posted on 11/28/2002 5:24:30 PM PST by Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
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To: Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
If a crusade is a religious war against non-Christians, then what might the religious war against the Cathers have been?

They were certainly as Christian as anybody else around in their time.

It's about time for everyone to just quit trying to justify the war against the Cathers.

50 posted on 11/28/2002 5:26:25 PM PST by muawiyah
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