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The Captain Kirk Principle
Scientific American ^ | December 2002 | Michael Shermer

Posted on 11/26/2002 7:25:35 PM PST by AndrewC

The Captain Kirk Principle
Intuition is the key to knowing without knowing how you know
By Michael Shermer


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Michael Shermer
Image: BRAD HINES

Stardate: 1672.1. Earthdate: October 6, 1966. Star Trek, Episode 5, "The Enemy Within."

Captain James T. Kirk has just beamed up from planet Alpha 177, where magnetic anomalies have caused the transporter to malfunction, splitting Kirk into two beings. One is cool and rational. The other is impulsive and irrational. Rational Kirk must make a command decision to save the crew, but he is paralyzed with indecision, bemoaning to Dr. McCoy: "I can't survive without him. I don't want to take him back. He's like an animal-- a thoughtless, brutal animal. And yet it's me!"

This psychological battle between intellect and intuition was played out in almost every episode of Star Trek in the characters of the ultrarational Mr. Spock and the hyperemotional Dr. McCoy, with Captain Kirk as the near perfect synthesis of both. Thus, I call this balance the Captain Kirk Principle: intellect is driven by intuition, intuition is directed by intellect.

For most scientists, intuition is the bête noire of a rational life, the enemy within to beam away faster than a phaser on overload. Yet the Captain Kirk Principle is now finding support from a rich emerging field of scientific inquiry brilliantly summarized by Hope College psychologist David G. Myers in his book Intuition: Its Powers and Perils (Yale University Press, 2002). I confess to having been skeptical when I first picked up the book, but as Myers demonstrates through numerous well-replicated experiments, intuition-- "our capacity for direct knowledge, for immediate insight without observation or reason"-- is as much a component of our thinking as analytical logic.

Nalini Ambady and Robert Rosenthal of Harvard University, for example, discovered that evaluations of teachers by students who saw a mere 30-second video of the teacher were remarkably akin to those of students who had taken the course. Even three two-second video clips of the instructor yielded a striking 0.72 correlation with the course students' evaluations.

Research consistently shows how so-called unattended stimuli can subtly affect us. At the University of Southern California, Moshe Bar and Irving Biederman flashed emotionally positive images (kitten, romantic couple) or negative scenes (werewolf, corpse) for 47 milliseconds immediately before subjects viewed slides of people. Although subjects reported seeing only a flash of light for the initial emotionally charged pictures, they gave more positive ratings to people whose photographs had been associated with the positive ones-- so something registered.

Intuition is not subliminal perception; it is subtle perception and learning-- knowing without knowing that you know. Chess masters often "know" the right move to make even if they cannot articulate how they know it. People who are highly skilled in identifying "micromomentary" facial expressions are also more accurate in judging lying. In testing college students, psychiatrists, polygraphists, court judges, police officers and Secret Service agents on their ability to detect lies, only the agents, trained to look for subtle cues, scored above chance.


The Captain Kirk Principle: intellect is driven by intuition, intuition is directed by intellect.

Most of us are not good at lie detection, because we rely too heavily on what people say rather than on what they do. Subjects with damage to the brain that renders them less attentive to speech are more accurate at detecting lies, such as aphasic stroke victims, who were able to identify liars 73 percent of the time when focusing on facial expressions. (Nonaphasic subjects did no better than chance.) We may even be hardwired for intuitive thinking: damage to parts of the frontal lobe and amygdala (the fear center) will prevent someone from understanding relationships or detecting cheating, particularly in social contracts, even if he or she is otherwise cognitively normal.

CONTINUED --- Click Here

(Excerpt) Read more at sciam.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: captkirk; crevolist; drmccoy; inference; insight; intellect; intuition; psychology; science; shermer; skeptic; spock
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No one else has posted this that I can tell. My previous assessment of Mr. Shermer's ability to discern value must now be reappraised.

I also add, "Design, I know it when I see it."

1 posted on 11/26/2002 7:25:35 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
It's in the math!
2 posted on 11/26/2002 7:29:16 PM PST by Southack
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To: AndrewC
Um, they've known this in the advertising business for HOW long?
3 posted on 11/26/2002 7:29:31 PM PST by tet68
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To: scripter; Heartlander; f.Christian; gore3000; CalConservative; Alamo-Girl; jennyp; *crevo_list
Intuitive ping. To jennyp: I pinged you because Shermer was the author and I have berated him due to Hardison.
4 posted on 11/26/2002 7:31:57 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: Southack
You beat the invitation! You are now "formally" invited. ;^)

Don't you usually have a nice bovine logo?

5 posted on 11/26/2002 7:33:27 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
I would like the Scientific American to analyze the Star Trek episode where Spock has to have sex once every 7 years or he goes crazy.
6 posted on 11/26/2002 7:35:00 PM PST by PJ-Comix
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To: tet68
Um, they've known this in the advertising business for HOW long?

It isn't "real" to many people until you can measure it and it is published a some orthodox scientific publication.

7 posted on 11/26/2002 7:35:15 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
The Captain Kirk principle. Would that be "Loudly claim how very important the Prime Directive is, while violating it IN EVERY SINGLE EPISODE?"
Is THAT the Captain Kirk principle they speak of?
8 posted on 11/26/2002 7:38:22 PM PST by Billy_bob_bob
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To: AndrewC
Intuition says a=in
9 posted on 11/26/2002 7:39:57 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: Billy_bob_bob
Is THAT the Captain Kirk principle they speak of?

Are you asking my rational or intuitive mind? If it is the rational side -- I hesitate to answer but no. If it is the intuitive side -- I definitely feel that it is not.

10 posted on 11/26/2002 7:43:58 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
I thought the Kirk principle was "If you can't have sex with it, blow the crap out of it!"
11 posted on 11/26/2002 7:45:55 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants
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To: PJ-Comix
I would prefer every seven hours...
Spock was a loser.
12 posted on 11/26/2002 7:47:20 PM PST by Robert_Paulson2
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To: Blood of Tyrants
I thought the Kirk Principle was, "Send in an expendable crew member first!"
13 posted on 11/26/2002 7:49:13 PM PST by ovrtaxt
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To: AndrewC
Actually,the Captain Kirk principle is to always send out the red shirted guys first, and to feel bad when good ol' Ensign Whozits buys the farm.
14 posted on 11/26/2002 7:50:24 PM PST by Chancellor Palpatine
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To: AndrewC
I always like to compare the clinton administration to the "Kobiayashi Maru" test. clinton hates to lose.

If you can't make the numbers what you want, change how you count the numbers.

15 posted on 11/26/2002 7:52:18 PM PST by copycat
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To: ovrtaxt
No, that is a Star Fleet standing order. It must be since the expendable crewman is ALWAYS the one to die.
16 posted on 11/26/2002 8:00:45 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants
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To: PJ-Comix
I would like the Scientific American to analyze the Star Trek episode where Spock has to have sex once every 7 years or he goes crazy.

Scientific American has been corrupted by liberals.
They'd probably try to link it to trouble with tribbles, thus proving that Spock was a poofter.

I don't think I could stomach that revelation.

17 posted on 11/26/2002 8:00:51 PM PST by Willie Green
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To: AndrewC
intuition is baloney...
intuition is a biggie with feministas.
hyperemotive driven behaviors... are endocrine system driven.

"first impressions" that they use to try and nail down similarities between a teacher in 30 second review vs.in class, flow from INTELLECT based on past, factual experience. That's not "intuition" its template application based on an internal database of factual experiences, properly perceived.

ALL that is "good" about what they are calling "intuition" here, is acgally internal "ods making" Las Vegas style, based on experiences as we have perceived them. And that is why raw "intuitions" cannot EVER be trusted without intellectual cognition.

IE. If you see a girl that looks like your first lover, ods are you would find her attractive even if you did not know she was an epileptic (if that former lover had worked out for you on some level), or you might find a really wonderful person, repulsive (if the girls she reminded you gave you syph, or left you for your best friend, or your sister...).

The problem is, you may find another person repulsive at first, but later find that "john" was nothing like your psycho 11th grade football coach in high school. Hence, "don't judge a book by its cover."

Intuition can often become more useful as "experiences" form a database and templates for future growth and interaction. OR, it can become debilitating as one becomes hormonally addicted to the emotive aspects that are not productive.

I trust my parents "intuition" better known as "ods making skills", based on decades of personal experience than I do my adult children's. Mom and Dad have a much larger database of events and persons to consider and form their "impressions."

Perception based on experience is being blurred here with "intuition" which is usually a code word for liberal-feminists whose default setting is the hyper-emotive-state d'jour for ill advised decisions NOT based on intellect. Wise women know these for what they are more commonly recognised as: "irrational" choices and behaviors.

I don't think much of intution as a basis for anything, especially for the young..
18 posted on 11/26/2002 8:04:56 PM PST by Robert_Paulson2
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To: PJ-Comix
I recall some comedian discussing that very phenomenon, in the context of how Spock's ears got that way...
19 posted on 11/26/2002 8:05:55 PM PST by OKSooner
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To: AndrewC
I know how exactly how the alternative Kirk feels -- everytime I get out on the road then get cutoff by one more %&*#! pinhead!
20 posted on 11/26/2002 8:08:04 PM PST by F16Fighter
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To: Robert_Paulson2
Spock was a pompous ass, BTW. A preview of all the different poofter characters that emerged on the next iterations of Star Trek with that poofter Picard and Whoopi Goldberg.
21 posted on 11/26/2002 8:10:02 PM PST by OKSooner
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To: Blood of Tyrants
I thought the Kirk principle was "If you can't have sex with it, blow the crap out of it!"

Kirk: Oh look, a culture that promotes suicide bombers with no sense of honor; they remind me of Romulans.

Set phasers to deep fry

22 posted on 11/26/2002 8:17:25 PM PST by Centurion2000
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To: Robert_Paulson2
I don't think much of intution as a basis for anything, especially for the young..

Okay. You are not required to accept a skeptics opinion nor accept the nebulous numbers, but there are others that disagree with you.

Intuition and Military Leadership

Intuition and Military Leadership

Columnist DAVID M KEITHLY writes about these important aspects.

What is the role of intuition in military leadership? Does it have one?

As described by specialists in the field, intuition is the practice of reaching decisions or conclusions without deliberate thought processes.1 That is, intuition compels the recognition of reality on the instant. Intuitive knowledge is to be distinguished from acquired knowledge through sequential procedures in deductive reasoning.

The value of intuition to the military commander has, in fact, long been acknowledged. Bernard Brodie, one of America’s most respected scholars, analyzed navies prior to theorizing about nuclear weapons and strategies for their use. In his classic A Guide to Naval Strategy, Brodie writes:

...the great commander must of course have a profound insight into all the ramifications of strategic principle...he must above all be able to see intuitively through the ever-prevalent ‘fog of war’...2

Similarly, intuition in philosophy often refers to the capacity of the mind to discern or “see” particular self-evident truths. The word, in fact, derives from the Latin verb intueor, meaning “to see.” Over time, philosophers have identified several distinct meanings of intuition.3 It can entail a “hunch,” a supposition not ushered in by inference. It can involve immediate perception devoid of the ability to define the respective concept. Or it can be non-propositional knowledge of something, that is, a comprehension not following from a series of deductive propositions.

To what extent, though, is intuition a facet of the female gender, as in the commonplace, but vague expression “feminine intuition”? Is it to be associated largely with psychics? To be sure, many in the military think so. It is ironic that military professionals whose responsibilities require a great deal of intuition, pilots of high-performance aircraft, say, are those most inclined to discount the significance of intuition and reject any serious examination of it.

To put some at ease, one can employ different terms to describe the same concept, coup d’oeil, for example, or the Teutonic, even Wodonic, Fingerspitzengefuhl or Blick.4 Coup d’oeil, for its part, is a Napoleonic term that has now been embraced by the US Marine Corps. The German, and before that, Prussian military used the terms Fingerspitzengefuhl and Blick to describe a sort of innate on-the-spot grasp of a situation. Prussian Field Marshal Helmuth Graf von Moltke referred to the phenomenon of coup d’oeil as Blick, literally a “glance”. German military literature has often used this term to denote the ability swiftly to assess circumstances. Regardless of what intuition is called, its deliberation by militaries has endured. A fair assumption is that coup d’oeil in combat leaders contributes substantially to military effectiveness. If it were otherwise, militaries would not have accorded this capability in their personnel the attention they have.

The following example illustrates military forces plying their trade in accordance with intuitive purposes. With the development of the Mitsubishi Zero prior to World War II and the adoption of attendant flying formations, highly skilled naval aviators of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) achieved remarkable results. Lack of good radio equipment induced fighter pilots to develop non-verbal and non-mechanical ishin denshin by which they claimed they could communicate, or at least understand others’ intent, during combat manoeuvres. This “sixth sense” surfaced after months of intense practice and training. The IJN experimented with expanding ishin denshin communication to larger nine-man divisions and eighteen-man squadrons.5 Such cognizance differs little from that fostered through the training of the US Marine Corps silent drill team. Indeed, ishin denshin is another name for intuition. The IJN developed ishin denshin in its fighter pilots and effectively utilized this faculty when sending men into battle.

Through the ages, distinguished commanders who have mastered intuition, or coup d’oeil/Blick, have included Alexander the Great, Hannibal, Frederick the Great, Napoleon Bonaparte, the Duke of Wellington, Ulysses S. Grant, Winston Churchill, Erwin Rommel, and Douglas MacArthur. Some of these have also been regarded as charismatic leaders. An almost uncanny power of intuition enhanced the professional reputation of Rommel, for example, and reinforced his standing as a charismatic figure. It was not for nothing that Rommel, largely because of his intuitive faculties on the battlefield, was known to friend and foe alike as “The Desert Fox”. Esteem for his abilities was reputed to be nearly as great in the British Eighth Army as it was among his own troops.

Germans have seemed perennially to grasp the value of coup d’oeil.6 In part, such appreciation stems from the healthy respect gained for the man who allegedly coined the term late in the eighteenth century. The military forces of another nation that suffered grievously at Napoleon’s hands also realized the benefits of command intuition. Accordingly, Russian/Soviet doctrine underscores that coup d’oeil is the product of training and experience.

Intuition is close to quickness of thought, and it is nothing more than a unique mental activity reduced to the limit in time. Intuition is possible only as a result of profound knowledge and enormous personal experience.
—Colonel M.I. Galkin7

Soviet doctrine suggested that as individuals gain familiarity with their capabilities and their environment, they are inclined to develop the intuitive ability to respond properly in battle (coup d’oeil/Blick).

Many US military successes in the Pacific theatre during the Second World War were attributable to naval commanders knowing intuitively what to do, as for instance, acknowledging that the role of smaller ships was to protect bigger ships, and that all were, in turn, tasked with protecting the landing forces. Even without written doctrine or operations orders, commanding officers as a rule understood such matters, much as the IJN fighter pilots needed no communications equipment to fight successfully as a unit. In its opening chapter on “The Human Element in Naval Strength,” the U.S. Navy’s 1944 War Instructions addressed such intuitive or instinctive actions. According to this combat doctrine:

“The human element is a combination of instincts plus intelligence.”
—War Instructions:
United States Navy, 19448

Later, the value of intuition would be officially accepted by the US Army, as evidenced by doctrine contained in FM 100-5 and other training and education booklets.9 The US Marine Corps has of late investigated an intuitive approach to command and control.10 Lieutenant General Paul Van Riper, USMC (Ret), former Assistant Chief of Staff for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence (C4I) at Headquarters Marine Corps, described a new concept for developing field commanders that would enhance coup d’oeil through continued exposure to combat situations in war games, simulations, exercises, and studies of past battles. An article by British Army Brigadier General G. L. Kerr11 advises that the development of intuitive skills for operational level commanders initially entails coming to know oneself by use of one of the various self-assessment instruments, such as the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) which expressly measures intuitive behaviour. The impediments to the intuitive process then need to be removed, Kerr argues. He prescribes a series of practice exercises, encouraging the creation of an intuitive milieu where the regular practice of  coup d’oeil is feasible. Military doctrine, he says, should reflect the need for more intuitive decision making. Among the widely acknowledged benefits of coup d’oeil are speed in decision making; the ability to visualize the battlefield in a spatial manner; initiative and originality; and the ability to gain surprise. Intuitive decision making should, however, complement, not replace, the more traditional analytic approach.

Can intuition then be taught or is it a mental endowment that is largely inborn? The short answer is that it can at least be cultivated. What is judgment other than the exercise of intuition? Experience shows that good judgment can be developed in persons. Plato, for his part, maintained that moral virtue depends upon an intuitive concept of the good. At the same time, he contended that proper education makes all the difference in the development of the moral person with good judgment. In athletics, intuition is a skill that has been fostered as long as team sports have existed, the idea being that team members should anticipate the actions of others and instantly figure out what teammates are doing. Such intuition is the result of extensive training, familiarity, and a shared sense of approach.

Nor should one be oblivious to the potential advantages accruing from the blending of intuition with inferential reasoning, as many recent studies focusing on “learning organizations” have specified.12 Peter Senge maintains that individuals of most value to such organizations are those who have achieved a high level of personal mastery. Individuals with a profound understanding of themselves are at the same time those most likely to integrate their left and right brains. Senge reminds his readers that Albert Einstein never discovered anything with his rational mind.


23 posted on 11/26/2002 8:41:19 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: tet68
"Um, they've known this in the advertising business for HOW long?"

Actually, they don't know it. Nobody in the ad business ever took Vance Packard and "The Hidden Persuaders" (subliminal perception) seriously.

On the other hand, the atavistic "Sixth Sense" and the visceral distrust we feel for some people -- almost immediately upon exposure -- is quite real. Bill Clinton comes to mind...

24 posted on 11/26/2002 8:58:04 PM PST by okie01
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To: AndrewC
Cops have been scientifically proven to be able to tell when a person is lying more often than the general public. The tecnique they use is still under scientific debate, but their accuracy is theorized to be the result of observing what a perp does while he's telling his story.

In other words, observation is the key. Heck...I knew Clinton was a cheap crook in 1993. I knew Jim Baker was a crook long before he was caught at it...and told my parents, who thought I was paranoid. Until he was shown for the fraud he is.

25 posted on 11/26/2002 9:00:18 PM PST by cake_crumb
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To: AndrewC
Chess masters often "know" the right move to make even if they cannot articulate how they know it. As a rather accomplished Chess player, I can tell you that what Shermer is articulating is not analogous to the example he used. Analogous to the chess example would be the driving of an auto while negotiating city traffic ... the training guides the action at a 'different' (perhaps less conscious) level than contemplative thinking.
26 posted on 11/26/2002 9:06:55 PM PST by MHGinTN
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To: cake_crumb
In other words, observation is the key.

Well, sometimes it is some that is not observed that should be. It leaves that nagging feeling that something is not right. You don't know what it is, but it is just not ri......................arrrrgh.


ARTHUR:
What?
MAYNARD:
'...The Castle of aaarrrrggh'.
BEDEVERE:
What is that?
MAYNARD:
He must have died while carving it.
LAUNCELOT:
Oh, come on!
MAYNARD:
Well, that's what it says.
ARTHUR:
Look, if he was dying, he wouldn't bother to carve 'aarrggh'. He'd just say it!
MAYNARD:
Well, that's what's carved in the rock!
GALAHAD:
Perhaps he was dictating.
ARTHUR:
Oh, shut up. Well, does it say anything else?
MAYNARD:
No. Just 'aaarrrrggh'.
LAUNCELOT:
Aaaauugggh.
ARTHUR:
Aarrrggh.
BEDEVERE:
Do you suppose he meant the Camaaaaaargue?
GALAHAD:
Where's that?
BEDEVERE:
France, I think.
thing
27 posted on 11/26/2002 9:13:41 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: MHGinTN
The best scientists in the world have invariably been highly intuitive, usually using their more-logical side to confirm their intuitive 'conclusions'.
28 posted on 11/26/2002 9:14:49 PM PST by expatpat
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To: Billy_bob_bob
I always thought they considered the Prime Directive to be some kind of vague benchmark.
29 posted on 11/26/2002 9:17:31 PM PST by Tribune7
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To: MHGinTN
Analogous to the chess example would be the driving of an auto while negotiating city traffic ... the training guides the action at a 'different' (perhaps less conscious) level than contemplative thinking.

I agree. The functioning of that ability is best demonstrated in speed chess.

30 posted on 11/26/2002 9:18:18 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: AndrewC
No one else has posted this that I can tell.

If you were intuitive, you would just know.

31 posted on 11/26/2002 9:24:26 PM PST by Nick Danger
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To: Nick Danger
If you were intuitive, you would just know.

Yes, logically speaking.

32 posted on 11/26/2002 9:31:25 PM PST by AndrewC
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To: MHGinTN
As a rather accomplished Chess player,

You might will like this --- Capablanca and Nimzowitsch - a confrontation......

33 posted on 11/26/2002 9:35:22 PM PST by AndrewC
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Comment #34 Removed by Moderator

To: AndrewC
Thanks for the heads up!
35 posted on 11/26/2002 9:39:05 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: AndrewC
And here I thought that the Captain Kirk principle was that 'if you're a bit player, never get into a shuttle craft'.
36 posted on 11/26/2002 9:44:00 PM PST by EternalVigilance
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To: expatpat
Dick Feynman would be the pinultimate example for that notion, don'tcha know! The Feynman diagrams, Q.E.D., his intuitive ability with numbers ... yup, the trained mind unconsciously at work to bring phenomena to the conscious mind.
37 posted on 11/26/2002 10:05:52 PM PST by MHGinTN
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To: okie01
Vance Packard ?... Have you read Subliminal Seduction? It was a big deal with American Studies years ago.
38 posted on 11/26/2002 10:09:59 PM PST by MHGinTN
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To: MHGinTN
"Have you read Subliminal Seduction? It was a big deal with American Studies years ago."

Can't say that I have.

I was involved in the advertising business from the early sixties until the early nineties. I worked on both the client and agency side and was involved with some large and sophisticated advertisers.

Nobody that I worked with ever gave an iota of credence to the concept of subliminal perception as an advertising device.

It was generally perceived as something for the Psychology Departments at the universities to play with...and use to get ink with the media.

Were we missing out on something?

39 posted on 11/26/2002 10:46:58 PM PST by okie01
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To: okie01
Oh yeah! It was amusing to read how Playboy Magazine was positioning their photos for effect and how the Tobacco industry was planting words in pictures and wolf heads, etc. The word 'cancer' would be inserted in a photo, unrecognizable to the conscious sight, designed to create a 'reverse psychology' effect on smokers. Amusing stuff that.
40 posted on 11/26/2002 10:53:03 PM PST by MHGinTN
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To: AndrewC
Saurian Brandy!

I said, give me Saurian Brandy!

(I liked that episode).

41 posted on 11/26/2002 11:22:12 PM PST by altair
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To: Razzz
A Freeper posted this on the Muslem Humor thread last week...

Why aren't there any muslems on Star Trek?

Because it takes place in the future....

42 posted on 11/26/2002 11:26:45 PM PST by musicman
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To: cake_crumb; AndrewC
My wife is extremely brilliant at this observation thing. She can have a short conversation with someone and walk away with all kinds of information. She has saved me much disappointment and money by letting me know if someone is honest or not!

Observation is absolutely the thing. On the other hand, I have been playing the guitar for some years now. The goal there is to become so familiar with the instrument that the sound you want, and the action you take, is synonymous. No stopping and considering the process itself. At that point, creating music on the fly is 'intuitive'.

So, it can work from both extremes.
43 posted on 11/27/2002 3:22:36 AM PST by ovrtaxt
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To: ovrtaxt
No one here has read James Kirk's autobiography?? Tsk, tsk, tsk. I know, it won't be available til the 24th century. Anyway, the Captain Kirk Principle is: Risk is Our Business.
44 posted on 11/27/2002 3:40:15 AM PST by goldstategop
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To: Robert_Paulson2
"..intuition is baloney..."

Sorry, but YOU are full of baloney. Anyone scientist who has ever had a "flash of creative insight" knows that intuition (whatever its source), is very real.

The REAL problem comes when intuition is allowed to over-rule rational analysis. Intuition = discovery, rational examination = proof are the two halves of scientific progress.

45 posted on 11/27/2002 3:55:12 AM PST by Wonder Warthog
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To: goldstategop
No one here has read James Kirk's autobiography?? Tsk, tsk, tsk. I know, it won't be available til the 24th century. Anyway, the Captain Kirk Principle is: Risk is Our Business.

I prefer the Darth Vader principle:

"Asteroids do not concern me, Admiral. I want that ship, not excuses."

Meaning, "Results Are Our Business". ;)

Regards, Ivan
Webmaster, TheDarkSide.Net

46 posted on 11/27/2002 3:59:53 AM PST by MadIvan
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To: AndrewC
Bump.
47 posted on 11/27/2002 4:08:23 AM PST by Skooz
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To: EternalVigilance
And here I thought that the Captain Kirk principle was that 'if you're a bit player, never get into a shuttle craft'.

No, I believe it's "The Man In Charge should always surround himself with Red Shirts."

Last words on Star Trek: "Touch that glowing orb? If you say so, sir...."

48 posted on 11/27/2002 4:56:44 AM PST by Jonah Hex
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To: OKSooner; Robert_Paulson2
Damn right, Spock was a poofter. And all that verbal sparring between him and McCoy had major homosexual overtones - in fact, I always suspected that they had adjoining cabins, and partied together when they were off duty.
49 posted on 11/27/2002 6:35:20 AM PST by Chancellor Palpatine
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To: Robert_Paulson2
ALL that is "good" about what they are calling "intuition" here, is acgally internal "ods making" Las Vegas style, based on experiences as we have perceived them. And that is why raw "intuitions" cannot EVER be trusted without intellectual cognition.

Intuition has nothing to do with "odds-making." I would call it rather, "subconscious intellectual processing", thinking and reasoning that takes place without us being aware that we are doing it.

A lot of human communication is non-verbal. We communicate with body language, emotion, facial expressions, gestures, and even odors. The brain has been trained since childhood to pick up on these cues, but we often tend to ignore them as we grow older. I believe that what we call "feminine intution" is actually this subconscious processing; women seem to be more atuned to non-verbal cues than men are, although either sex is capable of it. Men are, in part, socially trained to ignore this type of perception as "feelings." Highly successful and clever people use this processing to augment their cognitive skills.

There's nothing mythical about intutition. And it's much more than simple probability estimating.

50 posted on 11/27/2002 6:45:33 AM PST by Cincinatus
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