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Backdrop Hides `Made in China' Labels
ABC News ^

Posted on 01/22/2003 4:26:40 PM PST by Karsus

ST. LOUIS Jan. 22 —

Someone went to great lengths to ensure the backdrop for President Bush's sales pitch Wednesday on his economic stimulus plan sent all the right messages and none of the wrong.

Bush delivered his remarks from a warehouse floor at JS Logistics, a trucking, courier and warehouse business that provided a visual image for his argument that his proposal carries economy-boosting benefits for small businesses. The audience was flanked on all sides by piles of cardboard boxes with additional piles in front of and behind his podium.

Each one of the hundreds of boxes had a piece of paper obscuring its "Made in China" label.

White House spokeswoman Claire Buchan laughingly attributed the clearly gargantuan paper-affixing effort to an "overzealous volunteer" on the president's advance team.

A backdrop made-to-order for the White House filled the space directly behind Bush, which is most likely to show up on TV news clips of the event. Blaring a logo of "Strengthening America's Economy," it exactly mimicked the real-life box piles, down to perfectly aligned shelves.

Except the boxes on the backdrop were labeled, "Made in the USA."


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government
KEYWORDS: ministryoftruth
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To: George from New England
"As much as I despise the Chinese Communists this couldn't happen if there wasn't complient US companies willing to import."

It's not "compliant US companies" that are the problem. It's a US Goverment trade policy that has given foreign governments and companies free reign in the US market to do anything they want. The US govenment has sold out US business and the American worker in its almost religious devotion to "free trade." Whose job or business will be next? Maybe yours? And yes, I agree that disloyal American companies also share much of the blame too.

51 posted on 01/22/2003 7:52:52 PM PST by StormEye
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To: DAnconia55
Who says the pie gets larger? Ask the telecom industry, or the internet industry...

Even if it does grow in the general sense of the word, if the pie grows at 5% but the number of entrants grows at 10%, the pie is smaller per entrant.

This creates inventories, leading to cyclical reduction in production and discounts on current stock.

And thus it is an inefficient model.

Secondly deeper discounting is only a short term surface fix. Also, the deeper the discount the smaller the profit.

52 posted on 01/22/2003 7:55:06 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: DAnconia55
The only solution that will keep us ahead, is to stop trying to build/make/do things that others can do cheaper.

Don't bother me until you read the link I posted in post #19

We need to be a nation of inventors, businessmen and engineers... We do not need textile workers

Hah. What a joke. Your brain I guess doesn't need your hands.

You lack ideas. Just all rhetoric. Get to reality.

53 posted on 01/22/2003 7:58:33 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: StormEye
The US govenment has sold out US business and the American worker in its almost religious devotion to "free trade."

I am somewhat with you, but I think it is not free trade that has done anything. Free trade is good. Imbalanced crap, referred to as "trade" is what screws us.

Free trade is a step up.

We need fair and free trade.

With China we have a glamourized purchasing agreement. We don't have "trade" because they don't buy jack.

54 posted on 01/22/2003 8:02:12 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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Comment #55 Removed by Moderator

To: DAnconia55
This creates inventories, leading to cyclical reduction in production and discounts on current stock.

A correction in production, or supply stocks is exactly what I refer to. Supply and demand are not connected when that happens.

56 posted on 01/22/2003 8:07:18 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: Karsus

57 posted on 01/22/2003 8:07:46 PM PST by Porterville
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To: maui_hawaii
Whats more is that Henry Ford had it right, and our corporations don't. Henry Ford paid the people who made the cars enough to afford their own products.

Henry Ford was an innovator, which allowed him to create a new market and new jobs, and his innovation allowed him to pay his workers well.

Now listen to president Bush's economic speeches. He never mentions innovation or creating new markets. Its always about farming, factories, or warehouses. Its about stimulating demand, so that already existing businesses will expand, but never about creating new up and comers that will challenge existing companies to expand or innovate to avoid getting replaced by the new guy.

58 posted on 01/22/2003 8:08:16 PM PST by Moonman62
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To: Karsus
This doesn't help with the Reagan Democrats.
Let's not forget Gephardts blunder also here in St. Louis back in 1988 blasting foreign owned companies while in a Moog plant (Italian co.)
59 posted on 01/22/2003 8:09:42 PM PST by Missouri
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To: Porterville

60 posted on 01/22/2003 8:10:31 PM PST by Porterville
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To: UnBlinkingEye
The joys of globalism, I wonder how long until Mexican truckers pick up and deliver the goods?

The Mexican campesinos keep shutting down the bridges with their NAFTA protests. Hopefully they'll get the piece of crap renegociated soon.

61 posted on 01/22/2003 8:18:03 PM PST by FITZ
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To: Moonman62
Innovation is definately in the works. I am all for it.

Necessity is the mother of invention though.

In a market where there is growth, there is opportunity.

Where there is growth, there is opportunity for the new guy to take that growth away from the other guy. In a down market though, its like trying to pry someone out of a foxhole.

Start-ups rarely win in a down economy. When you are sowing seeds, especially when they are young, you have to have the right conditions or they are easy to die.

As far as creating new markets, the FTAs IMO are just that. Giving us access to new markets. That is what I complain about so much. We give some jackass all the access in the world to our market, but we don't get anything from their market. And when we do negotiate access to their markets, someone comes in and undercuts our investment, thus stifling the real potential we could have reaped.

62 posted on 01/22/2003 8:19:52 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: Cicero
I doubt that Bush knew anything about it. The advance people set these things up.

It's too bad that only a volunteer understands the importance of Americans having jobs and that jobs aren't from the government subsidizes but from things being made in the USA.

63 posted on 01/22/2003 8:20:00 PM PST by FITZ
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To: Moonman62
Why was the president at a trucking and warehouse company? Does he really think they are going to lead our economy in economic growth and job creation?

The only other choice was a Walmart or Family Dollar. There's not many factories left for him to go to for pictures.

64 posted on 01/22/2003 8:23:14 PM PST by FITZ
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To: Moonman62
By the way, you never answered this question I posted to you before:

you:
except young growth companies won't be able to compete on that playng field,

me:
What makes you think they won't be able to compete?

Seriously, what is your reasoning? Is it that they won't be able to pay enough dividends, or that they won't win enough market share against big companies? That they won't attract investors?

Here is a question (assuming that smaller companies are less profitable than big ones): if you bought a small to medium cap company share @ $10. The market cap for the whole company was say $100 million but the company has been around for 30 years and they post slow growth. Annually though they pay a dividend of $1.25 per share.

Then there is big multinational XYZ... you buy theirs @$50 per share... and they pay on average $5 per share...which one is a better return for you, the small investor? ------

The Bush plan for tax free dividends will favor the small, and smaller guy.

65 posted on 01/22/2003 8:25:32 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: maui_hawaii
Corporate America needs to change its tune.

The problem is that it isn't corporate AMERICA anymore and more FTAs will only increase the rate at which corporations expatriate.

66 posted on 01/22/2003 8:32:53 PM PST by antidisestablishment
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To: maui_hawaii
You've been on FR awhile. You should know that you're not supposed to drag a debate from one thread to another. Anyway, I wiped the floor with your "irrational exuberance" comment and I'm going to finish the job tommorrow on the other thread. Good night.
67 posted on 01/22/2003 8:43:49 PM PST by Moonman62
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To: FITZ
The only other choice was a Walmart or Family Dollar. There's not many factories left for him to go to for pictures.

Or he could have visited a successful company like Dell in his old hometown. Instead, he's visiting all the companies Karl Marx would have visited if he'd done a tour touting his economic plan.

68 posted on 01/22/2003 8:48:00 PM PST by Moonman62
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To: Moonman62; Jim Robinson
I have been on FR about twice as long as it says... I posted under a different nick for over a year before using this one...

Yup, been here a while, and never heard that rule.

That is one of the good things about FR... to be able to cross reference. FR is for ideas and discussion. Ideas can be promoted or discredited through honest discussion.

Its not a bash (per say in this instance, so no need to be offended) against the Freeper, but why hash through all the same stuff we went through last week on another thread? Its going there in the exact same direction anyway. Why not just direct you there to the original thread if that is what you want to do?

I am an open minded guy, but there is no point trying to prove the same point to the same person 50 times, then next week have some "rule" stipulating that I can't refer to the original argument, refutation, or enlightenment that I might have had.

You wiped the floor??? I don't remember that... maybe I wasn't paying too much attention (I get a few bumps here and there so maybe I missed it). Was it when you said Alan Greenspan referred ONLY to large caps like IBM in his 'irrational exhuberance' statement?

How do you know that? Back it up. I am an open minded guy. Changed my mind a few times here on FR. I am not too prideful to do that. For some reason you are just sooo sure that Bush's plan won't benefit the small guy. Sounds like your position is written in stone, and no one can change it.

If you want to finish the job, go ahead. Just try to stay away from the outbursts. Anger is no argument.

Good night to you too.

69 posted on 01/22/2003 9:06:52 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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The President looked like a total fool on that stage. No doubt about it.


70 posted on 01/22/2003 9:20:53 PM PST by primeval patriot (It's people like you wot cause unrest!)
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To: maui_hawaii
Free trade is good. Imbalanced crap, referred to as "trade" is what screws us.

Bingo. I have no idea how free trade got corrupted into accessing massive pools of Third World slave labor.

Do these "free traders" think they're kidding anyone when they sign trade agreements with the poverty-stricken dregs of the global community, then turn around and claim they represent massive new markets for American high tech goods?

LOL, maybe some day, but it'll take years or decades and during that time the price we'll pay is lost American jobs.

So the good news is eventually we'll bring the whole world up to the US standard of living. The bad news is it'll take decades, and until it happens Americans will have to get used to not having jobs.

Hmmm, I wonder if Congress will support extending unemployment benefits for another 50 years?

71 posted on 01/22/2003 9:45:40 PM PST by Busted Keyboard
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To: Busted Keyboard
To me "trade relations" and "free trade" are not the same thing. Free Trade means a lot more than just importing cheap chinese stuff in a one way path.

Free Trade means the equal treatment of both parties. It means two way trade.

Trade relations on the other hand are often unfair and imbalanced. We give China a 5% tariff rate and they give us a 40% tarriff...

China trade is a classic example of a one way street.

Have you seen the latest issue of Forbes magazine? Go check out the article about labor in Asia.

How do sweat shops contribute to the economy?

72 posted on 01/22/2003 9:56:06 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: Busted Keyboard
Free Trade would be more like "we give Australia access to our markets without government interference." In turn Australia does the same to us.

Under that arrangement we are free to compete head on, without crutches or barriers.

73 posted on 01/22/2003 9:58:39 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: Karsus
He is responsable for the actions of his staff.

Exactly!

74 posted on 01/22/2003 10:11:31 PM PST by Dajjal
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To: Joe Hadenuf
bump
75 posted on 01/22/2003 10:12:21 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: maui_hawaii
Have you seen the latest issue of Forbes magazine? Go check out the article about labor in Asia.

Thanks. I will.

Bob Zoellick had a lengthy piece in the Dec 7th Economist preaching the usual free trade gospel. Not surprisingly, there was nothing substantial addressing the effects of the Uruguay round on US jobs, let alone the in-progress DDA (Doha Development Agenda).

It seems clearer every day that -- in almost every conceivable way -- there is a widening chasm between America's political elites and her average citizens.

76 posted on 01/22/2003 10:13:43 PM PST by Busted Keyboard
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Comment #77 Removed by Moderator

To: maui_hawaii
Right.

However, the majority of labor is a commodity whose relative cost is primarily determined by the local housing costs, the government-imposed taxation and regulatory burden, and the exchange rate. America cannot compete labor-for-labor with most Third World countries because all three of these make America far more expensive.

And those who believe so-called productivity will save this country's jobs are deluding themselves. Any productivity-enhancing plant or equipment can be equally well used in Pittsburgh or Shenzen.

78 posted on 01/22/2003 10:27:30 PM PST by Busted Keyboard
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To: Busted Keyboard
You are nailing it.

Labor though to some IS nothing more than a commodity. That though is an absolute FOOLISH way to look at it. I seriously cannot stand arrogant assholes who think like that. They deserve to perish in ruin for an attitude like that. I cannot describe how I hate people like that.

Labor is our market. That is the key! Its not where we get labor, its where we sell! We sell and make money when people do well. That is what we want is for people to do well. Doing well, in whatever station in life you are, whether its finance director, or maid, makes for a consumer.

Out of work people don't buy houses or cars. They don't get and repay loans.

We want success. Racing to the bottom of the pay chart is not the best option for us. Cheap labor equals cheap consumers, particularly referring to market development.

The asshole attitude that DAnconia55 used when he said We need to be a nation of inventors, businessmen and engineers... We do not need textile workers is absolute ignorance. It needs to be rooted from the republican mindset. It is nothing more than hateful propaganda of no use.

79 posted on 01/22/2003 10:50:57 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: maui_hawaii
Don't get me wrong. I am not bashing inventors, investors, engineers, or any of that.

I think its great.

To think everyone in the nation will achieve that is not realistic. In order to have a healthy economy we should have a range of things in it. Not just one thing. There should be a progressive ladder which people can progress up. Specifically textiles is not the issue.

Are you familiar with the Bible? There is a part where the writer says, "the eye doesn't say to the hand, I have no need of thee..."

80 posted on 01/22/2003 10:59:58 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: Karsus
But WHICH China?
During the Clinton Years, "Made in Tiawan" was replaced with "MADE IN CHINA".
81 posted on 01/22/2003 11:15:52 PM PST by PizzaDriver (an heinleinian/libertarian)
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To: maui_hawaii
I understand what you're saying and I agree with you.

IMO, the world is entering the post-nation-state era. People are being divided into two camps: the globalists who are willing to cast aside allegiances to any country for the sake of making a profit, and the conservative nationalists who still believe there is value in preserving the history and traditions of the nation-state.

Conervative nationalists -- while embracing capitalism and a free-market economy -- also believe in ensuring their own country has a healthy, strong, diversified economy, with jobs for all those who are willing to work. Conservative nationalists are willing to put country before profit.

To globalists, countries don't matter -- profit does. Globalists put profit before country. They are willing to see the US become the Appalachia of the global economy as long as their corporations continue to make money.

IMO.
82 posted on 01/22/2003 11:18:29 PM PST by Busted Keyboard
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To: Busted Keyboard
They are willing to see the US become the Appalachia of the global economy as long as their corporations continue to make money.

Bump. Definately.

The problem with these guys is they want everything from America, but they don't want to give anything to America.

Like I said before, the right way is like ranching. You have to fatten the herd, and constantly nurture before you can eventually reap what you want from them.

When its time to butcher the animal, you don't kill the whole herd. You take the one that is ready to be taken. That way, tommorrow you still have a herd.

83 posted on 01/22/2003 11:26:26 PM PST by maui_hawaii
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To: FR_addict
Bush will address the Mexican border before he gets to thinking about our thoughts on China.
84 posted on 01/31/2003 8:52:46 AM PST by B4Ranch
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To: Busted Keyboard
Globalists put profit before country.
Good points. Let me just note: profit=control, country=its ideals. So, you got quite close. The globalists agenda is murder... of an ideal, of a dream... You know which one, right?
85 posted on 05/29/2003 8:22:50 PM PDT by singsong
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To: TLBSHOW
These little stupid things are adding up fast.

And they still are...

86 posted on 01/08/2004 2:31:34 PM PST by Paul Ross (Reform Islam Now! -- Nuke Mecca!)
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To: Paul Ross
way old news
87 posted on 01/08/2004 2:33:03 PM PST by rbessenger
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To: DAnconia55; Cannoneer No. 4
We do not need textile workers.

Right... Let's just crawl to China for our Soldier's uniforms.

88 posted on 01/08/2004 2:33:19 PM PST by Paul Ross (Reform Islam Now! -- Nuke Mecca!)
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To: deport; maui_hawaii; bvw; JohnHuang2
Notice how the pictures from this embarrassment have been expunged virtually everywhere???
89 posted on 01/08/2004 2:41:22 PM PST by Paul Ross (Reform Islam Now! -- Nuke Mecca!)
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To: rbessenger
Notice how the photos from this have been expunged virtually everywhere. Not so old news evidently that someone has not gone to some trouble to clean up after the mess...
90 posted on 01/08/2004 2:42:58 PM PST by Paul Ross (Reform Islam Now! -- Nuke Mecca!)
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To: bvw
Yes, all the healthcare and related supporting industries
are doing all right. However The number of uninsured people continues to grow as low quality (low pay, minimum benefits) service jobs fill the economic void left from the transfer to China of our manufacturing base.
Eventually you will see severe financial crises arise in the healthcare industry from people not being able to pay for services or expensive health insurance or the latest wonder drugs.
91 posted on 03/09/2004 7:57:26 PM PST by new world odor
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To: StormEye
There is nothing more delightful to the international banking cartel than slave labor
92 posted on 03/09/2004 8:02:52 PM PST by claptrap
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To: StormEye
There is nothing more delightful to the international banking cartel than slave labor
93 posted on 03/09/2004 8:02:56 PM PST by claptrap
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To: Karsus
Oh, my. Where is saint pat buchanan when we need him to lead us out of this unholy situation?

We are doomed, we are doomed.

94 posted on 03/09/2004 8:04:23 PM PST by CWOJackson (What are you complaining about, she called me compassionate...)
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To: Paul Ross
The Army uses hats from China!
95 posted on 03/09/2004 8:05:40 PM PST by claptrap
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To: claptrap; Cannoneer No. 4; harpseal; Travis McGee; Jeff Head; bvw
Berets, actually. The Black ones that they reassigned from Special Forces distinction, and bastardized to everyone in the Army.

But this particular outsourcing won't stop there. Soon, with the collapse of the American textile industry, the whole uniform, and all their boots, will be made there.

We already outsource 50% of our military hardware, and the Administration won't defend the old Reagan-Standard of at least 65% U.S. content. Next we'll be 'outsourcing' our armed forces so that we can hire a million Indians and Mexicans to fight for us at 10% of what we pay our troops.

And that is the way Rome went down the toilet. Rome outsourced all its military know-how and jobs to foreign tribes, and its citizens preoccupied themselves with debauchery, corruption, bread and circuses. Patriotic sentiment died.

Next thing they knew the barbarians they had armed, and trained in their methods were at the gates. Rome was conquered.

96 posted on 03/10/2004 7:54:37 AM PST by Paul Ross ("A country that cannot control its borders isn't really a country any more."-President Ronald Reagan)
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To: Paul Ross
"Next we'll be 'outsourcing' our armed forces so that we can hire a million Indians and Mexicans to fight for us at 10% of what we pay our troops."

We're already doing that in Iraq. We're footing the bill for the Polish and other Eastern European contingents.
97 posted on 03/10/2004 8:00:11 AM PST by LN2Campy
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To: maui_hawaii

"Its not trade. Its purchasing."

Uhhhh, yeah.


98 posted on 09/18/2004 1:55:43 PM PDT by Attention Surplus Disorder (You get more with a gun and a smile than just a smile itself!)
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