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Willis, Director Give New Leg to Refugee, (Support Willis at the Box Office)
Gwinnett Daily Post ^ | Friday, March 7, 2003 | AP

Posted on 03/07/2003 9:57:06 PM PST by fight_truth_decay

CLARKSTON — After appearing in the new Bruce Willis movie ‘‘Tears of the Sun,’’ John Anyak received a special gift from Willis and the movie’s director, Antoine Fuqua.

They spent $20,000 to buy a new artificial leg for the Sudanese refugee to replace the one he wore out in four months of filming in the jungles of Hawaii.

‘‘They did something I will never forget,’’ Anyak said. Anyak, who lives in an east Atlanta suburb, had no acting experience, but the movie needed someone to play the role of an African war amputee. Anyak lost his left leg during the civil war in Sudan in the 1980s.

‘‘I was worried because I didn’t know how to do it,’’ Anyak said. ‘‘How will I go there, and I don’t know how to do the movie?’’

His anxiety subsided after Willis chatted with him and five Sudanese friends from the Atlanta area who also had roles in the movie, which opens Friday.

‘‘Everybody liked us because Bruce liked us,’’ Anyak said. Anyak was separated from his parents when he was about 8 and joined thousands of boys wandering East Africa. Anyak said a bullet smashed into his left leg as he ran from attackers one night.

‘‘You think you will die when you’re shot and nobody is with you,’’ he said. ‘‘You think a lot of things.’’ He received a wooden leg and crutches and was sent to a Kenyan refugee camp, where he and thousands of others spent nearly 10 years. They came to be called the Lost Boys of Sudan. About 3,800 have resettled in the United States.

In Georgia, Anyak got an artificial leg from David Holcomb, a Canton man who owns a prosthetics company. When Holcomb got a call from a Hollywood production company looking for African amputees, he contacted Anyak.

‘‘I couldn’t imagine going through’’ what they did, said Fuqua, who also directed ‘‘Training Day.’’ ‘‘You look in their faces and look in their eyes and it keeps you honest.’’

On Monday, Anyak attended a private screening of the movie in Atlanta with friends who are also in the movie — Gam Awino, Gabriel Gai, Santino Garang, Abraham Nhiany and Nathaniel Nyok.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: barbarity; brucewillis; democracy; diplomacy; ethniccleansing; greed; lostboys; massacres; tearsofthesun; unitednations; war
About the film

"In real life, the 47-year-old action star laments that not enough credit is given to the nation's military. ``These guys are the real heroes,'' he said. ``I'm just an actor.''

As a small gesture of support -- and at the urging of his youngest daughter, Tallulah -- Willis had 12,000 boxes of Girl Scout cookies shipped to American soldiers stationed in Afghanistan last year.

The New Jersey-raised actor and outspoken Republican said he wouldn't mind spending the rest of his career playing military men on the screen. Entertainment News

Mixed reviews on this film, but if planning to see a movie this weekend; let's put out money down at the box office and support Willis in 'Tears of the Sun'.

1 posted on 03/07/2003 9:57:06 PM PST by fight_truth_decay
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To: All
Willis, who turns 48 on March 19, sits down with journalists for what turns into a casual, civil and thoughtful conversation about his new film Tears Of The Sun, which opens today. It was shot a year ago in extremely rugged conditions on a remote, rain-soaked part of the Hawaiian island of Oahu.

QUESTION: Why talk at all?

BRUCE WILLIS: "I don't avoid it. Look, to be honest with you, the whole system of sending actors out to promote films is something that I've always found a little awkward. If I could get away with not doing it, I wouldn't do it. But it's part of the culture of films and part of the business of what is a huge, huge business that you're (the media) part of as well. It's part of promoting a film and I'm very proud of this film."

Q: What makes Tears different from most action movies?

BW: "I don't think this is just an action picture. It's a drama, I guess, at heart. And it's a rescue mission. It's about a group of eight Navy SEALs who try to help people get out harm's way."

Q: That could still be played as action cliche. What distinguishes this one from all the others?

BW: "Well, there's a lot of heart in this film. Look, all films, except for comedies, are really about good triumphing over evil. It's all basically the same story. (But) I'm glad you saw the subtleties that we got into the film. We worked very hard on it. This is, by far, the hardest film I've ever done, both physically and emotionally."

Q: You play the commander of the SEALs. If you did not become a movie star, could you see yourself as one?

BW: "I don't know. But those guys are my heroes. I did a lot of research on the Navy SEALs, and what they have to go through, and I'm not sure I'd be able to survive that. It's a pretty tough training program they have to go through."

Q: Choosing the real military pack and not the fake "Hollywood" pack stuff with foam and rubber, you trained for the film with retired SEALs vet Harry Humphries, who also worked on Black Hawk Down. Describe the sessions.

BW: "If you want to lose about 18 pounds, put on a 65-pound pack, go to Hawaii and run through the jungles in 100-degree heat."

Q: What is the most impressive thing about the real deal?

BW: "Just the code of ethics of the Navy SEALs -- how strong that is and how anonymously they do their jobs. I mean, they are heroes, but they are unsung heroes."

Q: Your co-star, Italian Monica Bellucci, said you were extremely generous as a co-star. What about her?

BW: "I think she's a terrific actress and, I think you would agree, she is very easy to look at. Even with that mud on her."

Q: Speaking of mud, and the tough conditions of the shoot, what was the most difficult scene to mount?

BW: "You know, I don't think there was one easy day, one easy scene. But we got to do some really fun things. We actually got to go on an aircraft carrier. That was really an amazing experience. That is one of the cool things about the job that I have -- I get to go places and see things and do things that a lot of other people don't get to do. I was standing probably 10 feet away from an F-16 taking off on this aircraft carrier deck and it was a singular experience."

Q: You don't sound jaded about being an actor. Is that true?

BW: "I still love acting. I'm still challenged by it. I still get a big kick out of it. If I could paint, I would paint. If I could sculpt, I would do that. But one of the things you guys seldom write about is the fact that acting, for actors, is an artistic expression. It's a way to express yourself creatively and I still enjoy it. I still enjoy acting a lot."

Q: After the failure of Hart's War, which was set in World War II, was making another war movie a concern?

BW: "I don't think you can tell enough stories about soldiers and the very, very difficult job that soldiers all over the world have. And that is to keep the bad guys on the other side of the line."

Q: Does your action-hero image get in the way of acting?

BW: "No. I think people make that association less these days. And it doesn't bother me. I work hard on every film that I do. I have so little control over how a film is received or perceived."

Q: What role does your blues-rock band play in your life?

BW: "You know, music is the last thing I get to do that I don't have to assign any financial reward to -- for (what are) apparent reasons: I'm not a very good singer. But I have a ball playing music and it's nice to have something that is really a hobby that I still get to do. It's just a hoot." -- BRUCE KIRKLANDINTERVIEW-- Toronto Sun March 7, 2003


2 posted on 03/07/2003 10:06:24 PM PST by fight_truth_decay (Occupied)
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To: fight_truth_decay
I'd like to let you know that you have convinced one man. Haven't been the movies in a while. Will go see this one. I'm committed to it. Thanks.
3 posted on 03/07/2003 10:07:12 PM PST by bluefish
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To: fight_truth_decay
I wouldn't support a movie star at the box office, because of his politics, though I reserve the right to refuse to plunk down my money for one whose politics I despise. If I thought this movie was any good, I'd consider seeing it, but since even the trailers look like horsepoop, and Steve Sailer said it has virtually no screenplay, AND that Willis is lousy in it, I think I'll spend my money on something else.
4 posted on 03/07/2003 10:09:32 PM PST by mrustow
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To: fight_truth_decay
BRUCE BUMP........
5 posted on 03/07/2003 10:10:15 PM PST by JulieRNR21 (Take W-04........Across America!)
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To: fight_truth_decay
P.S. Maybe ten years ago, the New York Post smuggled a party crasher into some exclusive soiree, miked him, and had a photographer follow him around. He said hello to the Willises. When Mr. Willis found out the guy was just an ordinary Joe, he lectured him about not knowing his place, before storming off.

I guess Willis had forgotten that not too long before, he had been working in a factory. I wonder how he would have appreciated some Hollywood producer lecturing him that he didn't know his place, and that he should go back to the factory in Jersey.

Fortunately for me, when I see Willis performing in a movie, being interviewed on TV, or sitting in for David Letterman, I rarely recall what a pathetic snob he really is.

Indeed, I wish I didn't know anything about any performers' politics or stupid personalities. Such knowledge makes it much harder to enjoy them as performers (think Barbra Streisand, Vanessa Redgrave, Tom Cruise, et al.). Unfortunately, they insist on letting the whole world know how human, all-too-human they are.

6 posted on 03/07/2003 10:26:10 PM PST by mrustow
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To: mrustow
I don't know if I trust a lot of the leftist film critics who are reviewing this film. I read at least a dozen reviews for this movie today, and I detected definite signs of bias against it, reviewers complaining more about the films politics (pro-military, pro-intervention) than the movie itself. Stephen Hunter of the Washington Post, who usually nails it, gave the film an unqualified rave. I'm definitely seeing this one tomorrow.
7 posted on 03/07/2003 10:40:05 PM PST by motexva (Cool site I saw today - antiwarcelebwatch.blogspot.com)
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To: fight_truth_decay
A Die-Hard Hollywood Republican bump.
8 posted on 03/07/2003 11:29:27 PM PST by Dr. Eckleburg
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To: All
anyone know how to send mr willis support email regarding this?
9 posted on 03/07/2003 11:49:15 PM PST by way-right-of-center (it's easy to hide when no one is looking)
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To: fight_truth_decay
I think we need a page to honor those in the entertainment industry who support our nation. Willis is a good guy. I support the idea that we spend some bucks on his film this weekend. I'd also like to see him and others highlighted on a web page for their loyalty.

If folks will send me names, I'll take care of it.

Free Republic Network Freeps Ahoy Cruise Thread - Sign Up Today! The FRN Radio Free Republic Free Republic Network Sign Bank Info on the Mother of All Rallies - Due Soon! FRN Los Angeles Chapter - Notes


10 posted on 03/08/2003 12:46:07 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Are you going Freeps Ahoy! Don't miss the boat. Er ship...)
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To: DoughtyOne
Bruce Willis is a class act both as a human being and actor. He gave $20,000 of his own money from this movie to help John Anyak, a Sudanese refugee get a new artificial leg. Liberals talk about compassion but conservatives actually practice it. And one should see Tears Of The Sun despite what the leftist film critics say because its a tribute to our nation's military. Now you can guess why the Left hates this film: they despise our military and then they loathe Bruce's politics. Two good reasons to watch this actor and this is his best bravura performance since Die Hard . Yeah, he always knows how to take out the bad guys on screen, LOL!
11 posted on 03/08/2003 2:32:48 AM PST by goldstategop
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To: motexva
RottenTomatoes.com rounds up all the movie reviews on the net, and they have this one at 35% positive overall, but among the major recognized critics, it's 47% positive, about an even split. To check them all out, go to http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/TearsoftheSun-1120908/

I have a feeling that a lot of the negatives arise from the leftist, anti-military politics of the reviewers. I subscribe to Entertainment Weekly for the radio comedy service I write, but it galls me the way they constantly insert their liberal views and little digs at Bush and Republicans into stories that have no relation to politics. I think they just hang out with people who all "think" exactly the same way they do, and they are so used to being leftist a-holes, they don't even realize they're letting it pop up in their writing. They probably think, "I'm not making a political statement! I'm just saying what everyone thinks!" And obviously, their editors "think" the same way, because it always makes it into the magazine. They'd better be glad I'm not their editor, or my blue pencil and I would teach them a few basic journalism lessons PDQ.

12 posted on 03/08/2003 3:56:29 AM PST by HHFi
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To: fight_truth_decay
Those who like Willis' other movies will probably go to see this one.

It is much the same as the others, only noticeably slower.

Belluci displays generous, uh... virtues. According to a brief net search (watch out for the pop-ups) she will be in Matrix Reloaded too.

Hart's War was a much better movie, although it was also slow (too slow, imho) in places. But Hart's War had some real characters, and a better plot, while Tears had just cardboard characters and a predictable plot.

The aircraft carrier scenes (landings and takeoffs) were cool for hardware junkies, and the jungle scenes made one wonder where it was actually filmed. Tom Skerritt gives a good supporting role as Willis' commander on the carrier.

It think most of those predisposed to like Willis will still like the movie.

13 posted on 03/08/2003 4:08:45 AM PST by SteveH
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To: mrustow
I will support Willis for standing up in support of our military men and women; and while this will not be an academy award winning film, I think I can part with the $6.50. If you want an excellent film you might want to see The Pianist. I didn't want to support this director, but this film all Americans should see.

Respectfully

f_t_d
14 posted on 03/08/2003 6:54:29 AM PST by fight_truth_decay (Occupied)
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To: goldstategop
Willis also tried to enlist, but the cut off age is 34.
15 posted on 03/08/2003 6:57:25 AM PST by fight_truth_decay (Occupied)
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To: mrustow
People change..I am sure you have changed, I know I have!
16 posted on 03/08/2003 6:59:19 AM PST by fight_truth_decay (Occupied)
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To: SteveH
I enjoy watching how promotions for movies evolve. I noticed how the promotions for this movie kept changing. A few weeks ago, commercials aired scenes backed up with an unsuitable sound track of what passes for rock music and a tag line that claimed this was the best war movie since 'Black Hawk Down'. The sound track didn't seem to fit (though that could just be that I am getting old). That they claimed it was the best since Black Hawk Down didn't say much since not many war movies have come out since then (not many that I am aware of). The commercials then changed to a sound track better suited for a war movie (dramatic crescendos et al) and a claim that ties the movie in with the star; the best movie since Die Hard. Big shoes to fill IMHO, but no matter, Die Hard was then, this is now. Still, much of this movie seemed more akin to the laborious scenes in LOTR:TTT wherein Treebeard, Merry and Pippin (sic?) are walking, and walking, and walking, and, lamenting, and walking, and pontificating, and walking ad nauseam (ducking for cover).

I agree with things you sited about the movie; it was slow, had a limp plot, was predictable, and filled flat characters- all together about 30 minutes of usable stuff stretched out to 118 minutes. Perhaps the producers (or whoever makes such calls) could have re-tooled the movie, as they seemed to do with the promotions (at some immeasurable cost, financially and artistically).

All that said, I went in expecting nothing too similar to Die Hard. I wasn't disappointed. Laced between all the walking, there are scenes that are extremely graphic (I noticed a father and his two young daughters walk out, probably a good idea) and scenes that pull at the heart strings. The movie closes with a quote from Edmund Burke, that probably should have been part of the opening credits, "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing". And that made it all worth while.
17 posted on 03/08/2003 7:30:43 AM PST by new cruelty
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To: All

Monica Bellucci

Frank Masi

18 posted on 03/08/2003 8:26:59 AM PST by fight_truth_decay (Occupied)
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To: goldstategop
I agree that Bruce is a class act.
19 posted on 03/08/2003 8:52:49 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Are you going Freeps Ahoy! Don't miss the boat. Er ship...)
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To: DoughtyOne
please see www.hollywood-hero.us That's where we honor past Hollywood Heroes and the new generation of actors brave enough to support President Bush
20 posted on 03/08/2003 9:32:31 AM PST by lisaann8
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To: lisaann8
Hey, that's great. Thanks.
21 posted on 03/08/2003 9:40:03 AM PST by DoughtyOne (Are you going Freeps Ahoy! Don't miss the boat. Er ship...)
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To: SteveH
Belluci displays generous, uh... virtues. According to a brief net search (watch out for the pop-ups) she will be in Matrix Reloaded too.

Monica Belluci will play Mary Magdalen in Mel Gibson's upcoming "The Passion".

22 posted on 03/08/2003 10:00:11 AM PST by montag813
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To: fight_truth_decay
I will support Willis for standing up in support of our military men and women; and while this will not be an academy award winning film, I think I can part with the $6.50. If you want an excellent film you might want to see The Pianist. I didn't want to support this director, but this film all Americans should see.

Respectfully

f_t_d

Talk about out of the fry pan, and into the fire! I definitely won't be paying $10 (what tickets cost in NYC) to see a movie by a rapist who has stayed out of jail by being a fugitive from justice for the past 25 years. I know, I'm a real difficult customer.

Truth be told, since our son came into the world three years ago, I only get out to see a movie at most once a year, so I'll probably pass on both of these guys. The last two flicks I saw were About a Boy and The Royal Tenenbaums.

It being my one-year anniversary since I saw a new movie in a thee-ay-tuh, if I could get out to see one in the next week or so, the candidates would be: About Schmidt, Adaptation, The Quiet American, Catch Me If You Can, Narc and Gods and Generals, in that order. I'm tempted to add, Gangs of New York, since I love Scorcese, and I'm familiar with the subject matter, but I've heard it wasn't that good.

23 posted on 03/08/2003 11:37:40 AM PST by mrustow
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To: motexva
I don't know if I trust a lot of the leftist film critics who are reviewing this film. I read at least a dozen reviews for this movie today, and I detected definite signs of bias against it, reviewers complaining more about the films politics (pro-military, pro-intervention) than the movie itself. Stephen Hunter of the Washington Post, who usually nails it, gave the film an unqualified rave. I'm definitely seeing this one tomorrow.

The following review comes from Steve Sailer, who is my favorite movie critic, one of my favorite writers (along with Mark Steyn, Thomas Sowell, Paul Craig Roberts, Fred Reed and Nicholas Stix), and who is most definitely a conservative (he's one of the stars at vdare.com, which is way too conservative for JimRob's taste).

Film of the Week: 'Tears of the Sun'

By Steve Sailer
UPI National Correspondent
From the Life & Mind Desk
Published 3/6/2003 3:15 PM

LOS ANGELES, March 6 (UPI) -- For decades, Hollywood saw Africa as a sunny setting where white folks like Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn or Robert Redford and Meryl Streep could enjoy outdoor adventure and romance. As anti-colonialist sensitivities hardened, however, nostalgic portrayals of glamorous and benevolent settlers have become politically unacceptable.

Meanwhile, in the real world, the more the colonial era fades into the past, the worse the news from Africa gets. Massacres, corruption, famine, and now disease dominate the few column inches the newspapers devote to Africa.

Not surprisingly, filmmakers have responded, like most of us, by largely losing interest in Africa. Thus, it was surprising to see ads touting a new Bruce Willis action drama set in Nigeria.

"Tears of the Sun" begins with fictional but unfortunately believable CNN coverage of a coup by the northern Muslim Fulani tribe, followed by massacres of the southern Christian Ibos in the horrific tradition of Rwanda and Sierra Leone.

Willis plays the leader of a Navy SEAL commando unit sent to evacuate a beautiful lady mission doctor. After seeing the carnage first-hand, Willis violate his orders and help her Ibo refugees walk to the Cameroon border. The SEALS find Muslim soldiers ethnically cleansing an Ibo village and annihilate them. Then an elite Fulani force chases them through the jungle. At the end, there's a really big explosion.

And that's about it. "Tears of the Sun" has one of the most minimal scripts I've ever seen. About 80 minutes into the two-hour movie, for example, there's a plot development where we learn why they are being followed. It's not well crafted -- no attempt was made to prefigure it -- but I thought to myself, "Hey, at least it's a plot development. Something is better than nothing."

"Tears" resembles a slow, despondent remake of Arnold Schwarzenegger's "Predator." In that minor classic, a similar crew of commandos is also stalked through the tropical forest, but by a vacationing hunter from outer space who intends to mount Arnold's stuffed head over his interstellar fireplace. He's a genuine sportsman (sportsalien?) who at the end strips off his superweapons and honorably challenges Arnold to duke it out man-to-monster. Too bad "Tears" doesn't have any human characters as fleshed out as "Predator's" space monkey.

Remember when Bruce Willis was funny? In recent years, his underlying sadness seems to have been winning the battle with his wit. The once arrogant wisecracker has become ever more self-effacing onscreen. I don't know whether this stems from newfound moral wisdom or clinical depression, but I fear Gloomy Gus can't give too many more charisma-free performances like this one and remain a huge star.

The rest of the cast is also glum, with the most memorable performance turned in by a violently yawning baboon.

Reports from the set in Hawaii indicate that Willis and Antoine Fuqua, the director best known for 2001's powerful "Training Day" (for which Denzel Washington won the Oscar), were at loggerheads over script and tone. Fuqua and Willis seem to have compromised by simply eliminating everything that they couldn't agree upon.

Fuqua wanted a downbeat depiction of genocide demonstrating the need for Western interventions. The film ends with Edmund Burke's famous line, "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." In contrast, Willis wanted it to be more entertaining.

Fuqua appears to have come out on top, since "Tears" is certainly not entertaining.

Still, Fuqua, who is black, is an interesting filmmaker because he ignores white Hollywood's stereotype that blacks are automatically more virtuous than whites. Fuqua's "Training Day" was refreshing because the corrupt policeman was black and the innocent one white (in contrast to the recent cop flop "Dark Blue").

Fuqua's dour film fails to convey the engaging cheerfulness and vivacity of Africans. By portraying the Ibos only as generic tragic victims, it doesn't help us care about them. Scenes of Fulanis slaughtering Ibos just made me want to think about something else. Only the most saintly of humanitarians can avoid falling into despair over Africa.

Instead, the continent's enduring appeal has been to more macho souls -- hunters, pilots, farmers, even mercenaries, many of whom can't seem to stay away from Africa.

"Tears" did not make me want to dispatch American boys into African wars. Yet, sometimes a little force can help humanity.

Consider the coming famine in Zimbabwe. A friend of mine with much experience organizing covert military operations says that, if given a moderate investment, he could put together a mercenary force to remove the catastrophe's main cause, racist President Robert Mugabe. My friend, though, would just wind up in the dock of the International Court in The Hague. So, he asks, why bother?

-0-

"Tears" is rated R for strong war violence, some brutality, and language.Copyright © 2001-2003 United Press International
 

24 posted on 03/08/2003 11:54:54 AM PST by mrustow
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To: motexva
P.S. The link follows:

Sailer on Tears of the Sun

25 posted on 03/08/2003 11:57:00 AM PST by mrustow
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To: fight_truth_decay
You might be interested in the review I posted at #24.
26 posted on 03/08/2003 11:58:23 AM PST by mrustow
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To: SteveH
The aircraft carrier scenes (landings and takeoffs) were cool for hardware junkies, and the jungle scenes made one wonder where it was actually filmed.

On a Hawaiian island.

27 posted on 03/08/2003 12:03:25 PM PST by mrustow
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To: mrustow
I think Sailer got it mostly right.

Black Hawk Down, Die Hard, Predator, and Gangs of New York are much better movies-- that's just my opinion. Predator, for example, draws one's attention and never lets go. I caught it on videotape and discovered that if I start watching it, it is hard to stop.

However, Sailer did bring up a couple of good points. One is that this bucks classical African movie stereotypes. I recall thinking that that was interesting and made the movie less unenjoyable than if it had been situated in, say, South Central.

But with Monica and all the SEAL lingo and hardware, still decidedly along the lines of a conventional "guy" flick.

On the basis of a treatment of a relatively little-known period in American history and the strength of acting, I can very much recommend Gangs of New York.

The chief competition for me to Tears were (in order) The Pianist and The Quiet American. (I'm believe Polanski is on the lam for statutory, but it seems to be orthogonal to his directing talents.) Anyone seen both? --Maybe next weekend...

28 posted on 03/08/2003 1:20:56 PM PST by SteveH
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To: SteveH
Actually, Polanski was not up for statutory, because the girl, though allegedly willing (according to the probation report), was only 13, and thus too young to give informed consent, and under the influence of alcohol (champagne) and drugs (qualuudes) he had given her.

Andy Vachss' Polanski File

29 posted on 03/08/2003 2:18:37 PM PST by mrustow
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To: mrustow
Yuck. Maybe I had read one Hollywierd press release too many...
30 posted on 03/08/2003 2:45:25 PM PST by SteveH
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To: HHFi
"I suscribe to Entertainment Weekly for the radio comedy service I write, but it galls me the way they constantly insert their liberal bias views and little digs at Bush and Republicans into stories that have no relation to politics..."

...One of major reasons I cancelled my subscription with EW and gave a portion of it the Bible League. Also, their consistent Gay-fawning and praising of thug Rappers was more than I could stand.

-Regards, T.
31 posted on 03/08/2003 3:27:41 PM PST by T Lady (.Freed From the Dimocratic Shackles since 1992)
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