Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Top 100 April Fool's Day Hoaxes of All Time
Museum of Hoaxes ^ | today | unknown

Posted on 04/01/2003 12:54:23 PM PST by Feiny

Top 100 April Fool's Day Hoaxes of All Time: 1-20


#1: The Swiss Spaghetti Harvest
In 1957 the respected BBC news show Panorama announced that thanks to a very mild winter and the virtual elimination of the dreaded spaghetti weevil, Swiss farmers were enjoying a bumper spaghetti crop. It accompanied this announcement with footage of Swiss peasants pulling strands of spaghetti down from trees. Huge numbers of viewers were taken in, and many called up wanting to know how they could grow their own spaghetti trees. To this question, the BBC diplomatically replied that they should "place a sprig of spaghetti in a tin of tomato sauce and hope for the best." -More-

spaghetti harvest

#2: San Serriffe
In 1977 the British newspaper The Guardian published a special seven-page supplement in honor of the tenth anniversary of San Serriffe, a small republic located in the Indian Ocean consisting of several semi-colon-shaped islands. A series of articles affectionately described the geography and culture of this obscure nation. Its two main islands were named Upper Caisse and Lower Caisse. Its capital was Bodoni, and its leader was General Pica. The Guardian's phones rang all day as readers sought more information about the idyllic holiday spot. Few noticed that everything about the island was named after printer's terminology. The success of this hoax is widely credited with launching the enthusiasm for April Foolery that then gripped the British tabloids in the following decades. -More-

#3: Sidd Finch
In its April 1985 edition, Sports Illustrated published a story about a new rookie pitcher who planned to play for the Mets. His name was Sidd Finch and he could reportedly throw a baseball with startling, pinpoint accuracy at 168 mph (65 mph faster than anyone else has ever been able to throw a ball). Surprisingly, Sidd Finch had never even played the game before. Instead, he had mastered the "art of the pitch" in a Tibetan monastery under the guidance of the "great poet-saint Lama Milaraspa." Mets fans everywhere celebrated at their teams's amazing luck at having found such a gifted player, and Sports Illustrated was flooded with requests for more information. But in reality this legendary player only existed in the imagination of the writer of the article, George Plimpton. -More-

Sidd Finch

#4: The Taco Liberty Bell
In 1996 the Taco Bell Corporation announced that it had bought the Liberty Bell from the federal government and was renaming it the Taco Liberty Bell. Hundreds of outraged citizens called up the National Historic Park in Philadelphia where the bell is housed to express their anger. Their nerves were only calmed when Taco Bell revealed that it was all a joke a few hours later. The best line inspired by the affair came when White House press secretary Mike McCurry was asked about the sale, and he responded that the Lincoln Memorial had also been sold, though to a different corporation, and would now be known as the Ford Lincoln Mercury Memorial. -More-

Taco Liberty Bell

#5: Nixon for President
In 1992 National Public Radio's Talk of the Nation program announced that Richard Nixon, in a surprise move, was running for President again. His new campaign slogan was, "I didn't do anything wrong, and I won't do it again." Accompanying this announcement were audio clips of Nixon delivering his candidacy speech. Listeners responded viscerally to the announcement, flooding the show with calls expressing shock and outrage. Only during the second half of the show did the host John Hockenberry reveal that the announcement was a joke. Nixon's voice was impersonated by comedian Rich Little.

#6: Hotheaded Naked Ice Borers
In its April 1985 issue Discover Magazine announced that the highly respected wildlife biologist Dr. Aprile Pazzo had discovered a new species in Antarctica: the hotheaded naked ice borer. These fascinating creatures had bony plates on their heads that, fed by numerous blood vessels, could become burning hot, allowing the animals to bore through ice at high speeds. They used this ability to hunt penguins, melting the ice beneath the penguins and causing them to sink downwards into the resulting slush where the hotheads consumed them. After much research, Dr. Pazzo theorized that the hotheads might have been responsible for the mysterious disappearance of noted Antarctic explorer Philippe Poisson in 1837. "To the ice borers, he would have looked like a penguin," the article quoted her as saying. Discover received more mail in response to this article than they had received for any other article in their history. -More-

Hotheaded Naked Ice Borer

#7: UFO Lands in London
On March 31, 1989 thousands of motorists driving on the highway outside London looked up in the air to see a glowing flying saucer descending on their city. Many of them pulled to the side of the road to watch the bizarre craft float through the air. The saucer finally landed in a field on the outskirts of London where local residents immediately called the police to warn them of an alien invasion. Soon the police arrived on the scene, and one brave officer approached the craft with his truncheon extended before him. When a door in the craft popped open, and a small, silver-suited figure emerged, the policeman ran in the opposite direction. The saucer turned out to be a hot-air balloon that had been specially built to look like a UFO by Richard Branson, the 36-year-old chairman of Virgin Records. The stunt combined his passion for ballooning with his love of pranks. His plan was to land the craft in London's Hyde Park on April 1. Unfortunately, the wind blew him off course, and he was forced to land a day early in the wrong location.

Branson's UFO Balloon

#8: Alabama Changes the Value of Pi
The April 1998 issue of the New Mexicans for Science and Reason newsletter contained an article claiming that the Alabama state legislature had voted to change the value of the mathematical constant pi from 3.14159 to the 'Biblical value' of 3.0. Before long the article had made its way onto the internet, and then it rapidly made its way around the world, forwarded by people in their email. It only became apparent how far the article had spread when the Alabama legislature began receiving hundreds of calls from people protesting the legislation. The original article, which was intended as a parody of legislative attempts to circumscribe the teaching of evolution, was written by a physicist named Mark Boslough.

#9: Wisconsin State Capitol Collapses
In 1933 the Madison Capital-Times solemnly announced that the Wisconsin state capitol building lay in ruins following a series of mysterious explosions. The explosions were attributed to "large quantities of gas, generated through many weeks of verbose debate in the Senate and Assembly chambers." Accompanying the article was a picture showing the capitol building collapsing. By modern standards the picture looks slightly phony, but readers in 1933 were fooled—and outraged. One reader wrote in declaring that the hoax "was not only tactless and void of humor, but also a hideous jest."

#10: The Predictions of Isaac Bickerstaff
In February 1708 a previously unknown London astrologer named Isaac Bickerstaff published an almanac in which he predicted the death by fever of the famous rival astrologer John Partridge. According to Bickerstaff, Partridge would die on March 29 of that year. Partridge indignantly denied the prediction, but on March 30 Bickerstaff released a pamphlet announcing that he had been correct: Partridge was dead. It took a day for the news to settle in, but soon everyone had heard of the astrologer's demise. On April 1, April Fool's Day, Partridge was woken by a sexton outside his window who wanted to know if there were any orders for his funeral sermon. Then, as Partridge walked down the street, people stared at him as if they were looking at a ghost or stopped to tell him that he looked exactly like someone they knew who was dead. As hard as he tried, Partridge couldn't convince people that he wasn't dead. Bickerstaff, it turned out, was a pseudonym for the great satirist Jonathan Swift. His prognosticatory prank upon Partridge worked so well that the astrologer finally was forced to stop publishing his almanacs, because he couldn't shake his reputation as the man whose death had been foretold.

#11: The Eruption of Mount Edgecumbe
In 1974 residents of Sitka, Alaska were alarmed when the long-dormant volcano neighboring them, Mount Edgecumbe, suddenly began to belch out billows of black smoke. People spilled out of their homes onto the streets to gaze up at the volcano, terrified that it was active again and might soon erupt. Luckily it turned out that man, not nature, was responsible for the smoke. A local prankster named Porky Bickar had flown hundreds of old tires into the volcano's crater and then lit them on fire, all in a (successful) attempt to fool the city dwellers into believing that the volcano was stirring to life. According to local legend, when Mount St. Helens erupted six years later, a Sitka resident wrote to Bickar to tell him, "This time you've gone too far!"

#12: The Sydney Iceberg
On April 1, 1978 a barge appeared in Sydney Harbor towing a giant iceberg. Sydneysiders were expecting it. Dick Smith, a local adventurer and millionaire businessman (owner of Dick Smith's Foods), had been loudly promoting his scheme to tow an iceberg from Antarctica for quite some time. Now he had apparently succeeded. He said that he was going to carve the berg into small ice cubes, which he would sell to the public for ten cents each. These well-traveled cubes, fresh from the pure waters of Antarctica, were promised to improve the flavor of any drink they cooled. Slowly the iceberg made its way into the harbor. Local radio stations provided excited blow-by-blow coverage of the scene. Only when the berg was well into the harbor was its secret revealed. It started to rain, and the firefighting foam and shaving cream that the berg was really made of washed away, uncovering the white plastic sheets beneath.

Sydney Iceberg

#13: The 26-Day Marathon
In 1981 the Daily Mail ran a story about an unfortunate Japanese long-distance runner, Kimo Nakajimi, who had entered the London Marathon but, on account of a translation error, thought that he had to run for 26 days, not 26 miles. The Daily Mail reported that Nakajimi was now somewhere out on the roads of England, still running, determined to finish the race. Supposedly various people had spotted him, though they were unable to flag him down. The translation error was attributed to Timothy Bryant, an import director, who said, "I translated the rules and sent them off to him. But I have only been learning Japanese for two years, and I must have made a mistake. He seems to be taking this marathon to be something like the very long races they have over there."

26 day marathon runner

#14: Planetary Alignment Decreases Gravity
In 1976 the British astronomer Patrick Moore announced on BBC Radio 2 that at 9:47 AM a once-in-a-lifetime astronomical event was going to occur that listeners could experience in their very own homes. The planet Pluto would pass behind Jupiter, temporarily causing a gravitational alignment that would counteract and lessen the Earth's own gravity. Moore told his listeners that if they jumped in the air at the exact moment that this planetary alignment occurred, they would experience a strange floating sensation. When 9:47 AM arrived, BBC2 began to receive hundreds of phone calls from listeners claiming to have felt the sensation. One woman even reported that she and her eleven friends had risen from their chairs and floated around the room.

#15: Webnode
In 1999 a press release was issued over Business Wire announcing the creation of a new company called Webnode. This company, according to the release, had been granted a government contract to regulate ownership of 'nodes' on the 'Next Generation Internet.' Each of these nodes (there were said to be over 50 million of them) represented a route that data could travel. The company was licensed to sell each node for $100. Nodes would increase in value depending on how much traffic they routed, and owners would also receive usage fees based on the amount of data that flowed across their section of the internet. Therefore, bidding for the nodes was expected to become quite intense. Offers to buy shares in Webnode soon began pouring in, but they all had to be turned down since the company was just a prank. There really was a Next Generation Internet, but there were no nodes on it. Business Wire didn't find the prank amusing and filed suit against its perpetrators for fraud, breach of contract, defamation, and conspiracy.

#16: Kremvax
In 1984, back in the Stone Age of the internet, a message was distributed to the members of Usenet (the online messaging community that was one of the first forms the internet took) announcing that the Soviet Union was joining Usenet. This was quite a shock to many, since most assumed that cold war security concerns would have prevented such a link-up. The message purported to come from Konstantin Chernenko (from the address chernenko@kremvax.UUCP) who explained that the Soviet Union wanted to join the network in order to "have a means of having an open discussion forum with the American and European people." The message created a flood of responses. Two weeks later its true author, a European man named Piet Beerma, revealed that it was a hoax. This is believed to be the first hoax on the internet. Six years later, when Moscow really did link up to the internet, it adopted the domain name 'kremvax' in honor of the hoax.

#17: The Left-Handed Whopper
In 1998 Burger King published a full page advertisement in USA Today announcing the introduction of a new item to their menu: a "Left-Handed Whopper" specially designed for the 32 million left-handed Americans. According to the advertisement, the new whopper included the same ingredients as the original Whopper (lettuce, tomato, hamburger patty, etc.), but all the condiments were rotated 180 degrees for the benefit of their left-handed customers. The following day Burger King issued a follow-up release revealing that although the Left-Handed Whopper was a hoax, thousands of customers had gone into restaurants to request the new sandwich. Simultaneously, according to the press release, "many others requested their own 'right handed' version."

#18: Canadian Finance Minister Quits to Breed Cows and Ducks
In 2002 a rumor was posted on a Canadian gossip website, Bourque.org, alleging that the finance minister, Paul Martin, was quitting his job in order to breed "prize Charolais cattle and handsome Fawn Runner ducks." Martin, it was said, would be showing his livestock at a local fair in Havelock, a tiny Quebec town boasting a population of only 811. The Bank of Canada was also said to be ready to intervene in case the news rattled the currency markets. Of course, as soon as the word of Martin's retirement began to spread, the markets did get rattled, and the Canadian dollar promptly fell to its lowest level in a month. The currency only recovered once the minister's office denied the rumor. Pierre Bourque, the man behind bourque.org, readily admitted the story had been a hoax. "The ducks," he pointed out, "were the tell-tale sign."

#19: The Case of the Interfering Brassieres
In 1982 the Daily Mail reported that a local manufacturer had sold 10,000 "rogue bras" that were causing a unique and unprecedented problem, not to the wearers but to the public at large. Apparently the support wire in these bras had been made out of a kind of copper originally designed for use in fire alarms. When this copper came into contact with nylon and body heat, it produced static electricity which, in turn, was interfering with local television and radio broadcasts. The chief engineer of British Telecom, upon reading the article, immediately ordered that all his female laboratory employees disclose what type of bra they were wearing.

#20: 15th Annual New York City April Fool's Day Parade
In 2000 a news release was sent to the media stating that the 15th annual New York City April Fool's Day Parade was scheduled to begin at noon on 59th Street and would proceed down to Fifth Avenue. According to the release, floats in the parade would include a "Beat 'em, Bust 'em, Book 'em" float created by the New York, Los Angeles, and Seattle police departments. This float would portray "themes of brutality, corruption and incompetence." A "Where's Mars?" float, reportedly built at a cost of $10 billion, would portray missed Mars missions. Finally, the "Atlanta Braves Baseball Tribute to Racism" float would feature John Rocker who would be "spewing racial epithets at the crowd." CNN and the Fox affiliate WNYW sent television news crews to cover the parade. They arrived at 59th Street at noon only to discover that there was no sign of a parade, at which point the reporters realized they had been hoaxed. The prank was the handiwork of Joey Skaggs, an experienced hoaxer. Skaggs had been issuing press releases advertising the nonexistent parade every April Fool's Day since 1986.


1-20 | 21-40 | 41-60 | 61-80 | 81-100


TOPICS: News/Current Events; Political Humor/Cartoons
KEYWORDS:
Of course, Dan From Michigan "Hillary Announces for 2004" is now #1.
1 posted on 04/01/2003 12:54:23 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
The links don't work....you have to go to the site to read more. Some are very funny!
2 posted on 04/01/2003 12:55:31 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Was the X rapest in chief born on April 1 ??
3 posted on 04/01/2003 12:56:11 PM PST by Uncle George
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Spaghetti trees. Ha!

Everyone can tell you that spaghetti is grown on farms 10 miles long and 2 inches wide.

4 posted on 04/01/2003 12:59:30 PM PST by Publius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Other than being reminded of John Hockenberry after all these years of blissful nonremembrance, Thanks.

Barf.

5 posted on 04/01/2003 1:00:14 PM PST by newgeezer (All "peaceful" Muslims $upport the jihad. Some of them are unaware.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
I thought the "live speech from Saddam Hussein" today was pretty good. Fooled me for half a minute.
6 posted on 04/01/2003 1:00:24 PM PST by rageaholic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Having lived in Madison, and with all due respect to the GOOD FOLK who are there.....#13 was HILARIOUS.
7 posted on 04/01/2003 1:02:34 PM PST by Bradís Gramma
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Uncle George
He was actually BORN?

Hmmmmmm
8 posted on 04/01/2003 1:03:02 PM PST by Bradís Gramma
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

I think they left out the Sports Illustrated spoof about a person from the arctic who could throw a 200 mph fastball.
9 posted on 04/01/2003 1:04:58 PM PST by JimDingle (Give Dingle a Jingle)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
The Sidd Finch story was a classic, since it didn't just show up on April 1st. If I remember correctly, Sports Illustrated ran a series of articles about the mysterious pitching project throughout spring training, including a few ridiculous photos that were smuggled out of a Mets practice field -- they showed a young pitcher with a work boot on one foot, pitching off a mound somewhere in Florida.
10 posted on 04/01/2003 1:05:53 PM PST by Alberta's Child
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
bump
11 posted on 04/01/2003 1:06:59 PM PST by NautiNurse (Usama bin Laden has produced more tapes than Steely Dan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Im still catching grief from this one I pulled 12 years ago. http://www.freerepublic.com/forum/a3a5c79860616.htm My Best Practical Joke.
12 posted on 04/01/2003 1:07:02 PM PST by Rebelbase
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
The April 1998 issue of the New Mexicans for Science and Reason newsletter contained an article claiming that the Alabama state legislature had voted to change the value of the mathematical constant pi from 3.14159 to the 'Biblical value' of 3.0. Before long the article had made its way onto the internet, and then it rapidly made its way around the world, forwarded by people in their email. It only became apparent how far the article had spread when the Alabama legislature began receiving hundreds of calls from people protesting the legislation. The original article, which was intended as a parody of legislative attempts to circumscribe the teaching of evolution, was written by a physicist named Mark Boslough.

A better analogy would be to compare these types of legislative solutions to math to legislative solutions to the hardships of life which invoke socialism.

When will we ever learn?
13 posted on 04/01/2003 1:07:08 PM PST by ConservativeDude
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
There was a great TV commercial a few years back, showing the spaghetti harvest, complete with peasant-garbed field workers among the trees.

btw - a news blurb in our local paper claims:

"April Fools' Day started in France in 1564, the year that the first day of the year was changed from April 1 to Jan. 1. Those who insisted on celebrating the old New Year's Day became known as April fools, and others played tricks on them."

14 posted on 04/01/2003 1:07:13 PM PST by P.O.E. (God Bless and keep safe our troops.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rageaholic
I thought the "live speech from Saddam Hussein" today was pretty good. Fooled me for half a minute.

Yeah, Saddam's return from the grave no show is worthy as an all time April Fool's joke.

15 posted on 04/01/2003 1:07:18 PM PST by TADSLOS (Sua Sponte)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
I remember #3, the story of Sid Finch. I got through the story when I received my SI in the mail and was discussing it with my dad. At the same time, we looked at each other and said, "Wait a minute, what's the date on the cover?" Sure enough...
16 posted on 04/01/2003 1:08:38 PM PST by Hatteras (The Thundering Herd Of Turtles ROCK!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Publius; Dan from Michigan
and if you go to Domino Farms in Ann Arbor MI, you can see the pizzas grow.
(Right Dan? You got the big award at the top of this thread)
17 posted on 04/01/2003 1:08:40 PM PST by netmilsmom (Bush/Rice 2004- pray & fast for our troops this lent-Peace through strength)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
I had a good one of my own this morning. I sent my wife (the 8th grade school teacher) an important looking email. Told her in bold print etc that we had just nuked Baghdad and the city of 5 million was virtually destroyed!!!!!. She emailed back a few minutes later in shock.. saying it's sad, but probably had to be done.. yada yada yada. Sent her one back that said April Fools. But before she received that one.. she told her whole class that we had just nuked Baghdad. I may be in trouble this evening. :)
18 posted on 04/01/2003 1:10:36 PM PST by kjam22
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JimDingle
That was the Sid Finch story
19 posted on 04/01/2003 1:10:46 PM PST by AppyPappy (Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: JimDingle
It was #3 -- the guy's name was Sidd Finch.
20 posted on 04/01/2003 1:11:47 PM PST by Alberta's Child
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: JimDingle
The website lists 100 pranks....check for your favorite!
21 posted on 04/01/2003 1:11:51 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: JimDingle
That's #3 above.
22 posted on 04/01/2003 1:12:46 PM PST by Atlas Sneezed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Alberta's Child
As a former Indiana basketball fan (until 9/10/00), this story of Sidd Finch reminds me of Ivan Renko, the star player from Europe who was "recruited" by the Hoosiers in 92, if I'm not mistaken. Renko was going to be the best player ever to play for the Hoosiers, even better than Damon...

Of course, Renko was nothing but a figment of Bob Knight's imagination, made up to irk the sports writers of the world. What was especially classic about this is that some sports writers actually wrote articles about how they had seen Renko play, and he wasn't nearly as good as Knight was making him out to be. Comedy.
23 posted on 04/01/2003 1:13:20 PM PST by Viva Le Dissention
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: AppyPappy
Back in 96 or 97 Paul Harris of 94.7 in DC said that the city had set up toll booths collecting one dollar from all the commuters crossing the state line into DC to pay for road upkeep. As we approached the city line from Suitland PKWY we could see people looking out of their car windows for the toll booth.
24 posted on 04/01/2003 1:13:38 PM PST by cardinal4 (The Senate Armed Services Comm; the Chinese pipeline into US secrets)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: All
last april fools, it was on a monday and on sunday night i told the hubbie not to forget to set the clock back an hour.he fell for it and got up and went to work an hour early. lol, i still am laughing about it.
25 posted on 04/01/2003 1:14:02 PM PST by meanie monster (hooked on phonics werked for me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
I remember back during the internet stock heyday, CNBC had an April Fool's Day story about a new IPO for E-Meringue.com. Order a fresh meringue over the net - have it delivered to your door to be ready to plop on top of the pie of your choice.

Naturally, CNBC had lots of calls and emails enquiring how to get in on the IPO....
26 posted on 04/01/2003 1:14:23 PM PST by Diverdogz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Opie & Anthony (recently of New York fame) were fired from a radio station in Boston a few years ago after they staged a dramatic "breaking news" story one April 1st about the untimely death of Boston mayor Thomas (Mumbles) Meninho in a car accident.

From what I heard, it was incredibly realistic and had people in tears all over Boston.

27 posted on 04/01/2003 1:16:49 PM PST by Alberta's Child
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
In 1982 the Daily Mail reported that a local manufacturer had sold 10,000 "rogue bras" that were causing a unique and unprecedented problem, not to the wearers but to the public at large. Apparently the support wire in these bras had been made out of a kind of copper originally designed for use in fire alarms. When this copper came into contact with nylon and body heat, it produced static electricity which, in turn, was interfering with local television and radio broadcasts. The chief engineer of British Telecom, upon reading the article, immediately ordered that all his female laboratory employees disclose what type of bra they were wearing.

A likely story.

28 posted on 04/01/2003 1:20:31 PM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
I remember # 14 very clearly. No one I know fell--or jumped--for it.
29 posted on 04/01/2003 1:20:45 PM PST by Remole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
The Phoenix New Times did a great one a few years ago with their "Arm The Homeless" foundation, giving guns to vagrants. The Brady-types went absolutely apesh***.
30 posted on 04/01/2003 1:24:10 PM PST by Britton J Wingfield
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Rebelbase
That thread is the best! And I loved your prank.
31 posted on 04/01/2003 1:24:31 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
April 1st used to be like a holiday to me. I can look back now on some of my finer moments, in no particular order:

1994: While working at a pizza shop delivering pizza, the goofball, Eddie Munster looking manager ended up in my crosshairs. I removed the driver seat from his car and hid it in the supply shed. But because I'm a nice guy, I left two phone books in place of the seat for him to sit on.

1986: Smart-ass history teacher needed brought down a couple of pegs. There was one girl in our class who he loved to see laugh, because once she started, she had a hard time stopping...mildly amusing. Before class started, i went to his desk and suggested that if he wanted to get her laughing again, he should ask her how fast her grandmother runs. He waits until the last 10 minutes of class and then, matter of factly asks her that question. She stood up, called him a jerk and said that her grandmother was in a wheelchair then storms out of the room (we'd planned this out ahead of time). No one else in the room was in on it. The looks they gave him, as well as the look on his own face, were priceless.

1997: Filled a co-worker's car with styrofoam packing peanuts...filled it through the open sunroof.

1985: Shotgun shells...ashtrays...mother's chain-smoking boyfriend...do the math.

32 posted on 04/01/2003 1:24:41 PM PST by Orangedog (Soccer-Moms are the biggest threat to your freedoms and the republic !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Interestingly, the "US puts virus in computer printer delivered to Iraq that takes down Iraq's Air Defense Network" from Gulf War I was an April Fool's hoax in a computer magazine, yet hardly anyone is aware of this and it's routinely cited as an example of American cyberwar capabilities.
33 posted on 04/01/2003 1:26:45 PM PST by John H K
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kjam22
I am stealing that one!
34 posted on 04/01/2003 1:28:19 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Bump
35 posted on 04/01/2003 1:29:30 PM PST by Fiddlstix
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
I remember the Spaghetti Tree joke. It was really very well produced -- quite convincing if you were ignorant!
36 posted on 04/01/2003 1:38:45 PM PST by expatpat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nutmeg; Clemenza; Yehuda; RaceBannon; firebrand; PARodrig; Vom Willemstad K-9; rmlew
ping
37 posted on 04/01/2003 1:55:11 PM PST by Cacique
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #38 Removed by Moderator

To: feinswinesuksass
bttt
39 posted on 04/01/2003 2:12:49 PM PST by ellery
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Publius
A loooooong time ago, I saw a repeat of that Spaghetti farm hoax. It is extremely well done, and very, very funny. I never realized until now that it was an April Fools' gag.

I highly recommend people watch it if they ever get a chance.
40 posted on 04/01/2003 2:20:54 PM PST by AFPhys (((PRAYING for: President Bush & advisors, troops & families, Americans)))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
Bump for later perusal.
41 posted on 04/01/2003 3:19:28 PM PST by SoDak
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: xJones
I am sorry I beat ya to it!
But, check out the link on this thread from post #12.
42 posted on 04/01/2003 3:22:35 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: HangFire
This one won't scare ya like the Hillary one did.
43 posted on 04/01/2003 4:03:16 PM PST by Feiny
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
bump
44 posted on 04/01/2003 4:57:01 PM PST by OperationFreedom ( www.OperationFreedom.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
bttt. . .
45 posted on 04/01/2003 5:11:43 PM PST by MeekOneGOP (Bu-bye Saddam! / Check out my Freeper site !: http://home.attbi.com/~freeper/wsb/index.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: feinswinesuksass
This one won't scare ya like the Hillary one did.

Ahhh, much better;-)

Love the "The 26-Day Marathon"...

46 posted on 04/02/2003 6:44:36 PM PST by HangFire
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Diago
bump
47 posted on 09/27/2003 7:26:37 AM PDT by Akron Al
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson