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It's 'Gang Up on Franklin Graham' Time Again: Pentagon Sticking to Its Guns....
AgapePress ^ | April 16, 2003 | Fred Jackson and Jody Brown

Posted on 04/16/2003 11:19:30 AM PDT by Remedy

U.S. military officials are refusing to give in to demands from some Muslims who say Franklin Graham shouldn't be allowed to speak at a Pentagon Good Friday service.

The Washington Times reports three Muslim employees at the Pentagon registered complaints when they learned that Graham was scheduled to speak there this Friday. Apparently they felt the well-known evangelist disqualified himself because he has stated publicly that Islam is a "very evil and wicked religion."

But Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. Ryan Yantis says he is not aware of any plans to un-invite anyone. As he puts it: "One religion, regardless of the religion, does not have the veto right over another religion."

Yantis also notes that separate Muslim services are scheduled at the Pentagon the same day because Friday is the Islamic sabbath.

Graham's characterization of Islam being an "evil and wicked" religion came shortly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. At the time, he noted that no Muslim clerics had gone to the World Trade Center to offer prayers or to apologize to the nation in the name of Islam.

Anti-Graham Bandwagon
The Council on American Islamic Relations has also demanded that Graham's international relief organization, Samaritan's Purse, not be allowed to do charitable relief work in Iraq. That criticism comes despite the fact, as World magazine's Mindy Belz points out, that Graham's group has been reaching out to Muslims for years in countries such as Bosnia, Afghanistan, Sudan, and Uzbekistan.

And Belz notes that some religion news outlets were among the first to suggest that Graham, because of his post-9/11 comments, is unfit to serve in Iraq. She says both Religion News Service and Beliefnet have questioned the evangelist's motives, the latter stating in a piece by its editor-in-chief and co-founder that President Bush and Secretary of State Colin Powell should step in and prevent Graham from doing charity work in that nation.

But a spokesman for the U.S. Agency for International Development, in response to questions from the press, stated: "What private charitable organizations choose to do without U.S. government funding is ultimately their decision." As Belz notes in her World column, that amounted to a quick lesson for reporters on First Amendment rights.

A spokesman for Samaritan's Purse tells World there is irony in the controversy. Ken Isaacs says the relief agency has "excellent solid relationships on the ground because we love people without condition, and they respect us for that. The platform of our witness is built on the quality of our work."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: franklingraham; goodfriday; muslimamericans; pentagon
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1 posted on 04/16/2003 11:19:30 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: Remedy
"One religion, regardless of the religion, does not have the veto right over another religion."

Exactly. Unfortunately, not many believe this any more.
2 posted on 04/16/2003 11:23:17 AM PDT by serinde
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To: serinde
The Atlantic | May 2002 | Tales of the Tyrant | Bowden He has become a student of one of the most tyrannical leaders in history: Joseph Stalin.
3 posted on 04/16/2003 11:24:16 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: serinde
Federalism And Religious Liberty: Were Church And State Meant To Be Separate?
4 posted on 04/16/2003 11:26:12 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: Remedy
Are we moving towards the time when we have to have reps from every "majority religion" at ceremonies like this? C'mon now, it's a Christian holiday.
5 posted on 04/16/2003 11:26:17 AM PDT by sarasota
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To: sarasota
Marxism: The New Secular Religion of the Left....

The Real Murderers: Atheism or Christianity?

6 posted on 04/16/2003 11:28:53 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: Remedy
The organizations, that Franklin Graham is involved with, have worked in parts of the world where Christians are persecuted by Muslims.
7 posted on 04/16/2003 11:29:01 AM PDT by syriacus (When DOES the autobiography of Bernard Shaw (formerly of CNN) come out?)
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To: Remedy
There are employees at the Pentagon and dare I say, in other sensitive locations in our government, who are moslems. Given that you believe that islam is an evil religion, how can you reconcile the fact that these employees appear to be competent and non-subversive. Have they resisted their religion's call to evil or is it possible that not all believers follow the same interpretations, just like Christianity?
8 posted on 04/16/2003 11:32:51 AM PDT by breakem
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To: breakem
There are employees at the Pentagon and dare I say, in other sensitive locations in our government, who are moslems. Given that you believe that islam is an evil religion, how can you reconcile the fact that these employees appear to be competent and non-subversive. Have they resisted their religion's call to evil or is it possible that not all believers follow the same interpretations, just like Christianity?

Iraq was an evil regime and all Iraqis were affiliated with it. But, not all Iraqis were bad, some were just Iraqis. This didn't make the regime any less evil.

9 posted on 04/16/2003 11:35:49 AM PDT by trebb
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To: trebb
Your aanology doesn't hold water. Iraq was not evil, Saddam was. Islam is not evil some of the followers are extremists. Some christians have an idiotic interpretation of christianity. Does that make christianity and idiotic religion.

Answer my question about the employees. Why are they allowed to work there and why is it okay to have a minister there who insults their religion?

10 posted on 04/16/2003 11:39:12 AM PDT by breakem
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To: trebb
"Iraq was an evil regime and all Iraqis were affiliated with it. But, not all Iraqis were bad, some were just Iraqis. This didn't make the regime any less evil."

What?


11 posted on 04/16/2003 11:42:14 AM PDT by thetruckster
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To: Remedy
I believe in the right of free people to choose a bad religion. We can't say "I believe they will do this or that some day..." and use that as an excuse to take their freedom of religion away. We can only judge individuals for individual acts (or SPECIFIC groups of individuals for the conspiracy of their SPECIFIC group).

While we have every right to believe a religion is evil and say so, some here on FR sound as if they think Islam should be outlawed. You have to understand that even if a group of Muslims believe they should kill us, they have not broken any laws until they conspire to actually do it. We can fight their bad beliefs with speech, friendship, righteous anger, whatever....but as soon as we cross the line into dictating what someone can and cannot believe we will have lit the torch that will destroy all religious freedom.

12 posted on 04/16/2003 11:45:00 AM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: breakem
U.S. Muslims say war on Iraq not justified ( Says Terrorist Front Group CAIR)

CAIR: 'Moderate' friends of terror

For these and other reasons, the FBI's former chief of counterterrorism, Steven Pomerantz, concludes that "CAIR, its leaders and its activities effectively give aid to international terrorist groups."

Nor is terrorism the only disturbing aspect of CAIR's record. Other problems include:

Intimidating moderate Muslims. In at least two cases (Hisham Kabbani and Khalid Durán), CAIR has defamed moderate Muslims who reject its extremist agenda, leading to death threats against them.

Embracing murderers. CAIR responded to the arrest and conviction of Jamil Al-Amin (the former H. Rap Brown) by praising him, raising funds for him and then denying his guilt after his conviction for the murder of an Atlanta policeman. Likewise with Ahmad Adnan Chaudhry of San Bernardino, Calif.: Disregarding his conviction for attempting murder, CAIR declared him "innocent" and set up a defense fund for him.

Promoting anti-Semitism. The head of CAIR's Los Angeles office, Hussam Ayloush, routinely uses the term "zionazi" when referring to Israelis. CAIR co-hosted an event in May 1998 at which an Egyptian militant Islamic leader, Wagdi Ghunaym, called Jews the "descendants of the apes."

Aggressive ambitions. As reported by the San Ramon Valley Herald, CAIR Chairman Omar M. Ahmad told a crowd of California Muslims in July 1998, "Islam isn't in America to be equal to any other faith, but to become dominant. The Koran . . . should be the highest authority in America, and Islam the only accepted religion on earth."

CAIR's real record is one of extremism. North American Muslims themselves are beginning to discover - and the government, leading media, churches, and businesses should follow - that CAIR represents not the noble civilization of Islam but an aggressive and radical strain similar to that which led to the suicide hijackings last September. CAIR must be shunned as a fringe group by responsible institutions and individuals throughout North America.


Two powerful "civil rights" organizations have emerged, both essentially fronts for fundamentalist factions. The Council for American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) and the American Muslim Council (AMC). CAIR is, Emerson testifies, is an offshoot of several terrorist groups such as Hamas and fronts that represent it. With shifting memberships and names, a "vast infrastructure" spreads propaganda, raises money for relief to the families of suicide bombers, and plans major campaigns against the enemy, the United States and its ally Israel. Now that Islam has secured a degree of cultural respectability, Islamic fundamentalists are able to use foundations and universities for their purposes, always cloaking pro-terrorist activities and plans as religion, social work, charity, and political pressure. The Islamic Jihad, one of the most lethal terrorist actions in the world, was based as a network of think tanks at the University of South Florida, where Islamic university professors carried on a campaign to sponsor "martyrs" in the holy war against Israel.

CAIR and the AMC have mounted a steady effort to silence all criticism or unfavorable publicity from journalists and media. Using cues from other pressure groups, they react immediately to any mention of Islam they consider unfavorable. Each of these they treat as a threat or as "an attack on Islam," and through carefully calibrated barrages of phone calls, press releases, and cries of "Islamophobia," they have managed to extract public apologies from news agencies, journalists, and politicians. When arrests are made under the AntiTerrorism Act of 1996, CAIR and AMC beat the anti-Islam drum, evoking cries of outrage from major liberal newspapers and congressmen.


Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)

According to Khalid Durán (who is a Muslim), in an article entitled How CAIR Put My Life in Peril, published in the Middle East Forum:

CAIR is the principle front organization of a coalition of Islamist (or fundamentalist Muslim) groups that have taken root in America over the past two decades. Most are spin-offs of the Islamic Association of Palestine (IAP), such as the American Muslims for Jerusalem, the Holy Land Foundation, and the Islamic Institute. These are extreme groups, and some have even come under federal investigation for alleged support of Middle Eastern terrorism. But CAIR's mission has differed from the others: its special assignment is the insinuation of the Islamist agenda into mainstream American politics. Like the many front organizations established by the Soviet Union in its heyday, CAIR works to give a "white bread" image to advocates of illiberal and even radical ideas.

CAIR is run by a duo. The executive director, Nihad Awad, is a Palestinian; his associate, Ibrahim ("Dougie") Hooper, is an American convert. Awad actively propagates the cause in Arabic, while Hooper handles most of the English-language work. To create the perception that CAIR speaks for Islam in America, the two indefatigably issue position statements on anything remotely touching on Muslim or Arab affairs, reacting on everything from U.S. foreign policy to letters in college newspapers.

WorldNetDaily: American Islamic lobby gets out the vote

A controversial American Islamic advocacy group has planned a voter registration drive to coincide with the upcoming Muslim holiday at the end of the pilgrimage to Mecca.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, alleged to have ties to terrorist groups such as Hamas, says "our goal, insha'Allah (if Allah wills), is to register more than 100,000 new Muslim voters over the next eight months."

"They may not admit it, but ultimately they want to make the U.S. a Muslim country," Steven Emerson, a leading anti-terrorism specialist, told WorldNetDaily.

"In the interim they want to acquire as much political power as possible to push their agenda, to be afforded legitimacy by political officials," Emerson said. "So this (voter drive) is part and parcel of their campaign."

CAIR spokesman Ibrahim Hooper indicated in a 1993 interview with the Minneapolis Star Tribune that he wants to see the United States become a Muslim country.

"I wouldn't want to create the impression that I wouldn't like the government of the United States to be Islamic sometime in the future," Hooper told the Star Tribune. "But I'm not going to do anything violent to promote that. I'm going to do it through education."

Emerson cites as evidence of CAIR's affinity for Hamas "their co-sponsorship of conferences calling for the death of Jews, statements on behalf of Hamas leaders, statements defending Iran and the Sudan and sponsorship of hate rallies where attacks on America are made."

Alamoudi, the former AMC director, was quoted at a Washington, D.C. rally, Oct. 28, 2000, saying: "I have been labeled by the media in New York to be a supporter of Hamas. We are all supporters of Hamas. I wish they added that I am also a supporter of Hezbollah."

CAIR seeks to underscore its political clout by citing a figure of about 7 million Muslims in the United States, but recent counts have come up with a much lower total. An evaluation of current estimates, conducted by Howard Fienberg and Iain Murray of the nonprofit, nonpartisan Statistical Assessment Service, concluded there are about 2 million U.S. Muslims. A recent study commissioned by the American Jewish Committee puts the number between 1.9 million and 2.8 million.

 

 

13 posted on 04/16/2003 11:45:23 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: breakem
They are celebrating a Christian holiday, not a Muslim holiday. It's not the business of the Muslims who work there who they bring in to lead a Christian service. Graham knows an evil when he sees it. Islam is NOT a religion of peace. It's evil. Period. That being said, we all know there are many good Muslims. We just haven't heard from them lately.
14 posted on 04/16/2003 11:45:39 AM PDT by Marysecretary (GOD is still in control!)
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To: RAT Patrol
Sell your rant to the Muslims/CAIR
15 posted on 04/16/2003 11:46:28 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: Marysecretary
under your logic, if Islam is a religion of evil, Christianity is an idiotic religion. Employees can certainly ask their employer not to have a speaker who has insulted their religion be invited to speak at the work place. And since their employer is the government, they have a right to speak up. Pick a minister who hasn't done that and shows respect for others.
16 posted on 04/16/2003 11:49:15 AM PDT by breakem
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To: Remedy
while your 13 is long and repititous of your original post. you failed to answer my question. If you need to preach so much, perjaps you can get an invite to the Pentagon at their annual Islam is Evil workshop. Peaceful moslems not invited of course.
17 posted on 04/16/2003 11:51:11 AM PDT by breakem
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To: breakem
In 1892, the Supreme Court stated that "this is a religious nation." Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States, 143 U.S. 457, 470 (1892). The Court has discussed the historical role of religion in our society and concluded that "[t]here is an unbroken history of official acknowledgment by all three branches of government of the role of religion in American life from at least 1789." Lynch v. Donnelly, 465 U.S. 668, 674 (1984). In Abington v. Schempp, 374 U.S. 203, 212 (1963), the Court recognized that "religion has been closely identified with our history and government." Such recognition is nowhere more affirmatively expressed than in Zorach where the Court stated that "[w]e are a religious people whose institutions presuppose a Supreme Being." 343 U.S. at 313. Nevertheless, this country has witnessed a long struggle over governmental acknowledgments of the religious identity of the people of the United States.

Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States -- 1892 Our laws and our institutions must necessarily be based upon and embody the teachings of the Redeemer of mankind... ...It is impossible that it should be otherwise and in this sense and to this extent our civilization and our institutions are emphatically Christian. -- NOTE: Quoted 87 past legal precedents to back this up

As early as 1811, Chancellor James Kent, Chief Justice of New York's highest court, in validating a prohibition against blasphemy, stated unequivocally that "we are a Christian people, and the morality of this country is deeply engrafted upon Christianity, and not upon the doctrines or worship of [non- Christian] imposters." The legal argument for this view was perhaps most memorably made by Kent's contemporary, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story, whose frequently quoted interpretation of the First Amendment, in his celebrated Commentaries on the Constitution, staunchly affirmed that Christianity was part of the common law. Jews in Christian America: The Pursuit of Religious Equality. By Naomi W. Cohen. Oxford University Press. 300 pp.

"I believe no one can read the history of our country without realizing that the Good Book and the spirit of the Savior have from the beginning been our guiding geniuses ... Whether we look to the first Charter of Virginia ... or to the Charter of New England ... or to the Charter of Massachusetts Bay ... or to the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut ... the same objective is present ... a Christian land governed by Christian principles. I believe the entire Bill of Rights came into being because of the knowledge our forefathers had of the Bible and their belief in it: freedom of belief, of expression, of assembly, of petition, the dignity of the individual, the sanctity of the home, equal justice under law, and the reservation of powers to the people ... I like to believe we are living today in the spirit of the Christian religion. I like also to believe that as long as we do so, no great harm can come to our country." -- [Liberal] Supreme Court chief justice, Earl Warren

"They [the Founding Fathers] were intent upon establishing a Christian commonwealth in accordance with the principle of self-government. They were an inspired body of men. It has been said that God sifted the nations that He might send choice grain into the wilderness ... Who can fail to see it in the hand of Destiny? Who can doubt that it has been guided by a Divine Providence?" -- Calvin Coolidge

"America was born a Christian nation. America was born to exemplify that devotion to the elements of righteousness which are derived from the revelations of the Holy Scripture." -- Woodrow Wilson

18 posted on 04/16/2003 11:53:17 AM PDT by Remedy
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To: breakem
I think liberals are evil but I believe in their right to exist. I think Satanism is evil but I even believe in its right to exist. I think dancing with snakes in a religious ceremony is nutso but I believe in a persons right to practice that religion.

Christians think Muslims are wrong; Muslims think Christians are wrong; Jews think Muslims are wrong; Muslims think Jews are evil, etc.... This can't come as a surprise to anyone. I don't see what the big deal is.

19 posted on 04/16/2003 11:56:29 AM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: Marysecretary
What nonsense you spouted. Come back to lecture us all on another's valid religion once you are able to move mountains.
20 posted on 04/16/2003 11:56:33 AM PDT by Cultural Jihad
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To: Remedy
you failed to address my original question and you continue preaching. I will not reply to you further on this thread unless you deal with your radical generalizations and tell me what these employees who follow such evil are doing in sensitive governmental agencies.
21 posted on 04/16/2003 11:56:47 AM PDT by breakem
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To: RAT Patrol
sad history and it continues.
22 posted on 04/16/2003 11:57:44 AM PDT by breakem
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To: Remedy
Sell your rant to the Muslims/CAIR

I agree with Franklin Graham about Islam. I also believe that Muslims have the same rights to their beliefs as the rest of us do. They just don't have the right to criminal activity.

23 posted on 04/16/2003 11:58:54 AM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: RAT Patrol
Amen. Let me give you a "well-said" bump.
24 posted on 04/16/2003 12:03:18 PM PDT by FourtySeven
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To: breakem
What that "sad" history reveals has little to do with religion and a lot to do with human nature. Mankind instinctively seeks God. We instinctively know that good and evil are not equal. The sad thing is that we are also instinctively greedy, arrogant, self-righteous, angry, etc.... In Christian theology that's described as the "sin nature" of man. Whether you agree with that definition or not, it's an undeniable reality. Mankind is capable of great evil OR great good. We make individual choices every day. Religion has played a part in both, but good and evil were not CREATED by religious belief. Religious belief is only an attempt to define it.
25 posted on 04/16/2003 12:05:58 PM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: RAT Patrol
While we have every right to believe a religion is evil and say so, some here on FR sound as if they think Islam should be outlawed. You have to understand that even if a group of Muslims believe they should kill us, they have not broken any laws until they conspire to actually do it. We can fight their bad beliefs with speech, friendship, righteous anger, whatever....but as soon as we cross the line into dictating what someone can and cannot believe we will have lit the torch that will destroy all religious freedom.

Very well said. Here's a quote from Alexander Solzhenitsyn that speaks to the same issue:

"If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being and who is willing to destroy his (or her) own heart?" - Alexander Solzhenitsyn

While I am very concerned about the Radical Islamic threat to our nation, I think that you are right to point out that we should not pretend that we are completely pure ourselves, and need to guard against the destruction of religious freedom and the First Amendment....

This is not an easy issue to grapple with, and we must resist the (very strong) temptation to make this a "black and white" issue.

26 posted on 04/16/2003 12:16:58 PM PDT by rightwingreligiousfanatic (Eternal Vigilance is the price of Liberty...)
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To: breakem; Remedy
Remedy seems to be a 'bot.

It the answer is not available in the clipboard, no pasting is possible.

27 posted on 04/16/2003 12:18:20 PM PDT by george wythe
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To: rightwingreligiousfanatic
I agree 100%!
28 posted on 04/16/2003 12:19:47 PM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: george wythe
If the 'bots would stop posting their litanies on some of these threads we could save half the bandwidth needed to run the site.
29 posted on 04/16/2003 12:21:58 PM PDT by breakem
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To: breakem
Your aanology doesn't hold water. Iraq was not evil, Saddam was. Islam is not evil some of the followers are extremists. Some christians have an idiotic interpretation of christianity. Does that make christianity and idiotic religion.

Answer my question about the employees. Why are they allowed to work there and why is it okay to have a minister there who insults their religion?

I agree the anology was not the best, but it was good enough for the rant. Iraq was not evil but some of its citizens were murdering terrorists. You can kick the dog all you want, but it will only bounce so many ways.

Would you have them fire people who make comments based on real-world observations? The "insults" were not aimed at Islaam, they were aimed at the so-called "Leaders" of Islaam for not condemning the terrorism. In fact, many of them tried to excuse or justify it. Under those conditions, if the Pope said it was OK to murder innocents because you weren't getting your way, the Catholic religion could be deemed evil. If you think someone who disdains Islaam shouldn't be working around people of the Islaam faith, you might be better motivated to find and stress the good points of the religion. It's a free country and, except for the fallout of politics, it's supposed to be OK to disagree and even dislike others just so long as you don't try to harm them. If you want to posit that having their religion demeaned "harms" them, I would have to say, grow up and grow a thicker skin and try to prove the nay-sayers wrong...

30 posted on 04/16/2003 12:25:22 PM PDT by trebb
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To: trebb
The behavior of extremists does not define the entire group. As I said earlier, does the presence of christian idiots paint all christianity as idiotic? Of course not. Did you expect Iraqis to speak out against Saddam and see their familes tortured and killed?

The presence of these employees indicates to me that they are doing their job or Rumsfeld would can them. They have a right to say, don't bring in this guy who insuts our religious beliefs. And I agree with them. Graham needs to learn how to respect the good and condemn the bad or he should stay inside during lightening storms.

31 posted on 04/16/2003 12:31:37 PM PDT by breakem
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To: trebb
btw, anyone who characterizes their comments as a rant is alright in my book. I often do the same. LOL!
32 posted on 04/16/2003 12:33:03 PM PDT by breakem
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To: Remedy
It is unfair and prohibited by our system of free religion for Mr. Graham to be blamed for merely repeating what God's Bible has to say about the nature of false religions and false prophets... like Muhammed.

To ascribe to Mr. Graham any wrongdoing for saying that Islam is an evil religion begs two questions in response:

1: Have you ever seen a Christian with C-4 plastique-and-ball-bearings taped to his chest?

2: Do you have the right to tell God what His religion should look like?

The Bible teaches that there are many paths to Hell, but only one path to Salvation, and that path is belief in The Messiah, Jesus Christ; also that any who believe not in Christ but come "in the name of God" are deceivers doing Satan's work.

Mr. Graham not only has the right, but the obligation to call Islam just what it is... and evil, false religion peopled by deceived tools of Satan.

Mr. Grahamn says these things because the Bible demands it. "You are either with us, or you are with the terrorists." G. W. Bush, September, 2001

;-/

33 posted on 04/16/2003 12:38:34 PM PDT by Gargantua
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To: Cultural Jihad
I can't move mountains, but my God can!
34 posted on 04/16/2003 12:40:04 PM PDT by Marysecretary (GOD is still in control!)
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To: breakem
You say it's idiotic. Not me. Franklin Graham is a fine man and minister of God's Word. They couldn't do better in my opinion.
35 posted on 04/16/2003 12:41:52 PM PDT by Marysecretary (GOD is still in control!)
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To: breakem
Graham's religion (Christianity) demands that he cause them (Muslims) to question and re-think their religious errors. America guarantees Mr. Graham's right to practice his religion, and if it makes the Muslims uneasy, that, too, is part of God's plan.

Islam is a tool of the deceiver, and he is Satan.

36 posted on 04/16/2003 12:41:54 PM PDT by Gargantua
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To: Marysecretary
bttt
37 posted on 04/16/2003 12:42:39 PM PDT by Guenevere (...STAY THE COURSE!!)
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To: Marysecretary
I can see he hasn't disrespected you. your definition of what a fine man is seems centerd on how he treats you and not how he treats others. Or is it okay to insult these followers of evil, who seem to not be following their religion very well since they seem like good employees.
38 posted on 04/16/2003 12:43:24 PM PDT by breakem
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To: Remedy
"One religion, regardless of the religion, does not have the veto right over another religion."

Gotta love it bump!

39 posted on 04/16/2003 12:44:19 PM PDT by k2blader (Pity people paralyzed in paradigms of political perfection.)
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To: Gargantua
I can see you and he use the same paint brush. Since you're so into rights, then you will acknowledge the rights of these government employees to petition the government not to allow this rude, ignorant person who insulted their religion to speak at their place of employment.
40 posted on 04/16/2003 12:45:19 PM PDT by breakem
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To: k2blader
You are encouraging ignorance. No one is vetoing anyones religion. It would seem that Graham comes the closest to doing that call an entire religion evil.
41 posted on 04/16/2003 12:46:46 PM PDT by breakem
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To: breakem
"One religion, regardless of the religion, does not have the veto right over another religion."

I dunno. I like the quote. It rings true. :-)

Thank God for men like Franklin Graham.

42 posted on 04/16/2003 12:56:48 PM PDT by k2blader (Pity people paralyzed in paradigms of political perfection.)
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To: breakem
You can take comfort that all rude and ignorant people share those rights, as well as the right to choose eternal suffering if they so desire... though such a choice is perhaps most truly ignorant.

For those who so choose to call someone who would try to dissuade them from that choice "ignorant" is priceless... despite that it's a guaranteed right.

Just like Timothy Robbins, all Americans have such rights, but must share also the right to endure the consequences of their choices without complaint, as the choice was theirs in the first place..

43 posted on 04/16/2003 12:57:15 PM PDT by Gargantua
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To: breakem
they are sleepers :)
44 posted on 04/16/2003 12:59:37 PM PDT by joesnuffy (Moderate Islam Is For Dilettantes)
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To: Gargantua
You can take comfort that all rude and ignorant people share those rights, as well as the right to choose eternal suffering if they so desire... though such a choice is perhaps most truly ignorant.

For those who so choose to call someone who would try to dissuade them from that choice "ignorant" is priceless... despite that it's a guaranteed right.

Very well said.

45 posted on 04/16/2003 1:00:02 PM PDT by k2blader (Pity people paralyzed in paradigms of political perfection.)
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To: breakem
Islam tries to teach that one day sinless Jesus will follow Mohammed, and this is one of the most evil things I have ever heard, and If Islam is not evil, then nothing is.
We need more men like Frankin Graham, who are willing to stand up and call sin by it's right name.
46 posted on 04/16/2003 1:00:52 PM PDT by tessalu
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To: Remedy
I am glad the pentagon stuck by its guns. Many examples of Islam being an evil religion, a religion of intolerance and hate.

Thanks for telling the truth Franklin.

47 posted on 04/16/2003 1:02:50 PM PDT by LaGrone
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To: breakem
If Graham attended a government event and made the comment that Islam is evil I could see your point. But that is not what happened. He was asked what he thought of Islam in an interview and he told the truth. Who has followed around the Muslim employees you speak of and picked up their beliefs about Christians or, better yet, Jews?

It is not fair or constitutional to banish Graham for his religious beliefs any more than it would be right to fire the Muslim employees for theirs. All Christians think Islam is wrong. Do we exclude all of them or only the ones who actually express their beliefs in public? If a Muslim can think Graham is an infidel, why can't Graham think a Muslim has an evil religion. (He didn't say Muslim's were evil, btw.)

Is it possible that your view is partly formed by your own negative feelings about Christianity in general?

48 posted on 04/16/2003 1:07:05 PM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: tessalu
Islam tries to teach that one day sinless Jesus will follow Mohammed, and this is one of the most evil things I have ever heard, and If Islam is not evil, then nothing is. Just remember that they have every right to believe it.
49 posted on 04/16/2003 1:10:42 PM PDT by RAT Patrol
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To: george wythe; RAT Patrol

I also believe that Muslims have the same rights to their beliefs as the rest of us do.

Do you know what they believe?

Islam's Immigrant Invasion of Europe: What sense is there in respecting those who don’t respect us?

Secularists

are Muslims who do not have a knowledge of the contents of the Quran and only know a verse or two to justify enjoying their life such as: "Wealth and children are the adornment of the life of this world" (Surat AI-Kahf 18:46).

Moderates

know the Quran but seek to make their faith relevant to modern life. They try to reconcile the contradicting verses in the Quran in such a way that Muslims may tolerate Jews and Christians living among them. They emphasize the verses that came to the Prophet Muhammad when he was weak militarily and in need of the support of Jews and Christians.

Islam means Peace, so they tell us! Several articles by Silas investigate aspects of Muhammad's life and actions that raise questions regarding his prophethood which is the core doctrine of Islam: Muhammad and the Death of Kinana, The Death of Muhammad, Muhammad, Aisha, Islam, and Child Brides. Further: A Rebuttal of Jamal Badawi's "Wife Beating".

Being a non-Muslim under Islamic rule:The theory and the reality ...

The central goal of Islam is to establish Islamic law in every country, and this is the declared purpose of many Islamic organizations also in the USA and in Europe. What could the implications be for your life? What can we learn from the past?

See also: Islamic law, History

The Character of God in Bible and Qur'an

The Qur'an An Evaluation of the Muslim Claims

 

Muhammad, Islam, and Terrorism The below following article "Muhammad, Islam, and Terrorism" was written nearly two and a half years before the terror attack of September 11th, 2001. This tragedy has shown again how important it is to understand the reasons and dynamics fuelling Islamic terrorism. Determining the right response is not easy. But some kinds of response are definitely wrong.

Top Shi'ite Cleric Bans Muslims From U.S. War ``It is not permissible for any Islamic party, country, ruler or political movement to extend any military, security or economic assistance to the United States in its war against any Muslim country or any Muslim faction,'' Sheikh Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah said in a religious ruling faxed to Reuters. Fadlallah is a former spiritual mentor of Lebanon's Iranian-backed Hizbollah guerrilla group, but he is widely respected as a scholar among Shi'ites abroad, including moderates.

50 posted on 04/16/2003 1:11:07 PM PDT by Remedy
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