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Tennessee School District Sued Over Ties to Evangelistic Crusade
FOX News via AP | 5/12/03 | Unknown

Posted on 05/12/2003 8:37:48 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants

MAYNARDVILLE, Tenn. — Every year, hundreds of Union County students take a field trip for the soul. Children are excused from class, loaded onto school buses with teachers and sent to a three-day Christian revival.

"I am going to ask you a question," an evangelical leader recently yelled to a sea of students ready for their field trip. "If you are glad to be here, say amen!"

With the ardor of a pep rally, the students shouted back: "AAAA-men!"

Not everyone is so enthusiastic.

Fourteen-year-old India Tracy said she was harassed and attacked by classmates for nearly three years after she declined to attend Baptist Pastor Gary Beeler's annual crusade because of her family's pagan religion.

Her family has filed a federal lawsuit against Union County schools, claiming the crusade, prayers over the loudspeaker, a Christmas nativity play, a Bible handout and other proselytizing activities in the rural school system have become so pervasive they are a threat to safety and religious liberty.

Union County officials say the system is neutral when it comes to religious activities, pointing out that the crusade is voluntary, teachers chaperone on their own time and school buses are operated by private contractors.

"We do not endorse, promote or prohibit it," said school spokesman Wayne Goforth.

District officials say the crusade, now in its sixth year, is like any other field trip, with parental permission required to let the children attend for two hours a day over three days. On the crusade's final day this year, April 30, more than 1,300 of the school system's 3,000 students attended.

"All local boards of education have the authority to allow students to voluntarily attend these types of events," said Christy Ballard, legal counsel to the Tennessee Department of Education.

But, she added, "it is very clear in the statute that they can't harass a student or coerce them to participate ... and, of course, they can't be school-sponsored."

Charles Haynes, a senior scholar at the Freedom Forum's First Amendment Center in Arlington, Va., said school officials and Christian leaders in Union County need a "crash course on the meaning of the First Amendment -- especially the part that separates church from state."

Beeler, 63, who lives and preaches in Union County, said he has been contacted by communities around the country wanting to set up similar crusades, and sees nothing wrong with children getting time off from school to attend them.

"The principals, the teachers, the bus drivers all have told us that they have less behavior problems after this crusade than they do before. So that tells us the positive effect," he said.

India said she was called "Satan worshipper" and accused of eating babies when it was revealed she was a pagan. She said she was taunted, found slurs painted over her locker and was injured when classmates assaulted her and slammed her head into the locker.

The lawsuit said school officials took no disciplinary action. In a May 2 legal response, school officials said they acted appropriately, denied the attacks happened, or said they were unaware of them.

Paganism is an ancient religious tradition that embraces kinship with nature, positive morality and the idea that there is both a female and male side of Deity.

After Christmas break in early 2002, India said three boys chased her down a hall at Horace Maynard Middle School, grabbed her by the neck and said, "You better change your religion or we'll change it for you."

She broke free and fled into the girls' bathroom. A teacher stopped the boys from following her, the lawsuit said.

"That was pretty much the last straw because she was terrified," said India's father, Greg Tracy.

The Tracys took India out of school on Feb. 26, 2002.

A straight-A student, she belonged to the leadership-service organization Beta Club, chess club, and band. She was the only girl on the middle school football team.

Now she takes Internet courses at home and hopes to transfer to a public school in Knoxville, 25 miles away.

"When was it too hard? I don't know," India said. "On a couple of occasions it was too hard and then it got easier and then it started getting bad again and I would come home bawling my eyes out."


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; Philosophy; US: Tennessee
KEYWORDS: aclu; antichristian; demonworship; education; evangelism; faith; fieldtrip; homeschoollist; pagan; religiousfreedom; teacher; whinecountry
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"We do not endorse, promote or prohibit it," said school spokesman Wayne Goforth.

Sounds reasonable to me.

Charles Haynes, a senior scholar at the Freedom Forum's First Amendment Center in Arlington, Va., said school officials and Christian leaders in Union County need a "crash course on the meaning of the First Amendment -- especially the part that separates church from state."

Really? I must ahve a defective copy of the Constitution because mine has absolutely no mention of "seperation of church and state" in the First Amendment. or anywhere else for that matter.

After Christmas break in early 2002, India said three boys chased her down a hall .... A teacher stopped the boys from following her, the lawsuit said.

Looks like the teachers are protecting this girl. Why don't we just make a law requiring children to be nice to each other? That ought to solve everything, right?

1 posted on 05/12/2003 8:37:48 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Are you suggesting that it's okay for students to assault one another over religious differences? I disapprove of this whole situation - and I'm an evangelical Christian - because it promotes the mob mentality that is already too much a part of schooling.


2 posted on 05/12/2003 8:46:15 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Obsessive-compulsive and proud of it!)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Fourteen-year-old India Tracy said she was harassed and attacked by classmates for nearly three years after she declined to attend Baptist Pastor Gary Beeler's annual crusade because of her family's pagan religion./i>

Pagan's, huh? Gee, that might not have anything to do with the kid being harassed now would it?

3 posted on 05/12/2003 8:46:37 AM PDT by Michael.SF. (If you cannot win by he rules, you must be a Democrat (or a Bruin).)
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To: Michael.SF.
Are YOU suggesting that it's acceptable for students to assault one another over religious differences?
4 posted on 05/12/2003 8:48:09 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Obsessive-compulsive and proud of it!)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
No religion, pass out free condoms and clean needles, we know those things work.
5 posted on 05/12/2003 8:49:09 AM PDT by Ursus arctos horribilis ("It is better to die on your feet than to live on your knees!" Emiliano Zapata 1879-1919)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Bump For Later
6 posted on 05/12/2003 8:50:08 AM PDT by FreeLibertarian (You live and learn. Or you don't live long.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Looks like the teachers are protecting this girl. Why don't we just make a law requiring children to be nice to each other? That ought to solve everything, right?

Apparently Blood of Tyrants hasn't read the part of the Bill of Rights that says you have the Freedom From Taunting.

It was dusted off from the Constitution by the Supreme Court in the 1960s. Those wise old sages also discovered after nearly 200 years of forgetting about the Right To Privacy line, as well as the Seperation of Church and State part too. Luckily activist Judges and Libertarians are here to protect our Constitutional rights.

7 posted on 05/12/2003 8:52:05 AM PDT by PeoplesRep_of_LA (Press Secret; Of 2 million Shiite pilgrims, only 3000 chanted anti Americanisms--source-Islamonline!)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
My copy is defective, too. No church/state separation mentioned anywhere.

And, to clarify: Paganism is a made-up amalgamation of new-agey philosophies and nature worship. It does not have a "centuries old tradition." It's the ultimate no-hassle school of thought.

According to the article, only 1300 of the 3000 kids attended; how does she feel "persecuted" when over half of the students Didn't Go? It's not like 2999 kids went, and she didn't... over half did not go on the field trip, just like she didn't.

I'm rather wondering just what sort of snotty comments she's made to invite the persecution of her peers? Still, kudos to the teacher who defended her from bullies; bullying is never appropriate, though it happen routinely in the "Lord of The Flies Jr. High" settings.

Regards,
8 posted on 05/12/2003 8:52:32 AM PDT by Missus (We're not trying to overpopulate the world, we're just trying to outnumber the idiots.)
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To: Tax-chick
Thank you, thank you, thank you. It's nice to hear from an Evangelical Christian who understands these things. I am not christian and I couldn't have said it better myself (though I'd get way more flames for doing so).

By the way, anyone else find it funny the guy from the school was names, "Mr. Goforth?" As is, "Go forth and multiply."

9 posted on 05/12/2003 8:52:45 AM PDT by whattajoke
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To: Blood of Tyrants
And, of course, you'd have no problem with you kids being "encouraged" to go on a pilgrammage to Mecca for 3 days, right?
10 posted on 05/12/2003 8:54:27 AM PDT by whattajoke
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Paganism is an ancient religious tradition that embraces kinship with nature, positive morality and the idea that there is both a female and male side of Deity.
The moderns who call themselves "pagan" practice a tradition as ancient as microwave popcorn or diet cola beverages. Though they borrow heavily, these "pagans" are not the practitioners of any chthonic or animist or shamanist tradition.
11 posted on 05/12/2003 8:55:06 AM PDT by Asclepius (as above, so below)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Fourteen-year-old India Tracy said she was harassed and attacked

I have problems beleving that,.

12 posted on 05/12/2003 8:56:57 AM PDT by oyez (Is this a great country or what?)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
If religion wasn't the reason, the harassment could be from the poor girl being a "nerd". After all, this is middle school. Where hormone induced emotions run rampant. Any Middle School teacher will tell you.

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

No "separaton of church and state", besides, our Federal Government doesn't have a "state" status!

13 posted on 05/12/2003 8:57:05 AM PDT by Zavien Doombringer (If I keep my eyes on Jesus, I could walk on water - Audio Adrenaline)
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To: Tax-chick
Never. She should be fully protected to practice her pagan religion as she see's fit, as long as it doesn't cause physical harm to another person. The schools should neither encourage nor discourage it. If one entire religion is disallowed because one child is 'uncomfortable' then ALL religons should be banned. But of course, you can't do that because the Constitution prohibits the state from making laws that prohibit the free exercise of religion. (Yea, right.)

But you cannot make children be nice to each other, you can only try to protect them all. Also, it seems that this girl is encouraged by her parents to be a "sore thumb", i.e. the fact that she was the only girl on the junior high football team. I would also bet that this girl is one of the "weird" ones.

Sorry, but while weird may be normal in LA or NY or Chicago, it doesn't play in Maynardville, TN.
14 posted on 05/12/2003 8:57:36 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Asclepius
I'll agree paganism is an amalgamation of wannabe's who simply demand attention with a loose set of rules, if any at all. But there is a history to it (or parts of it), much of which became basis for some of the more traditional religion's holidays.
15 posted on 05/12/2003 8:57:39 AM PDT by whattajoke
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To: Tax-chick
Being a local, and hearing about this from both sides of the situation, I have my doubts about the story that India is telling. No, it's not ok for students to assault one another over religious differences - then again, it's not ok for someone to lie in order to receive preferential treatment. This isn't about religious freedom, it's about money.
16 posted on 05/12/2003 8:58:21 AM PDT by Tennessee_Bob (Dieses sieht wie ein Job nach Nothosen aus!)
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To: Tax-chick; Michael.SF.; Blood of Tyrants
OK, you've tried to beat 2 strawmen on this thread on the same point, I think there is a limit. Would YOU please settle down Taxchick? I've never met these two and I'm quite certain they weren't suggesting that christian kids should target pagens for bullying.

As an unrelated point, I just thought it needed to be mentioned "oh my God! Would somebody PLEASE think about the children!!!"</sarcasm>
17 posted on 05/12/2003 8:59:26 AM PDT by PeoplesRep_of_LA (Press Secret; Of 2 million Shiite pilgrims, only 3000 chanted anti Americanisms--source-Islamonline!)
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To: whattajoke
Or "Go forth and make disciples of all nations"...
18 posted on 05/12/2003 9:00:54 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Tax-chick
I would suggest that it's unacceptable for a student to make up lies about how other students assaulted her, just so she could get time off from school and so her parents could initiate a potentially lucrative lawsuit.

her story sounds like just that: a story.

Additionally, most "victims" of "hate crimes" turn out to be hoaxers.

19 posted on 05/12/2003 9:01:54 AM PDT by wideawake (Support our troops and their Commander-in-Chief)
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To: Missus
Good catch. This student should not be bullied because of her religion, but kids are mean and taunt all the time about anything, from the color of your socks to the type of juice in your lunchbox. A pagan would stand out in this area like a neon light. It has nothing to do with the crusade, especially when over half the students didn't.

20 posted on 05/12/2003 9:02:10 AM PDT by I still care (America is great because it is good. When it ceases to be good, it will cease to be great.)
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To: oyez
I would have problems believing that ANY 14 year-old isn't harassed. Geeky kids who draw attention to themselves get harassed. It probably has nothing to do with the subject at hand. And 14 year-old girls are partial to hyperbole. I think the little goosestepper can't stand to see others having a good time.
21 posted on 05/12/2003 9:02:37 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
This article is extremely bias. The entire article is written in support of the lawsuit. The only exception is this single sentence where in a legal response, the school denies the charges.

In a May 2 legal response, school officials said they acted appropriately, denied the attacks happened, or said they were unaware of them.

Here is another example of the bias contained in this article.

Paganism is an ancient religious tradition that embraces kinship with nature, positive morality and the idea that there is both a female and male side of Deity.

Here we have everything the PC crowd loves - environmental worship, good feelings and feminism. Note that this definition of 'Paganism' is chosen to suit the author's agenda. Also note the irony in the fact that environmental worship, good feelings (e.g self-esteem) and feminism are precisely what is currently taught in public schools. According to this author's chosen definitions, such teachings should be banned due to religious concerns (i.e Paganism).

22 posted on 05/12/2003 9:03:19 AM PDT by Pete
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To: Blood of Tyrants
She should be fully protected to practice her pagan religion as she see's fit, as long as it doesn't cause physical harm to another person.

I don't think you see the point. She is allowed to practice her "religion". Acording to the law, the Schools can encourage it.

If one entire religion is disallowed because one child is 'uncomfortable' then ALL religons should be banned.

Why should all religions be banned because ONE person is uncomfortable? That ONE person needs to get a grip! "The needs of the many out weigh the needs of the one". Tell me why make 1300 people uncomfortable because of 1 complaint?

23 posted on 05/12/2003 9:04:58 AM PDT by Zavien Doombringer (If I keep my eyes on Jesus, I could walk on water - Audio Adrenaline)
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To: PeoplesRep_of_LA; Missus; Zavien Doombringer
I have figured it out. That clown was reading from his copy of the socialist USSR Constitution where there IS a 'seperation of church and state' clause.
24 posted on 05/12/2003 9:05:30 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: whattajoke; Blood of Tyrants
And, of course, you'd have no problem with you kids being "encouraged" to go on a pilgrammage to Mecca for 3 days, right?

Or attending a three-day Satanist Mass. After all, religious expression is appropriate everywhere, anytime.

25 posted on 05/12/2003 9:06:28 AM PDT by jimt
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To: jimt
As long as it is voluntary, why would I care?
26 posted on 05/12/2003 9:07:57 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: Tax-chick
Are you suggesting that it's okay for students to assault one another over religious differences? I disapprove of this whole situation - and I'm an evangelical Christian - because it promotes the mob mentality that is already too much a part of schooling.

These are two different problems:

Harrassment - No child should be harrassed because of her parents or her own beliefs and tolerance needs to be taught to those who are harrassing her.

The Field Trip - Since this is voluntary and the school does not fund it, then there should be no reason to object to the trip. In this case the Pagan's need to be tolerant of the other children's right to express their own religious beliefs.

The parents of the girl are placing the blame on the field trip, which they object to, and are not owning up to the fact that their own bizarre beliefs may be having a negative effect on their own child.

Why did they need to let others know that they are Pagans? Probable answer: they are more interested in their 'cause' (either promoting Paganism or stopping the field trip), then they are in their own childs welfare.

27 posted on 05/12/2003 9:08:54 AM PDT by Michael.SF. (If you cannot win by he rules, you must be a Democrat (or a Bruin).)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Sending kids to a Christian revival for a field trip is just plain bizarre.
28 posted on 05/12/2003 9:10:27 AM PDT by Belial
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To: Blood of Tyrants
I believe the Federalist Papers may clear up this confusion.
Thomas Jeferson was an advocate for the freedom of religion and wanted to make sure that government would not have any control over man's covictions to worship God, or a deity. He did quote, a separation of church and state should be maintained, only in defence of freedom to worship, not for the government to be Atheistic. Religion plays an important role in our government and with out religion, our laws would be morally corrupt. Our Constitution was based on the premise of a Supreme Godhead that truth and justice will be judged by Him (God).
29 posted on 05/12/2003 9:11:05 AM PDT by Zavien Doombringer (If I keep my eyes on Jesus, I could walk on water - Audio Adrenaline)
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To: Zavien Doombringer
{Why should all religions be banned because ONE person is uncomfortable? That ONE person needs to get a grip!}

According to the rules of political correctness, liberals have a right not to be offended.
30 posted on 05/12/2003 9:11:21 AM PDT by Kuksool
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To: Blood of Tyrants; Tennessee_Bob
Let's keep this in perspective:

If India and her parents were so against this activity, why give her permission to participate in a voluntary activity? I'm sure she could have stayed in a classroom and done homework or read her beloved pagan books.

I agree with you, TennBob - This is a setup - they are after money.

31 posted on 05/12/2003 9:11:27 AM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: Belial
No more bizarre then sending them to a Native American ceremony or an anti-drug rally.
32 posted on 05/12/2003 9:11:34 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: Zavien Doombringer
You apparently didn't get the sarcastic tone of my post. I'll use the &lt;/sarcasm&gt; symbol the next time.

This is just another blatant attempt to stick the federal government in where it doesn't belong. You have freedom of religon, not freedom FROM religion. Teachers shouldn't be proselitizing but neither should they be prohibited from saying a silent prayer or wearing religions symbols.
33 posted on 05/12/2003 9:11:42 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Fourteen-year-old India Tracy said she was harassed and attacked by classmates for nearly three years after she declined to attend Baptist Pastor Gary Beeler's annual crusade because of her family's pagan religion.

She was the only girl on the middle school football team.

And of course by her report she was harrassed for her satanic religious beliefs alone? Yeah right!

34 posted on 05/12/2003 9:13:28 AM PDT by joesnuffy (Moderate Islam Is For Dilettantes)
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To: Belial
Sending kids to a Christian revival for a field trip is just plain bizarre.

No, that isn't bizarre to those that are accustomed to it. Teaching a homosexual and Alternative lifestyle is. Changing the truth of God into a lie is not only bizarre (confusion) but an abomination, yet the schools make that mandatory!

35 posted on 05/12/2003 9:14:46 AM PDT by Zavien Doombringer (If I keep my eyes on Jesus, I could walk on water - Audio Adrenaline)
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To: whattajoke
Where exactly do you see it that teachers and principals are encouraging the children to go? Where do you see it that it was the government sponsoring ANY of the activities?
36 posted on 05/12/2003 9:16:11 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
Ah, sarcasm...I love it! I agree, teachers shouldn't proselitizing,(coaxing people from one church to thiers) but expressing faith isn't proselitizing. I agree also there isn't a freedom from religion. Atheists don't even relize that Atheism is a "religion". Atheists proclaim there isn't a God, yet they believe they are incharge of themselves. Only when they realize they aren't in control of thier environment, does thier "natural instinct" to call on God kick in!
37 posted on 05/12/2003 9:19:10 AM PDT by Zavien Doombringer (If I keep my eyes on Jesus, I could walk on water - Audio Adrenaline)
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To: Belial
You mean ALLOWING them to go with their parent's permission? How DARE they!
38 posted on 05/12/2003 9:19:10 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Pete
Paganism is an ancient religious tradition that embraces kinship with nature, positive morality and the idea that there is both a female and male side of Deity.

Note how they use the term 'positive morality' when 90% of the population probably has no idea what they mean (most people would assume it means good, traditional moral values or something like that). Why can't they use a term like 'moral relativism' that means aproximately the same thing and is self-explanatory?

39 posted on 05/12/2003 9:22:54 AM PDT by Nathaniel Fischer (Mark Sanford in '08)
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To: AppyPappy
No more bizarre then sending them to a Native American ceremony or an anti-drug rally.

No, it's totally different.

Native American ceremonies are mostly a matter of history, in no small part thanks to the earlier efforts of zealous Christians. The purpose of exposing kids to this is to give them an awareness of a culture most are not familiar with. It's certainly not to tell them to pray to the rain god or affirm his existence. Can you say the same about the Christian revival?

An anti-drug rally, while still retaining elements of propaganda, is essentially sending a health message to kids. And that kind of thing is necessary and useful to some degree.

The bottom line here is these Christians, like fundamentalists of any religion, want EVERYONE to convert to their set of beliefs. In case you've forgotten your history, there are reasons we have limited the reach of these fanatics.
40 posted on 05/12/2003 9:24:09 AM PDT by Belial
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To: Blood of Tyrants
And of course the moral character building going on for 99.9% of the students who "voluntarily" attend and the ultimate effects of this character building on our nation..will be ignored or mis-reported in by eduational authorities who are more interested in the more traditional marxist views of what kinds of character building destroy a nation....

Which of course is their stated goal.....
41 posted on 05/12/2003 9:24:38 AM PDT by joesnuffy (Moderate Islam Is For Dilettantes)
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To: jimt
After all, religious expression is appropriate everywhere, anytime.

Nu-uh. I have my Liberatarian True US Constitution right here and the 37th Amendment clearly says that "no one shall be religious, or perceived to be there of, if they are on State property* or within sight of a State Employee**."

I have Rights! Don't oppress me with your religious fanaticism, you obviously are close minded zealot and not a real American.

** "Within Sight of" as defined by judges discrestion by The Right To Privacy of the 32nd Amendment

42 posted on 05/12/2003 9:27:03 AM PDT by PeoplesRep_of_LA (Press Secret; Of 2 million Shiite pilgrims, only 3000 chanted anti Americanisms--source-Islamonline!)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
You mean ALLOWING them to go with their parent's permission? How DARE they!

No, I mean the school facilitating and excusing kids for a field trip centered around some fundie dogma...that's BIZARRE.
43 posted on 05/12/2003 9:27:38 AM PDT by Belial
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To: Pete
It is obvious that the words were selected with a serious anti-Christian bias. I seriously doubt that the word "crusade" was ever used by the sponsors of this event.
44 posted on 05/12/2003 9:30:09 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants
India Tracy's family probably would have no problem if the school district held diversity workshops featuring a Muslim scholar, an eco-feminist Wiccan, and a gay Methodist pastor. These kinds of workshops occur across the country in very liberal school districts. Surprisingly, the ACLU has no problem with the workshops. To them, the workshops are not promoting religion, they're fostering cultural diversity. Talk about hypocrisy!
45 posted on 05/12/2003 9:30:47 AM PDT by Kuksool
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To: Zavien Doombringer
Changing the truth of God into a lie is not only bizarre (confusion) but an abomination, yet the schools make that mandatory!

You're just proving my point. Not everyone understands the same truth of god as you do. Just like not everyone understands Osama's truth about god.

Either way- it isn't for public schools to understand or teach "God's truth". If you want to brainwash your kids to think exactly as you do, build a clubhouse in the backyard and teach them whatever you think they should hear.
46 posted on 05/12/2003 9:31:11 AM PDT by Belial
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To: Belial
Fundie dogma? Buddy, you are the bizarre one here. In case you haven't noticed, there are over 1 billion followers of this "fundie dogma" religion.
47 posted on 05/12/2003 9:32:02 AM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Even if the government took all your earnings, you wouldn’t be, in its eyes, a slave.)
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To: Belial
Native American ceremonies are mostly a matter of history, in no small part thanks to the earlier efforts of zealous Christians. The purpose of exposing kids to this is to give them an awareness of a culture most are not familiar with. It's certainly not to tell them to pray to the rain god or affirm his existence. Can you say the same about the Christian revival?

With the general knowledge that most Native Americans believe in the Great Spirit, and everything they do gives glory to that deity, including thier dance - you say is history. To the Native American it is RELIGION!!

Now for the other aspect, those that went on this field trip, they wanted to go and paid to go. They were not "forced" by the school. So those 1300 that went, did so on thier own accord. Like it or not there is a moral majority that is getting tired of the secular few telling them what to do! Freedom of religion, not FROM religion!

Can you say the same about the Christian revival?

Yes we can, History dictates many Christian revivals. Azusa street for one and the Central Park (NY) Revival! There were many Tent Revivals in the late 1800's. So, yep. It is History in the making and revisited!

48 posted on 05/12/2003 9:32:27 AM PDT by Zavien Doombringer (If I keep my eyes on Jesus, I could walk on water - Audio Adrenaline)
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To: Blood of Tyrants; Zavien Doombringer
You have freedom of religon, not freedom FROM religion.

Are you implying that states have a legitimate power to impose religion on those who don't want it?

For example, should states be able to force someone to go to church?

49 posted on 05/12/2003 9:33:15 AM PDT by freeeee
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To: Belial
The bottom line here is these Christians, like fundamentalists of any religion, want EVERYONE to convert to their set of beliefs.

What's wrong with that? I want everyone to be a conservative. I want everyone to respect gun ownership. I don't see the problem here

In case you've forgotten your history, there are reasons we have limited the reach of these fanatics.

Oh so I am a fanatic now. Great. Do I get paid more now?

50 posted on 05/12/2003 9:33:22 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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