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To: ffusco
If I remember correctly, as areas became Romanized the number of soldiers recruited from those areas declined remarkably. I believe that by the time of the empire most soldiers were from the provinces and then later on from areas outside the empire. I don't know whether patriotism was a factor in most of Rome in the time just before the rise of Christianty as most of the population were not really citizens in the modern sense of the word.

I think most of the institutions and attitudes we (as conservatives) admire in the Romans were pretty much tied to the Republican era, and as far as I know any Republican sentiment died out by the time of Tiberius (although I don't know, do you know when Romans finally gave up on the idea of the Republic, as it was in the time of the consuls?)
32 posted on 05/31/2003 12:45:52 AM PDT by Dat
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To: Dat
As Roman provinces became civilized the people became lazy prefering a bourgeois lifestyle to that of a farmer/soldier which was a 26 year career. Rome prefered to "nation build" and when a people were Romanized they were expected to guard their own land with native troops. Rome couln't have a standing army throughout its empire so instead built raods in order to send rapid response to any border conflict.
This was evident in Roman Britain where native Britons defended their northern outpost for 200? years after the Romans left. Britain continually asked Rome for help, but Rome was busy fighting the Goths who were flowing into the Empire from Romania through Germany.
I think you are correct about conservative admiration for republican Rome, although the Golden age was under the Ceasers and a period of so-called good Emperors. Many orators were critical , particularly Cicero, and many Romans were aware their civilization was in decline- as today we complain about illegal immigration and corruption. Even under the Empire many republican traditions continued at the local levels of government.
34 posted on 05/31/2003 1:19:23 AM PDT by ffusco (Maecilius Fuscus, Governor of Longovicium , Manchester, England. 238-244 AD)
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To: Dat
It fell off as areas became more urbane and sophisticated.

Take a look at the coasts of the U.S. and the leftist control of most of our cities and you'll see a similar thing.

There is nothing new under the sun.
49 posted on 05/31/2003 2:31:58 AM PDT by TheAngryClam (This space for rent.)
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To: Dat
I think most of the institutions and attitudes we (as conservatives) admire in the Romans were pretty much tied to the Republican era, and as far as I know any Republican sentiment died out by the time of Tiberius (although I don't know, do you know when Romans finally gave up on the idea of the Republic, as it was in the time of the consuls?)

When Caligula was assassinated, there was some sentiment within the Senate to restore the Republic, but of course Claudius was made emperor instead. I don't know if there was anything after that.

124 posted on 05/31/2003 7:46:50 AM PDT by Stefan Stackhouse
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