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The Jefferson Davis Funeral Train Story
Sierra Times ^ | 06-03-2003 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr

Posted on 06/06/2003 10:41:06 AM PDT by stainlessbanner

June 3, 2003, is the 195th Birthday of Jefferson Davis.

There is a highway that begins in Washington, D.C. and runs through Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, California and Oregon.

Some call it the largest monument to an American.

That (It) is the Jefferson Davis Highway in memorial to a man who graduated from West Point Military Academy, served in the United States Army, was elected as United States Senator and the Confederate States of America's first and only President-1861-1865.

This story is about a man who served his God, his family and his country. This is about the strong love the people of the South had for a man who never asked anything for himself, but was always ready to help his fellow man.

Jefferson Davis was born on June 3, 1808, in Christian County now (Todd) Kentucky. He died at the home of a friend in New Orleans, Louisiana on December 6, 1889, from severe bronchitis, complicated by malaria.

The funeral of Jefferson Davis was no simple affair. Two hundred thousand attended the services at Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans. He was laid to rest in a temporary tomb of the Army of Northern Virginia.

The events of May 29, 1893, would overshadow all other news events covered by Dixie's Newspapers. It was the day the mortal remains of Jefferson Davis were removed from Metairie Cemetery, placed in a new casket and taken to Confederate Memorial Hall to again lay in state.

On the evening of May 29, 1893, Davis' funeral procession started toward the New Orleans railroad station where train Engineer Frank Coffin and his locomotive would start the 1,200 mile trip to Richmond, Virginia. Davis would be re-interred at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond.

Mrs. Jefferson (Varina) Davis began three years previous to secure a special funeral train and military escort.

The train was No. 69 of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad and the Conductor was George Crammer.

Davis' body was placed on a catafalque inside a converted observation car. The windows of the car were removed so the people could view the casket.

The crowd was so huge that the funeral procession had a difficult time getting to the train station.

The L and N train 69 pulled of New Orleans at midnight.

Uncle Bob Brown, a former Servant of the Davis family and a passenger on the train, saw the many flowers that children had laid on the side of the railroad tracks. Brown was so moved by this beautiful gesture that he wept uncontrollably.

The train stopped near Gulfport, Mississippi at Beauvoir which was the last home of Jefferson Davis.

In Mobile, Alabama the train was met by a thousand mourners and the Alabama Artillery fired a 21-gun salute. Locomotive No. 25 was also added with C.C. Dewinney as Engineer and Warren Robinson as Fireman.

In Montgomery church bells rang as a caisson carried Davis to the Alabama Capitol. A procession carried the casket through the portico where Jefferson Davis had taken the oath of office as President of the Confederacy.

The casket was placed in front of the bench of the Alabama Supreme Court room. Above the right exit of the room was a banner with the word 'Monterey' and above the left exit was a banner with the words 'Buena Vista.'

The significance of these words were that Jefferson Davis was a hero at Monterey and wounded at Buena Vista in the War with Mexico.

The train continued to the Georgia State line going through West Point, LaGrange and finally pulling into Union Station in Atlanta. A caisson carried the Southern Leaders body to the Georgia Capitol and there laid in state.

The Jefferson Davis Funeral Train continued through South Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina and in Danville, Virginia a large throng gathered around the train and the people sang," Nearer My God To Thee" as city church bells tolled.

Finally the train reached Richmond, Virginia. On Wednesday, May 31, 1893, in the morning, and Mrs. Alberta Lee Thompson described it best as follows:

"On Arriving in Richmond on Wednesday morning, May 31, the body lay in state in the Virginia capitol building until final rites in the cemetery in the afternoon. With Mrs. Davis were her two daughters, Winnie and Margaret (Mrs. J. Addison Hayes) and Mr. Hayes. Six state governors acted as pallbearers. Thousands attended the service in Hollywood Cemetery, including Confederate military leaders and privates, where with the Presidential twenty-one gun salute the beloved leader was laid to final rest."

Lest we forget those who helped make America great!


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: confederate; csa; davis; dixie; dixielist; history; honor; jeffersondavis; memorial; south; train
President Jefferson Davis Quotes:
1 posted on 06/06/2003 10:41:06 AM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: stainlessbanner
Stainless,

Those quotes are moving. You've motivated me to learn a bit more about JD.
2 posted on 06/06/2003 11:17:20 AM PDT by babyface00
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To: babyface00; sweetliberty
If some would read more about Jefferson Davis, they may learn the the war betwen the states was not about slavery, as many uninformed claim.
3 posted on 06/06/2003 11:27:43 AM PDT by Budge (God Bless FReepers!)
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To: Budge
You wouldn't have any recommended links, would ya?
4 posted on 06/06/2003 11:39:51 AM PDT by babyface00
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Comment #5 Removed by Moderator

To: stainlessbanner
My law office is located on So. Jefferson Davis Pkwy in New Orleans
6 posted on 06/06/2003 12:01:43 PM PDT by bigeasy_70118
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To: stainlessbanner
May we the descendents of such great men as President Jefferson Davis, Gen. Robert E. Lee, Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, Sec. of War & Foreign Sec. Juda P. Benjamin, and all the others who faught with such Honor and so much blood to preserve our Freedom from Tyrants never surrender to the Monster that is called the "Federal Goverment".

Sic Temper Tyranus

7 posted on 06/06/2003 12:32:31 PM PDT by Southron Patriot
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To: babyface00
Not offhand...but I might suggest a Google search, also check on Amazon.com for some older books on his life.
8 posted on 06/06/2003 12:35:17 PM PDT by Budge (God Bless FReepers!)
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To: stainlessbanner
Bump
9 posted on 06/06/2003 12:40:40 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (http://www.ourgangnet.net)
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To: Budge
"... If some would read more about Jefferson Davis, they may learn the the war betwen the states was not about slavery, as many uninformed claim."

It's not uninformed to state that the slavery aspect remains inescapable because Jefforson Davis didn't free the slaves before he fired on Fort Sumter.

10 posted on 06/06/2003 12:42:31 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid
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To: stainlessbanner
Stainless,

The following is an excerpt from the ROGERSVILLE REVIEW NEWSPAPER, Rogersville, Tennessee, December 22, 1889 from a report that was written in the MORRISTOWN GAZETTE (TN).

My GGGrandfather was Col. O.C. King, mentioned in the article, and a member of the 61st Tennessee Infantry.

MORRISTOWN’S TRIBUTE to JEFFERSON DAVIS in 1889

To the Memory of Jefferson Davis - Interesting Services. The Board of Directors of the Confederate veterans’ Association of Upper East Tennessee convened in extraordinary session at the office of Col. O. C. King, President of the Association, at 10 o’clock on Wednesday the 11th inst., and arrangements were made for the public meeting at the Opera House at 11 o’clock, in pursuance of the call by the president of the association, which was published in last week’s Gazette. At the directors’ meeting a committee composed of five directors, Col. Jas. E. Carter, Capt. J. C. Hodges, Hon. Jas. G. Rose, Maj. G. W. Folsom and W. T. Robertson was appointed to draft a memorial of Mr. Davis, to be engrossed on the record and roster books of the association; after which the board took a recess until 2 o’clock p.m., and immediately the members went to the Opera House, where a large and select audience of the best people of Morristown and vicinity was in waiting. The large attendance of ladies was noticeable. About 11:30 a.m., the exercises at the Opera House began, the choir singing “How blest the righteous when he dies.” The opening prayer was made by the Rev. Geo. F. Robertson of the Presbyterian church and was a fervent and eloquent petition to the Throne of Grace. Then the president of the association, Col. O. C. King, delivered a brief preliminary address, eloquent in its just tribute to Mr. Davis. After King was followed by the beautiful and appropriate hymn - “Rest.” rendered with exceptional taste and affect by the choir. After this Capt. J. C. Hodges delivered an address which was listened to with marked interest. He was followed by Col. Jas. E. Carter, who though not practiced in public speaking, made a speech of a few minutes, which, for its earnestness and sincerity, was deeply affecting. The choir then rendered the beautiful and touching piece founded upon the last words of Stonewall Jackson - “Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees.” Then followed an address by Rev. R. N. Price, in which the religious and moral traits of Jefferson Davis’ character were dwelt upon in length, and several incidents in Mr. Davis’ life, were told with marked effect. Then followed the reading of a short eulogy by Mr. Thomas Price Williams. Then J. H. McClister, Esq. secretary of the association, delivered a brief address. Then followed the doxology and the benediction by Rev. R. M. Hickey.

The exercises throughout were characterized by a grand solemnity befitting the occasion, and we doubt if anywhere the funeral of Jefferson Davis was more appropriately observed than at Morristown.

At 2:30 p.m., the board of directors met again at the office of Col. O. C. King, when the committee on Memorial submitted the following paper, which was unanimously adopted as the sense of the association, and was ordered to be spread of record and also engrossed on a memorial page of the roster of the association:

MEMORIAL Unanimously adopted by the Confederate Veterans’ Association of Upper East Tennessee:

On the 6th day of December, 1889, in the city of New Orleans, State of Louisiana, Jefferson Davis, late President of the Confederate States of America, departed this life. In his long and eventful life has been illustrated more vividly than in the life of any other American, living or dead, the most exalted phases of American manhood. In early life fortune smiled on him, in that he was afforded abundant opportunities for high mental culture. These opportunities were faithfully improved by him, so that at the dawn of his early manhood he was abundantly equipped to meet the wants of the active and useful life upon which he was at once called to enter. He was born and educated for a leader among men, and opportunity for the development of the qualities of his mind and body came thick and fast in after life. He first became widely known to the people of America through his transcendent qualities as a soldier during the Mexican war. The fearful charge of the Mississippi Rifles, led by Jefferson Davis, on the battlefield of Buena Vista, has only here and there a parallel in the history of wars. That day gave the name of Jefferson Davis to the world, to be placed on the roll of famous men. From that day forward he was known and recognized and treated as a leader of men. And whether in the cabinet or in the national council, or as the chieftain of the people of his own Southland, he illustrated at every point he greatness of his character.

Time would fail if we should attempt even a slight glance at the great events in the history of this country in which he acted an honorable and prominent part.

But whether in camp or council, whether in the din of war or in the hush and quiet of his long retirement in private life, he ever impressed the world with the great fact that he was a Christian gentleman in the very highest sense of those terms. As a slight token of the regard in which he is held by the Confederate Veterans of East Tennessee.

Be it resolved, That in the death of Jefferson Davis there has passed from earth one who, in all the elements of his character and in all his acts in life, illustrated the very highest type of American patriotism and exalted manhood.

2. That we will ever cherish his memory, not so much because he was our great leader in war as because in all the walks of life he was an ensample worthy of our imitation, and because he ever showed himself worthy the highest respect of those who honor and love the patriotic citizen, the true soldier and the Christian man.

3. That we tender to the widowed wife and orphaned daughters assurances of our heartfelt sympathy for them in this hour of their saddest bereavement.

4. That the Secretary of this Association be directed to set apart in his roster a memorial page upon which he will in a suitable manner inscribe this memorial.

5. That the Secretary forward to Mrs. Davis and engrossed copy of this memorial.

The board adopted a resolution of thanks to the members of the choir for the excellent and appropriate music rendered by them during the services at the Opera House, and also to Mr. Thomas Price Williams for the eulogy read by him, and he was also requested to furnish a copy of it for publication, and to give the original to the Association, to be filed with its archives. The thanks of the Association were also extended to the Rev. Messrs. Robertson, Price and Hickey, for the parts taken by them respectively in the services of the day.

11 posted on 06/06/2003 12:58:27 PM PDT by Ol' Sox
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To: stainlessbanner
Great post. Many thanks.
12 posted on 06/06/2003 1:22:15 PM PDT by reelfoot
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To: The KG9 Kid
It's not uninformed to state that the slavery aspect remains inescapable because Jefforson Davis didn't free the slaves before he fired on Fort Sumter.

A very weak argument.

Let's see if I can help you with this.

You said, "...Davis didn't free the slaves before he fired on Fort Sumter." No, he didn't, because that would be akin to the yankees shutting down the power to all those mechanical marvels they held "in slavery" in the factories only the yankees had.

Do you not understand history, or were you one of those unfortunates who were hand-fed revisionist history?

13 posted on 06/07/2003 7:37:22 AM PDT by Budge (God Bless FReepers!)
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To: stainlessbanner
Thanks for the post. Reminds me I need to take the boys to Hollywood Cemetary this summer.
14 posted on 06/07/2003 7:45:33 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands (http://wardsmythe.crimsonblog.com - updated today!)
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To: Stonewall Jackson
Great Read - you should do some research on this event.
15 posted on 06/07/2003 7:53:58 AM PDT by 30-06 Springfield
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To: Budge
If some would read more about Jefferson Davis, they may learn the the war betwen the states was not about slavery, as many uninformed claim.

From here:

"So, here are the reasons given by the Rebels themselves as to why they chose treason against the U.S.A:

Opening paragraph, Mississippi Declaration of Secession:

Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery-- the greatest material interest of the world. Its labor supplies the product which constitutes by far the largest and most important portions of commerce of the earth. These products are peculiar to the climate verging on the tropical regions, and by an imperious law of nature, none but the black race can bear exposure to the tropical sun.

Opening paragraph, Georgia Declaration of Secession:

The people of Georgia having dissolved their political connection with the Government of the United States of America, present to their confederates and the world the causes which have led to the separation. For the last ten years we have had numerous and serious causes of complaint against our non-slave-holding confederate States with reference to the subject of African slavery.

From the Texas Declaration of Secession:

Texas abandoned her separate national existence and consented to become one of the Confederated Union...She was received into the confederacy...as a commonwealth holding, maintaining and protecting the institution known as negro slavery-- the servitude of the African to the white race within her limits-- a relation that had existed from the first settlement of her wilderness by the white race, and which her people intended should exist in all future time.

In all the non-slave-holding States...the people have formed themselves into a great sectional party...based upon an unnatural feeling of hostility to these Southern States and their beneficent and patriarchal system of African slavery, proclaiming the debasing doctrine of equality of all men, irrespective of race or color-- a doctrine at war with nature, in opposition to the experience of mankind, and in violation of the plainest revelations of Divine Law. They demand the abolition of negro slavery throughout the confederacy, the recognition of political equality between the white and negro races, and avow their determination to press on their crusade against us, so long as a negro slave remains in these States

...all white men are and of right ought to be entitled to equal civil and political rights; that the servitude of the African race, as existing in these States, is mutually beneficial to both bond and free, and is abundantly authorized and justified by the experience of mankind, and the revealed will of the Almighty Creator, as recognized by all Christian nations...

From the South Carolina Declaration of Secession:

We affirm that these ends for which this Government was instituted have been defeated, and the Government itself has been made destructive of them by the action of the non-slaveholding States. Those States have assume the right of deciding upon the propriety of our domestic institutions; and have denied the rights of property established in fifteen of the States and recognized by the Constitution; they have denounced as sinful the institution of slavery; they have permitted open establishment among them of societies, whose avowed object is to disturb the peace and to eloign the property of the citizens of other States. They have encouraged and assisted thousands of our slaves to leave their homes; and those who remain, have been incited by emissaries, books and pictures to servile insurrection."

Uninformed? I don't think so.

16 posted on 06/07/2003 8:12:24 AM PDT by #3Fan
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To: The KG9 Kid
It's not uninformed to state that the slavery aspect remains inescapable because Jefforson Davis didn't free the slaves before he fired on Fort Sumter.

Slavery was a big part of the dispute leading up to the Civil War. It certainly wasn't the only thing, and arguing whether it the most important thing, or simply a big factor is interesting but will never be resolved.

I don't know that Lincoln or Davis had any constitutional authority to "liberate" private property. Where would they get that power?

17 posted on 06/07/2003 8:24:04 AM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: stainlessbanner
I have a picture of his grave site but since my scanner is broken, I guess someone else will have to provide it.

I am not a fan of Jefferson Davis by any means. I went there as a curiosity and to pay my respects.
18 posted on 06/07/2003 8:35:05 AM PDT by Shooter 2.5 (Don't punch holes in the lifeboat)
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To: babyface00
"When certain sovereign and independent states form a union with limited powers for some general purpose, and any one or more of them, in the progress of time, suffer unjust and oppressive grievances for which there is no redress but in a withdrawal from the association, is such withdrawal an insurrection? If so, then of what advantage is a compact of union to states? Within the Union are oppressions and grievances; the attempt to go out brings war and subjugation. The ambitious and aggressive states obtain possession of the central authority which, having grown strong in the lapse of time, asserts its entire sovereignty over the states."
---Jefferson Davis

This one in particular has got me thinking . . . which is a good thing.

19 posted on 06/07/2003 9:14:09 AM PDT by savedbygrace
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To: bigeasy_70118
Enjoy it while ye may! The PC Police are coming. Malcolm X Parkway? Rodney King Drive?
20 posted on 06/07/2003 9:21:32 AM PDT by Dionysius
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To: stainlessbanner
This is part of the Constitution he protected and defended?

"In all such territory the institution of negro slavery, as it now exists in the Confederate States, shall be recognized and protected by Congress and by the Territorial government." - Article IV - Section III

http://www.law.ou.edu/hist/csa.constitution.html

Sorry. This guy's in hell right now.

21 posted on 06/07/2003 9:26:12 AM PDT by KantianBurke (The Federal govt should be protecting us from terrorists, not handing out goodies)
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To: The KG9 Kid
RE post 10: General Grant didn't release his slaves until after the war.
22 posted on 06/07/2003 9:27:19 AM PDT by southland
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To: Dionysius
I have a couple of black clients from northern states who a deal with on a semi regular basis. I can always hear them cringe when I give my address.
23 posted on 06/07/2003 9:37:55 AM PDT by bigeasy_70118
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To: babyface00
Primary sources are fun to read. Often come to a conclusion at odds with conventional wisdom:

Journal of the Congress of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1865

To search the above, go here. Select "Journal of the Confederate Congress" at the "All Titles (or select a title)" menu above the search field.

The Virginia Military Institute has wonderful archives here

Thousands of primary documents are at this University of Virginia site:

The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War

24 posted on 06/07/2003 9:44:27 AM PDT by DPB101
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To: Budge
"...Let's see if I can help you with this.

You said, "...Davis didn't free the slaves before he fired on Fort Sumter." No, he didn't, because that would be akin to the yankees shutting down the power to all those mechanical marvels they held "in slavery" in the factories only the yankees had."

You've just admitted that you agree that some men were made by your Creator to serve you as machines.

God made men. Men made slaves.

I can't help you with that, Pharoah.

25 posted on 06/07/2003 10:48:58 AM PDT by The KG9 Kid
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To: stainlessbanner
What is that highway?
26 posted on 06/07/2003 11:03:24 AM PDT by NovemberCharlie
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To: Budge
Correction. As the liberals in our country want us to believe.
27 posted on 06/07/2003 4:31:44 PM PDT by proudofthesouth
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To: stainlessbanner; All
Can anyone recommend some good biographies on Jefferson Davis?
28 posted on 06/07/2003 4:36:44 PM PDT by proudofthesouth
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To: stainlessbanner
Uncle Bob Brown, a former Servant of the Davis family and a passenger on the train, saw the many flowers that children had laid on the side of the railroad tracks. Brown was so moved by this beautiful gesture that he wept uncontrollably.

Johnson sure has a way with words:
The mental image of a work-stooped-down Darkie weeping over a fallen hero almost made my own worn eyes water.

29 posted on 06/07/2003 5:03:25 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: stainlessbanner
Forgot to close my tag: </sarcasm>
30 posted on 06/07/2003 5:04:24 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: stainlessbanner
Forgot to close my tag: < /i>
31 posted on 06/07/2003 5:06:28 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: proudofthesouth; babyface00; sweetliberty; Budge
Additional Reading:

Jefferson Davis: Private Letters, 1823-1889
by Jefferson Davis, Hudson Strode (Editor)

Jefferson Davis, American
by William J., Jr. Cooper

The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government
by Jefferson Davis

Thanks for the excellent posts, Budge. Good to see you on the thread : )

32 posted on 06/07/2003 7:54:15 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: *dixie_list; annyokie; SCDogPapa; thatdewd; canalabamian; Sparta; treesdream; sc-rms; Tax-chick; ...
The third-grade teacher in Arkansas asked her class, "Now, who can tell me who our president was during the Civil War?"

A little boy raised his hand. "Yes, Johnny?" said the teacher.

"Jefferson Davis," the boy said proudly. And no one could argue with that.

33 posted on 06/07/2003 7:56:46 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: DPB101; Budge; stainlessbanner
Ditto that. Thanks for the links DPB and the fine posts Budge. Jefferson Davis was indeed an admired man. I've never heard of the two hundred thousand attending his funeral, that is amazing

And thanks for the quotes stainless. I have one by General Lee on my desk at work about doing all one can and I'll be adding one from Davis out of these

Deo Vindice

34 posted on 06/07/2003 8:17:33 PM PDT by billbears (Deo Vindice)
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To: Ol' Sox
Excellent. What a tremendous honor bestowed upon Col. King and yourself as his decendant.
35 posted on 06/07/2003 8:51:15 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: The KG9 Kid
I would suggest that you read the book titled 'A Constitutional History of Secession' by John Remington Graham. Graham, by the way, is a Minnesota lawyer but does a laudable job of lining up and explaining the reasons for the Southern States' secession from the Union. Read it and become informed as to what truly caused the war.
36 posted on 06/08/2003 2:30:19 PM PDT by Colt .45 (Cold War, Vietnam Era, Desert Storm Veteran - Pride in my Southern Ancestry!)
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To: stainlessbanner
I've visited Davis' grave in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, and not to sound flip about it, but it's "the best view in the house"--his gravesite overlooks the James River, and is rather spectacular.

Also buried in Hollywood--two US Presidents (James Monroe and John Tyler), Confederate Generals JEB Stuart and George Pickett, and several Virginia governors. There's also a monument to Pickett's Charge listing the units involved, and an area of hundreds of anonymous Confederate graves. Sadly, these graves are NOT kept up well by the cemetary, and are sometimes vandalized and desecrated with drug paraphernalia and litter by residents of the local neighborhood.

My wife and I had our first date in Hollywood Cemetery. I kid you not, she drove up from South Carolina to meet me in Richmond and the next day I took her there because of her interest in history. It didn't scare her off, so I guess I did something right! :)

}:-)4
37 posted on 06/08/2003 2:59:37 PM PDT by Moose4 (Mew havoc, and let loose the kittens of ZOT!)
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To: proudofthesouth
Please read Crowns of Thorns and Glory by Gerry Van Der Huevel. Deep insight into the honorable and courageous lives of President Jefferson Davis and his heroic wife, Varina Howell Davis -- as well as that of Mary Todd Lincoln, who was, because of her Southern heritage, probably one of the most villified first ladies in history.
38 posted on 06/08/2003 6:14:03 PM PDT by varina davis
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To: southland
General Grant didn't release his slaves until after the war.

Sorry, that's flat out false. Grant didn't have any slaves to free when the war broke out. His in-laws freed their's in January or February of 1863.

39 posted on 06/08/2003 6:19:36 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: The KG9 Kid; Budge
KG9 - why did the North did not free it's slaves prior to the war? It took Lincoln two years to issue the EP - even then it didn't free yankee slaves. Davis is not the real target you want.
40 posted on 06/08/2003 7:42:11 PM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: stainlessbanner
Late bump!!!
41 posted on 06/09/2003 4:23:08 AM PDT by SCDogPapa (In Dixie Land I'll take my stand to live and die in Dixie)
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To: stainlessbanner
Late bump!!!
42 posted on 06/09/2003 4:23:09 AM PDT by SCDogPapa (In Dixie Land I'll take my stand to live and die in Dixie)
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To: stainlessbanner
Late bump!!!
43 posted on 06/09/2003 4:23:09 AM PDT by SCDogPapa (In Dixie Land I'll take my stand to live and die in Dixie)
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To: stainlessbanner
Let's see if the liberals have the guts to shut down this Confederate cemetery
44 posted on 06/09/2003 4:27:20 AM PDT by Alouette (Why is it called "International Law" if only Israel and the United States are expected to keep it?)
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To: stainlessbanner
Great thread!!

BTTT

45 posted on 06/09/2003 6:40:23 AM PDT by Constitution Day (BWONNGGG!! Even Eric Rudolph is sick of hearing about Scott Peterson. **THIS WAS A FOX NEWS ALERT**)
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To: stainlessbanner
SMART KID!
46 posted on 06/09/2003 2:00:00 PM PDT by stand watie (Resistence to tyrants is obedience to God. -Thomas Jefferson)
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To: bigeasy_70118
"I have a couple of black clients from northern states who a deal with on a semi regular basis. I can always hear them cringe when I give my address."

It's good that Jeff Davis can still strike such fear into Yankee hearts!

47 posted on 06/18/2003 1:15:19 PM PDT by Redbob
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