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To: Kevin Curry
Now to replace it with a statue of two men engaged in anal sodomy.

Whatever Kevin. Full blown hysterics doesn't help much does it? A Buddhist lawyer or a Hindu defendent might feel that by the court's endorsement of the 10 commandments, it is prejudicial against them or their clients.

A juror walks into the building, sees the religious monument, and then sees a defendant of a different faith, and a connection is made subconsciously, that the fellow is guilty, because he worships one of these heathen religions.

Nobody is stopping Alabaman's from worshipping God, the courts just don't like the undue influence this has on potential jurors who might take the person's faith in mind more readily, with the religious reminder of their faith when they enter the court house.

Oh.. but it is much more fun to run around and talk about statues of sodomites. Statues of Krishna is more apropos. Would you feel comfortable in a courthouse, where the population to begin with was mostly Hindu, you were accused of committing a crime against a Hindu, and the judge has placed a shrine to Krishna or Shiva in full view of the jury? Think outside the box. It works.

44 posted on 07/01/2003 3:41:41 PM PDT by dogbyte12
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To: dogbyte12
Whatever Kevin . . .

What do you mean, "whatever"?

The Ten Commandments is ordered removed by judicial fiat--not because of, but despite the First Amendment as it was designed.

Suppose it were replaced with a statue of two (fully dressed, for the sake of nominal modesty) men or two women, hands on chest or breast and thigh, engaged in a passionate kiss. Simply name the piece of excrement "The Gay Dawn" in honor of the Lawrence decision so that it can be fobbed off as symbolic of civil rights. Or how about a statute of a late term abortion entitled "Dr. Carhart's Loving Hands" (approriately draped so that the act of murder is strongly suggested but not depicted) would there be any legal basis whatsover for a court to order either statue removed? Absolutely not.

But posting the Ten Commandments is an abomination, all the machinery and rage of government is enlisted to remove it from the public sphere.

Black is white, and up is down. There is a backlash developing. I intend to encourage it.

62 posted on 07/01/2003 3:56:00 PM PDT by Kevin Curry
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To: dogbyte12
"Nobody is stopping Alabaman's from worshipping God, the courts just don't like the undue influence this has on potential jurors who might take the person's faith in mind more readily, with the religious reminder of their faith when they enter the court house."

Funny, the Ten Commandments displayed in the U.S. Supreme Court never seemed to have that effect on thier decisions. You're reaching for pie in the sky. Until the recent advent of fearful, politically correct automatons in our country walking around posing as Americans, all of our Law Schools taught that all modern law evolved directly from the Ten Commandments , (which, by the way, they did). Includng murder, adultery, stealing, and lying. Honoring your parents and giving your affection to your wife or husband instead of "the girl/guy next door aren't bad moral traits either. Nor is honoring God a bad thing. Who could possibly be intimidated or distressed by this beautiful moral code? Only the enemies of God.

74 posted on 07/01/2003 4:02:46 PM PDT by TheCrusader
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To: dogbyte12
look pal, this nation was founded upon judeo-christian beliefs. it wasn't founded in the name of allah or buddah.
75 posted on 07/01/2003 4:02:48 PM PDT by MatthewViti
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To: dogbyte12
Not ever having a comparative religion class, I've often wondered which one of these rules for living(the big 10) could be offensive to other religions. Do those religions endorse murder, stealing from or lying to others? Maybe screwing someone elses wife--please fill me in about what makes these "rules" so intimidating to others.
84 posted on 07/01/2003 4:07:00 PM PDT by freeangel (freeangel)
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To: dogbyte12
"... juror walks into the building, sees the religious monument, and then sees a defendant of a different faith, and a connection is made subconsciously, that the fellow is guilty, because he worships one of these heathen religions

Your hypothetical condition is totally ruined when you realize that NOBODY in a court of law is ever identified by his or her brand of religion ~ no one asks ~ no one tells.

Jurors are not identified according to their religion, and it's beyond the authority of the court to define what is or is not a legitimate religion or legitimate religious practice (although the damned judges do it all the time because each and every one of them is a narrow minded sectarian bigot of the worst sort.)

In any case, most jurors are probably not going to recognize the Ten Commandments, and even if they do they will probably identify it as part and parcel of Judaism despite the desperate pleas of some people in FR that it was really Christians who brought down the stone tablets from Mount Sinai.

210 posted on 07/01/2003 7:32:26 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: dogbyte12
A juror walks into the building, sees the religious monument, and then sees a defendant of a different faith, and a connection is made subconsciously, that the fellow is guilty, because he worships one of these heathen religions.

Wow, you have quite an imagination! Sees a defendant of a different faith? How does that work? Do most people wear labels indicating what religion that practice?

270 posted on 07/01/2003 8:42:49 PM PDT by judgeandjury (The more numerous the laws, the more corrupt the state.)
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To: dogbyte12
A Buddhist lawyer or a Hindu defendent might feel that by the court's endorsement of the 10 commandments, it is prejudicial against them or their clients.

I am a Hindu and I would be honored by seeing the 10 commandments or any religious rules that help people become more faithful and moral. Sectarianism and atheism are the problems, not religion. This country was founded on basic religious principles, by mostly Christians, and the 10 commandments are held in honor by Jews and Christians alike, and are therefore have historical relevance. If I, as a Hindu don't mind, and in fact support such display, maybe a poll can be taken. (sarcasm)

Better yet, just read what the writers and signers of the Constitution thought about displaying the 10 Commandments.

291 posted on 07/01/2003 9:29:03 PM PDT by First Amendment
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To: dogbyte12; Kevin Curry

There is only one moral Law. You would find that Hindus are as repelled and disgusted by the cruel evil of homosexual sodomy as any Christian is.

319 posted on 07/01/2003 10:36:03 PM PDT by Cultural Jihad
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