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Columnist David Limbaugh Says Sodomy Ruling is a "Gold Mine" for Liberals
Human Events ^ | 07-07-03 | Limbaugh, David

Posted on 07/07/2003 1:06:01 PM PDT by Theodore R.

Sodomy Ruling Part II: A Liberal Gold Mine by David Limbaugh Posted Jul 7, 2003

Our Rulers, The Supreme Court

The Supreme Court's ruling in Lawrence v. Texas (the sodomy case) is a veritable gold mine for liberals and the shifting values they hold dear.

Not many conservatives I know have any desire to see the sodomy laws of any state enforced against homosexual behavior within the confines of one's private residence. But the Supreme Court's opinion had little to do with protecting that kind of privacy and much more to do with legitimizing homosexuality, moral relativism and the concept of the Constitution as an evolving document. And for good measure, the Court also took a gratuitous swipe at American sovereignty in the process.

Sure, Justice Anthony Kennedy talked about privacy, and his reasoning could have disastrous consequences if applied to its logical conclusion, as Senator Rick Santorum correctly warned. But "privacy" is hardly what was motivating the majority. The Court was determined to make a statement endorsing homosexuality as a status, not just homosexual behavior. This is profound and far ranging, but part of a continuing progression of cases sanctioning homosexuals as a protected class. The Court in Romer v. Evans (1996), for example, struck down a Colorado statute that prohibited granting special protection to homosexuals under state antidiscrimination laws.

In his majority opinion, Justice Kennedy criticized (before overruling) the 1986 Supreme Court case of Bowers v. Hardwick, in which the Court validated a state sodomy law, for demeaning the homosexual relationship. "To say that the issue in Bowers was simply the right to engage in certain sexual conduct demeans the claim the individual put forward, just as it would demean a married couple were it to be said marriage is simply about the right to have sexual intercourse." And, "(The) continuance (of the Bowers case) as precedent demeans the lives of homosexual persons."

I am not disputing that a criminal statute outlawing sodomy between homosexuals demeans the homosexual relationship -- of course it does, and it's intended to. Until relatively recently our society openly disapproved of such relationships. But it is equally true that the Court's language legitimizes such relationships -- and is intended to. Had the Court merely intended to protect the homosexual act within the home it wouldn't have addressed the "demeaning of the homosexual relationship." The Court also acknowledged the "dignity" of homosexuals "as free persons."

And where this Court is concerned, forget any affinity for the Constitution's original intent, much less its reliance on absolute truths. Kennedy continued, "(The drafters of the Due Process Clauses of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments) knew times can blind us to certain truths, and later generations can see that laws once thought necessary and proper in fact serve only to oppress." Are we to infer from this that the writers of the Bible were blind to certain truths and that we can now safely discard them as outmoded, prejudicial and homophobic? This concept might be news to King Solomon, who told us "there is nothing new under the sun."

Justice Kennedy's endorsement of postmodern moral relativism and humanism is hardly new. In Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1996), he and his robed colleagues wrote, "At the heart of liberty is the right to define one's own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe and of the mystery of human life. Beliefs about these matters could not define the attributes of personhood were they formed under compulsion of the State."

Oh well, we might as well throw out American sovereignty along with moral absolutes while we're at it. I'm not exaggerating. The Court virtually incorporated into the Constitution the ever-changing values of other nations -- "a wider civilization." "The right the petitioners seek in this case has been accepted as an integral part of human freedom in many other countries," said the Court. "There has been no showing that in this country the governmental interest in circumscribing personal choice is somehow more legitimate or urgent (than that of other nations)."

Swell. Now we not only have to contend with the erosion of traditional values from the aggressive moral relativism in our own country, but that of other even more "progressive" nations. What possible justification is there to consider, let alone adopt, as constitutional principles the values of other nations? The last time I checked, we didn't have an international constitution.

President Bush has provided badly needed moral leadership in our War on Terror. But while we're paying scant attention, our moral foundations are continuing to crumble from within. The president should use his bully pulpit to challenge this court publicly. Done effectively, it could lead to the filibuster-proof majority he needs to bring sanity to the judiciary.

Mr. Limbaugh is a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Absolute Power.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government
KEYWORDS: bowers; court; davidlimbaugh; government; kennedy; lawrence; lawrencevtexas; liberals; santorum; scotus; sodomy; supreme
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1 posted on 07/07/2003 1:06:01 PM PDT by Theodore R.
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To: Theodore R.
The legal ramifications of this are going to be felt for decades. This will make Brown vs. Board of Education and Roe v. Wade seem relatively insignificant.
2 posted on 07/07/2003 1:08:02 PM PDT by PackerBoy
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To: Theodore R.
Justice Kennedy's endorsement of postmodern moral relativism and humanism is hardly new. In Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1996), he and his robed colleagues wrote, "At the heart of liberty is the right to define one's own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe and of the mystery of human life . . ."

What is most interesting about this quote is that it marked the "official" end of the U.S. Supreme Court as a relevant body in my own life. This idiotic, empty, silly statement just about summarizes the entire institution and what it has become.

At least I can comfort myself in knowing that Justice Kennedy fully supports my right to define my own existence as one that owes not a shred of respect to any U.S. Supreme Court decisions anymore.

3 posted on 07/07/2003 1:12:24 PM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: Theodore R.
Are we to infer from this that the writers of the Bible were blind to certain truths and that we can now safely discard them as outmoded, prejudicial and homophobic?

Yes. The Biblical endorsements of slavery are a notable example.

4 posted on 07/07/2003 1:13:25 PM PDT by AntiGuv ()
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To: Alberta's Child
I think the Casey case was in 1991. It was the one that affirmed "Roe" (5-4 at he time) because "Roe" had in its eyes become "established law." Of course, the court did not affirm "Bowers" last month as "established law." The Supreme Court accepts "established law" that it wants to accept.

If Bush appoint O'Connor as chief justice, I don't think I can support Bush in 2004. O'Connor as chief justice is in the words of JFK a case of when "your party asks too much."
5 posted on 07/07/2003 1:20:12 PM PDT by Theodore R.
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To: AntiGuv
The Biblical endorsements of slavery are a notable example.

While the Biblical endorsement of slavery has been misused throughout the centuries, it is not an example of how men's understanding changed the truths of the Bible.

This is not a Bible study forum, but I would suggest that you study this subject much more carefully. You should focus on 1) the notion of slavery discussed in the Bible and 2) the status of all human beings from a spiritual point of view.

Shalom.

6 posted on 07/07/2003 1:20:28 PM PDT by ArGee (If you can read this your computer may be infected with a virus.)
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To: Theodore R.
I am not disputing that a criminal statute outlawing sodomy between homosexuals demeans the homosexual relationship -- of course it does, and it's intended to.

I wish I'd thought of saying this so clearly and succinctly. Then again, that's probably why I'm not a syndicated writer.

We need to maintain laws against homosexual behavior to continue to demean those who engage in it, whether we ever enforce such laws in the bedroom or not.

Shalom.

7 posted on 07/07/2003 1:21:55 PM PDT by ArGee (If you can read this your computer may be infected with a virus.)
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8 posted on 07/07/2003 1:31:49 PM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: AntiGuv
Yes. The Biblical endorsements of slavery are a notable example.

Please provide references to these endorsements.

9 posted on 07/07/2003 1:33:53 PM PDT by VoiceOfBruck (I know everything.)
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To: Theodore R.
This ruling profoundly discouraged me. The way I see it, the war for our nation's survival became vastly more difficult to win with this decision — not just due to the decision, itself, but due to the sweeping language used to justify it.
10 posted on 07/07/2003 1:39:38 PM PDT by Wolfstar (If we don't re-elect GWB a truly great President we're NUTS!)
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To: Wolfstar
This ruling profoundly discouraged me. The way I see it, the war for our nation's survival became vastly more difficult to win with this decision...

I'm not so sure. This decision might only move the issue from the courts into the political arena. Gays constitute a much smaller minority than did African Americans, and their position generates far less sympathy from the majority. The GOP is in a good position to capitalize from this, and the Democrats are firmly tied to the homosex lobby, a group with many many problems.

It will take time to play out, but time and human nature are with us here (as they were with race relations, which the GOP was on the right side of from the beginning).

(steely)

11 posted on 07/07/2003 2:23:11 PM PDT by Steely Tom
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To: AntiGuv
"The Biblical endorsements of slavery are a notable example."

The Bible tolerates and provides civil laws for several things, including slavery, divorce, and polygamy. But that shouldn't be viewed as an endorsement of such.

Divorce was allowed by Moses and laws were established because of the "hardness of men's hearts". Polygamy was allowed also allowed, despite that Genesis chapter 2 says man would cling to the woman (singular) and the TWO shall become one flesh. Slavery is just another example of a common practice which the Bible made allowance for. However it did write laws for protection of the slave and for the slave to gain freedom in many instances.

The following is from this link.

Why does the Bible seem to tolerate the institution of slavery?

The slavery tolerated by the Scriptures must be understood in its historical context. Old Testament laws regulating slavery are troublesome by modern standards, but in their historical context they provided a degree of social recognition and legal protection to slaves that was advanced for its time (Exodus 21:20-27; Leviticus 25:44-46).

In ancient times, slavery existed in every part of the world. Slaves had no legal status or rights, and they were treated as the property of their owners. Even Plato and Aristotle looked upon slaves as inferior beings. As inhumane as such slavery was, we must keep in mind that on occasion it was an alternative to the massacre of enemy populations in wartime and the starvation of the poor during famine. It was to the people of this harsh age that the Bible was first written.

In New Testament times, slave labor was foundational to the economy of the Roman empire. About a third of the population was comprised of slaves. If the writers of the New Testament had attacked the institution of slavery directly, the gospel would have been identified with a radical political cause at a time when the abolition of slavery was unthinkable. To directly appeal for the freeing of slaves would have been inflammatory and a direct threat to the social order. 1 Consequently, the New Testament acknowledged slavery’s existence, instructing both Christian masters and slaves in the way they should behave (Ephesians 6:5-9; Colossians 3:2; 4:1; 1 Timothy 6:2; Philemon 1:10-21). At the same time, it openly declared the spiritual equality of all people (Galatians 3:28; 1 Corinthians 7:20-24; Colossians 3:11). 2

The gospel first had the practical effect of doing away with slavery within the community of the early church. 3 It also carried within it the seeds of the eventual complete abolition of slavery in the Western world.

The fact that the Bible never expressly condemned the institution of slavery has been wrongfully used as a rationale for its continuance. In the American South prior to the Civil War, many nominal Christians wrongly interpreted the Bible’s approach to slavery and used their misunderstanding to justify economic interests. The terrible use of African slave labor continued in spite of those who argued from the Scriptures for the equality of all races. 4

Only under the leadership of Abraham Lincoln did an American government bring an end to the nightmare of slavery that had long blighted the American conscience. The cost was incalculable. Nowhere in the world has more “brothers’ blood” been shed over the issue of slavery than in America. (Over 600,000 soldiers were killed in the Civil War.) As President Lincoln said:

Fondly do we hope—fervently do we pray—that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue, until all the wealth piled up by the bond-man’s two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, “the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.”

The writer of the “Battle Hymn Of The Republic,” popularized during the Civil War, expressed the views of millions who participated in the suffering of that era when she wrote:

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord, He has trampled out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored, He has loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible, swift sword, His truth is marching on.

Today the Christian message of the spiritual equality of all men under God has spread throughout the world, and it is rapidly becoming the standard by which the human values of all nations are measured.

Written by: Dan Vander Lugt

12 posted on 07/07/2003 2:40:44 PM PDT by DannyTN (Note left on my door by a pack of neighborhood dogs.)
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To: DannyTN
Wow! Well done thou good and faithful servant. Dividing the word correctly is a Spirit gift.
13 posted on 07/07/2003 2:49:12 PM PDT by MHGinTN (If you can read this, you've had life support from someone. Promote Life Support for others.)
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To: VoiceOfBruck
Exodus 21:2-10
Exodus 21:20-32
Leviticus 25:44-46
Deuteronomy 20:13-14
Proverbs 29:19

Ephesians 6:5-9
Colossians 3:22
I Timothy 6:1-2
Titus 2:9-10
Philemon 1:10-21
I Peter 2:18
14 posted on 07/07/2003 2:49:58 PM PDT by AntiGuv ()
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To: DannyTN; MHGinTN
I see nothing in that link which implies anything but Biblical endorsement of slavery.

The slavery tolerated by the Scriptures must be understood in its historical context.

Are we to infer that Biblical "truths" are dependent on historical context?

15 posted on 07/07/2003 2:52:58 PM PDT by AntiGuv ()
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To: PackerBoy
The legal ramifications of this are going to be felt
 for decades. This will make Brown vs. Board
of Education and Roe v. Wade seem relatively insignificant.


Yes, it's going to be a big one.  The social conservatives
will be, heck-they are, into industrial grade whining.
16 posted on 07/07/2003 2:54:36 PM PDT by gcruse (There is no such thing as society: there are individual men and women[.] --Margaret Thatcher)
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To: Wolfstar
R. Limbaugh this morning said that the rulings were essentially 'irrevocable'.

That's pretty much it. Bush has to answer for this with the amicus briefs that were filed. What was he thinking?
17 posted on 07/07/2003 3:00:01 PM PDT by RinaseaofDs
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To: AntiGuv
"Are we to infer that Biblical "truths" are dependent on historical context? "

No that would be a wrong inference. What you are to infer is that the Bible makes allowances for man's fallen condition. God hates divorce but nevertheless included laws to govern divorce.

Polygamy was not the model that God set up in Genesis chapter 2, but nevertheless, the Bible include laws on how to treat your wives if you have two and you love one but hate the other. Should we infer from that, that God endorses hating one of your wives? Of course not! That would be contradictory to everything else the bible is about.

Same thing with slavery. The Bible commands you to love others. Yet it has laws to govern slavery, because God knows the heart of man, and man's heart is not righteous.

18 posted on 07/07/2003 3:02:32 PM PDT by DannyTN (Note left on my door by a pack of neighborhood dogs.)
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To: Alberta's Child
This idiotic, empty, silly statement just about summarizes the entire institution and what it has become.

Actually, while that phrase is sheer idiocy, it is calculated. It is the eternal humanistic demand to be able to define one's past, present, and eternity without filtering one's existence through the prism of Almighty God. The Justice is this case is asserting a right to define your own existence, as if any human being can do that apart from God.

The battle continues.

19 posted on 07/07/2003 3:02:32 PM PDT by Zack Nguyen
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To: DannyTN
We infer God's hatred of divorce, polygamy, and certain types of hatred due to various relevant Scriptures. Upon what do we base our inference of his alleged hatred of slavery? Could you provide whatever relevant citations?
20 posted on 07/07/2003 3:05:08 PM PDT by AntiGuv ()
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