Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Iranian Alert -- DAY 34 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
Live Thread Ping List ^ | 7.13.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 07/13/2003 12:01:06 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The world media has all but ignored this week's dramatic events in Iran. The regime has masterfully handled the world media. As we reported yesterday, the regime appears to have a new ally in their efforts to silent the media, Cuba.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/944757/posts

Several days ago we reported the jamming of LA based Iranian broadcasters, the key link of communication of the Iranian protest movement. The regime had been jamming the signals in the past within Iran using equipment purchased from France.

But days before the July 9th protests were to begin the broadcaster began reporting that their uplink signal was being jammed as well. This would require jamming equipment either in the US or nearby. We have been seeking confirmation of this story. We now have it.

Loral Skynet, hired a firm to investigate the source of the jamming. The result was that they have narrowed the probable source of the jamming to be in the vicinity of Havana Cuba.

This story has national security implications. We need to write the media and ensure they cover this breaking story. We need to contact our elected officials and demand they investigate this immediately.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-52 next last
To find all the links to all 33 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 07/13/2003 12:01:06 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: All
LOOK! Another Freeper Just Gave To The Cause! WAY TO GO!
We Salute Free Republic's Donors! Be one! Donate Here By Secure Server
Or mail checks to FreeRepublic , LLC PO BOX 9771 FRESNO, CA 93794
or you can use
PayPal at Jimrob@psnw.com
STOP BY AND BUMP THE FUNDRAISER THREAD- It is in the breaking news sidebar!

2 posted on 07/13/2003 12:02:32 AM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- DAY 34 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST P> Live Thread Ping List | 7.13.2003 | DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

3 posted on 07/13/2003 12:09:32 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All
Backers of Iranian Reform Fight Tide of Frustration

By Afshin Molavi
Jul 13, 2003

Critics Say Movement Has Become Irrelevant

TEHRAN -- A faded, nearly shredded picture of Iranian President Mohammad Khatami peers at customers from the back of Mitra Azad's computer in a travel agency in central Tehran. Pen marks on the smiling president's salt-and-pepper beard and the curled-up edges of the sticker offer evidence of a hasty attempt to remove it.

Azad, 28, once a devoted supporter of the president who called for greater political and social freedoms and what he termed Islamic democracy, admits taking a pen to the sticker. "He has disappointed me," Azad said. "I truly believed in him, but he and his reformist group are simply not effective. He is not willing to fight for us. So I no longer want him on my computer."

Across Iran, more and more of the 20 million Iranians who voted overwhelmingly for Khatami in 1997 and 2001 are losing patience with the reformist president and his supporters, who drove the movement and rode the charismatic president's coattails.

In its heyday from May 1997 through late 2001, the movement captivated the Iranian people by challenging the conservative clerics' grip on power, spawning a newspaper renaissance, popularizing basic concepts of democracy and creating a new generation of pro-democracy intellectuals.

Today, the movement is on the ropes, battered by election losses to conservative foes and fractured by internal disagreements over the future. Many leading reformists are in jail or have effectively been silenced.

"In the eyes of many people, the reformists have become irrelevant," said Shirzad Bozorgmehr, editor of the independent Iran News, an English-language daily. "While they battle among themselves and take every defeat with ease, the movement is dying before our eyes."

Students and democracy activists recently called for Khatami's resignation in nationwide protests that included blistering anti-government slogans. In details of a speech made public yesterday, Khatami said he would step down if the people wanted him to, the Associated Press reported.

"We are not masters of people but servants of this nation. If this nation says 'we don't want you,' we will go," Khatami was quoted as saying.

Many members of the politically active student groups recall with bitterness the impotence that reformists displayed in 1999 during a crackdown on nationwide student protests that left at least five people dead and hundreds in jail. On Wednesday, some of the Iranians who gathered to commemorate the fourth anniversary of those protests dismissed the reformist movement as irrelevant.

"They are useless," said Mehrnaz, 33, a homemaker who attended the rally and who, like many of the people interviewed, gave only one name. "They just speak nice words but do little."

When groups of bearded, hard-line vigilantes -- members of a group known as Ansar-e-Hezbollah -- circled a group of protesters, scowling and shouting Islamic slogans, one protester looked around and said, "Will the reformists save us from these thugs?"

A leading pro-democracy student group, the Daftar-e-Tahkim-e-Vahdat (Office to Foster Unity), broke with the reformists last week, declaring in an open letter to U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan that their former allies were incapable of achieving democracy, human rights and freedom.

The group also lashed out at Iran's conservatives, accusing them of creating a system of "political apartheid." Analysts said the strongly worded letter represented a severe setback for Iran's reformist movement, since the Daftar was a key organizer of pro-reform students.

When three leading Daftar members were taken away at gunpoint after a news conference on Wednesday, one member of the organization said: "Where is Khatami now? Three of our members were virtually kidnapped by security forces. Why is no one speaking out?"

Last month, peaceful protests against plans to privatize universities gave way to larger protests that touched on national issues of discontent, leading to five nights of clashes pitting students and disgruntled residents against pro-government militias, plainclothes security officers and national police.

"The reformists are in office because of the support they received from students," said Shervin, 23, a chemistry student at Tehran University. "Now it is time for them to support us. So far, they haven't done so. I'll give them one more chance. Let's see what they do from here onwards."

Leila, 24, an architecture student, disagreed: "The reformists are finished. Let's move on."

Khatami's supporters point out that his hands are tied by Iran's two-pronged system of government, under which legislation enacted by elected reformists is subject to review by institutions controlled by appointed conservatives. For example, the Guardians Council -- a body of clerics and lay jurists who were not elected -- can veto laws.

The hard-liners have proved unwilling to accommodate popular opinion, but Khatami's supporters say the president, fearing violence and instability, prefers a cautious approach to democratization. Others in the reform camp say the time has come to abandon that approach.

"We stretched the democratic spaces as far as they could go," said Ali Reza Alavitabar, an intellectual who describes himself as "a structural change" reformist, seeking to reorganize the government to strengthen democracy. "Now it is time to challenge and change the anti-democratic elements of the system."

Khatami has proposed legislation that would strengthen the presidency and limit the power of the Guardians Council, which also screens candidates for public office, regularly rejecting radical reformists, secular democrats and secular nationalists.

But a reformist member of parliament who requested anonymity said he believed the Guardians Council would reject the legislation, which would "lead to a showdown in parliament."

Some government officials, journalists and other influential Iranians say conservatives will contest parliamentary elections in February 2004 and presidential elections in May 2005 on a platform of economic security, banking on disillusionment with reformists to keep voter turnout low.

When conservatives run for office, they generally receive no more than 20 percent of the vote. In April, however, that was enough for the conservatives to win Tehran's municipal council elections against reformists, whose supporters stayed away from the polls en masse.

"The conservative victory in the municipal elections was a microcosm of the strategy they hope will allow them to win elections over the next two years," said Morad Saghafy, a secular intellectual and editor of Goft-o-Gu Quarterly.

Saghafy describes the reform camp's refusal to vote as "a political act, not a sign of apathy" -- a reflection, he said, of a movement among some Iranians who are looking for an option to both the Islamic democracy sought by Khatami's movement and the authoritarian, conservative-dominated republic.

Such dissent could strengthen the reformist movement, Alavitabar said.

"I think it is very good that students and the general population are questioning Khatami and the reformist movement," he said. "It is good that they are demanding results. This is a sign of political sophistication. I just hope that people do not stray away from politics. We will need their support as we move forward."

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1121.shtml
4 posted on 07/13/2003 12:14:04 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; risk; Eala; yonif; rontorr; ewing; norton; freedom44; RaceBannon; ...
7/12/03
Iranian MPs urge armed forces not to enter political bickering

Members of the Assembly of Student Movement of Majlis in a letter to the Commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) Major-General Rahim Safavi on Friday called for preventing armed forces from entering into political issues, the press reported here on Saturday, IRNA reported from Tehran.
The English-language newspaper `Iran Daily' wrote that the letter which had been signed by Fatemeh Haqiqatjou, Ali Tajernia, Reza Yousefian and Ali-Akbar Mousavi Khoeini also described a recent statement issued by reportedly 306 members of university groups as "taking side with a certain political current".

Referring to the late Imam's emphasis on non-interference of the armed forces in political issues, the signatories said, "Unfortunately, the Imam's stipulations have been frequently twisted and changed by parts of the armed forces to justify factional stances."

The MPs said that they were referring to university Basij, which they called an appointed organization that has nothing to do with the student movement.

"The recent statement, which has been masterminded by university Basij and signed by more than 250 university Basij centers is nothing but explicit partiality in favor of a certain political current or, at least, an effort to cast doubt on reformist currents," the letter said.

The MPs called on Safavi not to let personal and factional interests become a basis for presenting unrealistic pictures of what is going on in the country and a permit for unbridled partiality for political groupings.

"We believe that the majority of those who are concerned about the system and even most of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps are dissatisfied with reduction of their status to that of proponents of a certain political current," they concluded.

http://www.payvand.com/news/03/jul/1079.html
5 posted on 07/13/2003 1:28:39 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Again you are doing a great service by posting these articles, so informative as to the recent history in Iran. Some of us have followed these events since even before the overthrow of the Shah (yes !) and this latest chapter we arepraying will bring the freedom that the Iraninans have benn striving for since ???? Post WWII ?
6 posted on 07/13/2003 1:45:03 AM PDT by happygrl (Iran Azad....until they are free, we are all "corrupt street women"!!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Could you explain to a non-Iranian what is the Majlis ?

Also what is Basij ?

Thank you.

7 posted on 07/13/2003 1:54:03 AM PDT by happygrl (Iran Azad....until they are free, we are all "corrupt street women"!!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: happygrl
I remember in college our wearing arm bands w/the red number 52 on them (for the 52 hostages in IRAN). I also remember wearing a pin that said "F--- Iran", and no one said a thing to me about taking it off. Back then, that was a pretty unaccepted word to say, let alone see in print - but it was accepted.
8 posted on 07/13/2003 2:01:02 AM PDT by bets
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: happygrl
Majlis is Parliament in Farsi Language.
Basij ( Armed People ) is a kind of Islamic Militia who fought against Saddam in the 80's Iraqi imposed war.
But now they are acting against Iranians, beat them, force freedom fighters to give up and so on.
Most of them are involved in brutal actions of the regime.
9 posted on 07/13/2003 2:38:42 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: bets
Could you tell me more about what you thought and what you think about us?

10 posted on 07/13/2003 2:40:56 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
I'm sorry, I don't understand your question?
My comment was remembering back in about 1979 or 80 during the "Iranian Hostage Crisis". In memory of the 52 American hostages held in Iran by Iranian terrorists, Penn State students were wearing armbands w/the number 52 on them. At the time, there was a lot of anger, and I had a pin w/that nasty saying on it. I've since thrown it away. But I was remembering the times - over 20 yrs ago. Friends, then enemies, then friends, then ?....guess times change.
Is that what you were asking about?
11 posted on 07/13/2003 2:49:44 AM PDT by bets
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: bets
Nice to meet you,
I am asking what you are thinking about Iranians now?
What is your idea about changes happening in Iran?
12 posted on 07/13/2003 3:00:06 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Based on what I hear, I'd like to think the recent protests would take a foothold for a positive, internal change. But, I'm not sure what I hear is truth - some from main-stream media, and some from people on FR who say they're directly in touch w/students and others currently protesting. It could all be spin for all I know.
13 posted on 07/13/2003 3:03:08 AM PDT by bets
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Good morning
Thanks for the ping
14 posted on 07/13/2003 6:17:40 AM PDT by firewalk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Thanks for the info.
15 posted on 07/13/2003 6:56:51 AM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
While you're translating:

What is the difference in meaning between "Iran Azad"
and..."Iran e-Azad?"
16 posted on 07/13/2003 7:05:45 AM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Where do you live, F14 Pilot?
17 posted on 07/13/2003 7:10:23 AM PDT by Texas_Dawg ("...They came to hate their party and this president... They have finished by hating their country.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert
President voices deep grief at Mrs Kazemi's death, assigns four ministers to inquire into case

Tehran, July 13, IRNA -- President Mohammad Khatami on Sunday expressed deep grief at sudden death of Iranian photographer Ms Zahra Kazemi and assigned four cabinet members to inquire into her death.

In a directive to Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ahmad Masjed Jamei, Minister of Information Ali Yunessi, Minister of the Interior Abdolvahed Mousavi Lari and Minister of Justice Ismail Shushtari, the president sought to clarify every aspect of the sudden death of the photographer.

"You should determine the reasons for her sudden death and who is responsible for it," President Khatami said in his directive in reaction to a statement from her family that she may have died of physical attack.

Ms Kazemi was arrested while taking photo from Evin prison compound where families of those under arrest were staging demonstration on June 23.

She suffered a stroke when she was subject to interrogation and died in hospital.

President Khatami urged the four cabinet ministers to see whether there is a matter of culpability in the case which led to the sudden death and report the outcome of their inquiry soon. SS/RR End

http://www.irna.ir/en/tnews/030713164551.etn00.shtml

Well, perhaps she suffered a medical stroke during the interrogations, but for sure she suffered multiple strokes of other kinds as well.
18 posted on 07/13/2003 7:29:19 AM PDT by AdmSmith
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot
Thank you very much. The post is understandable now.
19 posted on 07/13/2003 7:33:55 AM PDT by happygrl (Iran Azad....until they are free, we are all "corrupt street women"!!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: happygrl
You are welcome
20 posted on 07/13/2003 7:38:26 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: F14 Pilot; bets
Could you tell me more about what you thought and what you think about us?

I remember those days too.

As angry as I was about the hostage situation (it was against all norms and laws of diplomacy) I was infuriated at the Iranian students in this country who told lies about being beaten and so forth when they were rounded up and their visas in the US were terminated.

What was strange was that, many Americans at the time were sympathetic to the Iranian revolution (due to the abuses by SAVAK) as we thought this was what the Iranians wanted and we would support them.

The actions of a few students here made it difficult for many Iranians who fled here after the Shah left. Quite honestly, there was a lot of anti-Iranian feeling for some time and it made it difficult for Iranians to be employed here.

Personally, my anger was mitigated by meeting other Iranians who were truly some of the nicest human beings I had ever met.

So I chalked up much of the bad behavior by some stuents in the US to their youth.

I'm glad another generation of Iranians is doing the hard work of striving for freedom and I wish them all the Providence and luck to achieve real democracy in Iran.

21 posted on 07/13/2003 7:47:52 AM PDT by happygrl (Iran Azad....until they are free, we are all "corrupt street women"!!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Khatami congratulates Chirac on Bastille Day

Tehran, July 13, IRNA -- President Mohammad Khatami in a message to his French counterpart Jacques Chirac on Sunday congratulated him, his government and the French people on the celebration of Bastille Day.

The July 14 Bastille Day is a national holiday in France which marks the fall of the Bastille prison in Paris at the start of the French revolution in 1789.

Khatami has expressed satisfaction over the growth of Tehran-Paris relations in recent years, stressing that any mutual struggle to boost ties would reinforce the affinity between the people of Iran and France.

He also stressed that Iran and France can use the vast capacity in their relations to expand their bilateral cooperation, adding that Tehran and Paris can have an effective role in helping to resolve regional crises and to promote world peace. AA/HM End

http://www.irna.ir/en/tnews/030713120406.etn02.shtml

And when can we congratulate Tehran on the Basij Day, the day of the fall of the Basij?
22 posted on 07/13/2003 7:48:06 AM PDT by AdmSmith
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: AdmSmith
"You should determine the reasons for her sudden death and who is responsible for it," President Khatami said.
"President Khatami urged the four cabinet ministers to see whether there is a matter of culpability in the case..."

Let's see.."we tried to stop her, but she kept running into our clubs"
"Therefore, it must be her own fault."

That sounds about right, doesn't it Mr Khatami?
23 posted on 07/13/2003 7:49:14 AM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: AdmSmith; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; happygrl
Remember that France sheltered Khomeini in the fall of 1979 and they also armed Iraq with High-tech weapons against Iran then they turned their back to you and other real stories we know at the moment.
So that it is usual if they salute each other.

No worries, we will win the fight soon!
24 posted on 07/13/2003 8:10:57 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: AdmSmith
Boy, the French just love the terrorists. Don't they?
25 posted on 07/13/2003 8:27:15 AM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert
Unfortunately, the frogs have a habit, like the Saudis, to pay terrorists for not being engaged on their soil. The result is well known.
26 posted on 07/13/2003 10:26:57 AM PDT by AdmSmith
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

Comment #27 Removed by Moderator

To: seamole
Gee. I wonder who that someone was?
28 posted on 07/13/2003 11:10:14 AM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: All
-Miami Herald


Posted on Sun, Jul. 13, 2003

Andres Oppenheimer
Cuba, Iran seek global Internet censorship rules

If you are outraged by the fact that Libya has been elected president of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, get this: Cuba and Iran -- among the world's worst dictatorships -- are playing a major role in drafting new U.N.-backed rules on the worldwide use of the Internet.

Not surprisingly, these repressive regimes are proposing rules that, if adopted by an upcoming U.N. Summit on the Information Society, would not only allow but encourage widespread censorship of the Internet, as well as growing state controls of TV and radio stations.

The World Summit on the Information Society, scheduled for December in Geneva, is organized by the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the International Telecommunication Union, another U.N. affiliate.

WRITTEN BY CUBA?

UNESCO, you may remember, is the organization whose campaign for a ''New World Information Order'' -- with greater state controls -- led the United States to withdraw from that group 18 years ago. The U.S. government is scheduled to rejoin the organization this year.

When I heard about the proposals to regulate the Internet, I went into the summit's website, www.itu.int/wsis/, and read key portions of the draft declaration that is scheduled to be adopted in December. It contains alarming proposals.

The most terrifying paragraphs are being proposed by Cuba, the country that earlier this year arrested 75 peaceful dissidents -- including 26 independent journalists -- and sentenced them to up to 28 years in prison for ''crimes'' such as possessing a tape recorder, having an unauthorized copying machine, or publishing articles in foreign media.

Cuba's crackdown on journalists led the French human rights group Reporters Without Borders to declare the island as ``the world's biggest prison for members of the press.''

SOME HIGHLIGHTS

Among the Cuban proposals contained in the summit's draft documents, which also include some milder recommendations by Iran:

• That the summit's Declaration of Principles paragraph calling for universal and affordable access to the Internet include the words ''in conformity with domestic legislation of each country.'' In other words, Cuba wants the U.N. document to give an official blessing to its policy of deciding who gets access to the Internet.

• That the document's paragraph about Internet domain names and other oversight rules, which establishes that Internet governance must be ''multilateral, democratic and transparent,'' be changed to include the word ''intergovernmental.'' In other words, that all major decisions on Internet traffic be subject to governments' approval.

• That the summit's action plan include a paragraph stating, ''legal and administrative measures should be taken to prohibit undue concentration of private ownership and control of the media.'' Fine, but who is to judge what constitutes ''undue concentration''? Countries like Cuba, which have total concentration of the media in government hands?

• That another paragraph be added to the action plan, stating that accountability by the global media ''should be enhanced through targeted measures of screening by governments.'' Great! We would have governments that jail journalists for their writings ''screening'' our stories!

U.S. officials and international freedom-of-the-press groups are worried about the December summit. They say there is a real chance that some of this language may actually be adopted.

`REASON FOR CONCERN'

The key issue at the conference will be whether the international community condemns or endorses the ''fire walls'' that many dictatorships are erecting to block access to Internet websites that they consider politically inconvenient, they say.

''Cuba is proposing language that would favor state control of the media,'' U.S. assistant secretary of state for international organizations Kim R. Holmes said in an interview. ``There is reason to be concerned.''

Asked whether the Bush administration is reconsidering the U.S. decision to rejoin UNESCO on Oct. 1, Holmes said that ''it's not something what we are consciously considering at this time.'' Other officials note that, to his credit, UNESCO Director Koishiro Matsuura has criticized Cuba's recent crackdown on independent journalists.

My conclusion: If dictatorships prevail in getting the December summit to approve a greater ''screening by governments'' of the new century's most rapidly growing communication medium, I would see UNESCO as a dangerous advocate of global censorship.

Perhaps what's needed is just the opposite effort: an international alliance of democracies to fight censorship on the Internet. Rep. Christopher Cox, R-Calif., has proposed a bill calling on the U.S. government to ''direct substantial international broadcasting resources to a global effort to defeat Internet jamming and censorship.'' Technically, it can be done, congressional sources say.

I agree. Rather than debating proposals to impose global censorship, the December summit should expose regimes that are still trying to deny their citizens their basic rights to read whatever they want.

29 posted on 07/13/2003 11:41:18 AM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
I was worried at the time the students refused to vote that the mad mullahs would use that to try to convince the world that the Iranian people still supported the mullahs. They are going to have to come up with something BEFORE the next elections.
30 posted on 07/13/2003 11:48:50 AM PDT by McGavin999 (Don't be a Freeploader, contribute to FreeRepublic!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert
Should have said the above article is already posted as a Thread elswhere. I copied it here for us to read.
And that's the author agreeing at the end. Not me.
Little confusing.
31 posted on 07/13/2003 12:40:46 PM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
State Department Has the Iran Situation All Wrong

July 12, 2003
Knite Ridder Tribune
Joel Mowbray

With turmoil in Iran gaining more and more attention - at least when Liberia isn't taking center stage - the media guessing game about the Persian nation has kicked into high-gear: is Iran next? Of course the question implies military action, but Iran could be "next" - just not in the military sense.

Last Wednesday marked the fourth anniversary of the July 9, 1999, crackdown on peaceful protesters at Tehran University, which immediately triggered more than 15,000 demonstrators to take to the streets. Even though the Iranian regime has recently jailed hundreds of the freedom movement's leaders - and thousands of people in all - as many as 10,000 protesters marked the anniversary in Tehran alone. Iranians demanding freedom and a truly democratic government were met with tear gas and wide-scale arrests.

The international press has labeled the demonstrators "students," but that's quite misleading. Students account for most of the leaders of the peace protests, but the movement has stretched into working-class and upper middle-class neighborhoods alike - and the government is as unpopular as any since the fall of the shah in 1979. The protesters want what many Americans take for granted: freedom.

Iran is a country with a rich cultural heritage. The population is well-educated, and the 70 percent of the country under the age of 25 is largely secular. Unlike most Middle Eastern countries where Islamic fundamentalism has a certain appeal because it has never taken the reins of power, Iran is a nation whose citizens have had more than 20 years to develop their disdain for fundamentalist rule. They are hungry for a homeland that looks more like America.

Too bad the U.S. State Department hasn't been helping them reach that goal.

To listen to the diplomats at Foggy Bottom, Iran is a country divided between the religious "hardliners" and the moderate "reformers." State's No. 2 official actually called Iran a "democracy" in an interview with the Los Angeles Times this February. Give the ruling mullahs credit for this much - they managed to dupe the U.S. State Department.

The Iranian mullahs pulled off an impressive marketing job by holding two consecutive elections in which a "reformer" won the presidency and then allowing the "reformers" to win a majority of parliament in the 2000 election. Beneath the surface, though, the story is much different. The Council of Guardians, a panel of 12 mullahs that controls most of Iran, vetted all candidates for president and Parliament. Even if the "reformers" who control the Parliament are actual reformers, they have little power to change anything. The Council of Guardians can veto any bill it chooses.

But the greatest - and most dangerous - myth that the mullahs have managed to perpetuate is that President Mohammad Khatami is a "reformer." What most don't realize is that he spent a decade as Iran's chief censor, from 1982 to 1992, where he censored more than 600 publications. He was one of 238 people who placed their hats in the ring - and 234 were declared ineligible by the Council of Guardians. In other words, Khatami was only of four candidates deemed acceptable by the mullahs.

Even though the elections were hardly more democratic than those found in the old Soviet Union, Iran's attempts to dress them up as something more apparently have worked. Secretary of State Colin Powell earlier this month called President Khatami "freely elected." But the harm caused by Powell's department runs much deeper than mere rhetoric.

For several years now, State has been trying to "engage" the mullahs. That approach has yielded little; the mullahs are still brutally repressing the Iranian people, and their efforts to develop nukes have not even slowed. The alternative approach isn't a military one, though. State could truly support the protesters - as President Bush has repeatedly done - and it could refuse to legitimize a crumbling regime with more "talks."

These steps wouldn't be a panacea - but they would be a crucial place to start.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=07&d=13&a=5

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
32 posted on 07/13/2003 2:25:18 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Thanks you. Time to put more pressure on the State Department.
33 posted on 07/13/2003 2:31:01 PM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife (Lurking since 2000.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Knite=Knight
34 posted on 07/13/2003 2:31:09 PM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Three more journalists held in Iran: Report
AFP
Tehran, July 13

Three more Iranian journalists have been arrested, taking the total currently behind bars to 21, the student ISNA news agency reported.

Hossein Bastani and Vahid Ostad-Pour of the pro-reform Yas-e-No daily, and Shahram Mohammadi-Nia, director of the weekly Vaght (Time), were summoned on Saturday by Tehran prosecutor, Saeed Mortazavi and then arrested, a Yas-e-No colleague told ISNA.

Bastani is famed for his political commentaries against the conservatives in Yas-e-No, the mouthpiece of the Islamic Iran Particiapation Front (IIPF), Iran's main reformist party led by Mohammad-Reza Khatami, brother of President Mohammad Khatami.

He is also a government employee charged with preparing news bulletins for President Khatami's office, press reports said.

Mohammadi-Nia has been accused of publishing an "inappropriate photograph and article," ISNA said, adding that "he was sent to jail since he could not post bail of 100 million rials" (more than $12,000).

Iraj Jamshidi, chief editor of the Asia financial daily which was suspended on Monday for publishing a front page picture of banned opposition leader Maryam Rajavi, remains in jail despite posting the required bail of two billion rials ($245,000), his paper said.

Yas-e-No reported that his brother Esmaiel Jahmshidi, a member of Iran's Writers Association, was also arrested on Wednesday.

35 posted on 07/13/2003 2:44:16 PM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
I'm really beginning to wonder about our State Department. Over the years, I've wondered about their loyalty to the US, now I'm convinced that only a quarter of them are loyal Americans and the rest are incompetent idiots who should be fired immediately.
36 posted on 07/13/2003 3:35:59 PM PDT by McGavin999 (Don't be a Freeploader, contribute to FreeRepublic!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

bttt
37 posted on 07/13/2003 4:13:28 PM PDT by firewalk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: happygrl
I remember those days too.
... What was strange was that, many Americans at the time were sympathetic to the Iranian revolution (due to the abuses by SAVAK) as we thought this was what the Iranians wanted and we would support them.
...Quite honestly, there was a lot of anti-Iranian feeling for some time and it made it difficult for Iranians to be employed here.
Personally, my anger was mitigated by meeting other Iranians who were truly some of the nicest human beings I had ever met.

This is almost exactly my experience. My wife had lived in Tehran and loved it and the people. When we met (in college) she was hanging out with the Iranian crowd. Then is when I began to get an education about Iran and Iranians.

I'm glad another generation of Iranians is doing the hard work of striving for freedom and I wish them all the Providence and luck to achieve real democracy in Iran.

As do I.

38 posted on 07/13/2003 4:23:33 PM PDT by Eala (Freedom for Iran -- http://eala.freeservers.com/iranrally)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert
Iranian-Canadian photographer likely to be buried in Iran
2 hours, 2 minutes ago


MONTREAL (AFP) - The mother of an Iranian-Canadian photojournalist, whose suspicious death was confirmed by Iranian authorities, has granted permission for her daughter to be buried in Iran, Canada's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said Sunday.



The mother of Zahra Kazemi, who lives in Iran, "has signed documents authorising the burial from today," a spokesman for the ministry here, Reynald Doiron, told AFP.


The announcement comes one day after the dead photojournalist's son, Stephan Hachemi, called for the repatriation of his mother's body to Canada.


Hachemi is seeking clarification on how his mother died.


"We are requesting that the Iranian authorities repatriate the body, in order to assist her son, but if the family have a change of heart, our request would be withdrawn," Doiron said.


"According to the laws of the Koran, a mother has the over-riding say in what happens to a body," he explained.


Kazemi, 54, died in uncertain circumstances after she was arrested by the Iranian authorities in late June for taking photographs of protestors outside the Evin prison in northern Tehran.


Iran's reformist President Mohammad Khatami (news - web sites) has told government ministers to investigate the matter and has expressed regrets over Kazemi's death.




39 posted on 07/13/2003 4:48:19 PM PDT by Nix 2 (http://www.warroom.com QUINN AND ROSE IN THE AM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Nix 2
Thanks for the update
40 posted on 07/13/2003 5:04:57 PM PDT by nuconvert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: All
WORLD OPINION OUTRAGED AT THE DEATH OF PHOTOGRAPHER IN IRAN

TEHRAN 13 July (IPS) Iranian President Mohammad Khatami, reacting to the international anger and dismay on the death of the Canadian-Iranian photojournalist Zahra Kazemi, instructed on Sunday four ministers to look into the case and "determine the reasons for her sudden death and who is responsible for it".

Ms. Kazemi, 54, died in a Tehran hospital on Friday night, after, according to Iranian officials, she suffered headache while under interrogation at the Intelligence Ministry.

But her family and friends, as well as Canadian officials who saw her "at a distance" in the hospital while she was in coma said she presented bruises and head injuries.

The Canadian government, in a statement, said there are indications that the Iranian-born Canadian photographer presented multiple bruises and brain injury.

Ms. Kazemi had been arrested on 23 June while taking pictures near the Tehran’s notorious Evin Prison, an official from the Islamic Guidance Ministry told the official news agency IRNA, adding that after she presented prison guards with Iranian identity documents, "she had been treated as an Iranian citizen".

"Ms Kazemi was arrested while taking photo from Evin prison compound where families of those under arrest were staging demonstration on June 23", IRNA confirmed, adding that she suffered a stroke when she was subject to interrogation and died in hospital.

The Iranian clerical-ruled officials said although Ms. Kazemi, who was covering Iranian situation for a Canadian publication and the London-based "Camera Press" photo agency had been issued press pass, but she was not authorized to cover the demonstrations.

During the two weeks of students-led anti regime protests in June and early July, the authorities arrested at least 4.000 demonstrators, most of them taken in Evin prison.

Expressing his "deep grief" at sudden death of the Iranian photographer, the powerless president assigned Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ahmad Masjed Jame’i, Minister of Information (Intelligence) Hojjatoleslam Ali Yunessi, Minister of the Interior Hojjatoleslam Abdolvahed Mousavi Lari and Minister of Justice Hojjatoleslam Isma’il Shoushtari to "clarify every aspect of the journalist’s death.

"You should determine the reasons for her sudden death and who is responsible for it", President Khatami said in his directive in reaction to a statement from Ms. Kazemi’s family that she may have died of physical torture.

President Khatami urged the four cabinet ministers to see whether there is a matter of culpability in the case, which led to the sudden death and report the outcome of their inquiry soon.

But analysts doubted the investigations would provide more information than that has been already offered by the authorities, that she had been arrested by prison guards while taking pictures in a high security zone and that she died in hospital from acute headache.

"And if the Canadian authorities insist more, the Iranians would not hesitate to charge her with espionage activities for foreign powers", one Iranian journalist told Iran Press Service, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The Canadian government and Mr. Stephen Hachemi, Ms. Kazemi’s son, insisted that her body to be returned to Canada for an autopsy, but not only the Iranian authorities refused the demand, they even did not allow a team of Canadian doctors to travel to Tehran and proceed to autopsy the victim’s body.

"I want to insist on the return of Zahra's body to Canada. That is all that is important at this point", the young Hachemi Hashemi told journalists at a press conference in Montreal.

He said once the body of my mother returned, he would urge the Canadian government to bring the murderers to international courts for trial and he would get help and assistance from international human rights groups to determine the conditions that led to her mother’s murder.

"We will help the family which has asked for the repatriation of the remains", the Canadian Foreign Affairs Ministry spokesman Reynald Doiron told the French news agency AFP. "The Canadian ambassador in Tehran has been instructed to meet with the Iranian foreign minister as soon as possible", he added.

A group of Iranian immigrants here, representing the Center for Thought, Dialogue and Human Rights in Iran, had written to Canada's minister of Foreign Affairs, Bill Graham, to demand, "the immediate return to Canada" of Kazemi's body.

"Due to the bad record of the Iranian regime on human rights abuses and in order for them to try to prevent the truth being found regarding the suspicious death of Ms. Kamezi, it is necessary that her body be flown back to Canada for an autopsy", the group said in its letter.

But according to well-informed sources, the authorities have already put pressures on Ms. Kazemi’s family, telling them that not only she should be buried in Iran, but also Islamic laws forbids the western practice of autopsy.

The Paris-based Reporters Without Borders expressed its "shock" at Kazemi's death and held the Iranian authorities responsible for her death after what it described as her "arbitrary arrest and lack of suitable medical attention".

The Association of Iranian Journalists Abroad (AIJA), in a fax to the leader of the Islamic Republic, Ayatollah Ali Khameneh'i, protested vigorously on Saturday to the death of Ms. Zahra Kazemi, an Iranian-born Canadian photo-journalist.

In another statement issued on Sunday and addressed to President Khatami, the Rome-based AIJA urged him to explain the circumstances of Ms. Kazemi’s arrest, who arrested her and on what charges?

"Did the journalist receive proper legal protection? Had she access to lawyer? Was she able to talk to her family? Was the family allowed to get medical assistance from their own doctors?", the Association asked the lamed President.

In its statement, AIJA also said it wanted to know why Ms. Kazemi had been transferred to a hospital that belongs to the Revolutionary Guards, not allowing any journalist to visit her and why the authorities refuses autopsy?

"The Association of Iranian Journalists Abroad, extremely concerned by the tragic fate of a respected colleague, not only urges the Iranian authorities to offer full information on the circumstances relating to the death of Ms. Kazemi, but also demands that an international independent team of lawyers and doctors that would include Dr. Karim Lahiji, an Iranian lawyer and deputy president of the Paris-based International Federation of Human Rights Leagues go to Tehran and investigate the case", AIJA said.

"In case the Iranian authorities refuse the admission of that team, the AIJAS reserves itself all the rights to take the matter to the attention of international courts for human rights", AIJA added. ENDS JOURNALIST DIES 13703

http://www.iran-press-service.com/
41 posted on 07/13/2003 6:43:58 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn

Her Photo...

42 posted on 07/13/2003 6:45:18 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
A very brave lady, R.I.P.
43 posted on 07/13/2003 7:09:08 PM PDT by Travis McGee (----- www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com -----)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: nuconvert
..What is the difference in meaning between "Iran Azad"
and..."Iran e-Azad?"...

Iran Azad = Free the country of Iran
Iran e Azad = Free the people of Iran
44 posted on 07/13/2003 9:06:59 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: All
Iranian professor, whose death sentence provoked outcry, sentenced to 4 years on appeal

By ALI AKBAR DAREINI
The Associated Press
7/13/03 7:47 AM

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) -- A university professor whose death sentence was repealed after nationwide protests will serve just under four years in jail, his lawyer said Sunday.

Hashem Aghajari, a history professor at Tehran's Teachers Training University, is also barred from running for office or occupying a government post for five years, lawyer Saleh Nikbakht told The Associated Press.

Aghajari was convicted of insulting Islam and questioning clerical rule during a speech in western Iran last June. Last November, he was condemned to death, banned from teaching for 10 years, exiled for eight years to three remote cities and sentenced to receive 74 lashes.

Iran frequently issues multiple sentences in cases where it wants to make an example of the accused.

Aghajari's sentencing last November provoked the biggest student protests in Iran in three years and highlighted the power struggle between the country's liberals and hard-liners.

He initially said he would not appeal the death sentence, challenging the judiciary to carry it out. But his lawyer filed an appeal over his objections.

Iran's Supreme Court lifted the death sentence in February, saying the charges were inconsistent with Aghajari's speech, and returned the case to a lower court for review.

The new sentence puts him in jail for three years, 11 months and 29 days. The verdict also suspends the previous sentence of 74 lashes.

Nikbakht said the appeals court issued its verdict on April 26 and that he was notified on June 9. He said did not announce the verdict because it coincided with student-led protests against the ruling Islamic establishment.

"I would have been accused by the judiciary of inciting public opinion," he said.

Nikbakht criticized the verdict as "an insult to justice and the judiciary." He said the appeals court ruling made new charges against his client, including libel and spreading lies.

Nikbakht said he appealed the new sentence earlier this week. It was not immediately clear if this would be Aghajari's last appeal.

Both parliament and President Mohammad Khatami had denounced the death sentence. But hard-liners, who dominate government bodies such as the judiciary and police and accuse reformists of undermining the principles of the 1979 Islamic revolution, defended the sentence.

Also Sunday, the editor of the reformist daily Yas-e-Nou said two of the paper's journalists had been detained.

Vahid Pourostad and Hossein Bastani were detained Saturday evening, Mohammad Naimipour said.

Naimipour, a prominent lawmaker, gave no further details. but relatives said the two were arrested on charges of threatening national security.

Prominent student leader Saeed Razavi Faqih was arrested Thursday on similar charges, relatives said. Faqih had organized student protests to condemn Aghajari's death sentence.

http://www.nj.com/newsflash/international/index.ssf?/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?a0429_BC_Iran-Professor
45 posted on 07/13/2003 9:29:41 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: All
Amnesty International slams student arrests in Iran

Sunday, July 13, 2003 - ©2003 IranMania.com

NICOSIA, July 12 (AFP) - Human rights group Amnesty International on Saturday expressed concern over the arrest of three student activists in Iran earlier this week.

In a statement received here by AFP, London-based Amnesty denounced the detention of the trio on Wednesday just minutes after they had held a press conference condemning the Islamic republic for banning events to mark the fourth anniversary of bloody student clashes with security forces.

Reza Ameri Nassab, Ali Moghtaderi and Arash Hashemi of the Office to Consolidate Unity (OCU), a pro-reform student umbrella group, "may have been targeted solely for the peaceful expression of their political views", Amnesty said.

"During the press conference they criticized restrictions on freedom of expression and association in Iran. They were said to have been forced to the ground and thrown into three separate vehicles and taken to an unknown destination. Ali Moghtaderi was reportedly released the same evening," the rights group added.

Amnesty claims that up to 4,000 demonstrators have been arrested in Iran since June 11 in the latest wave of student protests, and that some 2,000 may remain in detention without charge or trial.

"Many of these detainees appear to have been targeted for demonstrating peacefully," the statement said.

"Amnesty International considers them prisoners of conscience and calls for their immediate and unconditional release. Amnesty International also calls for anyone charged with a recognisable criminal offence to be given prompt fair trial.

"The authorities should take immediate measures to ensure that student activists and peaceful demonstrators are treated in accordance with international human rights standards," the statement added.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=16919&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
46 posted on 07/13/2003 9:32:13 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
And Azadi?
47 posted on 07/13/2003 10:33:03 PM PDT by chantal7
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Well, at least Amnisty International is doing something useful for a change. I am sickened by the lack of attention this is getting by the liberal press.
48 posted on 07/13/2003 10:45:59 PM PDT by McGavin999 (Don't be a Freeploader, contribute to FreeRepublic!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: chantal7
...And Azadi?...

Azad = Free
Azadi= Freedom
49 posted on 07/13/2003 11:11:05 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
Thanks! I thought so but wanted to confirm.
50 posted on 07/13/2003 11:23:39 PM PDT by chantal7
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-52 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson