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Any Lawsuits Yet To Speak Of?

Posted on 07/14/2003 11:30:02 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55

I honestly believe that the threat of lawsuits against individual downloaders was and is bogus. I have not seen one shred of evidence to the contrary. I've downloaded tons of songs beginning back with Napster. It never hurt the recording industry one ounce. What hurts them is when there is no interest. Luckily for them, Napster and Kazza kept the interest alive.

When Napster first came out everyone loved it and there was no talk of lawsuits. The recording industry was booming. Sales were up and I remember news pundits and other talking heads say that the reason sales of CD's were up was because of Napster. Napster had spawned a new interest in music and was keeping it alive.

How many of you downloaded every song off a CD, and then burned it onto another CD? Like many others I would download one song, listen to it, and if it was good enough, I would go out and buy the CD. I never found each song on a new CD, and downloaded each one. Now I have no way of listening or knowing anything about a new CD so my interest has waned considerably, and I won't be at the Music Store anytime soon.

Now the RIAA has successfully destroyed Napster and I might add about half of their profits. They are now going after Kazza. This won't be easy to do because Kazza is worldwide. Instead of going after Kazza, they are attempting to scare the downloaders into dropping Kazza in a scheme Jethro and the Beast would be proud of. If only those downloaders were elderly then the liberals could take away the ability to download and blame it on the Conservatives.

The RIAA should wake up and not do what Martha Stewart did. Martha attempted to make 200 thousand dollars illegally and ended up losing millions. This is what happens to the CEO's that are crooked. They work hard much like Martha did, and end up with more money than they know what to do with. Then once they get to the top, some decide they don't want to work for it anymore and become deceitful.

That brings them down as soon as they make that first choice. Now the RIAA is talking about how terrible their sales are, and they are blaming it on Kazza and other file sharing programs. Maybe they should take a look at when their sales started to tank. Its right when they started threatining their consumers with lawsuits!

Back to my question. Has anyone been sued yet? Any Senators sons or daughters been thrown in jail over this? Anybody been dragged into court? I didn't think so.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: 1stammendment; conmen; constitution; crooks; daschle; filesharing; firstammendment; gangsters; hometaping; internet; kazza; lawsuits; martha; momoneymomoney; monopoly; moremoremore; musclemen; musicindustry; organizedcrime; protectionracket; racketeering; riaa; rico; scapegoat; shakedown; tomgreen
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1 posted on 07/14/2003 11:30:03 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55
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To: ConservativeMan55
KAZAA FIGHTS BACK.
2 posted on 07/14/2003 11:37:39 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: mhking; Snowy; KarlInOhio; PBRSTREETGANG; sticker; appalachian_dweller; jjm2111; AdA$tra; ...
Ping.
3 posted on 07/14/2003 11:39:44 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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4 posted on 07/14/2003 11:40:27 AM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: Support Free Republic
"Forget about it, dude -- even genocidal litigation can't stop file sharers," said Wayne Rosso, president of Grokster, one of several systems that allow users to upload and download files -- many of which are unauthorized MP3 copies of songs published by the RIAA's member companies. Rosso said file-trading activity among Grokster users has increased by 10 percent in the past few days. Morpheus, another file-trading program, has seen similar growth.
5 posted on 07/14/2003 11:41:34 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
Intellectual property is one's own property. Copyright laws mean something.

If recording companies desire to "give away" tracks, as promos, the can do so.

For a third party to take your party, and distribute it for profit is theft.
6 posted on 07/14/2003 11:52:21 AM PDT by truth_seeker
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To: ConservativeMan55
Can anyone explain to me how the record industry can identify those who download songs on servers such as Kaaza. My understanding is that they are downloading songs from another private parties computer, not some central computer....How do the recording industries "cops" know which IP address is downloading what songs without committing some internet snooping crime themselves?
7 posted on 07/14/2003 11:52:26 AM PDT by Froggie
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To: truth_seeker
Copyright law indeed means something, but "intellectual property" is a complete fiction.
8 posted on 07/14/2003 11:54:00 AM PDT by Sloth ("I feel like I'm taking crazy pills!" -- Jacobim Mugatu, 'Zoolander')
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To: visualops; Question_Assumptions; Astronaut; friendly; vikzilla; Nick Danger; zeugma; T Lady; ...
Ping!
9 posted on 07/14/2003 11:55:36 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Froggie
In other words they have to committ the supposed "Crime" in order to catch the supposed "criminals"
10 posted on 07/14/2003 11:56:40 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: truth_seeker
No profit is involved if I decide to take a song from a CD, turn it into an MP3 and give it to my friend on his computer. That isn't any different than making a cassette tape.
11 posted on 07/14/2003 11:57:42 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Froggie
Can anyone explain to me how the record industry can identify those who download songs on servers such as Kaaza.

Not sure I can totally answer your question, but the downloading is not the crime, it's the 'making available' for download that is the crime.
In other words, if you make a copyrighted work available for download from your machine, it is YOU who have committed the crime.
And those addresses are available without illegal snooping, that's how the sharing thing works.

I use 'crime' only in the way the allegations make it - I myself and not convinced one way or the other.

12 posted on 07/14/2003 11:59:45 AM PDT by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: truth_seeker
I hope you have a fire extinguisher handy because you are about to get flamed. Not by me, though, because I agree with you 100%. The file thiefs will have excuse after excuse as to why stealing someone else's work product is legally and/or morally justified, but the bottom line is that stealing the music is no different than going to the corner mini-mart and stealing a tank of gas. (The oil companies deserve it because they charge too much per gallon, manipulate the market to screw the consumer, and rip the consumer off.)
13 posted on 07/14/2003 12:00:09 PM PDT by Labyrinthos
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To: Froggie
OK, sorry I posted it for the 10th time !!
I'll do better research next time!
14 posted on 07/14/2003 12:01:45 PM PDT by Froggie
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To: Froggie
OOPS that last post was posted in the wrong spot - I better give it up for the day!
15 posted on 07/14/2003 12:02:23 PM PDT by Froggie
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To: truth_seeker
Copyright laws mean something.

They sure do. They have their foundation in the Golden Rule: He who has the Gold rules.

16 posted on 07/14/2003 12:02:43 PM PDT by Jeff Gordon
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To: Labyrinthos
Copyright absurdity: Happy Birthday to You!
Copyright Royalties for copying this post for use by other freepers has been paid in full.

17 posted on 07/14/2003 12:03:28 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
That isn't any different than making a cassette tape.

I don't know this for a fact, but I will bet you that it's not legal to record a copyrighted work onto a cassette and give to your friends, either.
The RIAA tried to get this enforced when cassettes first came out, but dropped it because everybody realized that cassette copies are not as good as the original, and that copies of copies just make it worse.
With the advent of CD copying, it's more feasible that a copy of a copy of a copy is just as good as the original. So they care more.

18 posted on 07/14/2003 12:06:10 PM PDT by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: ConservativeMan55
Senator Hatch suggests destroying downloaders computers!
19 posted on 07/14/2003 12:06:30 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Izzy Dunne
Once I buy it they should have no say in what I do with it. Its now my property and if I want to go throw it into a lake so the fish can make copies that is my choice.
20 posted on 07/14/2003 12:08:04 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: truth_seeker
I fail to see how your post has anything to do with this thread.
21 posted on 07/14/2003 12:08:46 PM PDT by candeee
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To: truth_seeker
For a third party to take your party, and distribute it for profit is theft.

If the fileservers had advertising or fees I could see a "profit" but where is the profit being made "trading" files?

I'm an outside observer in all of this (I don't download tracks).

The guy selling mixtapes at the corner store is making a profit but for 20 years, the industry has generally turned a blind eye to that practice too.

Certainly the industry accepted the practice of making a mix tape and GIVING it to a friend. Taping off the radio wasn't a crime either.

The industry eventually got a tax levied on blank cassettes (even though there is no justification of which artists to share that revenue with).

22 posted on 07/14/2003 12:10:42 PM PDT by weegee
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To: candeee
Take a stand against the Recording Industry Association of America!
23 posted on 07/14/2003 12:12:50 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55

24 posted on 07/14/2003 12:13:29 PM PDT by Nick Danger (The liberals are slaughtering themselves at the gates of the newsroom)
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To: ConservativeMan55
Why doesn't the RIAA just stop whining and come up with a new distribution model. They will never stop people from ripping a CD onto disk and distributing it; lawsuits or no lawsuits. They will never stop people from seeking 15 songs (normally of which only 2 are any good) for free that they would otherwise pay 16 bucks for. If however they make it convenient, affordable and legal to take part in the industry people will. People have been copying music enmasse since tape recorders became available; to somehow think it can be stopped is naive and just turns people off. If they can seriously take on the digital distribution market then they'd slash their distributions costs to nearly nothing all of which can be used to benefit the consumers.
25 posted on 07/14/2003 12:16:26 PM PDT by Naspino
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To: Nick Danger
How not to get sued by the RIAA.
26 posted on 07/14/2003 12:17:12 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Nick Danger
LOL!
27 posted on 07/14/2003 12:19:13 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Izzy Dunne
With the aging babyboom buying public not supporting new acts and young people dissatisfied with the mainstream promotion man's bands advent of CD copying, it's more feasible that sales have dropped and RIAA's share of record revenue has also dropped a copy of a copy of a copy is just as good as the original. So they care more.

The recording industry has several "collection agencies" (musclemen) who have tried to pursue all avenues for more revenue (including getting bars that have a tv on to cough up money because there could be a tv ad with a song in it). The name of their game is collecting money. Not paying it out to labels or artists. The more money they bring in, the more of it they can skim off for themselves.

Everyone wants to exist in a growth industry. Consider the home tapers a "new market" to tap.

28 posted on 07/14/2003 12:19:30 PM PDT by weegee
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To: truth_seeker
For a third party to take your party(sic), and distribute it for profit is theft.

There is no profit involved in file-SHARING.

Besides which, file-sharing is a violation of a malum prohibitum law, meaning it is wrong only because there is law against it, in contrast to a malum in se law, meaning the act (such as murder) is wrong in and of itself.

The current music distribution system developed when the technology for mass reproduction of music was limited to pressing grooves into vinyl disks. The music industry was providing a valuable service to the artists and the listeners because of the large capital investment required to create recordings.

Times have changed. Modern computer technology allows anybody with a PC to record and distribute music, be it music they recorded themselves or music they copied from a commercial source.

People like you want to enforce obsolete business models on modern technology. You want technology to adapt to the law, rather than force businesses to adapt to technology.

If people like you have their way, in ten years it will be illegal to own a general-purpose computer. You will only be able to purchase digital-rights management appliances that, first and foremost, protect obsolete industries, like the recording industry, from modern technology.

Gutting technology available to ordinary people seems like a mighty high price to pay to protect sleazebags like music promoters, but I guess your prefer protecting the obsolete business model of sleazebags to allowing ordinary people to have full access to the most advanced technology possible.

29 posted on 07/14/2003 12:20:02 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Drug prohibition laws help support terrorism.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
When you think of the word cartel, the visions of Tony Montana, reaching into his closet to introduce you to his little friend comes to mind.

A cartel, my friends, is a group of independant companies coming together, to control production of product in order to fix prices. This joining of forces often times sqeezes potential competitors before they can truely give the marketplace a choice.

The latest cartel is one that effects each and every one of you.

The cartel I speak of is the RIAA or the Recording Industry Association of America.

The membership to this exclusive club is quite impressive. A complete who's who of the industry.

The RIAA's main function was to make sure that artist's copyrights were not stomped on by illegal forces trying to make a prophet from artists without paying up.

Sounds nice.

But in the past decade or so, the cartel has been moving into a darkened place where the rights of the music fan(consumer) have been stomped on.

The first salvo was fired at MP3.com. With MP3.com's Instant Listening Service and Beam-it programs, Net users can get digital copies of CDs they already own or of music they've purchased from the company's CD retail partners. In other words, MP3.com gave the users digital online access to songs the user already paid for. This way, the user can download and listen to music while waiting for the CD that was purchased to arrive via mail. MP3.com says it uses security technology to verify that the computer user owns a physical copy of the CD.

In other words, the RIAA, wants you to pay for the CD and then pay for every download of that CD you already own! Double dipping. Perhaps we even should pay royalties for every time we mention an artists name to a friend.

This should surpise no one. The RIAA tried to get the supreme court in the early 1990's to declare the sale of used CDs as illegal and to ban the resale of them. They of course lost.

The recording industry wants to make it harder for consumers to directly copy CDs .Efforts are already in place to install digital "watermarks" on CD tracks that would enable copyright holders to trace illegal copies and to create devices that would refuse to play clones. In its first phase, SDMI selected a watermark system created by Verance Technologies as the global standard. Big brother is watching.....be afraid!

Now the cartel has focused its big cannons on Napster.

This one is bit more complicated than the MP3.com situation. This time, the music is for free and unlimited. But what are the limits on music sharing? If I make a copy for a couple of my friends, is that illigal? How about a million friends? Where is the line? And since Napster isn't making any money right now, then how can they be accused of piracy without showing profit?

I can understand the arguement that the artists might be screwed out of royalties if the Napster user downloads, yet never purchases. But to have the RIAA, whos members have been screwing the artists since Little Richard, use the bands as a pollitical pawn in this big corperate chess game is the hight of hypocrisy.

The fact that the very few in the music biz make money off of royalties and most make the little scratch they can from concerts and shirt sales.

The RIAA should at least be intellectually honest with us and tell us that they are in this suit for the control. The control of product is the heart and sole of the cartel. And once the heart and soul is beating in sync(no not the crappy band) , then the prices can be fixed.

And now for a little lube before the next segment......

The RIAA, who are great at giving sermons of fairness from the financial pulpit, have been busted for illegal price fixing with some major music chains.

New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who led the charge against the evil empire, said that the price fixing represented a few dollars per CD and the total damage to consumers is estimated to be over $470 million dollars.

Well, where the hell is my check?!

It seems that record companies have been paying for the advertising of stores that agreed to sell the CDs at a price fixed by the record company. They even have a name for it, it's called Minimum Advertised Pricing (MAP).

I have another word for it........THE RAPING OF THE MUSIC FAN!

The companies named in the suit are:

Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Brothers Music Group
Sony Corp.'s Sony Music Entertainment
Seagram Co.'s Universal Music Group
BMG, the music unit of Bertelsmann AG
EMI Group Plc.

Somehow, while Janet Reno and the justice dept. were busy trying to break up Microsoft, the RIAA have coasted by with a free ride. Maybe it's because the likes of Barbra Streisand and Don Henley have free range amongst politicians. Who knows.

What I do know however, that I find it impossible to see the RIAA's side in the Napster suit. After all the recording industry has done to the music fan as well as the artists, how can you support them? Napster is fan and artist friendly. The cartel is not.

To steal a line from the great M.L.K.,....
I have a dream. A dream where artists can bypass the recording industry altogether and sell their music directly online to the fan through programs such as Napster. Each download would be about 20 cents, thus costing the fan about two dollars or so per CD with no cost for physical product to the artists. Then the artists can go out on the road and make even more scratch with concerts and merchandising.

I have seen the promiseland......and so has the recording industry. That's why they will stop at nothing to destroy freedom and continue their economic bondage on you, me and Little Richard.
30 posted on 07/14/2003 12:24:30 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Naspino
Lobbyists in radio don't like the concept of webradio either. Viacom and Clear Channel spent millions (billions?) acquiring the lion's share of stations. If the business model changes, their monopoly is challenged.
31 posted on 07/14/2003 12:25:51 PM PDT by weegee
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To: ConservativeMan55
The mob found a happy home in the music industry in the 1950s and 1960s. I wouldn't think that the business model has changed any even if the connections to "organized crime" no longer exist.

Certainly some genuine gangsters still operate in the music business.

32 posted on 07/14/2003 12:28:27 PM PDT by weegee
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To: weegee
I guess thats what the Rap Gangsters fit right in with them.
33 posted on 07/14/2003 12:30:46 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
Or is it Gangsta Rappers? I get the two confused.
34 posted on 07/14/2003 12:33:49 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
The RIAA SUCKS!!!
35 posted on 07/14/2003 12:34:21 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
"I have a dream"

The modern enterainer's "dream" seems to stay at home and be a studio band with occassional "star" appearances on eMpTy-V or cameos in movies.

Performance and touring (live performance) seems to take a back seat position to being famous.

Record sales get the name out there but much of the money goes to the label (to pay off padded out studio charges, promotion fees, distribution, etc.). The "publisher" gets money from the song airplays on the radio.

The act gets money from live performance and tshirt sales. No one can take away your live performance money (the only way to get that live show is to be there, even a videotape of the show is not the same).

Too many artists would like to be able to sit at home (disecting hooks from previous generations hit songs and looping them) and live a life of luxury and relaxation.

Being a musician is a job, that's why I say that these characters "dream" of being stars. Famous for being famous.

36 posted on 07/14/2003 12:35:27 PM PDT by weegee
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To: ConservativeMan55
I honestly believe that the threat of lawsuits against individual downloaders was and is bogus.

Believing it doesn't mean it isn't going to happen.

Expect it.

37 posted on 07/14/2003 12:35:52 PM PDT by Chancellor Palpatine
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To: weegee
Excellent Analysis! RIAA PLANS TO HACK YOUR COMPUTER!
38 posted on 07/14/2003 12:37:12 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: Chancellor Palpatine
The reason I say this is because I have heard many stories about how they were planning on threatening lawsuits. I've heard them say they would threaten. I am sure they will attempt to set a few examples, but how in the world will they ever sue EVERYONE????? Just wait until a Senators son or daughter of wife, or Sentaor himself is sued.
39 posted on 07/14/2003 12:38:55 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
Napster which was once a brilliant example of American ingenuity..is now reduced to this?
40 posted on 07/14/2003 12:42:38 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
The Motion Picture Association of America wants to ban DVD Technology as well! We have to stop them!
41 posted on 07/14/2003 12:46:13 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
As if we didn't already have enough reasons to boycott Disney.
42 posted on 07/14/2003 12:52:16 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
As if we didn't already have enough reasons to boycott Disney.
43 posted on 07/14/2003 12:52:18 PM PDT by ConservativeMan55 (If they sneak in throw em out on their chin!!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
There are some gangsters in that part of the music business (on the production side as well as among the recording artists) but that is hardly the only current example.

I've read Kerry Segrave's Payola in the Music Industry: A History, 1880-1991. It is excellent and covers every bit of the technology in the idustry from sheet music and vaudevile to organ grinders to recorded music, to radio, to recorded music on radio... The industry has always dictated to the courts what the first ammendment means.

The copies I see on bookfinder.com are eighty dollars up to the hundreds; I bought mine from a library sale for a couple of bucks. I wouldn't say that it is worth spending $250 but I do heartily recommend it.

There is also William Knoedelseder's STIFFED:A TRUE STORY OF MCA,THE MUSIC BUSINESS,AND THE MAFIA which I hear is a good book (deals with the 1970s and 1980s, the book came out in 1993).

I also hear that Clinton Heylin's Bootleg: The Secret History of the Other Recording Industry is a good read (I'd rather pick this one up than Stiffed).

I'm sure that there is much more good reading here:

The BOMP Bookshelf - Inside the Record Industry

"Note: these are primarily expose´s about the rotten secrets the music industry would rather you not know about. For books about how to break into or make it in the music industry, click here."

44 posted on 07/14/2003 12:52:31 PM PDT by weegee
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To: Froggie
There was an article in some magazine I read last week about how the RIAA knows who is allowing downloads. As I understand it, they basically do searches for songs they're protecting to see how many Kazaa users are sharing it. Basically, they're just compiling a big list of people who are sharing certain songs. I'm not technologically adept, but somehow, they can get your "address" as well. Then, they complain to your ISP, who is the one that has to give up your actual physical address. I think some ISP's recently lost a lawsuit trying to resist giving out the names and addresses of their customers.
45 posted on 07/14/2003 1:00:10 PM PDT by LanPB01
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To: weegee
The industry eventually got a tax levied on blank cassettes

They got that same tax levied into blank CD's ... now I just carry a portable 20GB hard drive that process mp3's and playlists .....

Pi$$ on RIAA

46 posted on 07/14/2003 1:11:15 PM PDT by Centurion2000 (We are crushing our enemies, seeing him driven before us and hearing the lamentations of the liberal)
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To: ConservativeMan55
I've got a region free DVD player that came that way from the factory. As much as Hollywood may cry that such machines are "illegal" they come from the factory with a menu option to turn off macrovision, region coding, etc. I am unaware of any attempt to pull such machines off the shelves or to stop their importation. Best Buy, Circuit City, and even Kmart routinely sell such systems. RCA, Sony and the like generally do not support such behavior from the factory.

Hollywood's response has been to release some DVDs with RCE (DVD Talk page on RCE); their name for a scheme that checks if a machine is "region free" (verboten in their eyes). Since I can manually set my DVD player to any region this is nothing more that a nusience (but something that would persuade me to boycott buying the American release since I would need to keep toggling my settings to play it). I have not seen any other countries embracing RCE or setting up barriers to the sale of region free players.

Some foreign DVD manufacturers offer different suplemental features or release their discs prior to the US discs. It's a global marketplace. People can buy import CDs, they should be able to buy import DVDs too.

Warner Home Video:

WHV will start a program to enhance the capabilities of the regional code specification for DVD beginning in October. This program is a response to the unauthorized practice of altering DVD video hardware players so that they bypass the region code requirements for DVD. This is happening on a more frequent basis in many territories, and retailers are openly marketing these non-complying players with names such as "region free" and "multi zone".

The Technology – The enhancement is an additional imbedded code (RCE – Regional Code Enhancement) on the DVD disc that makes the current regional coding more robust.

How It Works – In simple language, the RCE allows the disc to detect if a hardware player is region specific (as required by the CSS licensing agreement), or if it has been manufactured or altered in the market to be "region free". If the player is "region free" the RCE will not allow the disc to play the program material. It will instead display a message on the television advising the consumer that the machine is not authorized to play this disc.

The actual wording will be as follows:
THIS DVD PLAYER MAY HAVE BEEN ALTERED AND IS UNABLE TO PLAY THIS DISC

THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THIS DISC DVD PLAYERS AND DISCS ARE DESIGNED TO WORK IN CERTAIN REGIONS

THIS DISC IS NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THIS PLAYER PLEASE CONTACT YOUR LOCAL RETAILER OR PLAYER MANUFACTURER FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE

WHV will start applying the RCE to discs scheduled for release in the U.S. market beginning in late October. At this time, the RCE will only be applied to Region 1 versions of titles. At least one other studio (Columbia TriStar) will also be releasing discs with the RCE during the 4th quarter.

The program has two objectives. (1) Discourage the export of region 1 discs to other regions and (2) discourage the sale of DVD video hardware that has been modified to “region free”.

WHV Sales personnel should immediately begin to communicate this program to key retailers in their respective territories.

It is especially important to focus on retailers selling product online, and any account, which may be exporting products outside Region 1. With the online retailers, we must discuss the need to properly notify consumers outside the region 1 territories that the disc may not play in their player before the disc is purchased. The customer dissatisfaction and returns risk is significant if this is not done. At this time there is no plan to send out a press release on this program. This document should be used to review the program with all U.S. accounts.

And this from Columbia:

October 3, 2000 Dear Customer: Columbia TriStar Home Video will be implementing a program to enhance the capabilities of the regional code specifications for DVD product beginning in October 2000. The Regional Code Enhancement affirms Columbia’s commitment to support regional coding, which was designed to respect and adhere to each country’s respective laws and policies governing ratings, censorship, release windows and rights for home video product. The enhancement will allow the Region 1 DVD disc to check the region code of the player ensuring that the player is a non-modified region 1 specific player. If the player has been modified to be region free, the Region 1 disc will display the following message:

"This disc is intended for play on non-modified Region 1 players only. There is nothing wrong with the disc. To assure playback you should purchase or rent a disc designed specifically for your region."

Please be assured that the Regional Code Enhancement technology will not affect the consistent high quality standard, set by Columbia TriStar Home Video, for audio and video on its DVD titles. We thank you for your support and understanding in our efforts to reaffirm our commitment to regional coding as both a theatrical and video organization.

Fox reportedly had this graphic on their UK Simpsons site:


47 posted on 07/14/2003 1:13:16 PM PDT by weegee
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If the artists and the industry want to decrease illegal downloading (yes, decrease -- not eliminate -- as you will never, ever be able to eliminate something this widespread) then lower CD/DVD prices.

In addition, Supreme Court justices must be required to define an MP3 or AVI. I wouldn't be surprised if at least four justices think that an MP3 is a type of assault weapon.

Frankly, I'm more concerned about border security than pimple-faced 15-year-olds downloading an *exclusive*, not-yet-released Britney Spears track off the internet.

48 posted on 07/14/2003 1:23:26 PM PDT by tuna_battle_slight_return (Help! .... I'm streaming and can't get up!)
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To: ConservativeMan55
236 million CD-R's burned in Japan, in 2002, alone.

2002 Global Music Sales

The US saw a third consecutive year of decline, with album sales down 10% in units, mainly due to falling sales from major album releases affected by sales substitution from internet sources.

Japan has continued to suffer from internet piracy and CD burning. An estimated 236 million CD-Rs were burned in 2002, while legitimate CD sales were 229 million. Overall the Japanese market fell 9%, but has the biggest national market share for music video sales, valued at $US 407.5 million.

Several Western European markets performed relatively well in the context of the global decline. France, the world's fourth largest market, continued to defy the global trend with 4% growth in unit sales. This is largely attributable to the continued growth in sales of French repertoire. Norway, Italy and Portugal also saw more or less flat markets.

The German market stands out as worst affected by mass CD burning. Sales fell by 9%, Germany's fifth consecutive year of decline. Spain has now fallen behind other Western European countries in per capita sales, with a fall of 16% in value. Spain has seen a sharp increase in physical CD-R piracy: in 2002 some 24 million pirate units were sold, in other words two out of every five records.

The UK market in 2002 came to the end of its five-year growth run. While the number of albums sold remained stable at 226 million, downward pressure on prices meant the value of album sales fell by 3% and illegal downloading was just one of the factors contributing to the continued decline in single sales. However 2002 was a strong in the UK for domestic artists, who accounted for half of the top 40 selling albums.

Music sales across Asia fell by 10%, largely because of continuing economic difficulties and both physical and internet piracy. The exception was Singapore, which experienced a growth in both regional and international repertoire.

In Latin America, Brazil partly recovered from last year's severe decline (up 4%) due mostly to stock liquidations. Mexico remains the biggest Latin American market and 10th in the world despite a second consecutive year of decline, with sales down 19%. Piracy continues to plague the market with 50% of the population buying pirate music products. The Argentinean market continues to suffer from severe economic and political instability and has fallen steeply by 23%.

Source: IFPI

49 posted on 07/14/2003 1:33:19 PM PDT by tuna_battle_slight_return (Help! .... I'm streaming and can't get up!)
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To: weegee
Region codes are nothing new. Back in the 80s a VHS tape from the US wouldn't play in Germany and vice-versa. I tried it with a home video to show friends what things were like, it wouldn't play. Something about the formatting differences between the regions.
50 posted on 07/14/2003 1:47:08 PM PDT by IYAS9YAS (Go Fast, Turn Left!)
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