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Iranian Alert -- DAY 42 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 7.21.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 07/21/2003 12:19:48 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: bushdoctrineunfold; iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement; warlist
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To find all the links to all 42 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 07/21/2003 12:19:48 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- DAY 42 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 7.21.2003 | DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 07/21/2003 12:23:11 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; AdmSmith; McGavin999; Eala; risk; RaceBannon; happygrl; Valin; piasa; ...
Iran missile move alarms Israel

Iran has brought into service a new ballistic missile that is capable of hitting Israel.
Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei attended a televised ceremony to hand over to the armed forces the Shahab-3 missile which has a range of 1,300 kilometres (800 miles).

"Today our people and our armed forces are ready to defend their goals anywhere," Mr Khamenei was quoted as saying by the AFP news agency.

Israel and the United States - which both accuse Iran of trying to develop nuclear weapons - have expressed grave concerns over the latest developments.

Iran is also under growing pressure from the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, to sign the so-called additional protocol to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, allowing tighter inspections of its nuclear facilities.

Iran has repeatedly denied the charges, insisting that its missile programme is purely meant as a deterrent.

'Ready to defend'

Iranian television showed Mr Khamenei, flanked by officers and other clerics, and three of the Shahab-3 rockets on what appeared to be mobile launchers.

"This divine force has answered all threats," Mr Khamenei was quoted as saying in front of about 1,000 troops in ceremonial dress.

Iranian television also reported that the Revolutionary Guards - who have their own air force - were given some new but unidentified attack and transport helicopters as well as an undisclosed number of Russian-built Sukhoi-25 jets.

The head of the Revolutionary Guards, Yahya Rahim-Safavi, was quoted as saying in his speech during the ceremony that his force was now "ready to defend Iran against any threat".

'Shooting star'

The surface-to-surface missile was first tested in 1998.

It was handed over to the armed forces after the final test was conducted earlier this month.

The Shahab-3 could also reach eastern Turkey and Pakistan.

In Farsi, Shahab means "meteor" or "shooting star".

Iran launched an arms development programme after its 1980-88 war with Iraq, following a US weapons embargo.

Since 1992, Iran has announced the production of missiles, a fighter plane, tanks and armoured personnel vehicles.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3081737.stm

3 posted on 07/21/2003 12:47:57 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
Tehran Prosecutor General told to quit over Canadian's death

World News
Jul 20, 2003

TEHRAN - Iranian reformist lawmakers on Sunday called for a top hardline judiciary official to resign or be sacked over the death in custody of a Canadian journalist this month.

In a series of blunt verbal attacks MPs accused Tehran Prosecutor General Saeed Mortazavi's interrogators of beating Montreal-based Zahra Kazemi to death and said the former judge was waging an implacable campaign against journalists in Iran.

Officials at Mortazavi's office and the judiciary declined to respond to Reuters' requests for comment on the accusations.

Kazemi, 54, a Canadian of Iranian descent, died of a brain haemorrhage caused by head injuries more than two weeks after she was arrested for taking photographs outside Tehran's Evin prison, where many political dissidents are held.

Kazemi's death has tested previously harmonious relations between Iran and Canada and shed a spotlight on Iran's shadowy security services and treatment of the media.

Reformist deputy Mohsen Armin, in a speech to parliament broadcast live on state radio, said Kazemi told police she had been beaten, particularly on the head, during initial interrogations by officials from Mortazavi's office.

"Mortazavi, instead of respecting the dignity of journalists and the country's prestige...by punishing those who beat her," ordered her to stay in detention, Armin said.

Three days after her arrest, complaining of feeling unwell, Kazemi was transferred to a hospital run by the hardline Revolutionary Guards where she slipped into a coma and died.

RUMOURS CAMPAIGN

Following Kazemi's death, Armin said Mortazavi had told officials to announce she had died of a stroke and ordered her body to be buried.

Kazemi's burial was halted when President Mohammad Khatami ordered a thorough investigation of her death. The results of the probe were to be announced by Monday, officials said.

"I announce that Mortazavi and his supporters should be dismissed and a court should review their cases," Armin said.

Conservatives said Mortazavi, who in his previous position as head of a Tehran court ordered the closure of scores of liberal newspapers, was the victim of a rumours campaign.

"Evidence shows the reformists' propaganda machine has begun its project aimed at removing Mortazavi," said Amir Mohebian, an editor of the hardline Resalat newspaper.

"If they succeed, they will use it to remove all the people they want, one by one," he told the ISNA students news agency.

The reformists accused Mortazavi and his allies in the judiciary -- a key bastion of conservative opposition to Khatami's pro-reform agenda since his 1997 election -- of being behind a wave of detentions of journalists. More than a dozen journalists and editors have been arrested since mid-June.

Many newspapers were now too afraid to publish stories without first checking with Mortazavi, the MPs said.

"Today the judiciary's behaviour shows that a lot of the activities of this organisation are under question and need to be seriously reviewed," MP Mohammad Kianoushrad told ISNA.

"Maybe the least the judiciary could do would be to accept the prosecutor's resignation," he added.

Some reformists have said Kazemi's case highlights the operation of a shadowy parallel intelligence service in Iran which is beyond the control of the government.

"This case is an opportunity reformists have been looking for to expose the operation of these parallel entities," said a political analyst, who declined to be named. "It may shed some light on this dark corner and help them get rid of some elements who have plagued them for the last six years."

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1274.shtml
4 posted on 07/21/2003 12:50:37 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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Comment #5 Removed by Moderator

To: All
Transcript of US Senator John Cornyn's speech on Iran

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Jul 20, 2003

The following is US Senator John Cornyn's speech made at the occasion of the commemoration of the 4th anniversary of July 9th Student Uprising in Iran. The meeting, highly covered by most Texan TV networks such as CBS and Warner, was organized by SMCCDI and held at the Dallas (Texas/USA) Intercontinental Hotel on July 13, 2003.

John Cornyn (R-TX) is one of the original co-sponsors of the "Iran Democracy Act", introduced by Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS), which seeks to help the Iranian secular forces in order to end the rule of the Islamic regime.

Parts of Senator John Cornyn's speech have been broadcasted, for Iran, by abroad based radio and TV networks. These transmissions have lead to the reception of tens of emails from Iranians expressing their gratitudes to the Senator and his colleagues.


The transcript of the speech is as follow:

"Thank you, Aryo Pirouznia, for that kind introduction. I’m happy to be here with all of you today.

This week, we marked the four year anniversary of attacks on students at the University of Tehran by fundamentalist militants. Those attacks killed one student, injured at least 20 others, and triggered six days of nationwide anti-government protests, the worst since the 1979 Islamic revolution that toppled the Shah.

As you all know, in anticipation of this anniversary, the government of Iran announced last week that it had taken steps to crush expected demonstrations. Several demonstrators were killed two weeks ago, and hundreds were badly beaten by the regime’s brutal thugs. The University of Tehran was shut down, along with all other Iranian universities. The regime officially arrested over 4,000 pro-democracy demonstrators, including 800 students and key student leaders – and the true number of the imprisoned is even higher than Iran’s spokesmen will admit.

Make no mistake: these are the actions of a vicious regime that fears for its survival. I am here to tell you that I am committed to ensuring that those who died protesting the repression of the Iranian government will not have died in vain.

After 24 years of theocratic rule, and nearly seven years under the so-called reform government, it is clear that the repressive government in Iran is still up to no good.

In a State Department report released earlier this year, Iran is cited as “the most active state sponsor of terrorism in 2002.” It has provided funding, training, weapons, and safe haven to anti-Israeli terrorist groups, including Lebanese Hezbollah, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command. According to the report, some members of Al-Qaeda have found safe haven in Iran.

The report also states that Iran’s “Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and Ministry of Intelligence and Security were involved in the planning of and support for terrorist acts and continued to exhort a variety of groups that use terrorism to pursue their goals.” And according to State Department Spokesman Richard Boucher, Iran is in the process of developing a full-scale nuclear program.

The State Department’s research also shows clearly that Iran is a serial abuser of human rights. To understand the full measure of Iran’s cruel and inhumane regime, you need look no further than the infamous Evin Prison in Tehran, where political opponents are viciously tortured, and even their children are imprisoned.

Terrorist groups cannot survive without the financial and logistical support provided by sympathetic governments. Without state sponsors, terrorist groups would have a difficult time obtaining the funds, weapons, materials, and protection they need in order to carry out their deadly activities.

This is the reason for President Bush’s doctrine of the post-September 11th world – that America will treat nations that harbor terrorists and support terrorist activity as no different from the terrorists themselves. That is why we have struggled to ensure American security and spread freedom throughout the world by ending the terrorist activities of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan, and toppling Saddam Hussein’s dangerous and illegitimate regime in Iraq.

In Iran, a country where nearly 70% of the people are under the age of 35, the majority of citizens have never known any government other than the tyranny of the mullahs. Yet the seeds for freedom are still there.

According to a survey conducted last year by the Tarrance Group, 63% of Iranians believe that “fundamental change” in Iran’s system of government is needed to create freedom and economic opportunity. And 71% would support a national referendum that allows the people of Iran to decide what system of government is best for the country.

President Abraham Lincoln recognized that it is our highest goal to see the dream of freedom thrive and spread. He said: “It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children’s children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives.”

I firmly believe that the very same goal is embodied in the Iran Democracy Act, which supports the right of the Iranian people to choose their government. The people of Iran should be able to choose to support the current fundamentalist regime or the creation of a new government, one based on respect for freedom and human rights.

History has taught us that we cannot afford to confront tyranny with feeble measures and meaningless words. The Western world has heard the cries for freedom in Iran. We must respond by sending a clear, definitive message: we will not stand idly by while this repressive regime abuses Iranian families and children, and we will not tolerate support for terrorism or illegal weapons programs that threaten the cause of peace and security in the Middle East.

The Iran Democracy Act is just the beginning. For the sake of freedom and security in the Middle East, we must adopt a comprehensive policy towards the current Iran regime.

We must end all efforts to accommodate or appease the Iran theocracy. We must have a policy of strong and unequivocal state support for groups in Iran that are dedicated to freedom and human rights – the same steps we once took in communist Poland. And we must support increased pro-democracy broadcasting into Iran – especially since such broadcasting has played a central role in recent protests

We must undertake serious diplomatic efforts to end the flow of nuclear components to Iran, particularly from nations that are already our allies. We must continue multilateral diplomatic efforts to press Iran to allow unfettered access of the IAEA to all locations.
And we must support the President’s Proliferation Security Initiative to block exports to Iran that will be used to enhance the country’s weapons and missile programs.

We must confront the government of Iran for what it is – a government dedicated to the development of nuclear weapons, the support of terrorist acts, and the repression of the people of Iran. America can no more bargain with this regime than a man can bargain with a rabid dog.

It is easy for some cynical politicians to say that the students demonstrating in Iran this week will ultimately fail. They look at history and come to that inevitable conclusion. We all remember the defiant courage of the students and demonstrators in Tiananmen – but we also remember the tanks, the soldiers, and the regime that ultimately prevailed.

It’s true that freedom in Iran may seem like a far off goal today, one that is undermined by regional political interests, one that requires the support of political leaders, one that some writers say requires a political miracle to succeed. But it should surprise none of us that these are the same naysayers who claimed that the Soviet Union would endure forever, that Saddam Hussein could not be toppled, that the Berlin Wall would never fall – and they all came crashing down in spite of it.

They say the people of Iran need a miracle. Well, I am an American – I believe in miracles.

We must continue to work together, never forgetting our goal, toward the cause of freedom in Iran. We can – we will – make this miracle happen.

Through it all, you here today, united with the pro-democracy forces in Iran, have never forgotten a deep, inviolable truth – one that I hope my political colleagues will be reminded of. As the poet Seamus Heaney (SHAY-muss HAY-nee) writes:

History says, don't hope
On this side of the grave.
But then, once in a lifetime
The longed-for tidal wave
Of justice can rise up,
And hope and history rhyme.

Thank you..."

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1275.shtml
6 posted on 07/21/2003 12:55:45 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn; dixiechick2000; Enemy Of The State; Travis McGee; kattracks; rontorr; nuconvert; ...
A GOOD LINK FOR THOSE PEOPLE WHO WANT TO KNOW WHO IS WHO IN IRAN...............

WHO HOLDS THE POWER IN IRAN:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/static/in_depth/middle_east/2000/iran_elections/iran_struggle_for_change/who_holds_power/

Check the above link and you will find out who is in charge over there!
7 posted on 07/21/2003 12:57:21 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; dixiechick2000; Enemy Of The State; Travis McGee; kattracks; rontorr; nuconvert; ...
Tehran, July 20, IRNA -- Five cabinet ministers in charge of an
inquiry into death of Iranian photojournalist Mrs Zahra Kazemi said on
Sunday that she died from physical attack.
President Mohammad Khatami assigned four cabinet members to
inquire into her death last week.
In a directive to Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Ahmad
Masjed Jamei, Minister of Information Ali Yunessi, Minister of the
Interior Abdolvahed Mousavi Lari and Minister of Justice Ismail
Shushtari, the president sought to clarify every aspect the victim's
sudden death. Minister of Heath and Medical Education Masoud
Pezeshkian joined the team in the process of autopsy.
"You should determine the reasons for her sudden death and who is
responsible for it," President Khatami said in his directive in
reaction to a statement from her family that she may have died of
physical attack.
Mrs Kazemi was arrested while taking photo from Evin prison
compound where families of those under arrest were staging
demonstration on June 23.
President Khatami urged the four cabinet ministers to see whether
there is a matter of culpability in the case.
The report issued by the investigating committee said that Mrs
Zahra Kazemi died of brain hemorrhage caused by a break in her skull
8 posted on 07/21/2003 1:48:15 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot
Thanks for the ping
9 posted on 07/21/2003 6:42:56 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: DoctorZIn
CNN refusing to tell the truth about Iran
IranVaJahan 7/20/03 Gary Metz
http://www.iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=07&d=20&a=5

Posted on 07/20/2003 10:11 PM CDT by freedom44


Repeating their Iraqi mistakes in Iran.

It appears CNN is once again in the business of burying news stories when their reports might embarrass their host country. If it were not for a student from Iran I might not have heard of this report. Fortunately the world of the Internet makes it increasingly difficult for stories to remain hidden from the public. The story I am referring to was published on gooya.com and while written in Persian it is available on the net. I contacted CNN for a response but they chose not to.

Gooya.com is reporting that an Iranian student, Hamid, provided CNN with video of the attack on the student dormitories by the regime. The student was arrested by the regime and taken to the same prison, Evin where the Canadian/Iranian photojournalist Zahra Kazemi was tortured. Kazemi eventually died allegedly under the hands of the regime official Saeed Mortezavi, Tehran's Chief Prosecutor. The story of her murder has been international news for the past week.

But unlike Kazemi whose photos of the Evin prison remain in the hands of the regime, Hamid was successful in getting his footage to CNN. According to this report CNN is refusing to air the student's footage, claiming it would endanger his life. But since they refused to air the footage the story has not received international attention and his life is now in grave danger.

It was reported that as the regime's enforcers arrived to arrest Hamid, he ate additional footage to keep it from the regime. They report that this young man was then taken to Evin prison where the same official responsible for the death of Kazemi ordered immediate surgery in the prison to retrieve the footage in his stomach. Since that time, due to infections caused by the surgery they were forced to move him to a hospital where it is reported he has four different infections.

Apparently CNN has not yet learned it lesson about protecting tortuous regimes. Just a few months ago CNN admitted that it sat on a variety of news stories in Iraq that would have exposed the nature of the Iraqi regime (New York Times, Editorial | The News We Kept To Ourselves, by CNN producer Eason Jordan).

In both cases they use the same excuse that they are protecting the lives of their sources of information.

In reality, the only thing keeping the regime from killing this brave Iranian is international awareness of his situation. The regime needs to maintain the illusion of respect for human rights to provide the Europeans and Japan with an excuse for further economic ties. If CNN were to broadcast this report and attribute it to him it would provide him with the notoriety needed to keep him from being one more unnamed student executed by the regime. It is time for CNN to stop protecting this regime in order to maintain its office in Tehran. When journalists sell out their ethics for rating it destroys the value of a free press to protect the innocent from corrupt governments.

I hope CNN will reconsider its position on this story. It may save a life and perhaps redeem the soul of that network.


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/949628/posts
10 posted on 07/21/2003 7:54:55 AM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iran's new secret Net police

From Joseph Farah's G2 Bulletin
Jul 21, 2003

Tehran launches 'ayatollah bugs,' say student groups

Sources close to student groups in Iran as well as diplomats in the capital Tehran said the government had formed a new secretive Internet police.

The unit, nicknamed the "Ayatollah bugs," was formed to monitor Internet activity and especially to stem the growing number of Iranian bloggers. The government believes Iranians are using Internet blogs to spread ideas alien to the Islamic revolution and especially the idea of democracy.

Agents stormed a number of universities and colleges across the country and checked computer rooms. In a number of cases students operating their own blogs were arrested. Iranian agents were ordered to monitor students in Europe who use cyber cafes or library computers for communications with dissidents and for the dissemination of info coming from Iran.

* Joseph Farah's G2 Bulletin is an online, subscription intelligence news service from the creator of WorldNetDaily.com – a journalist who has been developing sources around the world for the last 25 years.

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=33664

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
11 posted on 07/21/2003 8:03:09 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: F14 Pilot
Thank you for the link!

It, sometimes, gets confusing trying to keep up with all of the thugs.;o)
12 posted on 07/21/2003 8:05:36 AM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: F14 Pilot
This story is getting attention from the media.
13 posted on 07/21/2003 8:06:42 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
More death sentences carried in Iran

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Jul 21, 2003

Several more death sentences were carried in Iran, on Saturday and on Sunday, against freedom lovers and opponents to the regime arrested following the bloody crackdown on last June's protests.

3 of the executions were carried in the central prison of Esfahan and the 3 others in the Capital. All arrested were young Iranians who preferred to stand against the ruling theocracy rather than living on knees.

The name of one of the executed has been reported as "Gholam Hossein Mohammadi" (known as Siavash) who was arrested during the bloody clashes of Nasim Shahr, a district of the the poor suburb of Tehran known as Eslam-Shahr.

Hundreds of other arrested demonstrators of all ages and genders are languishing in prisons and several of them will be executed in the next days according to the regime's decision to increase its policies of Terror and Fear adopted in order to undermine the popular will for its overthrown. 5 of these future executions, decided to be carried "publicly" are to take place in Esfahan this week.

The threats made against the families of arrested and murdered demonstrators seem to work as many refuse to comment on their relatives fates.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1292.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
14 posted on 07/21/2003 8:07:03 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Re #11

What is the situation in Iran now? Is the opposition regrouping? Are they changing their strategy now? Or are they just laying low to weather the on-going crackdown?

15 posted on 07/21/2003 8:07:17 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: F14 Pilot
Thank you
16 posted on 07/21/2003 8:08:54 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: F14 Pilot
"Five cabinet ministers in charge of an inquiry into death of Iranian photojournalist Mrs Zahra Kazemi said on Sunday that she died from physical attack."

"President Khatami urged the four cabinet ministers to see whether there is a matter of culpability in the case.
The report issued by the investigating committee said that Mrs Zahra Kazemi died of brain hemorrhage caused by a break in her skull."

I'm glad to see they aren't trying to whitewash the matter.

Everyone involved should be imprisoned, and beaten with shoes until their skulls crack.

Or, at least, attached to trees and taunted.

17 posted on 07/21/2003 8:11:42 AM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: DoctorZIn
"Iranian agents were ordered to monitor students in Europe who use cyber cafes or library computers for communications with dissidents and for the dissemination of info coming from Iran"

Well, this is scary. Are they going to start kidnapping Europeans now?
18 posted on 07/21/2003 8:12:30 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert; DoctorZIn
That IS scary. How long before they start monitering in the US?
19 posted on 07/21/2003 8:17:15 AM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: DoctorZIn
Any other information on this poor soul?
I suppose we'll learn the names of the others in the next few days.
Just Terrible.
20 posted on 07/21/2003 8:17:29 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: dixiechick2000; DoctorZIn; nuconvert; Valin; BeforeISleep; piasa; McGavin999; seamole; rontorr; ...
EU warns Iran it will review ties over nuclear row.

BRUSSELS (AFP) - EU foreign ministers expressed "increasing concern" over Iran's nuclear program and warned that the EU will review relations with Tehran unless it cooperates with the international nuclear watchdog agency, the IAEA.

In a joint declaration Monday, the foreign ministers demanded Iran's "urgent and unconditional acceptance" of an additional protocol under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to provide for surprise inspections of its nuclear sites.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20030721/wl_mideast_afp/eu_foreign_iran_warn_030721151347

The ministers "decided to review future steps of the cooperation between the EU and Iran in September," the statement added.
21 posted on 07/21/2003 8:35:15 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: dixiechick2000
I'm sure there's monitoring already going on here of larger pro-democracy groups and organizations. There are Iranians here with prices on their heads.
But chatting back and forth within the U.S. isn't what they're after. It's people and organizations with direct links to student leaders and pro-democracy groups in Iran that I think they're concerned about. It's that kind of outside influence they're trying to quash. (I think)
22 posted on 07/21/2003 8:36:11 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert; dixiechick2000; DoctorZIn; seamole; RaceBannon
Bush raises stakes in Iran turmoil


PRESIDENT BUSH has dramatically raised the pressure on the troubled, divided leadership of Iran. He and other world leaders would "not tolerate construction of a nuclear weapon" by Iran, he said Wednesday. Bush's rise in rhetoric coincided with efforts at a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency to get Iran to sign an additional protocol under the Non- Proliferation Treaty to permit more intrusive inspections of its nuclear facilities. Tehran, which says it needs more nuclear plants to generate electricity, has bridled at accusations by Washington and others that it has concealed a nuclear weapons program.

The president also further praised pro-democracy protesters in Iran, and urged the Islamic government there to treat the embattled students and other dissenters with "the utmost of respect."

It is a tense time for the nation immediately east of Iraq, where American military forces remain on alert. Iran is very conscious of being tagged by Bush, along with Iraq and North Korea, as part of an "axis of evil."

Whether the flexing of American power next door has much to do with the growth of unrest, especially among younger Iranians, is hard to gauge. There is, however, little doubt that most people in Iran, who vote when they have the chance for reformist politicians, would like to loosen the tight control maintained by the conservative clergy since the Islamic revolution of 1979.

Few Iranians want to bring back the discredited monarchy of the shah, but millions also don't want their lifestyle choices, and decisions of their president and legislative majority, negated by the heirs of the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and bands of thuggish "vigilantes" who show up to punish dissent.

The popular desire for more personal freedom, however, has no chance while Ayatollah Ali Khamenei functions as supreme leader, controlling the judiciary and trumping the administration of twice-elected President Mohammed Khatami in such important matters as who stays out of prison and who does hard time.

Dissent is disorganized and its effect on the power structure minimal. Scattered protesters, without muscular protection, are easily picked off or intimidated by Khamenei's enforcers. And Bush's vocal backing of restive Iranians may not be helpful, given wariness about past U.S. support of the shah.

Yet, with America at the forefront of efforts to police suspicious aspects of Iran's nuclear program, Iran has to treat Bush's warning on the issue with deadly seriousness. Tehran could ease the crisis by signing the additional protocol.

The real world -- in the form of both internal pressure for democracy and international demand for nuclear safety and eradication of terrorism -- is knocking loudly on the Iranian mullahs' doors. They should open up before the world comes crashing through.

** http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/06/19/ED84992.DTL
23 posted on 07/21/2003 8:43:34 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: nuconvert; dixiechick2000
The Mullahs and hard liners in Iran believe in the theory of suspicion to any one who has links with west.
A chatter can be an Agent to their view.
A poster here can be a spy.
They dont know any thing and they dont recognize any thing except their right to survive.
24 posted on 07/21/2003 8:46:47 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
"They should open up before the world comes crashing through."

That's okay. Let the world come crashing through. With "brooms" to sweep the place out.
25 posted on 07/21/2003 8:52:47 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
They didnt want to open the doors because they knew that people wont accept a theocracy.
So they had to tighten the security and act under the name of Allah to do what they wish.
The more they opened doors, more they drowned in to people's will.
People just dont want a religious form of governing.
That is it.
They will be swept out soon.
26 posted on 07/21/2003 8:59:44 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
I just received this comment from one of our student contacts in Iran...

"Tell the forum that Iranians won’t be afraid of Ayatollahs any more.
If they jail all of us, we will be freed sooner that they think.
They cannot do any thing to stop this opposition.
They will be toppled so soon."

This is not a game. They are a brave people. These are life and death matters. We must not be silent. We must educate Americans of their courage and the price they are paying in their struggle for the liberties we take for granted.
27 posted on 07/21/2003 9:07:57 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Canada Warns Iran to Come Clean

July 21, 2003
Toronto Star
Miro Cernetig

SHAWINIGAN, que. -- Prime Minister Jean Chrétien is demanding that Iran find out whether Canadian photojournalist Zahra Kazemi died because she was beaten while in police custody.

"If crimes have been committed, we're demanding of the Iranian government to punish those who committed the crime," said Chrétien at a news conference in his hometown of Shawinigan.

"And we will push that case because if it is the case, it is completely unacceptable that the journalist (goes) there to do professional work and (is) treated that way."

He said reports out of Iran about what happened to Kazemi are contradictory. Some Iranian officials say the Montrealer had been beaten while others deny it, he said.

"We have to know all the facts before passing another judgment, but we're very keen on having the truth out," he added.

Chrétien said yesterday he was still not sure what had happened to Kazemi, 54, who died Friday in a Tehran hospital after being arrested June 23 while taking photos near the notorious Evin jail, where many dissidents are held.

"We would like the body to come back to Canada," the Prime Minister said, adding that Canadian officials could then carry out their own examination of the cause of the woman's death.

"My information is that the body has not been buried (in Iran)."

Chrétien's comments came hours after one top official in Iran admitted Kazemi was beaten to death, and did not die of a stroke as originally claimed.

Vice-President Mohammad Ali Abtahi told reporters yesterday that Kazemi died "of a brain hemorrhage resulting from beatings," and he promised to prosecute any individual or group found responsible.

But in what vacationing Foreign Affairs Minister Bill Graham characterized as an "open and frank" exchange, his counterpart, Kamal Kharrazi said investigators are still determining how Kazemi's skull was fractured below her left ear.

"He pointed out she might have fallen or had an accident. I said if that's the case, clearly you will have to demonstrate that because you're in a situation that she was in your custody," Graham told the Star's Mary Gordon from Corsica, France.

"I pointed out that our information was that Madame Kazemi had been in perfectly good health when she was turned over to the Iranian authorities and that, in my view, it is up to them to establish the cause of her death."

At a news conference in Montreal, Kazemi's son, Stephan Hachemi, said he wasn't surprised by the vice-president's admission. "I'm not surprised by anything. I'm amazed and petrified by all that's going on in my life."

Though Graham expressed concern about whether Iranian authorities can proceed openly, he said President Mohammad Khatami is seeking to "make this a demonstration that the law must be applied in Iran."

Kharrazi said the investigation will be complete in a few days.

Canada has not asked for an independent investigation, Graham said. "Our wisest course is to encourage the government ... and to tell the government that we expect it to live up to its responsibilities and accept its assurances, and let it know that in the event that it does not, that we will revisit the issue."

Graham said Canadian-Iranian relations are "totally and utterly dependent on and related to the satisfactory disposition of this matter."

Gary Sick, a former White House Iran policy chief who runs the Middle East Institute at Columbia University in New York, said the Iranian government's coming forward with medical information could mean the probe will be open.

Khatami's reformist government has often accused the hard-line judiciary of running parallel security forces and unregistered detention centres. Elected in 1997, he successfully cracked down on a rogue operation in the intelligence service, Sick said. That, however, has been his only major success with regard to the security services, which are protected by senior people in the conservative side of the Iranian government and operate on their own.

Sick said though he couldn't predict its outcome, the investigation shows Khatami is trying to do something about a part of government that is "not under very good control."

Hachemi said he and his grandmother in Iran want Kazemi's remains brought to Canada, but the grandmother has been forced to say she wants the body kept there.

Janice Gross Stein, director of the University of Toronto's Munk Centre for International Studies, said Kazemi's mother has likely been severely pressured.

"It's as much an internal dispute in the family by a grandmother who's terrified of the regime, it's even more an internal dispute within the regime," she said.

"The really crucial question is, which part of the Iranian government (did this)? Because Khatami will apologize. So? It's not he who did it. It's not his people who did it."

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?GXHC_gx_session_id_=6d4ee36ae96f6298&pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1058393419042&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154
28 posted on 07/21/2003 9:10:41 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
This is a statement from students of Amir Kabir Technical University, Tehran.

We Will Become Liberated Without Violence

Today, while writing this declaration, we are ashamed of not being in prison and we are disgraced not being under your torture. We are suffering to see that our friends, who together were practicing day and night lessons of passive resistance and nonviolence, are in solitary confinement in your prisons under the most savage physical and mental torture.

Until yesterday Mehdi Habibi, Abdollah Momeni, Amin Zadeh, Ameri Nasab, Hojjat Sharifi, Arash Hashemi, Bagher Oskooi, and others were one with us in peaceful protest. Now their days and nights are spent in the dark prison cells that have borrowed darkness from your conscience. We will continue the path that we started together with them and in honor of them. We will never forget the promise we made to each other, that one has only to tolerate—not instigate—the violence in order to achieve peace. We tell you, as they do, that your sickle is rusted!

As you uselessly try to muffle my song,
I will sing stronger than ever.

We tell you that we will counter your readiness and eagerness to inflict pain with our strength for tolerance of pain. We will balance your power of imprisonment, torture, harm and hurt with our moral strength and we will without an ounce of hatred. However, we will never let you proudly attack and lash us, and smile victoriously at the sight of our bloodied bodies.

We are talking to YOU!
Imprison us, torture us, and extract confessions from us. Expel, imprison, exile and even execute our professors. Destroy and set fire to our houses. Make us bloody and drag us in our own blood to your torture chambers. Beat us and leave our bloodied bodies alone. We will endure and will never hate you! We will never slap your face. When you stab our side, we will never swear at you. When you throw us out from the third floor, we will answer your violence with tolerance. We will continue to tolerate pain and torture until your acts of cruelty, past and present, returns to haunt you! This is our campaign. We see freedom in nonviolence and you see power in violence. We swear that we will stand with no violence against your power, even in the face of your torture, stabs and lashes.

In pursuing freedom, we will never take arms, we will never assassinate, we will never torture. We know well that violence is bad, assassination is ugly, and torture is painful. We have learned patience and tolerance in our doctrine. There will be an ease after every hardship.
We will campaign with our honesty, our clean conscience and our minds. Our campaign is the tolerance of your torture. We will wait and tolerate the pain so long that we make your conscience, darkened for the last few decades, wake up from ignorance.

We will tolerate pain but not complain, suffer torture but not shout. We will continue until the world testifies to our innocence, and until your black conscience testifies to your cruelty. Then your nights will be filled with nightmares of your own torture cells, nightmares of the lashes you inflicted on our tired bodies, and you will not rest any more. Be certain that tomorrow, even if you are still in power, you will not be able to spend your nights without nightmares reflecting on the muffled cries and open wounds of the youth of this land.

We will tolerate pain until your conscience arises from its poisoned slumber and until you are obliged to yield to the people to relieve your guilty consciences. Tomorrow, at the time of the people’s victory and when you have fallen from the pedestal of power to the dark well of disgrace, we will be there to welcome you and show you again that we abhor violence, we do not even hate you, our torturers, and we will forgive you without any reward. Although we will never hate you, we can not forget you because the wounds you have inflicted will never heal.

We will continue to campaign without violence in order to prove to the world that violence should not be responded by violence, and cruelty is not the proper answer against cruelty. We would like to show that violence, in any shape or form and under any cover up - torturer or tortured, oppressor or oppressed - is condemned. We will become liberated without violence!

Islamic Society of Students of Amir Kabir Technical University (Tehran/Iran)
July 2003

http://akunews.org/News/view.asp?ID=2707
29 posted on 07/21/2003 9:24:36 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: F14 Pilot; *Bush Doctrine Unfold; *war_list; W.O.T.; DoctorZIn; Eurotwit; freedom44; FairOpinion; ..
Thanks for that article!

President Bush and Prime Minister Blair are under coordinated attack by the leftists of the world over their activities in the War on Teror.

See this article for more information:

Bush targeted by leftist 'intelligence professionals'

Bush Doctrine Unfolds :

To find all articles tagged or indexed using Bush Doctrine Unfold , click below:
  click here >>> Bush Doctrine Unfold <<< click here  
(To view all FR Bump Lists, click here)



30 posted on 07/21/2003 9:56:39 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Iran Mullahs will feel the heat from our Iraq victory!)
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To: nuconvert
I'm sure there's monitoring already going on here of larger pro-democracy groups and organizations.

An Iranian friend of mine thinks so too. My friend said that there were Iranians here who would have liked to attend the recent demonstration but were afraid for family back in Iran if they did so.

31 posted on 07/21/2003 10:11:08 AM PDT by Eala
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To: F14 Pilot
"They dont know any thing and they dont recognize any thing except their right to survive."

That's chilling, but not surprising.

32 posted on 07/21/2003 1:15:36 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: DoctorZIn
"This is not a game. They are a brave people. These are life and death matters. We must not be silent. We must educate Americans of their courage and the price they are paying in their struggle for the liberties we take for granted."

Amen, Dr.Z!

33 posted on 07/21/2003 1:20:12 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: DoctorZIn
That is a brave statement by the university students.

"We will tolerate pain until your conscience arises from its poisoned slumber and until you are obliged to yield to the people to relieve your guilty consciences."

I think one problem is that they don't have consciences, guilty or otherwise.

34 posted on 07/21/2003 1:26:43 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: dixiechick2000
I agree.
35 posted on 07/21/2003 1:39:21 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn; All
At 5:15PM EST NPR ran the Cuban jamming story on "All Things Considered". Talk about strange bedfellows...

There is no link on their web site at this time.

36 posted on 07/21/2003 2:35:51 PM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
This just in...

This is a follow-up to the CNN story of the Iranian student “Hamid.”

We just heard a report from Ghazi Saeed one of Azadi TV anchors that “Hamid” died of complications as a result of multiple infections following the brutal surgery performed on him by the regime in the infamous Evin prison.

If you missed the story you can find it at:
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/949321/posts?page=3#3


Our hearts go out to his family and friends.

DoctorZin
37 posted on 07/21/2003 3:41:54 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Thank you for the update, DoctorZIn. My thoughts are with his family and friends as well.
38 posted on 07/21/2003 3:53:22 PM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife (Lurking since 2000.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Oh, no! That you for the update on "Hamid". My heart goes out to his family.

CNN, once again, has blood on their hands.

39 posted on 07/21/2003 4:08:04 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: All
Bush Issues One of His Strongest Recent Threat to Iran and Syria

July 21, 2003
BBC News
BBCi

US President George W Bush has accused Iran and Syria of continuing to support terrorism and warned the US may take action.

In one of his strongest recent threats to Iran and Syria Mr Bush, speaking in Texas, said their behaviour was "completely unacceptable" and that any state which continued to support terror "will be held accountable".

He also said their actions hampered peace efforts in the Middle East, calling terrorism "the greatest obstacle to the creation of a Palestinian state".

"Supporting and harbouring terrorists undermines prospects for peace in the Middle East and betrays the true interests of a Palestinian state," he said.

Iran and Syria have been the subjects of increasing attacks by the Bush administration, which considers them state sponsors of terrorism.

Iran was named by Mr Bush as part of an "axis of evil" which also included Iraq and North Korea.

Syria was later added to the list by US officials, as were Libya and Cuba.

US anger towards Syria has increased in recent months, after the US accused Syria of harbouring former members of ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's regime.

And Iran has been accused by the US of attempting to develop nuclear weapons.

Iran has vehemently denied the charges, and accused the US in turn of encouraging unrest within its borders following protests by Iranian reformers last month.

'Culture of unity'

The US president was speaking at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, during a two-day visit by Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

Analysts say Mr Berlusconi's visit could give him more political clout
Mr Berlusconi was warmly welcomed by the US president, who personally drove the Italian leader to the ranch before beginning talks.

At a later news conference, the two leaders seemed anxious to stress the unity of the US and Europe, with Mr Berlusconi heaping praise on Mr Bush and urging reconciliation between the two sides.

"My belief is that we need to support... a culture of unity and cohesion and not nurture a culture of division," he said.

Mr Bush in turn thanked Mr Berlusconi for his "wise counsel" and expressed confidence in Italy's new role as holder of the European Union presidency.

"I am confident under his leadership that Europe and America will meet the challenges set before us," he said.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3084213.stm
40 posted on 07/21/2003 4:17:34 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Ignoring Iran's Abuses

July 21, 2003
The Washington Times
Editorial/Op-Ed

While American news outlets fixate on the 16 words spoken by President Bush about Iraqi efforts to acquire uranium during the State of the Union address (three months after Congress voted to authorize the use of force), they have largely ignored a far more important story from that region of the world: the efforts of the people of Iran to overthrow an oppressive dictatorship, and the regime's brutal efforts to hang on to power, which now may include the murder of a Canadian journalist by Iranian security forces.

The situation in Iran has major geopolitical implications for the United States. With the demise of Saddam Hussein, Tehran is indisputably the world's leading supporter of international terrorism and a determined foe of U.S. efforts to bring peace to the Middle East. The regime has chemical and biological weapons, and could produce nuclear weapons in the next few years. With more than 150,000 U.S. troops stationed in neighboring Iraq and Afghanistan, few developments would be more beneficial to American foreign policy interests than the replacement of the current government with a democratic one that is pro-Western in orientation.

In June, during 10 nights of mass protests throughout the country, police arrested 4,000 people — virtually all of whom remain behind bars. Vigilantes supported by the regime played a critical role in suppressing the demonstrations; some members of these groups reportedly invaded campus dormitories in order to beat student protesters in their beds. On July 9, hundreds of police officers and vigilantes surrounded Tehran University, where they arrested three student leaders after they had cancelled plans to hold a sit-in to protest against the repressive Islamic dictatorship in Tehran.

The paranoia and brutality of Iranian security forces had horrific consequences for Canadian photo journalist Zahra Kazemi. Kazemi, 54, was arrested June 23 while taking pictures outside Evin prison near Tehran, where many of those arrested are believed to be held. Iranian officials initially claimed she suffered a stroke during her interrogation; now, Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi says she may have died of a fractured skull after having fallen "accidentally." But the French newspaper Liberation reported last week that Kazemi (a Quebec resident with joint Canadian and Iranian citizenship) suffered the skull fracture after being beaten in the head with a shoe by an interrogator — an Iranian security official. The news of Kazemi's death could seriously damage relations between Tehran and the government of Prime Minister Jean Chretien, which has sought warmer ties with the current Iranian regime. Ottawa has warned that relations between the two countries could be jeopardized if Iran fails to return Kazemi's body and explain the circumstances of her death.

What's remarkable thus far is how little attention the democracy protests and the abysmal human rights situation in Iran have received from the three major networks: From the beginning of June through Thursday night, ABC, NBC and CBS evening news programs devoted less than nine minutes of air time to the human rights situation in Iran — a mere 11 seconds a night. Given the huge geopolitical implications for the United States, it surely deserves more serious, comprehensive coverage. For more information on the Iranian pro-democracy protests, see the Web site: http://www.daneshjoo.org.

http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20030720-103228-8013r.htm
41 posted on 07/21/2003 4:20:08 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
The EU issued a warning today over the nuclear program and human rights. I just pinged you to the thread.
42 posted on 07/21/2003 4:55:56 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: DoctorZIn
While American news outlets fixate on the 16 words spoken by President Bush about Iraqi efforts to acquire uranium during the State of the Union address (three months after Congress voted to authorize the use of force), they have largely ignored a far more important story from that region of the world: the efforts of the people of Iran to overthrow an oppressive dictatorship, and the regime's brutal efforts to hang on to power, which now may include the murder of a Canadian journalist by Iranian security forces.

That and Kobie Bryant. It's like there's a black hole between Iraq and Afghanistan.
Extremely frustrating to say the least.
43 posted on 07/21/2003 4:56:23 PM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: dixiechick2000
Good post.
44 posted on 07/21/2003 4:57:29 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Valin
I'm giving your reply a well deserved big ol' bump!

It's very frustrating...
45 posted on 07/21/2003 5:04:28 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: dixiechick2000
Your bump
Was it good for you? It was good for me! :-)
46 posted on 07/21/2003 5:09:07 PM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: Valin
LOL! Absolutely! ;o)
47 posted on 07/21/2003 5:11:07 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." --Will Rogers)
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To: All
There is nothing particularly unusual about what happened to Zahra Kazemi

The Globe and Mail, Margaret Wente 7.21.2003

She was picked up by government thugs for suspected crimes against the regime, and beaten so that she would confess. She died of a broken skull. Perhaps her death was accidental. But the torture was deliberate, and purely routine. The only unusual feature was her Canadian passport.
Margaret Wente

A Column By MARGARET WENTE From Saturday's Globe and Mail

There is nothing particularly unusual about what happened to Zahra Kazemi. It has happened to thousands of other people in Iran. She was picked up by government thugs for suspected crimes against the regime, and beaten so that she would confess. She died of a broken skull. Perhaps her death was accidental. But the torture was deliberate, and purely routine.

The only unusual feature was her Canadian passport.

The people who beat her to death probably didn't know about that. She was travelling on her Iranian passport, and had obtained the standard work permit issued to Iranian nationals. Then she went to Iran's most notorious prison to take pictures of demonstrators who had gathered there to protest the detention of thousands of prisoners of conscience. If the people who bludgeoned her to death knew what a fuss they were about to kick up, no doubt they simply would have expelled her. Their policy is to only kill domestic journalists.

We have a double standard in these matters, which is only human nature, I suppose. We're outraged when a Westerner runs afoul of the local justice system in some barbaric country. We're horrified that the Saudis have been talking about executing William Sampson. Of course they'll never do it, because Mr. Sampson is white and Western, and they don't need the aggravation. The Filipinos and other foreign workers who've lost their heads to Saudi justice weren't so lucky.

In the matter of Ms. Kazemi, our Foreign Affairs Minister and our Prime Minister are demanding Iran make a full accounting. They sound as if this is actually a possibility. Perhaps they believe the "reformers" have real power there. That is a delusion shared by many Westerners, who think that constructive engagement with the mullahs might persuade them to give up their nuclear weapons aspirations, stop funding international terrorism and stop killing people in their jails. Oh, well. Lots of people entertained the same delusions about Saddam.

Ask Iranians, and most of them will tell you that Iranian "reform" is an illusion. Take Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the "Supreme Leader," and Mohammad Khatami, the President -- supposedly, they are the hard-liner and the friendly face. In reality, they're Tweedledum and Tweedledee. Another illusion is that "democracy" has somehow taken hold. It's true, there were elections. But almost all the would-be candidates were declared ineligible before anybody had a chance to vote for them.

To be sure, the ayatollahs' slaughter of their own citizens has never reached a Saddam-like scale (except, perhaps, when they sent a million unarmed boys into war against Iraq and told them they would die as glorious martyrs). But their objective is the same: totalitarian control of the people.

"Do they still use the word 'reformists' about some people here?" wrote an Iranian in Tehran to her exiled friend in the United States. "They're very much hated now." As for the reformer President Khatami, "people curse him more than the hard-liners." The exiled friend to whom she wrote is a courageous woman named Azar Nafisi, who left Iran in 1997. Ms. Nafisi's extraordinary new book, called Reading Lolita In Tehran, lifts the veil on life in Iran. Those who hope the regime is capable of reforming itself ought to read it.

For two decades after the revolution, Ms. Nafisi taught English literature in Iran. Over the years, her books were banned and her students imprisoned and tortured. Some of her female students emerged from jail so traumatized that they immediately married and had children to remove themselves from official scrutiny. Some were arrested, and were never seen again. After teaching at university became too dangerous, Ms. Nafisi began a book club in her house, where young women would come each week to throw off their veils and discuss the subversive works of Vladimir Nabokov, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Jane Austen. In her living room there was freedom. Now teaching in the U.S., Ms. Nafisi keeps up an e-mail correspondence with a few former students. Recently some excerpts were published in The Washington Post.

"Dearest Manna," Ms. Nafisi wrote to her friend in Tehran. "Where can we turn when we are caught by such extreme cruelty as that of a regime whose vigilantes throw protesters out of their dormitory windows, and an indifferent world that is too busy finding some saving grace for what is at best a moderate theocracy to pay attention to such horrific images?"

President Khatami likes to talk to the West about a "dialogue of civilizations." And lately the regime has allowed a certain relaxation of female dress codes. But Ms. Nafisi maintains that nothing has really changed. The state is still able to interfere at will with anything it considers immoral. There is no escape. "Living in the Islamic Republic," she writes, "is like having sex with a man you loathe."

Much of the West has been dazzled by the window-dressing of reform. Western journalists describe Mr. Khatami approvingly as a reformer, even though the number of state executions has not abated since he took office. Western academics routinely show up at conferences to praise Iran for its art and culture, overlooking its inconvenient human-rights abuses.

Western oil companies channel money to Iranian front groups that portray the regime as a bunch of reasonable fellows who are open for business. The UN even chose Iran to host a pre-meeting for one of its conferences against racism, racial discrimination and intolerance, thus lending legitimacy to a nation that flogs women for wearing nail polish, and still approves of death by stoning.

Canada's leaders, too, are talking as if Ms. Kazemi's murder were some unfortunate accident, which can be cleared up by an apology and a promise to do better in the future. "If crimes have been committed, we are demanding of the Iranian government to punish those who committed the crime," said Jean Chrétien the other day. And Bill Graham declared that the inquiry into Ms. Kazemi's death would be a test of whether the reformists can prevail.

But there is zero chance that the guilty will be brought to justice. That is because the real power struggle in Iran isn't between the hardliners and the reformers. It's between a regime that is as obsessed as ever with repression, sex and death, and a population that only wants life.

"Dearest Manna," Ms. Nafisi wrote to her friend. "Although many of the protests are presented as purely political, they are in fact existential in nature: Millions of people have been deprived of their right to individual freedoms, they have been forced to forgo the pleasure of ordinary life: falling in love, walking down the street hand in hand, dancing, singing, wearing lipstick -- and this turns the protest against the regime into an existential confrontation: We are fighting in order to exist."

mwente@globeandmail.ca

http://www.unitediranians.org/memo.asp?ID=1287
48 posted on 07/21/2003 5:34:24 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Oh Doctor, I'm so sorry to hear about his death. May God send His angels to carry him home. He was a brave man.
49 posted on 07/21/2003 5:50:26 PM PDT by McGavin999
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To: DoctorZIn
Great. Someone's paying attention.
50 posted on 07/21/2003 5:59:24 PM PDT by nuconvert
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