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32 Things You Likely Didn't Know
email | July 26, 2003 | Anonymous

Posted on 07/26/2003 10:38:39 PM PDT by Hildy

1. A rat can last longer without water than a camel.

2. Your stomach has to produce a new layer of mucus every two weeks or it will digest itself.

3. The dot over the letter "i" is called a tittle.

4. A raisin dropped in a glass of fresh champagne will bounce up and down continuously from the bottom of the glass to the top.

5. A female ferret will die if it goes into heat and cannot find a mate.

6. A duck's quack doesn't echo. No one knows why.

7. A 2 X 4 is really 1-1/2" by 3-1/2".

8. During the chariot scene in "Ben Hur," a small red car can be seen in the distance (and Heston's wearing a watch).

9. On average, 12 newborns will be given to the wrong parents daily! (That explains a few mysteries....)

10. Donald Duck comics were banned from Finland because he doesn't wear pants.

11. Because metal was scarce, the Oscars given out during World War II were made of wood.

12. The number of possible ways of playing the first four moves per side in a game of chess is 318,979,564,000.

13. There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, purple and silver.

14. The name Wendy was made up for the book Peter Pan. There was never a recorded Wendy before.

15. The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin in World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.

16. If one places a tiny amount of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death. (Who was the sadist who discovered this??)

17. Bruce Lee was so fast that they actually had to s-l-o-w film down so you could see his moves. That's the opposite of the norm.

18. The first CD pressed in the US was Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the USA."

19. The original name for butterfly was flutterby.

20. The phrase "rule of thumb" is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.

21. The first product Motorola started to develop was a record player for automobiles. At that time, the most known player on the market was Victrola, so the called themselves Motorola.

22. Roses may be red, but violets are indeed violet.

23. By raising your legs slowly and lying on your back, you cannot sink into quicksand.
24. Celery has negative calories. It takes more calories to eat a piece of celery than the celery has in it to begin with.

25. Charlie Chaplin once won third prize in a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest.

26. Chewing gum while peeling onions will keep you from crying.

27. Sherlock Holmes NEVER said, "Elementary, my dear Watson."

28. An old law in Bellingham, Washington, made it illegal for a woman to take more than three steps backwards while dancing!

29. The glue on Israeli postage is certified kosher.

30. The Guinness Book of Records holds the record for being the book most often stolen from public libraries.

31. Astronauts are not allowed to eat beans before they go into space because passing wind in a spacesuit damages them.

32. Bats always turn left when exiting a cave!


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: trivia
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Just a little late Saturday Night fun.
1 posted on 07/26/2003 10:38:39 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
31. Astronauts are not allowed to eat beans before they go into space because passing wind in a spacesuit damages them.

That may be a good example of a misplaced modifier. I can see how a good fart in a space suit may harm the astronaut, but I can't see how it harms the suit. A pig lives in its own slop! :-)

2 posted on 07/26/2003 10:44:09 PM PDT by krb (the statement on the other side of this tagline is false)
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To: Hildy
33. James Cagney NEVER uttered the phrase, "You dirty rat" in any of his movies.
3 posted on 07/26/2003 10:46:11 PM PDT by Jay D. Dyson (Threaten me? That's life. Threaten my loved ones? That's death.)
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To: Hildy
Number 8 i supposedly intrue, and I doubt if 6 is true.
4 posted on 07/26/2003 10:46:41 PM PDT by js1138
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To: js1138
6 is true.
5 posted on 07/26/2003 10:47:21 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
34. Hillary Clinton is living proof of Hitler's love of Water Buffalo. (Believe it or...laugh your heiny off?)
6 posted on 07/26/2003 10:47:43 PM PDT by Jay D. Dyson (Threaten me? That's life. Threaten my loved ones? That's death.)
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To: js1138
I meant 8 is true...how the hell would I know about a duck's echo!!!!!!
7 posted on 07/26/2003 10:47:52 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: js1138
Number 8 is partially questionable. (I have seen Heston's wristwatch in the chariot scene in Ben Hur. Can't say I saw any car, though...)
8 posted on 07/26/2003 10:48:48 PM PDT by Jay D. Dyson (Threaten me? That's life. Threaten my loved ones? That's death.)
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To: Jay D. Dyson
The original email only stated the car. I remembered the watch.
9 posted on 07/26/2003 10:49:42 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
16. If one places a tiny amount of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death.

That explains why James Carville is a teetotaler...

10 posted on 07/26/2003 10:53:21 PM PDT by EternalVigilance
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To: EternalVigilance
lol...Is that true, that he's a tee totaler? I bet he was a flaming alcoholic at one time in his life. Typical rager.
11 posted on 07/26/2003 10:55:48 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
#20 and #24 are both false.
12 posted on 07/26/2003 10:56:59 PM PDT by Our man in washington
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To: Hildy
A duck's quack echoes just like any other sound:

http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/20021002.html
13 posted on 07/26/2003 10:59:40 PM PDT by Honcho Bongs
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To: Hildy
15. The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin in World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.

I don't doubt that an allied bomb killed an animal at the zoo, but I wonder how they are sure it was the first bomb.

14 posted on 07/26/2003 11:00:04 PM PDT by squidly
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To: Our man in washington
Of course number 20 is false - what self-respecting man would beat his wife with anything thinner than his thumb?



(j/k)
15 posted on 07/26/2003 11:00:58 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (Some days, it's just not worth gnawing through the straps...)
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To: Hildy
lol...Is that true, that he's a tee totaler?

No, I made it up because it sounded funny. ;-)

16 posted on 07/26/2003 11:01:03 PM PDT by EternalVigilance
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To: squidly
LOL...FREEPERS crack me up!
17 posted on 07/26/2003 11:02:18 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
A duck's quack doesn't echo. No one knows why.

Per "Ask Yahoo!" - We hate to break it to you, but all our sources say a duck's quack echoes just like any other sound. There doesn't seem to be anything special about the noise, except that it has mysteriously produced this persistent bit of folklore.

That intrepid tester of suspicious stuff, Cecil Adams of the Straight Dope, assigned it to one of his researchers. She disproved the myth herself in 1998 with a few friends, a duck, and a large courtyard conducive to echoes. Sure enough, the quack echoed (once they figured out how to make the duck quack, that is). Likewise, the good folks at the premiere urban legend resource, Snopes.com, have personally experienced the quacky echo of talkative ducks.

The MadSci Network suggests an explanation for this common misconception. An echo is caused by sound waves reflecting off a hard surface. Higher frequency sounds reflect better and create stronger echoes. Perhaps some ducks have quacks without a lot of high frequency components, resulting in very faint echoes.

Physlink.com explains how an extremely clever duck might avoid creating an echo at all. If the distance between the duck and a reflective surface falls exactly at one of the nodes of the quack's sound wave, sound will not be reflected back, thus no echo. The duck could also use partially reflective material and some sound wave measurements to prevent a quack from echoing, much in the same way the military hides aircraft from radar. However, we suspect Daffy and his pals aren't quite that sophisticated or conniving.

18 posted on 07/26/2003 11:02:58 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Tagline Extermination Services, franchises available, small investment, big profit)
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To: Hildy
Thanks Hildy. Picked up a few fun facts.
19 posted on 07/26/2003 11:03:05 PM PDT by SAMWolf (Kiss me twice. I'm schizophrenic.)
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To: Swordmaker
OK, OK, I'll concede the duck. The duck is out.
20 posted on 07/26/2003 11:03:43 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
Fabulous post, Hildy! A most welcome diversion!

I have my doubts about #24, but I can attest to #4 --- I hope that doesn't tell you too much about me! ;-)
21 posted on 07/26/2003 11:04:09 PM PDT by onyx (Name an honest democrat? I can't either!)
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To: Hildy
27. Sherlock Holmes NEVER said, "Elementary, my dear Watson."

On Star Trek, Capt. Kirk never said "Beam me up, Scotty."

22 posted on 07/26/2003 11:05:38 PM PDT by Redcloak (All work and no FReep makes Jack a dull boy. All work and no FReep make s Jack a dul boy. Allwork an)
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To: onyx
Is it just raisins, or any light round object in the carbonation?
23 posted on 07/26/2003 11:05:38 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in
May and still smelled pretty good by June. However, they were starting
to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor.
Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting married.
* * * * * *
Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the
house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons
and men, then the women and finally the children-last of all the
babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone
in it. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water."
* * * * * *
Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood
underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the
dogs, cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof.
When
it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and
fall off the roof. Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."
* * * * * *
There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This
posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could
really mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a
sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy
beds came into existence.
* * * * * *
The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt.
Hence the saying "dirt poor."
* * * * * *
The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when
wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on the floor to help keep their
footing. As the winter wore on, they kept adding more thresh until when
you opened the door it would all start slipping outside. A piece of
wood was placed in the entranceway. Hence the saying a "thresh hold."
* * * * * *
In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that
always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things
to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat.
They
would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold
overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes the stew had food
in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme, "Peas
porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old."
* * * * * *
Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special.

When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off.
It
was a sign of wealth that a man "could bring home the bacon." They would
cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and "chew
the fat."
* * * * * *
Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content
caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning
and death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400
years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.
* * * * * *
Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of
the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or "upper
crust."
* * * * * *
Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would
sometimes knock them out for a couple of days. Someone walking along
the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They
were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family
would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would
wake up. Hence the custom of holding a "wake."
* * * * * *
England is old and small and the local folks started running out of
places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the
bones to a "bone-house" and reuse the grave. When reopening these
coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the
inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they
thought they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it
through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell.
Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the "graveyard
shift") to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be "saved by the
bell" or was considered a "dead ringer."


24 posted on 07/26/2003 11:06:06 PM PDT by big bad easter bunny
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To: Jay D. Dyson
I have seen Heston's wristwatch in the chariot scene in Ben Hur.

If you look real close, though, I think that you'll see it's actually a historically accurate wrist sundial. :=)

25 posted on 07/26/2003 11:07:47 PM PDT by Bob
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To: big bad easter bunny
WOW...you get MUCH better emails than I do! :)
26 posted on 07/26/2003 11:07:55 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
If #5 is true, having a female ferret for a pet would be a temporary thing.
27 posted on 07/26/2003 11:09:27 PM PDT by South40 (Get Right Or Get Left)
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To: Hildy
6. A duck's quack doesn't echo. No one knows why


QUACK

28 posted on 07/26/2003 11:12:38 PM PDT by hole_n_one
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To: Hildy
I can't answer that. I've only seen it done with raisins.
29 posted on 07/26/2003 11:12:44 PM PDT by onyx (Name an honest democrat? I can't either!)
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To: big bad easter bunny
Wine and lead could be deadly; I'm not so sure about ale and whiskey, it's the acid, you see.

BTW, that little piece of plastic that holds the end of your shoelace together to keep it from unraveling is called an aglet.

30 posted on 07/26/2003 11:14:52 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: Hildy
Hate to crash the party, but I can recall a few of these being disproven on Snopes.com, a great website I might add. Sorry.
31 posted on 07/26/2003 11:15:22 PM PDT by baseballfanjm
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To: Hildy
Re: Oscars made of wood in WWII due to metal shortage... partially true.


Oscar Deviations
Source: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The original Oscars were cast in bronze. After a few years, the Academy switched to britannium to make it easier to apply a smooth finish.

In the early years, the Academy gave child winners miniature Oscars.

In 1937, ventriloquist Edgar Bergen and his dummy, Charlie McCarthy, won an Oscar for special acting: a wooden Oscar with a moveable mouth.

In 1938, the Academy honored Walt Disney with one full-size Oscar and seven miniature statuettes for "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."

During World War II, Oscars were made of plaster due to the metals shortage. Winners were allowed to turn in the plaster statues for gold ones when the war ended.
32 posted on 07/26/2003 11:15:46 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Tagline Extermination Services, franchises available, small investment, big profit)
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To: Hildy
20. The phrase "rule of thumb" is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn't beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.

This version of "Rule of thumb" has be refuttedas being a creation of the feminist movement to illustrate the historical oppression of women.

Alternate, more likely version: The width of a man's thumb was considered to be the equivalent of one inch and was thus used for measuring purposes, when a measurement was not deemed to be critical, but merely a close approximation.

33 posted on 07/26/2003 11:15:48 PM PDT by Michael.SF. ("Torn between half truths and victimization, fighting back with counter attacks" - V. Morrison)
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To: Hildy
1. A rat can last longer without water than a camel.

Let's try an experiment to see if this one is true: remove the water coolers from DNC Headquarters.

34 posted on 07/26/2003 11:15:54 PM PDT by EternalVigilance
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To: Hildy
Some of these I'd heard before, but not that the name Wendy originated in Peter Pan.

How interesting, if true.
35 posted on 07/26/2003 11:16:35 PM PDT by cyncooper
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To: squidly
The first bombing raid on Berlin was a token raid, in retaliation for an accidental German raid on a London suburb (the Germans had avoided bombing London in the Battle of Britain).
36 posted on 07/26/2003 11:19:18 PM PDT by AntiGuv ()
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To: big bad easter bunny
Fascinating...
37 posted on 07/26/2003 11:22:31 PM PDT by cyncooper
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To: cyncooper
I had to go check and the truth is somewhere in between... click here (www.wendy.com)
38 posted on 07/26/2003 11:23:07 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
14. The name Wendy made up for Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie.

Per The Straight Dope:

J. M. Barrie did not invent the name Wendy for his 1904 play Peter Pan, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up (the book form of the story, Peter and Wendy, was published in 1911). He did popularize it, though. Barrie apparently was inspired to use the name by a young friend named Margaret Henley, the daughter of writer William Henley. Margaret, who died around 1895 at age 6, called Barrie her "friendy." Since she couldn't pronounce her Rs at the time, the word came out "fwendy," or "fwendy-wendy," in some versions of the story.  

But we have absolute proof that there were earlier Wendys, thanks to the just-released 1880 U.S. Census and the 1881 British Census (available here). These documents show that the name Wendy, while not common, was indeed used in both the U.S. and Great Britain throughout the 1800s. I had no trouble finding twenty females with the first name Wendy in the United States, the earliest being Wendy Gram of Ohio (born in 1828). If you include such spelling variations as Windy, Wendi, Wenda, and Wandy the number triples.

As to the origins of said name, websites here and here make the claim that Wendy is a derivative of the name Gwendolen or maybe Gwendolyn. Looking further, I chanced upon World Wide Wendy, a site dedicated to, well, all things Wendy. On this site, Doctor of Folklore Leslie Ellen Jones discusses the possible Welsh origins of the name Gwendolyn and its derivative Wendy. In both the English and U.S. Census, however, the name Wendy is also used as a male first name, so I suspect further research may be required.

Of course, if you go back a few centuries and head east a mite, we have the Chinese emperor Wendi of the Sui dynasty (541-604), and before that the Great Emperor Wendi of the Han dynasty (179 BC-157 BC). But that's stretching it a bit far, don'tcha think?

39 posted on 07/26/2003 11:23:08 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Tagline Extermination Services, franchises available, small investment, big profit)
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To: Swordmaker
Beat me by a nose (We all know where that comes from).
40 posted on 07/26/2003 11:23:58 PM PDT by Hildy
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To: Hildy
Buttered bread falls buttered side down every time. A cat falls feet down every time. A cat with a piece of buttered bread duct taped to it's back , then tossed into the air will float in mid air !...........honest !

Stay safe.........great thread !

41 posted on 07/26/2003 11:25:03 PM PDT by Squantos (Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.)
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To: Swordmaker; Hildy
Well--thanks for the added information!

42 posted on 07/26/2003 11:25:38 PM PDT by cyncooper
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To: Hildy
5. A female ferret will die if it goes into heat and cannot find a mate

Also true of Vulcan males.

43 posted on 07/26/2003 11:29:22 PM PDT by petuniasevan (Contentsoftaglinemaysettlesomewhatduringtransmission.)
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To: petuniasevan
So what you're saying is, never leave a Vulcan alone with your pet ferret?
44 posted on 07/26/2003 11:34:11 PM PDT by Slings and Arrows (Eminently logical, Captain.)
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To: South40
This is definitely true about ferrets. We lost one that way that we were told had been spayed, but it hadn't. If they go into heat and don't breed, their red blood cell production ceases.

It takes a while for all the old cells to age and die, after which the ferret basically suffocates because there is not enough red blood cells to carry oxygenated blood.
45 posted on 07/26/2003 11:35:10 PM PDT by chaosagent
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To: Redcloak
And Bogart never said "Play it agin, Sam" in Casablanca
46 posted on 07/26/2003 11:35:56 PM PDT by chaosagent
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To: Hildy
19. The original name of the butterfly was flutterby."

From the North American Butterfly Association:

What is the origin of the word "butterfly."

No one really knows the origin of this word. It is possible that it arose from the butter-yellow color of common European butterflies called sulphurs.

47 posted on 07/26/2003 11:36:07 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Tagline Extermination Services, franchises available, small investment, big profit)
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To: big bad easter bunny
Saturday Night BUMP
48 posted on 07/26/2003 11:37:46 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (RATS: We're sorry Saddam.)
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To: Hildy
According to the about.com hoax and urban legends site, #6 is not true:

A Duck's Quack Doesn't Echo

An urban legend

Summary: A duck's quack doesn't echo, and nobody knows why.

Status: False.

Comments: Note well that you won't find this claim made in any scientific journal or textbook. You will find it in questionable sources such as email trivia lists and fruit drink bottle caps — reason enough to be skeptical.

The obvious question — and the one never answered by those who tout this absurd factoid, naturally — is, why wouldn't a duck's quack echo? What could there possibly be about the sound a duck makes that would uniquely exempt it from the physical laws that apply to all other such sounds, e.g., a dog's bark, a cat's meow or a lamb's bleat?

The answer is: nothing.

Resources:

Is It True that a Duck's Quack Doesn't Echo?
Ask the Experts, PhysLink.com

Resources: Is It True that a Duck's Quack Doesn't Echo?
Ask the Experts, PhysLink.com

PhysLink.com

Question Is it true that a duck's quack doesn't echo? If so, why?

Asked by: Matt Schonert

Answer

I'm sorry to say that it's not true about the quack of a duck. Quacks echo as much as any other sound in nature. However, there is a way to avoid an echo, the problem is that it depends on your distance from the object reflecting the sound, and not the type of sound itself.

Sound travels in waves, and all of these waves have a specific wavelength (the distance from point on a wave to the exact point on the next). If by chance, the distance between the emitter of the wave and the reflector is exactly on one of the nodes of the wave... the sound will not reflect back at all. There will just be a standing wave created between one place and another, as all points on the wave would have zero net displacement. You can try this in the lab with a strobe light and a string oscillator. Also, if you have done the experiment with the column of water and the tuning fork, you will notice dead spots. These are distances where no matter what you do with the tuning fork, you won't hear anything coming from the tube.

The second way to avoid an echo, is to use a partially reflective material. This method is one of many that helps to hide aircraft from radar. If you position a half-reflective layer exactly one-quarter wavelength in front of a fully reflective layer, the wave will cancel itself out. By separating the layers by 1/4 wavelength, half the wave bounces off the first, and the other half of the wave bounces of the second. The travel time from the first layer to the second and back again, is exactly 1/2 wavelength, which means that the positive peak displacement is balanced exactly by the negative peak displacement. Again, no net displacement = no discernable wave return.

Answered by: Frank DiBonaventuro, B.S., Air Force officer, Tinker AFB, OK.

-----------

And now, folks... back to your dining and dancing pleasures .. ;-)


49 posted on 07/26/2003 11:38:47 PM PDT by STARWISE (W: the Right Man when we needed him the most ... our blessing from God. Thank you, God.)
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To: Hildy
21. The first product Motorola started to develop was a record player for automobiles. At that time, the most known player on the market was Victrola, so the called themselves Motorola.

Per Motorola company website:

Motorola History

The company was founded by Paul V. Galvin as the Galvin Manufacturing Corporation, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1928. Its first product was a "battery eliminator," allowing consumers to operate radios directly from household current instead of the batteries supplied with early models. In the 1930s, the company successfully commercialized car radios under the brand name "Motorola," a word suggesting sound in motion. During this period, the company also established home radio and police radio departments; instituted pioneering personnel programs; and began national advertising. The name of the company was changed to Motorola, Inc., in 1947.

50 posted on 07/26/2003 11:39:12 PM PDT by Swordmaker (Tagline Extermination Services, franchises available, small investment, big profit)
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