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Some brands of cigarettes ' more addictive'
Telegraph ^ | 27/07/2003

Posted on 07/27/2003 12:15:45 PM PDT by yonif

Some cigarette brands are likely to be far more addictive than others, new research warns.

For the first time, scientists have measured the amount of super-addictive "freebase" nicotine different cigarettes deliver to the smoker. Like crack cocaine, freebase nicotine vaporises and passes rapidly through the lungs into the bloodstream.

Because it reaches the brain so quickly it is thought to be more addictive than normal nicotine, which stays in the form of sooty smoke particles. Until now it has not been known how much freebase nicotine various types of cigarette contain.

The new research, from a team at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, US, could lead to ways of rating the addictiveness of different brands.

Scientists compared 11 brands of cigarette available in the US.

They found that some brands contained 10 to 20 times higher percentages of freebase nicotine than experts had previously been led to believe. Brands were compared with a laboratory "reference" cigarette containing one per cent freebase nicotine.

They varied greatly, ranging from one per cent or two per cent to 36 per cent for a speciality US brand called American Spirit.

The popular Marlboro brand contained up to 9.6 per cent freebase nicotine. Other well known brands included Camel (2.7 per cent), Winston (five per cent - 6.2 per cent) and Gauloises Blondes (5.7 per cent - 7.5 per cent).

In many cases, the freebase content was higher in the first puffs. Marlboro, for instances, had a freebase nicotine level of 9.6 per cent in the first three puffs and 2.7 per cent in later puffs.

Professor James Pankow, who led the study reported in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, said: "We found big differences in the percentages of freebase nicotine among 11 commercial cigarette brands.

"During smoking, only the freebase form can volatise from a particle into the air in the respiratory tract. Gaseous nicotine is known to deposit super-quickly in the lungs. From there, it's transported rapidly to the brain.

"Since scientists have shown that a drug becomes more addictive when it is delivered to the brain more rapidly, freebase nicotine levels in cigarette smoke thus are at the heart of the controversy regarding the tobacco industry's use of additives like ammonia and urea, as well as blending choices in cigarette design."

The tests were carried out using a laboratory smoking device and a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer which analyses chemical composition. Separate measurements were made of the first three puffs and about eight subsequent puffs.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: addication; brands; cigarettes; nicotine; smoking; tobacco
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To: cryptical
Congratulations! :-D

I smoked Marlboro 100's for almost 20 years, & finally quit in early January using the nicotine patch. I stretched the 14 patches contained in the box to 21 days, & that was it. It was terribly difficult, but I think the worst is over & it's all downhill from here. I am atill using the stopsmokingcenter.net to check my daily progress & keep myself motivated. I gotta admit tho, that I really do miss smoking, I feel like my best friend has left me.....but I know the positives of quitting far outweigh my enjoyment of smoking cigarettes.
21 posted on 07/27/2003 2:00:50 PM PDT by huggadawg
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To: TigersEye
Interesting. Thanks! (I feel like Forrest Gump sometimes without any of that stuff.)
22 posted on 07/27/2003 2:01:08 PM PDT by DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet
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To: Rodney King
Viceroy Lights, mah man.
23 posted on 07/27/2003 2:05:35 PM PDT by annyokie (Admin Moderator has got it in for me.)
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To: deadhead
Switch, don't fight.
24 posted on 07/27/2003 2:05:50 PM PDT by jwalsh07
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To: yonif
Duh. How much money funded this gem of research?
25 posted on 07/27/2003 2:14:01 PM PDT by Ruth A.
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To: huggadawg
I quit over twenty years ago. The last craving I had was six years ago. Where you are now is a rough place. Pretty soon (since you are so recently quit) you will notice the cravings will fade in about six minutes if you tough it out. Later the cravings become less regular in interval and some of them can last for a long time. There was one I remember that lasted 45 minutes that would have got me if there had been a cig in the house. After a year I smoked about 18 cigs in one day, and it was as if I had never quit, except it was easy to stop. No tobacco since then except a piece of a Cuban cigar at my niece's wedding.

Good luck with your project, it is worth the effort.

26 posted on 07/27/2003 2:21:56 PM PDT by Iris7
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To: DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet
Marlboros have WHAT in them?

Actually, that one might be a myth ; ) The reason for the saltpeter was supposedly to make them burn smoother or something. But they do add things, for flavor and to make it burn well and not go stale before it gets sold.

Before viagra, much of the business that "fertility clinics" did had to do with male impotence problems. There were studies done, and IIRC, upwards of 70% of the men were heavy cigarette smokers, and Marlboros were disproportionately represented among the smokers as a preferred brand.

There are other things that contribute. Carbon monoxide, which I think has a long half-life in your body and displaces some of what should be oxygen in your blood, and the vasoconstricive action of nicotine are both things that wouldn't help, and they're common to all brands.

But the Marlboro-impotence thing was I think the inspiration for the controversial California anti-tobacco ad campaign in which the Marlboro Man's cigarette droops.

27 posted on 07/27/2003 2:22:26 PM PDT by Yeti
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To: squidly
I think menthol cigarettes are more irritating to the bronchial passages, and the smoker seeks soothing relief by smoking another (menthol) cigarette.
28 posted on 07/27/2003 2:29:45 PM PDT by Arthur McGowan
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To: Yeti
Damn. What woman would ever have imagined a Marlboro Man with a droopy cigarette?

This is almost like the day I found out the Easter Bunny wasn't real.
29 posted on 07/27/2003 2:30:36 PM PDT by DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet
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To: TigersEye
I have no plans to quit. Do I need to worry about how addictive the brand of tobacco I'm smoking is?

Guess not.

Well, a case could be made that you would be better off, because long international flghts might get on your nerves less if your brand was less addictive -- things like that. But basically why worry?

I, on the other hand, intend to quit and it bothers me that it is difficult to do that.

30 posted on 07/27/2003 2:33:26 PM PDT by Yeti
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To: DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet
What woman would ever have imagined a Marlboro Man with a droopy cigarette? This is almost like the day I found out the Easter Bunny wasn't real.

Well, don't feel bad ... I think that is one of those studies that sounds worse than it is. Just because most of the guys at the impotence clinic were smokers, doesn't necessarily mean that most smokers are impotent.

But I would say that if a smoker has that problem, the first thing he should try is cutting back on the cigarettes.

31 posted on 07/27/2003 2:42:13 PM PDT by Yeti
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To: jwalsh07
"The popular Marlboro brand contained up to 9.6 per cent freebase nicotine"

To think I have been freebasing all these years, oh my.

I am going to start smoking Quest, maybe it will help?


32 posted on 07/27/2003 2:42:33 PM PDT by deadhead (God Bless Our Troops and Veterans)
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To: TigersEye
don't forget there is also arsenic and ammonia in cigarettes. I am SOOOOOO glad I never took up that habit.
33 posted on 07/27/2003 2:53:27 PM PDT by Canadian Outrage (All us Western Canuks belong South)
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To: DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet; Scenic Sounds
The Easter Bunny isn't real? Really? Scenic told me that he was real. I can't believe it!
34 posted on 07/27/2003 2:55:06 PM PDT by Cathryn Crawford (Why don't you think I'm a neocon?)
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To: Yeti
It isn't as difficult as you think.There is some psychological reason at the root of why you smoke, and if you can figure out exactly what the hold a smoking has on you, you can quit, cold turkey.It maybe because someone you know and admire smokes and to quit would mean damaging such a relationship.It could also be boredom :)Good luck!
35 posted on 07/27/2003 2:59:06 PM PDT by habs4ever
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To: Cathryn Crawford
Yeah. Drag, huh? Two big disappointments for me, both in the same week!
36 posted on 07/27/2003 3:01:23 PM PDT by DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet
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To: yonif
They varied greatly, ranging from one per cent or two per cent to 36 per cent for a speciality US brand called American Spirit.
 
That line proves to me that this study/article is a load of crap.
 
Please excuse my language.

37 posted on 07/27/2003 3:11:45 PM PDT by AnnaZ (unspunwithannaz.blogspot.com... "It is UNSPUN and it is Unspun, but it is not unspun." -- unspun)
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To: huggadawg
Congratulations right back...

I'm pretty motivated, having had a heart attack Apr 17th.

I don't have huge cravings, just passing thoughts from time to time, more situational/habitual than a real desire.
38 posted on 07/27/2003 3:11:59 PM PDT by cryptical
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To: cryptical
Congrats. I took Nicorette when it first came out, worked like a champ for me, my wife and two car-pool friends. Best thing I ever did.
39 posted on 07/27/2003 4:15:51 PM PDT by 1066AD
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To: habs4ever
I intend to break that habit 4ever ; )

I recognize that there are many psychological factors involved, and I think that part of the reason cigarettes are so difficult is the combination of the chemical addiction and the nail-biting-like habitual behavior.

[...leaning back on couch...]

Of course, there's the compulsive aspect from the fact that I used to steal them from my mother and father. And in school, all the cool kids smoked, including the cool chicks. And then as a young adult, all the times I didn't have enough money for cigarettes, then when I got paid -- WOW that cigarette was great.

[...stretch ... thoughtful pause ...]

Y'know Marlboro was my brand for close to 20 years ... I was always secretly enamoured of the "Marlboro Country" ads. Wide open spaces. The Rockies. Freedom. Like a dream of a far-away freedom that couldn't ever be real for me, but I could stare at some of those ads and just daydream. Cowboys. It wasn't that I wanted to be a cowboy, just that I wanted to be where they were in those pictures.

When I was 7 or 8, I remember we had about 100 posters of different paintings, some deal my parents got or something, and they were all rolled up together. I went through them to pick some for my room. I gravitated to big landscapes and cowboy scenes. I remember one of my favorites was a night-time cowboy campfire scene. The cool thing about it was the lighting. All midnight blue with the glow of the campfire in the middle, and one of the prominent things in the scene was one of the cowboys lighting his cigarette. The light from it lit up his face and hand in a warm, magical glow.

Around that same time, my father had a study in the basement level of our split-level. There were two small windows high up in the room. As he sat in his recliner, reading and puffing absent-mindedly on his pipe, rays of daylight would stream into the room from the windows, creating columns of illumination through which rich swirls of smoke would drift slowly, languidly. The puffs and swirls seemed to exist only while touched by the twin streams of light through the narrow windows. If we were quiet, and didn't disturb his reading, we were allowed to sit on the floor and watch, while jazz played quietly on the stereo.

He eventually quit, but my sister and I still smoke. And both of us have tried to quit. Interestingly, my younger brother smoked and quit. Both my dad and him began their smoking in college. My sister and I started(in earnest) when we were fourteen. I have observed this pattern in others as well -- that those who start earlier seem to struggle, while those who start later tend to be more able to take-or-leave them. I think during adolescence your brain chemistry is more adaptable, and that you can develop a stronger dependence on the substance if you smoke through adolescence than if you smoke the same amount time as an adult.

I know that I can let them go, but it does seem to be an ordeal.

40 posted on 07/27/2003 5:20:35 PM PDT by Yeti
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