Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Patton's Third Army Activated August 1, 1944
79th Division Website ^ | John J. Pellino

Posted on 08/01/2003 12:12:25 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa

PATTON'S THIRD ARMY

Pre-Operational Phase In Normandy

When the Third Army Headquarters landed on French soil, the first thing done was to insure absolute security. In accordance with the plan Overlord, the presence of the Third Army was to be kept secret as long as possible. The idea was to keep the German High Command guessing as to the where- about's  of General Patton.

During the first days in the  Allied invasion, the XIX Tactical Air Command, whose primary job was aerial support for the Third Army, established its own headquarters adjacent to the army headquarters. Their detailed planning then started with high hopes for quick destruction of the Germans.

The G-2 Section of the Third Army made an in-depth report on enemy capabilities. It was the immediate concern of Third Army Headquarters to receive and prepare their arriving troops, who were coming in via control pints established at the Utah and Omaha beachheads. During the month of June, over five hundred units of the Third Army were moving over the small roads of the peninsula.

With these troops arriving daily, Patton was in a hurry to get going. He was fearful that the war might be over before the could get into the battle, dice battle reports had indicated that First Army alone had, by July 7, taken 46,219 prisoners of war (POWs) and killed 4739 of the enemy.

On July 22, General Bradley issued a directive from Twelfth Army Group indicating that the Third could become operational by  July 24. Operational Cobra, Bradley's slightly changed version of Patton's breakout plan, was originally to start at 1300 hours on July 24,  with VIII Corps to join in at o5030 hours on July 25. In each case, the D-Day and H-Hours were advanced a full twenty-four hours due to bad flying weather, which prevented the scheduled aerial Bombardment.

Finally, champing at the bit, Patton was given verbal orders on July 28 that he would, indeed, assume operation control of the Third Army. As Acting Deputy Commander, Patton hit the enemy  with the VII Corps, quickly followed by the 4th and 6th Armored Divisions. Bring up the rear were the 8th and 79th  Infantry Divisions. The lightning quick blow thoroughly upset and hurt the Germans. They began a rapid retreat which would become the normal course of events for the next nine months.

The Forward Echelon of Third Army Headquarters, named Lucky Forward by General Patton, made their first of many moves to a position five miles west of Coutances.

Patton Third Army became operational

August, 1944

The Third Army became operational at 1200 hours on August 1, 1944, a warm, clear day. It was perfect weather for the type of mobile war that General Patton loved to wage.

Under Patton's command were the VIII Corps, commanded by Troy H. Middleton, the XII Corps, commanded by Gilbert R. Cook, the XV Corps, commanded by Wade H. Haislip, and the XX Corps, commanded by Walton H. Walker, one of Patton's favorites. Patton once said of Walker that  'He will apparently fight anytime, anywhere,and with anything that I will give to him.' That was the type of commander Patton liked.

 At the same time and day, the XIX Tactical Air Command became operational  under the command of General O.P Weyland.

the operations of August would develop into five distinct phases:

  1. The conquest of Brittany.
  2. Encirclement of the Seventh German Army at Argentan-Falaise.
  3. The rapid advance to the Seine River, including the envelopment of enemy forces from Mantes Gassicourt to Elbeuf.
  4. The enemy evacuation of southwestern France.
  5. The chasing of the Germans across the Marne, Aisne, and Meuse Rivers.

Back to home page


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: crazygeorgepatton; georgespatton; godsgravesglyphs; militaryhistory; patton; wwii
Can't forget Crazy George.
1 posted on 08/01/2003 12:12:25 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa

Heck yeah I bought one.

Walt

2 posted on 08/01/2003 12:19:42 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
He is the man! My favorite movie of all time.
3 posted on 08/01/2003 12:20:06 PM PDT by microgood (They will all die......most of them.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: microgood
He is the man! My favorite movie of all time.

Yeah, saw an interview with Bardley's aide Chet Hanson; he said Scott nailed his characterization of Patton. So that was interesting. I saw that movie @ 25 times in the theater.

Walt

4 posted on 08/01/2003 12:22:13 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
60 years ago today my father and 150 Bomber Crews were on the first attack on Ploesti. Five medal of Honors came out of that raid. Most dcorated mission in history.
5 posted on 08/01/2003 12:22:53 PM PDT by Blessed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
I've read several book on General Patton. I'm convinced the war would've been extended a year longer if he hadn't been in charge of the 3rd, and shortened by one year if Eisenhower would've given him the supplies he needed instead of giving that bafoon Montgomery the supplies to get our guys killed in the north (A Bridge Too Far).

He was one of the richest men in the service when he entered the service. As the before mentioned movie said, he was a warrior out of his time.

God said of King David, he was alive "for such a time as this". The same can be said of General George S. Patton, the Lord God sent him to us (and the Jews) for such a time as this.

6 posted on 08/01/2003 12:25:53 PM PDT by bedolido (Quitters Never Win! Winners Never Quit! But those who never win and never quit are idiots!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Blessed
Five medal of Honors came out of that raid. Most dcorated mission in history.

The leader of the Ploesti raid got lost and took a wrong turn, didn't he? ;-). He still got the MOH. I saw where General Leon Johnson passed away recently at the age of 94.

Walt

7 posted on 08/01/2003 12:28:01 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
bump
8 posted on 08/01/2003 12:33:13 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bedolido
I've read several book on General Patton. I'm convinced the war would've been extended a year longer if he hadn't been in charge of the 3rd, and shortened by one year if Eisenhower would've given him the supplies he needed instead of giving that bafoon Montgomery the supplies to get our guys killed in the north (A Bridge Too Far).

Just change out Patton at Third Army with Bradley at 12th Army Group and all the guys would've been home for Christmas. C'est la guerre!

Walt

9 posted on 08/01/2003 12:35:32 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
Thanks for the post, Walt. Patton be the man!
10 posted on 08/01/2003 12:35:36 PM PDT by colorado tanker (Iron Horse)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Blessed
My uncle was in on that raid. Made it through that one and eventually back home, the whole time in a B-25 called the "Sad Sack." He died a few years ago. :(
11 posted on 08/01/2003 12:38:03 PM PDT by thesharkboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker
Thanks for the post, Walt. Patton be the man!

I hate to let August 1 roll around without some sort of tribute to crazy George. The D'Este biography is very, very good.

There's a great anecdote in it about Patton passing up an opportunity to be military attache in London in the mid '30's. His wife wanted to go. But, he wrote her that the Brit men were wonderfully charming but treated there wives like crap, and were always very needy of funds. His very attractive daughters Ruth Ellen and Little Bee were in their late teens. So he passed that chance by. He wrote something like, "when I'm gone, tell the girls I wasn't such a mean old bastard after all."

Walt

12 posted on 08/01/2003 12:42:27 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: bedolido
Hell, Patton would have already been in Moscow if they had let him.
13 posted on 08/01/2003 12:43:35 PM PDT by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: thesharkboy
Oops. I meant B-24s of course. See the roster of planes and captains at:

http://www.pconline.com/~csgregg/389/p_roster.htm

and see if your father's plane is there. My uncle flew in the "Sad Sack," not the "Sad Sack II," which was shot down.

14 posted on 08/01/2003 12:44:23 PM PDT by thesharkboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: colorado tanker
My recruiter promised me I could be a tanker. Lying SOB.

Walt

15 posted on 08/01/2003 12:44:28 PM PDT by WhiskeyPapa (Virtue is the uncontested prize.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
The Speech

Somewhere in England

June 5th, 1944

The big camp buzzed with a tension. For hundreds of eager rookies, newly arrived from the states, it was a great day in their lives. This day marked their first taste of the "real thing". Now they were not merely puppets in brown uniforms. They were not going through the motions of soldiering with three thousand miles of ocean between them and English soil. They were actually in the heart of England itself. They were waiting for the arrival of that legendary figure, Lieutenant General George S. Patton, Jr. Old "Blood and Guts" himself, about whom many a colorful chapter would be written for the school boys of tomorrow. Patton of the brisk, purposeful stride. Patton of the harsh, compelling voice, the lurid vocabulary, the grim and indomitable spirit that carried him and his Army to glory in Africa and Sicily. They called him "America's Fightingest General". He was no desk commando. He was the man who was sent for when the going got rough and a fighter was needed. He was the most hated and feared American of all on the part of the German Army.

Patton was coming and the stage was being set. He would address a move which might have a far reaching effect on the global war that, at the moment, was a TOP-SECRET in the files in Washington, D.C.

The men saw the camp turn out "en masse" for the first time and in full uniform, too. Today their marching was not lackadaisical. It was serious and the men felt the difference. From the lieutenants in charge of the companies on down in rank they felt the difference.

In long columns they marched down the hill from the barracks. They counted cadence while marching. They turned off to the left, up the rise and so on down into the roped off field where the General was to speak. Gold braid and stripes were everywhere. Soon, company by company, the hillside was a solid mass of brown. It was a beautiful fresh English morning. The tall trees lined the road and swayed gently in the breeze. Across the field, a British farmer calmly tilled his soil. High upon a nearby hill a group of British soldiers huddled together, waiting for the coming of the General. Military Police were everywhere wearing their white leggings, belts, and helmets. They were brisk and grim. The twittering of the birds in the trees could be heard above the dull murmur of the crowd and soft, white clouds floated lazily overhead as the men settled themselves and lit cigarettes.

On the special platform near the speakers stand, Colonels and Majors were a dime a dozen. Behind the platform stood General Patton's "Guard of Honor"; all specially chosen men. At their right was a band playing rousing marches while the crowd waited and on the platform a nervous sergeant repeatedly tested the loudspeaker. The moment grew near and the necks began to crane to view the tiny winding road that led to Stourport-on-Severn. A captain stepped to the microphone. "When the General arrives," he said sonorously, "the band will play the Generals March and you will all stand at attention."

By now the rumor had gotten around that Lieutenant General Simpson, Commanding General of the Fourth Army, was to be with General Patton. The men stirred expectantly. Two of the big boys in one day!

At last, the long black car, shining resplendently in the bright sun, roared up the road, preceded by a jeep full of Military Police. A dead hush fell over the hillside. There he was! Impeccably dressed. With knee high, brown, gleaming boots, shiny helmet, and his Colt .45 Peacemaker swinging in its holster on his right side.

Patton strode down the incline and then straight to the stiff backed "Guard of Honor". He looked them up and down. He peered intently into their faces and surveyed their backs. He moved through the ranks of the statuesque band like an avenging wraith and, apparently satisfied, mounted the platform with Lieutenant General Simpson and Major General Cook, the Corps Commander, at his side.

Major General Cook then introduced Lieutenant General Simpson, whose Army was still in America, preparing for their part in the war.

"We are here", said General Simpson, "to listen to the words of a great man. A man who will lead you all into whatever you may face with heroism, ability, and foresight. A man who has proven himself amid shot and shell. My greatest hope is that some day soon, I will have my own Army fighting with his, side by side."

General Patton arose and strode swiftly to the microphone. The men snapped to their feet and stood silently. Patton surveyed the sea of brown with a grim look. "Be seated", he said. The words were not a request, but a command. The General's voice rose high and clear.

"Men, this stuff that some sources sling around about America wanting out of this war, not wanting to fight, is a crock of bullshit. Americans love to fight, traditionally. All real Americans love the sting and clash of battle. You are here today for three reasons. First, because you are here to defend your homes and your loved ones. Second, you are here for your own self respect, because you would not want to be anywhere else. Third, you are here because you are real men and all real men like to fight. When you, here, everyone of you, were kids, you all admired the champion marble player, the fastest runner, the toughest boxer, the big league ball players, and the All-American football players. Americans love a winner. Americans will not tolerate a loser. Americans despise cowards. Americans play to win all of the time. I wouldn't give a hoot in hell for a man who lost and laughed. That's why Americans have never lost nor will ever lose a war; for the very idea of losing is hateful to an American."

The General paused and looked over the crowd. "You are not all going to die," he said slowly. "Only two percent of you right here today would die in a major battle. Death must not be feared. Death, in time, comes to all men. Yes, every man is scared in his first battle. If he says he's not, he's a liar. Some men are cowards but they fight the same as the brave men or they get the hell slammed out of them watching men fight who are just as scared as they are. The real hero is the man who fights even though he is scared. Some men get over their fright in a minute under fire. For some, it takes an hour. For some, it takes days. But a real man will never let his fear of death overpower his honor, his sense of duty to his country, and his innate manhood. Battle is the most magnificent competition in which a human being can indulge. It brings out all that is best and it removes all that is base. Americans pride themselves on being He Men and they ARE He Men. Remember that the enemy is just as frightened as you are, and probably more so. They are not supermen."

"All through your Army careers, you men have bitched about what you call "chicken shit drilling". That, like everything else in this Army, has a definite purpose. That purpose is alertness. Alertness must be bred into every soldier. I don't give a fuck for a man who's not always on his toes. You men are veterans or you wouldn't be here. You are ready for what's to come. A man must be alert at all times if he expects to stay alive. If you're not alert, sometime, a German son-of-an-asshole-bitch is going to sneak up behind you and beat you to death with a sockful of shit!" The men roared in agreement.

Patton's grim expression did not change. "There are four hundred neatly marked graves somewhere in Sicily", he roared into the microphone, "All because one man went to sleep on the job". He paused and the men grew silent. "But they are German graves, because we caught the bastard asleep before they did". The General clutched the microphone tightly, his jaw out-thrust, and he continued, "An Army is a team. It lives, sleeps, eats, and fights as a team. This individual heroic stuff is pure horse shit. The bilious bastards who write that kind of stuff for the Saturday Evening Post don't know any more about real fighting under fire than they know about fucking!"

The men slapped their legs and rolled in glee. This was Patton as the men had imagined him to be, and in rare form, too. He hadn't let them down. He was all that he was cracked up to be, and more. He had IT!

"We have the finest food, the finest equipment, the best spirit, and the best men in the world", Patton bellowed. He lowered his head and shook it pensively. Suddenly he snapped erect, faced the men belligerently and thundered, "Why, by God, I actually pity those poor sons-of-bitches we're going up against. By God, I do". The men clapped and howled delightedly. There would be many a barracks tale about the "Old Man's" choice phrases. They would become part and parcel of Third Army's history and they would become the bible of their slang.

"My men don't surrender", Patton continued, "I don't want to hear of any soldier under my command being captured unless he has been hit. Even if you are hit, you can still fight back. That's not just bull shit either. The kind of man that I want in my command is just like the lieutenant in Libya, who, with a Luger against his chest, jerked off his helmet, swept the gun aside with one hand, and busted the hell out of the Kraut with his helmet. Then he jumped on the gun and went out and killed another German before they knew what the hell was coming off. And, all of that time, this man had a bullet through a lung. There was a real man!"

Patton stopped and the crowd waited. He continued more quietly, "All of the real heroes are not storybook combat fighters, either. Every single man in this Army plays a vital role. Don't ever let up. Don't ever think that your job is unimportant. Every man has a job to do and he must do it. Every man is a vital link in the great chain. What if every truck driver suddenly decided that he didn't like the whine of those shells overhead, turned yellow, and jumped headlong into a ditch? The cowardly bastard could say, "Hell, they won't miss me, just one man in thousands". But, what if every man thought that way? Where in the hell would we be now? What would our country, our loved ones, our homes, even the world, be like? No, Goddamnit, Americans don't think like that. Every man does his job. Every man serves the whole. Every department, every unit, is important in the vast scheme of this war. The ordnance men are needed to supply the guns and machinery of war to keep us rolling. The Quartermaster is needed to bring up food and clothes because where we are going there isn't a hell of a lot to steal. Every last man on K.P. has a job to do, even the one who heats our water to keep us from getting the 'G.I. Shits'."

Patton paused, took a deep breath, and continued, "Each man must not think only of himself, but also of his buddy fighting beside him. We don't want yellow cowards in this Army. They should be killed off like rats. If not, they will go home after this war and breed more cowards. The brave men will breed more brave men. Kill off the Goddamned cowards and we will have a nation of brave men. One of the bravest men that I ever saw was a fellow on top of a telegraph pole in the midst of a furious fire fight in Tunisia. I stopped and asked what the hell he was doing up there at a time like that. He answered, "Fixing the wire, Sir". I asked, "Isn't that a little unhealthy right about now?" He answered, "Yes Sir, but the Goddamned wire has to be fixed". I asked, "Don't those planes strafing the road bother you?" And he answered, "No, Sir, but you sure as hell do!" Now, there was a real man. A real soldier. There was a man who devoted all he had to his duty, no matter how seemingly insignificant his duty might appear at the time, no matter how great the odds. And you should have seen those trucks on the rode to Tunisia. Those drivers were magnificent. All day and all night they rolled over those son-of-a-bitching roads, never stopping, never faltering from their course, with shells bursting all around them all of the time. We got through on good old American guts. Many of those men drove for over forty consecutive hours. These men weren't combat men, but they were soldiers with a job to do. They did it, and in one hell of a way they did it. They were part of a team. Without team effort, without them, the fight would have been lost. All of the links in the chain pulled together and the chain became unbreakable."

The General paused and stared challengingly over the silent ocean of men. One could have heard a pin drop anywhere on that vast hillside. The only sound was the stirring of the breeze in the leaves of the bordering trees and the busy chirping of the birds in the branches of the trees at the General's left.

"Don't forget," Patton barked, "you men don't know that I'm here. No mention of that fact is to be made in any letters. The world is not supposed to know what the hell happened to me. I'm not supposed to be commanding this Army. I'm not even supposed to be here in England. Let the first bastards to find out be the Goddamned Germans. Some day I want to see them raise up on their piss-soaked hind legs and howl, 'Jesus Christ, it's the Goddamned Third Army again and that son-of-a-fucking-bitch Patton'."

"We want to get the hell over there", Patton continued, "The quicker we clean up this Goddamned mess, the quicker we can take a little jaunt against the purple pissing Japs and clean out their nest, too. Before the Goddamned Marines get all of the credit."

The men roared approval and cheered delightedly. This statement had real significance behind it. Much more than met the eye and the men instinctively sensed the fact. They knew that they themselves were going to play a very great part in the making of world history. They were being told as much right now. Deep sincerity and seriousness lay behind the General's colorful words. The men knew and understood it. They loved the way he put it, too, as only he could.

Patton continued quietly, "Sure, we want to go home. We want this war over with. The quickest way to get it over with is to go get the bastards who started it. The quicker they are whipped, the quicker we can go home. The shortest way home is through Berlin and Tokyo. And when we get to Berlin", he yelled, "I am personally going to shoot that paper hanging son-of-a-bitch Hitler. Just like I'd shoot a snake!"

"When a man is lying in a shell hole, if he just stays there all day, a German will get to him eventually. The hell with that idea. The hell with taking it. My men don't dig foxholes. I don't want them to. Foxholes only slow up an offensive. Keep moving. And don't give the enemy time to dig one either. We'll win this war, but we'll win it only by fighting and by showing the Germans that we've got more guts than they have; or ever will have. We're not going to just shoot the sons-of-bitches, we're going to rip out their living Goddamned guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks. We're going to murder those lousy Hun cocksuckers by the bushel-fucking-basket. War is a bloody, killing business. You've got to spill their blood, or they will spill yours. Rip them up the belly. Shoot them in the guts. When shells are hitting all around you and you wipe the dirt off your face and realize that instead of dirt it's the blood and guts of what once was your best friend beside you, you'll know what to do!"

"I don't want to get any messages saying, "I am holding my position." We are not holding a Goddamned thing. Let the Germans do that. We are advancing constantly and we are not interested in holding onto anything, except the enemy's balls. We are going to twist his balls and kick the living shit out of him all of the time. Our basic plan of operation is to advance and to keep on advancing regardless of whether we have to go over, under, or through the enemy. We are going to go through him like crap through a goose; like shit through a tin horn!"

"From time to time there will be some complaints that we are pushing our people too hard. I don't give a good Goddamn about such complaints. I believe in the old and sound rule that an ounce of sweat will save a gallon of blood. The harder WE push, the more Germans we will kill. The more Germans we kill, the fewer of our men will be killed. Pushing means fewer casualties. I want you all to remember that."

The General paused. His eagle like eyes swept over the hillside. He said with pride, "There is one great thing that you men will all be able to say after this war is over and you are home once again. You may be thankful that twenty years from now when you are sitting by the fireplace with your grandson on your knee and he asks you what you did in the great World War II, you WON'T have to cough, shift him to the other knee and say, "Well, your Granddaddy shoveled shit in Louisiana." No, Sir, you can look him straight in the eye and say, "Son, your Granddaddy rode with the Great Third Army and a Son-of-a-Goddamned-Bitch named Georgie Patton!"

16 posted on 08/01/2003 12:47:09 PM PDT by AxelPaulsenJr (Ozzy Osborne says that pot leads to harder drugs.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
My dad was in the third army and he is just now, at age 87, starting to tell stories.

The last movie he saw in the theatres was Patton and said he thought they did a good job of portraying the old man. He's one that thinks Patton's death was not an accident.

Don't even know his unit. But dad did reconnaisance. He called it scouting. Biggest job Battle of the Buldge. Scoping out German locations.

Dad was d-day plus 6. Wouldn't see Saving Private Ryan nor would he go with me to all the anniversaries in Europe. Just keeps saying he saw all he wanted the first time. Hope to see him open up a little more on the war stories.

17 posted on 08/01/2003 12:49:29 PM PDT by breakem
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
Hell, Patton would have already been in Moscow if they had let him.

Patton had the right idea. Unfortunately, I think the Russians would've kicked our butts (we were close to having the bomb by then). We would've needed more than what we had there to beat the Russians. They were manufacturing tanks by the dozens by then in eastern Russia. The attacked the Germans with a fresh corp (if not more) of soldiers, tanks and aircraft. They had been building and hiding them from the Germans and at a given time, unleashed them on the Germans... chased them all the way to Berlin (some divisions went as far as France).

18 posted on 08/01/2003 12:52:14 PM PDT by bedolido (Quitters Never Win! Winners Never Quit! But those who never win and never quit are idiots!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
Your #9...precisely correct!

Eisenhower had to starve Patton's tanks of fuel to slow him down enough to make the Russians and the Brits happy.

19 posted on 08/01/2003 1:00:05 PM PDT by Southack (Media bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: breakem
Your dad must have been with my dad's little brother, also a scout tank (three man crew baby sherman) commander in the 4th armored division of the third army. Uncle was credited with driving the first US tank into Mooseburgh POW camp. They raced against the clock to beat an SS unit there and fought it out at the gates, killing them all. Uncle made it into one of Broakow's books. Meanwhile another uncle was in the Pacific with the Marines and dad was in Africa/Italy with the 15th Air Corps. Two out of three are gone now.
20 posted on 08/01/2003 1:06:54 PM PDT by wtc911
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa; snippy_about_it
Thanks for the post WhiskeyPapa.

I've wondered how things might have been different if Patton hadn't been reined in or if he was in charge of Market-Garden.
21 posted on 08/01/2003 1:09:51 PM PDT by SAMWolf (My dad fought in World War II, it's one of the things that distinguishes him from the french.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
Bradley was to cautious. You're correct in your assessment. Patton instinctively knew where to attack and how. That attribute has only been found a few times in war. The recent successful attack by the 3rd army in Iraq used Patton as a guide. Hit'um where they ain't.
22 posted on 08/01/2003 1:10:54 PM PDT by bedolido (Quitters Never Win! Winners Never Quit! But those who never win and never quit are idiots!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
My recruiter promised me I could be a tanker. Lying SOB.

We must have talked to the same recruiter.

23 posted on 08/01/2003 1:11:48 PM PDT by SAMWolf (My dad fought in World War II, it's one of the things that distinguishes him from the french.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf
I've wondered how things might have been different if Patton hadn't been reined in or if he was in charge of Market-Garden.

Patton wouldn't have been so dumb. Montgomery had brave men around him and was lucky at El Alamein, the proof of his bafoonery was his convoluted Market-Garden plan.

24 posted on 08/01/2003 1:13:53 PM PDT by bedolido (Quitters Never Win! Winners Never Quit! But those who never win and never quit are idiots!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: bedolido
My favorite portrayal of Patton wasn't in the movie Patton, but in the generally horrible "sequel". In that movie, Patton came across a German POW camp where the men and officers were trudging around, heads down, beaten and depressed. Patton called out the senior officer and castigated him for allowing his command to be in that state.

Later in the movie, Patton comes by again. The Germans are lined up in formation, neater, well-disciplined. The German commander snaps a salute at Patton, his face proud and respectful. Patton salutes back, and says under his breath:

"With these men ... and my Third Army ... I'll kick those Russians sons-of-bitches back to Moscow!"

He WAS a son-of-a-bitch, but he was OUR son-of-a-bitch!
25 posted on 08/01/2003 1:17:27 PM PDT by You Dirty Rats
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: wtc911
My father said he and two others in his squad crossed the river into Berlin and were ordered over the radio to come back to the east bank, because they had to wait for the Russians to enter Berlin.

He told this to my son and I have a hard time getting him to open up, but some day soon.

26 posted on 08/01/2003 1:18:55 PM PDT by breakem
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa


27 posted on 08/01/2003 1:20:49 PM PDT by SAMWolf (My dad fought in World War II, it's one of the things that distinguishes him from the french.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
Walt, being young and foolish and heavily influenced by MASH, I tried to get into Medical Service Corps or M.I. The Exec at our ROTC detachment told me I was getting Armor because I was a history major, a connection I never quite got. Maybe the idea was since Patton was a history buff all tankers should be history buffs.

Later, I found out Armor was the place to be. There's nothing quite like cruising with a lotta tons of steel wrapped around you. (Well, driving a jet fighter would be cool too, but my eyesight nixed that idea.)

28 posted on 08/01/2003 1:23:21 PM PDT by colorado tanker (Iron Horse)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: breakem
They were likely in different units since at the time Berlin fell my uncle was way south in the Sudetenland, in or near Czechoslovakia. He's the one of the three still living. They have an official "day" in his honor every year in his town. He never talked much either. What I know about his activities I heard from my dad and what I know about my dad's I heard from my uncle after dad was gone. The three brothers came home to Queens after the war and moved back into the same room they shared in 1941. The next year or so the house was full of nightly dreams about burning planes, dead and dying friends....you know. I learned this from another uncle who was just a kid then but remembers it well.
29 posted on 08/01/2003 1:30:13 PM PDT by wtc911
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf; All
BUMP

30 posted on 08/01/2003 1:31:27 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Tag Lines Repaired While You Wait! Reasonable Prices! Fast Service!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bedolido
Unfortunately, I think the Russians would've kicked our butts (we were close to having the bomb by then). We would've needed more than what we had there to beat the Russians. They were manufacturing tanks by the dozens by then in eastern Russia.

I don't think so. Airpower alone would have dessimated the Russians. There were enough P-47's operating from German airstrips to obliterate every Russian tank all the way back to Siberia. 8'th Airforce now had dozzens more bomber groups and on any given day 10,000 planes with escorts could take out those Russian factories. There Yak fighters were no match for Mustangs and Spitfires at altitude and we would have had air superiority. There were more than enough divisions and material staged or in the pipeline to take care of Russia easily but there was no political will to do so because we wanted to finish off the Japanese and not lose anymore lives in Europe. The Russians new this is well and this is why they did not press their hand or attempt to occupy any of western Europe which was in chaos at the time. Truman waited to long to stop Russia's grip on eastern Europe from taking hold as Churchill had earlier warned Roosevelt at the Malta conference concerning postwar Europe.

31 posted on 08/01/2003 1:57:46 PM PDT by Mat_Helm
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: SAMWolf; WhiskeyPapa
Thanks for the ping SAM and the post Walt!
32 posted on 08/01/2003 2:01:25 PM PDT by snippy_about_it (Pray for our Troops)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: AxelPaulsenJr
Oh my word, I am so happy you posted this speech.

I cried.

Then I had this thought that Rummy sounds a lot like Patton.
33 posted on 08/01/2003 5:53:46 PM PDT by Conservababe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
Speaking of the General, I helped build Stack (Bonfire for those that are uninformed) to the Patton motion picture soundtrack... it will motivate you at 1:00 am!

Hey Dr. Gates... here's my $0.02... get a safe Bonfire up and running and put it back where it belongs...Duncan Field.

Trajan88; TAMU Class of '88; Law Hall (may it R.I.P.) Ramp 9 Mule; f.u.p.

34 posted on 08/01/2003 5:59:38 PM PDT by Trajan88
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
The leader of the Ploesti raid got lost and took a wrong turn, didn't he? ;-). He still got the MOH. I saw where General Leon Johnson passed away recently at the age of 94.

My dad was in Gen. Johnson's group.They hit their target but had heavy AAA because the group that got lost hit their target first. Johnson got the Medal for going in anyway.If you have seen the picture associated with this raid that shows a B24 coming ot of the smoke with two smokestacks in the background, my dad always believed that was his plane.They made it away from target but had to jump and spent 18 months in a Rumanion POW camp.
35 posted on 08/01/2003 6:00:17 PM PDT by Blessed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: WhiskeyPapa
My father was in Patton's third army. At the end of the war, dad was riding in a jeep. They passed some women and dad stood up like he was reaching out to hug the women. He fell out of the jeep and broke his wrist. Made it through the war with no injuries and then, that.
36 posted on 11/22/2003 8:28:19 PM PST by steppenwolffe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

·Dogpile · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo · Google ·
· The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


37 posted on 06/03/2009 5:43:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Blessed
"To recognise their bravery, 89 decorations were awarded to members of the raiding party, including five Victoria Crosses."

Called, "The Greatest Raid of All."

BBC video 58:37

38 posted on 08/17/2013 6:14:30 PM PDT by rvoitier (Progressives are in the GOP, too.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson