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Iranian Alert -- August 15, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.15.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/15/2003 12:03:07 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement
To find all the links to all 67 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 08/15/2003 12:03:07 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- August 15, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 8.15.2003 | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 08/15/2003 12:04:47 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
PA seizes $3 million Iran sent Islamic Jihad

By Ze'ev Schiff, Haaretz Correspondent and Haaretz Service
Last Update: 15/08/2003 08:22

The Palestinian preventive security apparatus, under Mohammed Dahlan, recently seized $3 million sent from Iran for the Islamic Jihad organization in the territories.

The money, which arrived indirectly via Arab countries, was confiscated by the Palestinian Authority, and then distributed to charity organizations.

In the seven weeks since agreeing on the cease-fire, the
PA has taken steps to reduce incitement against Israel and to tighten its control over PA funds. However, the control is not complete and PA chairman Yasser Arafat and his security services have their own funds.

Israeli sources say the Palestinian leadership sees these acts as fighting terrorism. PA Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas and Minister for Security Affairs Dahlan have not carried out any real action against the terror organizations. Even the "90-day plan" on security issues that Dahlan presented to the United States is hardly being implemented, except for organizational steps, the Israeli sources say.

Dahlan and Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz met for four hours Thursday evening to discuss transferring more cities to Palestinian control and PA action against terror. They are planning to meet again on Friday or Sunday, Israel Radio
reported.

Israel said it was prepared to hand over Qalqilyah and Jericho, Israel Radio reported, and the Palestinians asked for control over Ramallah.

Mofaz told Dahlan that the transfer depended on Palestinian willingness to take "real action against the terror organizations," Israel Radio reported. They also discusses ways to advance the peace process.

Palestinian sources described the talks as positive, but said that no agreements were reached.

Following the meeting, an Israeli security source said that "our goal is to advance the peace process, not to crush it."

Mofaz met Thursday morning with U.S. envoy to the Middle East John Wolf and called on him to press Dahlan and Abbas to take action against terror.

http://c.moreover.com/click/here.pl?l84810758
3 posted on 08/15/2003 12:12:27 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
DCHQ chief says Iran home to two million drug addicts

8/14/03
Secretary-General of the Drug Control Headquarters (DCHQ) Ali Hashemi said in Hamedan on Wednesday that Iran has over two million people addicted to various kinds of drugs, IRNA reported.

"Some 1.2 million are hardcore drug abusers while 800,000 are using drugs as pastime," he added.

Also, he said out of 270,000 heroin addicts, 140,000 are intravenous drug users (IDUs) and "65 percent of AIDS sufferers are also injecting drug addicts."

He said Tehran and Kermanshah provinces have the highest rates of addicts in comparison to the whole size of their population.

Addicts spent a whooping rls 40 billion on their destructive habit and use between 800 tons to 1,050 tons of assorted narcotics annually, the drug czar underlined.

Also Hashemi said that out of 15,000 arrested or self-introduced addicts in seven provinces 802 are women.

Some 43.4 percent of addicts are between 20-30 years of age and three percent have higher education, he said adding that some 90 percent of DCHQ activities are in line with the prevention and demand reduction strategies.

Hashemi added that "this constitutes our strategy to reign in the drug abuse spread."

Hashemi, also a presidential advisor, said last month that the drug problem has degenerated into a global threat whose impact is not less than that of nuclear and environmental hazards'.

Speaking to reporters, he added that the cash flow from drug trade runs close to dlrs 1,600 billion annually and that the total number of addicts worldwide is close to 400 million.

He referred to the 44 million youth under 30 in Iran and said, "They are facing danger of addiction and we need to strive to create employment opportunities for them and fill their idle time."

The drug czar also warned that if addiction in the country is not effectively dealt with, "it could become a national security threat."

He said one of the DCHQ's goals is to reduce the threat of addiction through prevention and treatment. He further highlighted the important role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in combating drugs trafficking.

Hashemi stated that DCHQ has inked anti-drug trafficking agreements with over 28 countries and participated in four seminars held in Paris, Tehran, Vienna and Kabul last year.

Hashemi said Afghanistan still poses a serious danger to the region as it serves as a route for transit of drugs.

He said more than 65,000 hectares of lands in Afghanistan were under poppy cultivation and the figure is expected to reach 85,000 hectares in 2003.

He expressed regret over Iran lying on the route for transit of drugs, calling for all-out campaign against use of illicit drugs.

He added that 152 tons of drugs, including 10 tons of morphine and 65 tons of hashish, were confiscated from drug traffickers in the same period.

http://www.payvand.com/news/03/aug/1078.html
4 posted on 08/15/2003 12:19:47 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
DCHQ chief says Iran home to two million drug addicts

8/14/03

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/964465/posts?page=4#4

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
5 posted on 08/15/2003 12:21:21 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran defies US with plan for second nuclear plant

AP in Tehran
Friday August 15, 2003
The Guardian

Iran is to get a second nuclear reactor with a capacity of 1,000 megawatts, and is beginning feasibility studies for a 5,000MW reactor, the official news agency IRNA reported yesterday.
First Vice-President Mohamad Reza Aref authorised the atomic energy organisation to sign contracts for the second reactor at the Bushehr nuclear power site, it said.

State television said on Wednesday that plans for a second reactor had been approved, but it did not report the size of the plant.

Iran is building its first nuclear reactor at Bushehr, on the shore of the Gulf, with Russia's assistance. It has a capacity of 1,000MW and should be completed next year.

Washington suspects it of developing a clandestine nuclear weapons programme and has lobbied for the International Atomic Energy Agency to declare Iran in violation of the nuclear non-proliferation treaty.

Iran denies that it has ambitions to make nuclear weapons and says it wants nuclear power as an alternative source of energy as its oil reserves diminish.

At its meeting yesterday, Iran's supreme nuclear council commissioned the atomic energy organisation to prepare studies for building a 5,000MW nuclear plant, IRNA reported.

The IAEA has called on Iran to allow unfettered access to its nuclear sites. It director general, Mohamed ElBaradei, will report on Iran next month.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/iran/story/0,12858,1019331,00.html
6 posted on 08/15/2003 12:23:11 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iran defies US with plan for second nuclear plant

AP in Tehran
Friday August 15, 2003
The Guardian

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/964465/posts?page=6#6

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
7 posted on 08/15/2003 12:24:13 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: DoctorZIn
Forget Hizbullah; Bomb Syria!

August 15, 2003
FrontPageMagazine.com
Ariel Natan Pasko

The time has finally come for Israel to take the gloves off and start to hit hard. It's time for Israelis to get over their "Syrian Syndrome," that irrational and deep-seated fear of Syria, dating back to the Yom Kippur War of 1973. The Syria of today might not be much different than the Syria of 1973, but Israel has changed dramatically. Israel's military in 2003 is more advanced. Israel's economy - while still a little slow - is exponentially ahead of Syria's. In fact, by every measure of national power Israel is well beyond Syria, and the gap has grown not shrunk since 1973. So get over it, Syria is a paper tiger, or a basket case.

Even after renewed attacks on Israel, why bother with Hizbollah? Why play Syria's and Iran's game? Why pretend that Hizbollah is calling the shots? Why give immunity to the real culprits? Put the blame squarely where it belongs: on Syria.

One could try to blame the Lebanese government for not doing enough to tone down Hizbollah. The Lebanese military really should take up positions in Southern Lebanon and de-militarize Hizbollah. Israel has left Lebanese soil. Ask the UN; for once they support our position and agree with us. But alas, Lebanon is not an independent state; Lebanon is a puppet regime controlled by Damascus.

So Israel needs to put the blame where it belongs; on the only power capable of reining in Hizbollah, of disarming them, of cutting off their flow of weapons from Iran, and of discouraging them from attacking Israel -- and that's Syria.

Syria uses Hizbollah as a proxy army to keep pressure on Israel. Notice the Syrian occupation army in Lebanon never attacks Israel; it's always Hizbollah. Thus, Syria cannot be directly blamed for the attack. Well, forget the small fry; blame Syria!

First, the Israeli government should make it a cornerstone of it's foreign policy to take every diplomatic opportunity to raise the issue of Syria' continuing violation of UN Security Council Resolution 520, which calls on all foreign forces - including Syria - to leave Lebanon. What a joke that Syria sits on the UN Security Council, while it violates a Security Council resolution. No wonder many people in the United States, Israel, and elsewhere hold the UN in such low esteem. And Israel should more vigorously lobby Washington to pressure Syria until Syria gets out of Lebanon.

In the beginning of May, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell visited Damascus and Beirut. After leaving Damascus, he said in a Beirut press conference that he and Assad discussed "all of the outstanding issues" that have hindered U.S.-Syrian relations in the past. That included frank talks about Weapons of Mass Destruction; Syria's support for Hizbollah; and closing the Iraq-Syria border "and keeping it sealed" to technology, fighters and Iraqi authority figures. Powell made it clear to Assad, that the U.S. commitment to Middle East peace "would include Syria and Lebanon, and would include the Golan Heights." But, Powell made no mention of speaking to Assad about getting Syria out of Lebanon.

Later, speaking in Beirut -- not Damascus -- Powell assured Prime Minister Rafik Hariri of U.S. support for "an independent and prosperous Lebanon free of all - all - foreign forces." But the main focus of Powell's visit to Syria, it seems, was to prevent it from helping out Saddam's buddies, to "give up the goods" on WMDs, to stop their support for terrorist groups (which they haven't) and to soften up their rejection of the Road Map. To this end, Powell dangled the Golan Heights as a reward for good behavior, despite Syria's opposition to the U.S. war in Iraq and despite their facilitation of "volunteer fighters" to help Saddam. Little focus was put on getting Syria out of Lebanon, and nothing has happened on that front since Powell's visit.

Yet, on May 2nd -- the day before Powell's meeting with Assad -- in Washington, Senator Barbara Boxer, D-CA, and Senator Rick Santorum, R-PA, introduced the Senate version of the Syria Accountability and Lebanese Sovereignty Restoration Act of 2003 (S 982). The bill's purposes are to 1) halt Syrian support for terrorism; 2) end the Syrian occupation of Lebanon; 3) stop Syria's production of Weapons of Mass Destruction; and 4) hold Syria accountable for the illegal Syrian-Iraqi trade, which provided Iraq with the weapons that killed American troops.

The House version of the Act was introduced on April 10. Both bills now have a solid majority of support in the U.S. Congress. Sponsors and supporters of the bill claim it will weaken Syria's ability to wage wars, to threaten its neighbors and to destabilize the region. So, there clearly is support for pushing Syria out of Lebanon emanating from the U.S. Congress. Israel should remind the Bush Administration of that.

Today, after the United State's victory in Iraq and the inclusion of Iraqi Shi'ites in its governing council, it would be hard for Hizbollah or Iran to portray the U.S. as out to get the Shi'ites in Lebanon just because they oppose Hizbollah. Ending the vicious Syrian occupation of Lebanon, and dismantling Hizbollah as a military force there, would also serve U.S. and Israeli interests in putting a firm limit to Iran's influence in the area. This no doubt would have a positive effect in weakening Islamic Jihad -- and to a lesser extent Hamas -- in Damascus and Gaza. Iran is already on the American and Israeli agenda, due to it's closing in on real nuclear capability. Anything that weakens Iran's ability to "export" the revolution is good for the region and the world.

Second, in blaming Syria's dictatorial regime for Hizbollah's attacks on Israel, the Israeli government should announce a new policy of retaliatory raids against Syrian military positions in Lebanon. Why should Syria be immune from the costs of its pro-Hizbollah policies? After announcing this change in policy of holding Syria accountable for Hizbollah attacks, the Israeli government should begin a policy of "graduated escalation" beginning with hitting Syrian positions in Lebanon.

Everyone should remember the beginning of the Lebanon War in 1982, when Israel warned Syria to stay out of its way but Syria didn't listen. When confronted, Israel shot down more than 90 Syrian planes with just one loss. Today, Israel has significantly increased its military superiority over Syria since1982. If Syria doesn't stop the Hizbollah attacks and prepare to end its occupation of Lebanon, the next phase would include selected targets in Syria itself. This "graduated escalation" would put the issue of the vicious Syrian occupation of Lebanon since 1976 and their support for Hizbollah terror against Israel on the top of the American, EU, and UN agenda.

Israel and the United States have to support a free and independent Lebanon, free of Syrian occupation, free of Hizbollah terrorism, free to return to its former glory. It's in Israel's interest; it's in Lebanon's interest; it's in the United States' interest; and it should be a top priority to demonstrate to Assad that the policy would also be in the Syrian people's interest.

http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=9399"
9 posted on 08/15/2003 9:12:01 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Forget Hizbullah; Bomb Syria!

August 15, 2003
FrontPageMagazine.com
Ariel Natan Pasko

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/964465/posts?page=9#9

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
10 posted on 08/15/2003 9:13:31 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
One Day After News of Their Escape Iran Denies Ever Holding Bin Laden's Son, Top Lieutenants

August 14, 2003
AFP
IranMania

TEHRAN -- Iran Thursday denied that it had ever held al-Qaeda leader Osama's bin Laden's son or two principal lieutenants after an Arabic daily charged that the trio were being allowed to slip out of the country.

A foreign ministry official told the Iranian Student News Agency that longstanding reports that Saad bin Laden and al-Qaeda number two Ayman al-Zawahiri and number three Saif al-Adel had been detained in Iran were untrue.

He strongly denied Wednesday's report by the London-based Asharq al-Aswat daily that Zawahiri might already have slipped across the border into Afghanistan or Pakistan with the help of elements of the hardline Revolutionary Guard and that Adel and bin Laden junior were trying to follow him.

"The individuals named by Asharq al-Awsat have never been arrested in Iran and so the allegation that they have left Iran is completely meaningless," the official told ISNA.

"All al-Qaeda members who were arrested in Iran remain in custody."

It is the first time that Iran has broken its silence about the identity of the al-Qaeda leaders it is holding. Previously Iranian officials had said only that they had arrested "important and less important members" of the Islamic militant network since the US-led war in neighbouring Afghanistan in late 2001.

Iran has come under immense US pressure to hand over its al-Qaeda captives amid charges that members of the group working out of Iran had a hand in triple suicide attacks that killed 35 people in Saudi Arabia in May.

The Islamic regime has said that it will try, extradite or deport all its captives, but Wednesday ruled out giving US investigators permission to question them.

Tehran-based diplomats say the regime's plans to dispose of its al-Qaeda prisoners have been complicated by the fact that many have been stripped of their original nationality and therefore cannot be extradited.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=15&a=3
11 posted on 08/15/2003 9:19:29 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
One Day After News of Their Escape Iran Denies Ever Holding Bin Laden's Son, Top Lieutenants

August 14, 2003
AFP
IranMania

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/964465/posts?page=11#11

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
12 posted on 08/15/2003 9:20:30 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Islamic regime shuts down official student body's website following publication of report on death of Canadian journalist

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Aug 15, 2003

The Islamic republic regime has closed down the website located at www.akunews.org. This website, in Persian, belongs to the official student body named "Amir Kabir Islamic Association of Students" (AKIAS).

This repressive move has happened since the begining of yesterday afternoon and has persisted till now (18:30 THR local time). It follows the publication, by this site, of a detailled report on the regime's Judiciary force's statement in reference to the death of the Candian-Iranian journalist killed under torture.

The Islamic judiciary had stated, on Thursday morning, that Zahra Kazemi was killed but was known to have been part of a plot and corruption network intending to contribute to the overthrown the Islamic republic regime.

The official's statement had continued, shamefully, that Kazemi had contributed to the creation of groups of young female intending to increase the prostitution in Iran.

It had added that Kazemi had contributed to the creation of operative groups and has teached them the preparation of incendiary devices such as Molotov Cocktails.

The Islamic judiciary's statement on Ms. Kazemi is in line with the known policy of the regime to discredit anyone, dead or alive, who might create a danger for the regime's existence in the World's opinion.

Many of the regime's opponents or victims have been qualified, in the last years, as "Drug Traffickers, Bandits, Renagades, Spies, Corrupts, Hooligans etc...". Such policy helps the regime's European and Japanese backers to justify the continuation of their economic relations with the clerical administration.

But this is the first time that such policy is used against a citizen of a country such as Canada and the regime hopes that the Canadian government will follow the same path as all other countries blinded by commercial opportunities.

Kazemi died under duress as she retaliated to the brutality of the regime's investigators. It's reported, by other sources, that she returned the slap in the face received from the infamous Judge Mortazavi. Thrown on the ground, she was feet kicked till death by the Judge and other investigators present in the room.

She refused, till death, to sign false confessions on basless charges of corruption and espionage.

It's to note that AKIAS was among those student bodies backing the so-called 'reformists" and it's totally different than the underground "Amir Kabir Independent Student Association" which seks a secular regime for Iran.

Kazemi's death is getting used, by the so-called reformist faction of the regime, in order to chase their opponents from judicial and political power with hope of saving the theocratic regime under a "reformed" frame. But such policy is rejected, today, by the majority of the Iranians who want the total annhiliation of the Islamic regime and the instauration of a Secular and Democratic regime.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1762.shtml
13 posted on 08/15/2003 9:21:54 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Islamic regime shuts down official student body's website following publication of report on death of Canadian journalist

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Aug 15, 2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/964465/posts?page=13#13
14 posted on 08/15/2003 9:22:37 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Thank you for the pings.
15 posted on 08/15/2003 9:40:40 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Life isn't fair. It's fairer than death, is all.")
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
Your welcome.
16 posted on 08/15/2003 9:51:50 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Might just be me, but this sounds a little dangerous. It doesn't seem as though the author takes into account, any other country coming to Syria's aid. Maybe even Iran?
17 posted on 08/15/2003 10:52:17 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
"The Islamic judiciary had stated, on Thursday morning, that Zahra Kazemi was killed but was known to have been part of a plot and corruption network intending to contribute to the overthrown the Islamic republic regime.
The official's statement had continued, shamefully, that Kazemi had contributed to the creation of groups of young female intending to increase the prostitution in Iran.
It had added that Kazemi had contributed to the creation of operative groups and has teached them the preparation of incendiary devices such as Molotov Cocktails"

This is really disgusting!. What was she supposed to be? A one woman / one person terror cell? And the whole Iranian government was afraid of this one small woman? How pathetic!! I hope Mortazavi rots in Hell.
18 posted on 08/15/2003 11:07:05 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Oh, and btw,

Goodmorning.
19 posted on 08/15/2003 11:08:35 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
Zahra Kazemi Case : EU foreign ministers urged to put pressure on Iran


Reporters Without Borders wrote to each of the European Union's 15 foreign ministers today urging them to put pressure on Iran over the murder of Zahra Kazemi, a journalist with both Iranian and Canadian citizenship. The letter was also addressed to the foreign ministers of the 10 countries that are about to join the EU, which has been conducting a "constructive dialogue" with Iran since 1998.

"We would like to formally ask you to do everything in your power to get the Iranian authorities to agree to the formation of an independent commission of enquiry that would include international experts," Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard wrote. "Those responsible for Kazemi's death must be identified, brought to trial and punished."

The organisation also ask the foreign ministers to support Canada in its representations to the Iranian authorities.

A resident in Canada for the last 10 years or so, Kazemi was on a visit back to Iran when she was detained on 23 June while photographing the relatives of detainees outside Evin prison, north of Tehran. She was beaten while in custody and died as a result of her injuries on 11 July.

The Iranian authorities at first tried to conceal the causes of her death. But on 16 July, Vice-President Ali Abtahi recognised that she had been "beaten." Nonetheless, her body was hastily buried on 22 July in the southern town of Chiraz, although that her mother, a resident in Iran, initially asked for her body to be repatriated to Canada. She acknowledged on 30 July that she had subsequently been pressured into giving permission for the body to be buried in Iran. The Canadian authorities have not stopped requesting the body's repatriation ever since Kazemi's death was announced.

Some reformist parliamentarians have gone so far as to blame Kazemi's death on the judiciary, a conservative stronghold. The Tehran prosecutor, Said Mortazavi, is said to have concealed the circumstances of the death and to have pushed for a rapid burial. In a letter published in the newspapers on 24 July, Mohammad Hussein Khoshvagt, director for foreign press at the culture ministry, acknowledged that Mortazavi forced him to announce that Kazemi's death was due to a cerebral haemorrhage. Mortazavi allegedly accused Khoshvagt (who is in charge of issuing press visas to foreigners) of issuing one to a spy.

The reformist parliamentarian Mohsen Amin said it was Mortazavi who gave the order for Kazemi's death to be attributed to cerebral haemorrhage, and who told the family to bury her very quickly. Amin also said that Kazemi told the police who questioned her that she had been hit on the head.

Another reformist parliamentarian, Elaheh Koulaie, attributed Kazemi's death to a climate of press censorship and hostility to any criticism.

On 30 July, Vice-President Abtahi spoke openly of "murder." On 11 August, the spokesman for the judiciary, Gholam Hossein Elham, recognised that Kazemi died as a result of a blow to the head, but said individuals were at fault, not an institution.

Nonetheless, the use of torture appears to be common in Iranian prisons. President Khatami's brother, in an open letter dated 9 July, called for measures to prevent abuses against political prisoners. Moreover, after leading a UN commission on human rights fact-finding mission to Iran, Louis Joinet in February 2003 voiced concern about conditions of detention, especially the widespread use of very long periods of solitary confinement which, he said, could be considered as a "prison within prison" and lent itself to arbitrary application.







http://www.rsf.fr/article.php3?id_article=7748
20 posted on 08/15/2003 11:51:03 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: All
Iran's reform road blocked
13/08/2003 12:57 - (SA)

Tehran - Iranian conservatives have rejected three reform bills put forward by President Mohammad Khatami, slamming reformist hopes of bringing "Islamic democracy" to Iran, said press reports on Wednesday.

The Guardians Council, a small conservative-run body that vets all legislation in line with the constitution and Islamic law, said on Tuesday night it had rejected two bills authorising the government to sign international agreements against torture and women's rights, and a third on electoral reform.

The electoral reform bill would have abolished the right of the council to weed out candidates for elections.

Reformists accuse the council of disqualifying reformists for flimsy reasons, and wanted to end its screening of candidates before crucial legislative elections early next year and presidential polls in 2005.

Many saw the bills as a last-ditch attempt to assert Khatami's embattled position in the face of entrenched religious conservatives.

The council first rejected the bill on April 1, insisting it was "the only authority to supervise the elections" and that there were 39 violations of the constitution and seven against Islamic teachings.

'Violate constitution and Islamic law'

The bill was returned to the reformist-dominated parliament, which amended it and re-approved it on July 20.

The 12 guardians, including six senior clerics appointed by supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and six lawyers appointed by the judiciary, decided the three bills violated the constitution and Islamic law, spokesperson Ebrahim Azizi was quoted as saying.

Although parliament had revised the electoral reform bill, Azizi said: "A certain number of the Guardian Council's objections have not been taken into account."

He added that certain additional clauses to the bill were less acceptable than those in the previous draft.

Theoretically, the bill must return to parliament until the two sides can agree.

But, in the event of a protracted dispute between the two bodies, the conservative Expediency Council, Iran's supreme political arbitration body, will decide on the matter. That is a recourse to which Khatami is strongly opposed.

Bid for democracy being blocked

Some reformers have proposed, instead, to call a referendum, which would require Khamenei's approval, or else stage a mass walk-out from their posts and plunge the regime into a crisis of legitimacy.

Khatami, elected president in 1997 and again in 2001, has consistently seen his bid to bring "Islamic democracy" to Iran blocked.

The ones responsible are the powerful hardliners, who dominate the judiciary, security forces and legislative oversight bodies.

Reformists fear that unless they can restore confidence among voters, next February's parliamentary elections could see a catastrophically low turnout of the kind seen during this year's municipal polls - which were won by conservatives.

http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_1401506,00.html
21 posted on 08/15/2003 12:12:44 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: AdmSmith
The black turbans' 'counterrevolution'

By Mustafa El-Labbad
Aug 15, 2003

The Iranian regime faces a challenge from new quarters. In an unexpected outburst, Hussein Khomeini, grandson of Ayatollah Khomeini, the founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran, lashed out against the ruling theocracy

Hussein Khomeini has added fuel to an already fiery domestic situation in Iran, with his vehement attack on the "rule of the clerics", the underlying principle of government in Iran since shortly after that country's Islamic Revolution in 1979. Moreover, Hussein's words should be assessed with regard of the added weight of the lineage factor in a society and polity in which 90 per cent of the populace are Shi'ite Muslims. Lineage is of fundamental importance to the Shi'ite creed which holds that the nephew of the Prophet Mohamed, Ali, and his descendants had been usurped of their right to inherit the command of the faithful. The Shi'ites have elevated the family and descendants of the Prophet to a position of sacred authority, and, today, among the Shi'ite communities in Iran, Iraq and Lebanon, the Ashraf (descendants of the family of the Prophet) are still distinguishable by their black turbans, as opposed to the white turbans worn by other members of the Shi'ite clergy. The charismatic leader of the Iranian Revolution Ayatollah Rohallah Khomeini, the Spiritual Guide of the Revolution Ali Khameini and the current President of Iran Mohamed Khatemi all wore black turbans.

Hussein Khomeini is the son of Mustafa Khomeini, eldest son of Ayatollah Rohallah Khomeini. In an open letter to Mohamed Khatemi, the Ayatollah's grandson demanded a public referendum allowing the Iranian people to determine the nature of their government. Advocating a secular form of government, he proclaimed that religion must be liberated from the tyranny of the state and warned that the regime had better take heed of the lessons to be learned from the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. Topping this off with another bombshell to the media, he declared that the struggle with Israel was a "fabricated conflict" and of little concern to the Iranian people.

Although the opinions aired by Hussein Khomeini have been frequently voiced by various factions of the Iranian opposition, his genealogy lends them a unique substance and, consequently, makes him a force that may ultimately be more dangerous and demoralising for the regime than any military operations carried out by the Mujahidin Khalq. That it was the Ayatollah's grandson that launched this powerful salvo suggests that the legitimacy of the Iranian regime has begun to crumble as political tensions slowly rise.

Born in Tehran in 1958, Hussein Khomeini fled Iran, then under the rule of Shah Mohamed Riza Pahlevi, in 1965, accompanying his father and grandfather in their exile, first to Turkey and then to Iraq. In the mid-1970s, SAVAK, the Shah's notorious secret service, assassinated Hussein's father in Najaf, Iraq, after which the dissident voice of his grandfather began to have a growing impact on events in Iran. Hussein, during this time, had followed the government educational curriculum in public primary and preparatory schools, after which he was enrolled in a Shi'ite seminary. Before completing his education, he was forced to leave Iraq with his grandfather who had fled to France. Following the victory of the Islamic Revolution, Hussein returned to Iran with his grandfather. At the age of 22 he served in the Iranian armed forces for eight months during the Iran-Iraq war.




The mid-1980s saw the emergence of a new political movement in Iran. The Republican Party, as it was called, acquired increasing sway in Iranian politics and eventually succeeded in moving into key positions in government. The most prominent figures in this movement were Hashemi Rafsanjani and Ali Khamenei, who continue to dominate the power spectrum in Iran today. One effect of the rise of this movement was to curb Khomeini's influence and curtail the prospects of his descendants in sharing or inheriting power. In addition to Ahmed Khomeini, the Ayatollah's second son who was still alive at the time, the contenders also included Hussein and Ahmed's son Hassan. While Hassan Khomeini would appear in official functions, Hussein had chosen to remain a recluse in the Shi'ite holy city of Qum. Upon the succession of Khamenei, following the death of Ayatollah Khomeini, the exclusion of Khomeini's descendants was finalised. Indeed, Ahmed was accorded no honours apart from permission to be buried by his father in the huge mausoleum whose gilded dome can be seen from the rooftops of Tehran, glittering under powerful spotlights at night. Perhaps inspired by the Shi'ites' historically ingrained sense of injustice and by the perceived wrong to the memory of his grandfather, Hassan Khomeini began to harbour a growing opposition to the regime. Although for several years he had been under compulsory detention in his residence in Qum, he has recently fled to Najaf, in Iraq, from where he broke his silence so dramatically this week.

Hussein's rebelliousness is not unique in contemporary Shi'ite societies. To his name, we can add those of such figures as Moqtada Al-Sadr in Iraq and Hassan Nasrallah in Lebanon. In spite of the vast differences in the outlooks of these three figures, they share, in addition to the black turban, a spirit of defiance against traditional Shi'ite leaderships, a relative youthfulness when compared to most Shi'ite spiritual leaders and generally radical politics and attitudes. They also all lack the necessary theological credentials for Shi'ite religious leadership, qualifications which must be acquired through a stringent centuries-old system of education and training.

Moqtada Al-Sadr, heir to the spiritual influence among Iraqi Shi'ites of the Sadr family which traces itself to the Prophet, came into the spotlight following the collapse of the regime of Saddam Hussein. Al- Sadr has capitalised on the frailty of the traditional Shi'ite leadership in Iraq, on the shaken legitimacy of the Iranian Ayatollah Muhsen Al-Hakim who had arrived in Iraq after the fall of Saddam, on Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani's call to keep Shi'ite religious institutions out of politics, and on the fact that his father, Mohamed Baqer Al-Sadr, and uncle, Mohamed Sadeq Al-Sadr, both Shi'ite religious leaders, were assassinated by the former Iraqi regime. Drawing on this political capital, Moqtada Al- Sadr has also appealed to the Iraqi Shi'ites' sense of historical oppression and political exclusion, succeeding in mobilising millions of his coreligionists into taking to the streets to demand their long overdue share in power in Iraq, where Shi'ites constitute the majority of the population.

The Lebanese Hassan Nasrallah led the Lebanese armed resistance against the Israeli occupation. At a time when many Lebanese political leaders were content with small gains and prepared to negotiate with the occupation forces, Nasrallah and his supporters mounted armed operations of great inventiveness and impact. Unable to sustain increasing losses, Israeli forces pulled out of Lebanon, marking their first forced, unconditional retreat in the Arab-Israeli conflict. On the basis of this victory, which gave him his credentials as a freedom fighter, Nasrallah won the support of the most of the Shi'ite community, which makes up a plurality of the diverse Lebanese population. Nasrallah's power is in spite of the presence of Al-Sayyid Fadlallah, the most highly esteemed Lebanese Shi'ite theologian, respected not only in Lebanon but among scholars and intellectuals throughout the Arab world.

In times of severe crisis, radical ideology is prone to gain ascendancy over logic and reason. An ideology operates on three interrelated philosophical levels: a perception of the order of the world, the nature of life and the role of man, or the metaphysical; an evaluation of specific states of affairs, grounding the ideology in the concrete; and an approach or programme for changing that which is imperfect or unacceptable.

The Khomeini ideology, since the success of the Iranian Revolution in 1979, appeared capable of realising the hopes not only of the Iranian people but also of the Shi'ites in Lebanon and Iraq, as well as smaller minorities in the Gulf States. With Khomeini, a perception of the world blended with the politics of the marginalised and discontent which in turn converged with religion as both the source of authority and the solution to create the revolutionary ideology par excellence. Marx has said, "Philosophers understand the world differently, but changing this world is what is important," his implication being that veneration for revolutionary goals had to be given primacy over philosophical and moral hairsplitting if the revolutionary movement is have the impetus and dynamism to effect change. It would seem that this applies to the new black-turbaned revolutionaries in the predominantly Shi'ite areas in the Middle East. However, the transformation which this new generation of radicals is steamrolling by the traditional Shi'ite leadership does not appear to be controlled or well-defined. Indeed, it appears totally unchecked by any social constraints and fuelled purely by the ideology of change, regardless of the form and means.

Recent developments suggest that Shi'ite communities in Iran, Iraq and Lebanon are headed for a new period of revolutionary ideological ferment, not from the radical left, which elsewhere in the world has generally been associated with the term "revolutionary", but from the centre of Shi'ite society, and targeting the traditional religious institutions and leaderships that once held that society together. The problem the Iranian regime has with Hussein Khomeini is that the ideology the Islamic Revolution had formerly used against its intellectual adversaries has, in the hands of Ayatollah Rohallah's grandson, been turned into a weapon against the "revolutionary state". Suddenly the winds of change have shifted direction; they are not coming from pro-royalists or left-wing Marxists who could always be branded as foreign proxies. Rather, they are coming from the core of one of the major pillars of revolutionary legitimacy: the Khomeini line. The black turban revolution is imbuing the Shi'ite masses in Iran with a new radicalism and mustering this energy against, not the civil, but the religious establishment.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1765.shtml
22 posted on 08/15/2003 12:45:21 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
The black turbans' 'counterrevolution'

By Mustafa El-Labbad
Aug 15, 2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/964465/posts?page=22#22

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
23 posted on 08/15/2003 12:46:48 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: AdmSmith
Adding fuel to the fire?

Thank you.

"Mortazavi allegedly accused Khoshvagt (who is in charge of issuing press visas to foreigners) of issuing one to a spy."

And she was supposedly spying on what? Military secrets?
Their nuclear weapons plant? NO. A crowded prison. Well, I don't think a SPY is going to go taking pictures of a prison to learn the latest technological advances that the Iranian military has to offer. So much for the "SPY" label.
24 posted on 08/15/2003 1:10:06 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
They have to try to justify their murder of her.
25 posted on 08/15/2003 1:38:28 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
They needed to try to come up with something more original than that.
26 posted on 08/15/2003 1:51:16 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
"Iran is to get a second nuclear reactor..."

They are just beggin' for it!

27 posted on 08/15/2003 2:17:49 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 (Two fish are in a tank. One says to the other ---"I'll man the guns, You drive")
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To: DoctorZIn
Thanks, Dr.Z, for all of the articles!
28 posted on 08/15/2003 3:06:23 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 (Two fish are in a tank. One says to the other ---"I'll man the guns, You drive")
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To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; dixiechick2000; Valin; McGavin999; AdmSmith; Eala; Texas_Dawg
Al-Qaeda 'hates Iran as much as it hates the US'

August 14, 2003

The al-Qaeda terrorist network hates Iran as much as it hates the United States, Iranian President Mohammed Khatami said yesterday.

"Whenever we find al-Qaeda members, we arrest them and the group has as much hatred and enmity to Iran as it does to the US," Mr Khatami was quoted by the news agency IRNA as saying.

He reiterated that all al-Qaeda members whose nationality could be verified would be extradited. The others were to be tried inside Iran.

He said there was no deal with the US over the prisoners, rejecting press reports that Washington and Tehran were in contact about swapping the al-Qaeda suspects for members of the Iranian rebel group People's Mujaheddin, which used to be based in Iraq before the fall of Saddam Hussein.

Mr Khatami did not disclose the identity of the al-Qaeda members detained in Iran, citing security reasons.

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/08/13/1060588457819.html
29 posted on 08/15/2003 10:20:08 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; nuconvert; Valin; Tamsey; BeforeISleep; ...
Majlis' approval of bill allowing Iran to join convention banning discrimination against women a mistake of MPs

Tehran, Aug 15, IRNA -- Interim Friday Prayer Leader of Tehran
Ayatollah Mohammad Emami Kashani said here that the approval by Majlis
of a law that would pave the way for Iran to join the Convention
Banning Discrimination Against Women was due to the MPs' lack of
familiarity with the subject.
Speaking to thousands of pious worshipers at the central campus of
Tehran University, the prominent alim added: "I heard President
(Khatami's) cabinet was opposed to the idea of presenting the bill to
parliament from the very beginning."
"But all the same," added Kashani, "had the people's
representatives been careful enough in tackling the various dimensions
of that bill, the resulting decision would not have been made."
He added: "The articles in that convention include phrases that
would render the attachment of any condition to its acceptance quite
meaningless."
Judging the convention to be unIslamic and against the rules of
humanity, the Friday prayer leader said: "Yielding to the articles of
that convention would be tantamount to ignoring the rules of justice
and humanity as far as relations between the two sexes are concerned.
Ths would not only endanger Islam but mankind as a whole, particularly
the "foundation of families."

http://www.irna.ir/en/hphoto/0308140000-0.ehp.shtml
30 posted on 08/15/2003 10:55:32 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
Hassan and Hussein Khomeini: Family Feud.
31 posted on 08/15/2003 11:05:38 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn; Texas_Dawg; McGavin999; Eala; happygrl; risk; ewing; norton; piasa; Valin; pcx99; ...
GEOSTRATEGY-DIRECT INTELLIGENCE BRIEF
Al-Qaida affiliates
pouring into Iraq
Ansar al-Islam fighters entering country through Iran

Posted: August 16, 2003
1:00 a.m. Eastern

© 2003 WorldNetDaily.com

Members of terror group Ansar al-Islam have been returning to Iraq from Iran, joining the hundreds of fighters based in the northern part of the country and near Baghdad, U.S. officials said.

The U.S. military suspects that Ansar carried out the bombing of the Jordanian embassy in Baghdad on Aug. 7. Eleven people were killed in the truck bombing.

Before the U.S.-led war in Iraq, Ansar insurgents were aided by Iran, which facilitated the flow of combatants into northern Iraq.

The United States has warned Iran several times to end its aid to Ansar and other insurgents in Iraq.

The U.S. military has observed an increase in the flow of al-Qaida-aligned insurgents into Iraq. These insurgents have come from Saudi Arabia and Syria, officials said.

"The one organization that we have confidence, that we know is in Iraq and in the Baghdad area, is Ansar al-Islam," said Lt. Gen. Norton Schwartz, operations director of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. "It is unknown whether this particular organization was associated with the events . . . But that is an al-Qaida related organization, and one we are focusing attention on."

"Ansar al-Islam, which was in Iraq before the war, is in Iraq now, [and] is a potential threat," said Gen. Richard Myers, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff. "Some of those individuals have been captured in Baghdad and other parts of the country [and] are being interrogated. So, for at least in the near term, they are going to be a potential threat that we're going to have to deal with."

Last month, officials said, the military detected an enclave of foreign insurgents located near Baghdad. The military killed many of the foreign combatants.

"There was an enclave of foreign fighters that were somewhere west of Baghdad, about two-thirds of the way to the border in tents in a camp – encampment that fought very fiercely," Myers said. "But all 75 to 80 of them were killed in that engagement. They were all foreign fighters. So, no one, I don't think, believes that there is not continued infiltration, potentially, of foreign fighters into that country."

Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said Iran continues to serve as a haven for senior al-Qaida members. He dismissed the prospect that Tehran would extradite al-Qaida fugitives to the United States.

"With respect to Iran, it is correct that there have been and are today senior al-Qaida in Iran," Rumsfeld said. "To the extent they would be handed over to us, it would be excellent. The chances of that happening, apparently, are about zero."

http://worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=34118
32 posted on 08/15/2003 11:13:12 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: AdmSmith; McGavin999; Eala; dixiechick2000; nuconvert; Valin; Tamsey; BeforeISleep; risk; ewing; ...
Osama's son in Iran: Report

http://www.rediff.com/us/2003/aug/13attack.htm
33 posted on 08/15/2003 11:15:28 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
That's what I've been saying since this thing started. The Iraqis came up to speed on terror tactic too fast for it to be a normal learning curve.

We're losing an opportunity by not making the Iraqis aware that they are being invaded by foreigners and they aren't Americans.

34 posted on 08/15/2003 11:18:12 PM PDT by McGavin999
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To: McGavin999
Yes, I think Iranians are afraid of a stabilized Iraq.
Once Iraq become silent, Iranians wont be silent.
That is why Iranian Mullahs are scared and sending troops into Iraq to make the situation hard for us.
35 posted on 08/15/2003 11:23:32 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
Perhaps they are more afraid that Najaf will take over Qum as the center of Shi'ite interpretation.
36 posted on 08/15/2003 11:38:25 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: AdmSmith
Not really of that, but because Iranian People will see the freedom Americans brought to Iraqis and they wont stay silent.
37 posted on 08/15/2003 11:41:07 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
BREAD PRICES IN IRAN APPEAR STABLE.
State bakeries are paying 40 rials (1/2 cents, or $0.005) for 1 kilogram of flour, "Entekhab" reported on 14 August. "Entekhab" reported that the government decided that bakeshops will keep their prices at the same level as in the previous year (1381). State radio reported on 13 August that the bakeries will get electricity, water, and gas at the previous year's prices, too. According to "Iran" newspaper on 9 August, several meetings were held recently at the Commerce Ministry to discuss this issue and even a minimal increase in the bread price was rejected. Some of the possible price increase would have offset a rise in employees' wages, but even this was rejected. Bread is a major staple for Iranians, and the government subsidizes bread prices. BS

COST OF A CHICKEN IN EVERY POT FALLS IN IRAN. Mohammad Fayaz, director of the Tehran municipal organization of fresh fruit and vegetable merchants (Sazeman-i Miyadin Miveh va Tarehbar-i Shahrdari-i Tehran), said the price of chicken will be reduced from 18,000 rials ($2.25) to 12,750 rials ($1.60) per kilogram, "Entekhab" reported on 14 August. BS

Comment: Subsidized bread is the path to economic disaster.
38 posted on 08/15/2003 11:45:05 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: AdmSmith
Sorry, the source was RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 7, No. 155, Part III, 15 August 2003
39 posted on 08/15/2003 11:47:25 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: AdmSmith
Thanks for the info, but as far as I know, they have been doing like that since fall of the late Shah.
40 posted on 08/15/2003 11:53:36 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- August 16, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 8.15.2003 | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”


41 posted on 08/16/2003 12:05:44 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: F14 Pilot
Yes the same crazy thing as in Egypt it is cheaper to feed the livestock with bread than to give them grain.
42 posted on 08/16/2003 1:24:37 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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