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Super flawless diamonds now made by machines
Worldnetdaily ^ | 08/18/03 | Staff Writer

Posted on 08/18/2003 9:12:19 AM PDT by bedolido

Setback for jewel industry is good news for high-tech

Two companies are manufacturing gem-quality diamonds that may break the DeBeers cartel and set off a high-tech craze for diamond chips much heartier than silicon, reports Wired Magazine's September issue.

The diamonds are flawless and can fool even the most expert of gemologists.

The natural conditions that produce diamonds have long been understood – put pure carbon under enough heat and pressure and it will crystallize into the hardest material known. But evolutionists have suggested it would require millions of years to reproduce the precise set of circumstances. Some have suggested the earth's diamonds were produced deep in the planet's mantle some 3.3 billion years ago.

While replicating the conditions in a lab isn't easy, many have tried. Since the mid-19th century, Wired reports, dozens of these modern alchemists have been injured in accidents and explosions while attempting to manufacture diamonds. Starting in the 1950s, engineers managed to produce tiny crystals for industrial purposes – to coat saws, drill bits and grinding wheels.

"But this summer, the first wave of gem-quality manufactured diamonds began to hit the market," the magazine reports. "They are grown in a warehouse in Florida by a roomful of Russian-designed machines spitting out 3-carat roughs 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A second company, in Boston, has perfected a completely different process for making near-flawless diamonds and plans to begin marketing them by year's end. This sudden arrival of mass-produced gems threatens to alter the public's perception of diamonds – and to transform the $7 billion industry. More intriguing, it opens the door to the development of diamond-based semiconductors."

Diamond is not only the hardest substance known, it also has the highest thermal conductivity.

"Today's speedy microprocessors run hot – at upwards of 200 degrees Fahrenheit," says the report. "In fact, they can't go much faster without failing. Diamond microchips, on the other hand, could handle much higher temperatures, allowing them to run at speeds that would liquefy ordinary silicon. But manufacturers have been loath even to consider using the precious material, because it has never been possible to produce large diamond wafers affordably. With the arrival of Gemesis, the Florida-based company, and Apollo Diamond, in Boston, that is changing. Both startups plan to use the diamond jewelry business to finance their attempt to reshape the semiconducting world."

The sudden appearance of multi-carat, gem-quality synthetics has sent the DeBeers diamond cartel scrambling. Several years ago, it set up what it calls the Gem Defensive Program – a campaign to warn jewelers and the public about the arrival of manufactured diamonds. At no charge, the company is supplying gem labs with sophisticated machines designed to help distinguish man-made from mined stones.

"I was in combat in Korea and 'Nam," says Gemesis founder Carter Clarke. "You better believe that I can handle the diamond business." His company has 27 diamond-making machines up and running – with 250 planned – at his factory outside Sarasota, Fla.

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TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; US: Florida
KEYWORDS: blingbling; debeers; diamonds; flawless; machines; made; now; super
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Yellow diamonds manufactured by Gemesis, the first company to market gem-quality synthetic stones. The largest grow to 3 carats.

1 posted on 08/18/2003 9:12:20 AM PDT by bedolido
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To: bedolido
Wonder how these dealies compare with moissanite?
2 posted on 08/18/2003 9:14:03 AM PDT by mewzilla
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To: bedolido
But evolutionists have suggested it would require millions of years to reproduce the precise set of circumstances.

What a stupid thing for this article to say.

3 posted on 08/18/2003 9:16:00 AM PDT by Sloth ("I feel like I'm taking crazy pills!" -- Jacobim Mugatu, 'Zoolander')
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To: bedolido
I wonder what's holding up synthetic crude?
4 posted on 08/18/2003 9:18:27 AM PDT by norraad
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To: bedolido
WND may have pulled this article from the current WIRED magazine. It was a really interesting article. One of the two technologies used to produce these diamonds is being developed by the guy who really bought gallium arsenide chips to market 10 or so years ago.

The plan is to sell gem quality diamonds (produced for a few dollars each) at about half price to DeBeers diamonds current price, so they can raise money for the chip building use. The article said that Intel had no current interest, as they have spent so much on silicon. A lot of money and business could swing on this new technology.

5 posted on 08/18/2003 9:22:12 AM PDT by NorthGA
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To: mewzilla
Wonder how these dealies compare with moissanite?

Moissanite is silicon carbide, with a Moh Hardness of 9.6. It is a good simulant, but not the "Real Thing".

Years ago, the blue LED was a kind of Holy Grail..If only someone could make one, with the red and green LED's available, RGB large monitors could be made! Cree Research was able to grow pure silicon carbide, which had the appropriate photonic bandgap for making blue LED's. It did not take them long to spin out another company to grow the gem material. There really is a mineral called "Moissanite", naturally-occurring SiC crystals found in meteorites.

So those huge color displays at stadiums, Disney World, etc, when viewed up close, have arrays of red, green, and blue LEDs, like the pixels in your monitor, and are, in a way, responsible for the Moissanite industry.

But there is nothing like diamond, whether from the ground or from a reactor.

6 posted on 08/18/2003 9:22:29 AM PDT by Gorzaloon (Contents may have settled during shipping, but this tagline contains the stated product weight.)
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To: bedolido
The diamonds are flawless and can fool even the most expert of gemologists.

Fool?? What does this idiot author mean by "fool"?

What an assinine statement. Diamonds are diamonds; I'll take cheap flawless ones over expensive flawed ones any day of the week.

7 posted on 08/18/2003 9:22:40 AM PDT by balrog666 (Ignorance never settles a question. -Benjamin Disraeli)
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To: bedolido
"Then there's Bryant Linares, president of Apollo Diamond, a Boston company that uses a chemical vapor process to grow a single-crystal diamond. The price per carat? $5."

http://www.nypost.com/business/2612.htm
8 posted on 08/18/2003 9:22:51 AM PDT by Roscoe
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To: bedolido
This is great news! Diamonds are Death. As long as diamonds retain their value, there will be a black market for it. And that means suffering and death in Africa.

De Beers maintains the high price of diamonds artificially by restricting availability, and their certification program does nothing to eradicate the black market or to ameliorate the suffering the black market causes.

Diamonds must lose their value.

9 posted on 08/18/2003 9:24:43 AM PDT by etcetera
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To: Gorzaloon
I've seen some moissanite, and the dispersion was actually pretty good. Considering the diff in price, I'd be happy with the moissanite. But then I've never thought that diamonds are a girl's best friend :)
10 posted on 08/18/2003 9:27:15 AM PDT by mewzilla
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To: norraad
Completion of the plants to produce refined pertroleum prducts from garbage including recycled tires is not that far off.
11 posted on 08/18/2003 9:28:14 AM PDT by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: balrog666
Diamonds are diamonds

Seems like, from discussion with an actual jeweler many years ago, that flawless natural diamonds are the exception. If someone turned up with a tray of flawless gem diamonds, one should assume they are all manmade. Natural diamonds have various inclusions and other defects, and color varies from one stone to the next.

12 posted on 08/18/2003 9:28:16 AM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the Law of the Excluded Middle)
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To: etcetera
Don't forget WWII my friend,

America wanted the DeBeers to maintain a diamond stockpile within the continental US of A to use for the machining requirements of the war effort, and they politely declined.

They wanted no stockpiles outside of S.A.

Thank goodness we now have Canadian diamond mines too.

13 posted on 08/18/2003 9:31:48 AM PDT by Sundog (Cheers.)
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To: RightWhale
Well if Intel won't jump on this, I hope AMD does. I can't wait for a 100 or 200 gigahertz machine.
14 posted on 08/18/2003 9:31:59 AM PDT by BushCountry (To the last, I will grapple with Democrats. For hate's sake, I spit my last breath at Liberals.)
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To: RightWhale
I guess "test tube babies" are not real babies?
15 posted on 08/18/2003 9:32:36 AM PDT by LetsRok
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To: RightWhale
Seems like, from discussion with an actual jeweler many years ago, that flawless natural diamonds are the exception. If someone turned up with a tray of flawless gem diamonds, one should assume they are all manmade. Natural diamonds have various inclusions and other defects, and color varies from one stone to the next.

True, but nobody requests inclusions and colors can be manufactured, so the top of the market will soon be dead. Where will that leave the bottom?

16 posted on 08/18/2003 9:34:51 AM PDT by balrog666 (Ignorance never settles a question. -Benjamin Disraeli)
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To: BushCountry
& it's a laptop to boot!
17 posted on 08/18/2003 9:36:01 AM PDT by norraad
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To: LetsRok
What's her name, and maybe it is best to not remember her name because she is a private person, the first in vitro baby, is now 25. Social problems due to that status seem to be minimal, which ought to be a relief. Comparison to jewelry might be apt or not depending on intent and context.
18 posted on 08/18/2003 9:37:49 AM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the Law of the Excluded Middle)
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To: bedolido
So now what will women expect from men? I mean, despite what they may claim, it is the extreme expense of diamonds that make women want them so much (yeah, they're pretty, but that isn't why most women want a big diamond). If they can be gotten cheaply, then they're really not much of an indication of how much the man cares for them, now are they?

So, I wonder what will replace the diamond as the ultimate token of devotion?

19 posted on 08/18/2003 9:39:07 AM PDT by Sicon
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To: Sicon
Land?
20 posted on 08/18/2003 9:39:58 AM PDT by BushCountry (To the last, I will grapple with Democrats. For hate's sake, I spit my last breath at Liberals.)
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To: balrog666
How is a star sports figure to atone for his transgressions when he can't buy a $4 million stone for his spouse because all diamonds now cost $1 a carat?
21 posted on 08/18/2003 9:40:23 AM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the Law of the Excluded Middle)
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To: Sicon
So, I wonder what will replace the diamond as the ultimate token of devotion?

Sheetrock (sorry, inside joke). :)

22 posted on 08/18/2003 9:40:38 AM PDT by najida (What handbasket? And where did you say we were going?)
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To: Sicon
...token of devotion?

Somehow that sounds oximoronic to me.

<.who you callin' a moron!

23 posted on 08/18/2003 9:41:30 AM PDT by norraad
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To: Sicon
So, I wonder what will replace the diamond as the ultimate token of devotion?

A house?

24 posted on 08/18/2003 9:41:31 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: balrog666
What an assinine statement. Diamonds are diamonds; I'll take cheap flawless ones over expensive flawed ones any day of the week.

But unless 2 or 3 child soldiers die, how will your wife know that you truly love her?

25 posted on 08/18/2003 9:41:39 AM PDT by AdamSelene235 (Like all the jolly good fellows, I drink my whiskey clear....)
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To: RightWhale
Of course you are right, and flawless diamonds are supposed to be manufactured with something that makes them fluoresce slightly so they can be quickly detected. There is nothing illegal about not doing so, and there are apparently more ways coming on line to manufacture them. De Beers want it to be illegal tho...

My daughter has a 100+ carat clunker left over from a drill manufacturing step where it came out 3/10,000" off spec, but it isn't clear.
26 posted on 08/18/2003 9:41:39 AM PDT by Sundog (Cheers.)
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To: etcetera
You must have read "Blood Diamonds."

It will be interesting to see how this pans out ... of course, "flawless" is not the biggest thing in how a diamond looks. A diamond with inclusions that's at the top of the color scale will look nicer than a "flawless" one of a lesser color.
27 posted on 08/18/2003 9:41:54 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Out of touch with trends since 1966.)
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To: bedolido
This sudden arrival of mass-produced gems threatens to alter the public's perception of diamonds – and to transform the $7 billion industry.

Diamonds: aluminum for the 21st Century?

28 posted on 08/18/2003 9:43:04 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: bedolido
Kobe Bryant must be very saddened by this information.
29 posted on 08/18/2003 9:43:25 AM PDT by COUNTrecount
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To: mewzilla
Wonder how these dealies compare with moissanite?

They blow moissanite away. They are REAL flawless diamonds. I sent an email out to that company as a curiousity and they are making yellow, flawless diamonds. They will also be making blue ones in the future.

Text of the email I got back from them.

Thank you for your interest in our beautiful canary yellow cultured diamonds. We have not yet rolled out our retailer network. We plan on being in 6 to 8 locations by this holiday season. Until we establish our network of resellers, we are selling direct and through our Internet partners. You might contact your local jeweler and request that they contact our sale department. If you would like to look at some stones on-line, please visit our web site www.gemesis.com or visit Takara at www.takaradiamond.com. Although we do not sell directly through our site, you can call us or e-mail us with specific information regarding what size, color and cut you are interested in and we can help you choose your cultured diamond.
We currently have most cuts in size range between 0.2 and 1.5 carats. Our prices range from $1750 per carat for smaller stones up to $3250 per carat for VS quality fancy yellow diamonds over one carat. We do have some good discounts on some of our stones as this is our initial introduction to the market. Our larger sizes are moving fast due to the tremendous amount of interest that the recent publicity has generated for us, so please let us know what type of stone you are interested in. Again, I appreciate your interest in Gemesis Cultured Diamonds. Please call us at 941 907-9889 if we can answer any questions for you.
Best regards,
B. Davidson
Product Director
The Gemensis Corporation

Hope it helps drive DeBeers into the ground.

30 posted on 08/18/2003 9:43:28 AM PDT by Centurion2000 (We are crushing our enemies, seeing him driven before us and hearing the lamentations of the liberal)
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To: AdamSelene235
...oooh, 'dat a gut'one!
31 posted on 08/18/2003 9:43:40 AM PDT by norraad
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To: dfwgator
So, I wonder what will replace the diamond as the ultimate token of devotion?

Fidelity?

32 posted on 08/18/2003 9:43:51 AM PDT by mewzilla (I'm so old-fashioned.)
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To: Tax-chick
Shouldn't it be possible to make diamonds with just about any color desired? That would be cool, a diamond rainbow.
33 posted on 08/18/2003 9:44:01 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck
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To: COUNTrecount
Stupid is as stupid does.
34 posted on 08/18/2003 9:44:45 AM PDT by norraad
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To: bedolido
If you want facts, not fantasy, check out this link to the top jewelry/diamond publication in the U.S.:

http://www.jckgroup.com/index.asp?layout=article&articleid=CA317139&industry=Gemstones+and+Pearls&industryid=704&webzine=jck&publication=jck

This is the third thread on this subject I'm aware of, by the way.

35 posted on 08/18/2003 9:45:21 AM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: NorthGA
If they get the process's cost down low enough, and can produce large diamonds in pre-determined shapes, diamond parts could replace steel parts in certain applications requiring high-hardness.

Imagine having a diamond chef's knife whose edge was atomicly-sharp, and would never need honing

36 posted on 08/18/2003 9:46:41 AM PDT by SauronOfMordor (Java/C++/Unix/Web Developer === needs a job at the moment)
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To: Sloth
The actual "Wired" article fails to mention "evolutionists." This is a re-write by WorldNetDaily. Perhaps the figure that all scientists are evolutionists. Or perhaps they are just share the general scientific ignorance that the rest of journalism exhibits.
37 posted on 08/18/2003 9:47:55 AM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: bedolido
OK already yet.

I want a cobalt blue one as a free sample.

Have never liked plain diamonds that much.
38 posted on 08/18/2003 9:49:31 AM PDT by Quix (DEFEAT her unroyal lowness, her hideous heinous Bwitch Shrillery Antoinette de Fosterizer de MarxNOW)
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To: etcetera
As long as diamonds retain their value, there will be a black market for it. And that means suffering and death in Africa.

The business fuels organized crime around the world. The diamond dealer busted in NYC last week for financing the sale of shoulder held missiles to take down U.S. aircraft is just one very small example.

39 posted on 08/18/2003 9:49:36 AM PDT by DPB101
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To: mewzilla
So, I wonder what will replace the diamond as the ultimate token of devotion?

Fidelity?

Household help!

40 posted on 08/18/2003 9:49:41 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Out of touch with trends since 1966.)
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To: r9etb
Diamonds: aluminum for the 21st Century?

No rusty aluminum is sapphire & ruby.

41 posted on 08/18/2003 9:51:21 AM PDT by AdamSelene235 (Like all the jolly good fellows, I drink my whiskey clear....)
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To: Tax-chick
I'm blessed :) I get both from Mr. Mew!
42 posted on 08/18/2003 9:52:31 AM PDT by mewzilla
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Shouldn't it be possible to make diamonds with just about any color desired? That would be cool, a diamond rainbow.

Post 30 says they're only doing yellow and blue so far. That doesn't mean they couldn't make top-quality white diamonds, of course ... maybe they can't, or maybe they're not ready for that market yet.

43 posted on 08/18/2003 9:53:21 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Out of touch with trends since 1966.)
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To: bedolido
I saw a documentary years ago on how Debeers controls the diamond market. In it it said General Electric perfected a technique like this and Debeers somehow paid them off. The diamond market has continued. The amount of control Debeers has has slipped but it's still there. Diamonds aren't rare but Debeers has done a wonderful job making the public think they are. I suppose cubic zirconia can be differentiated from diamonds but I think most lay people couldn't tell the difference on first glance. These "real" diamonds should be fun to have soon if this pans out.
44 posted on 08/18/2003 9:55:14 AM PDT by xp38
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To: xp38
It's been illegal to sell (unlabeled only?) artificial gems since 1929. On the other hand, diamond drills are useful.
45 posted on 08/18/2003 9:57:14 AM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: etcetera
Diamonds are death. DeBeers does maintain the artificial value line through carefully meted out product. And, the western media, led by the NYT is complicit in this bloody business through its repetive op-ed clarion for crack down on the "illegal" diamond trade. Illegal means anything outside the control of the SA/Israel/Amsterdam/47thSt cartel.
46 posted on 08/18/2003 9:57:29 AM PDT by wtc911
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To: AdamSelene235
No rusty aluminum is sapphire & ruby.

Actually, part of my original comment mysteriously disappeared.

Did you know that the tip of the Washington Monument is a 100-Oz aluminum pyramid? Back in the 19th century, aluminum was extremely rare, as they hadn't yet discovered the modern electrical smelting techniques that make it a disposable metal.

47 posted on 08/18/2003 9:57:55 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: bedolido
America grabs another industry... let China manufacture styraphome cups.
48 posted on 08/18/2003 9:59:43 AM PDT by Porterville (I hate anything and anyone that would attack the things that I love...)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Shouldn't it be possible to make diamonds with just about any color desired? That would be cool, a diamond rainbow.

They already do. I've seen Russian synthetics in red, blue, green, white and other colors/shades. In addition the colors of certain natural diamonds can be altered by zapping them with nuclear radiation or high pressure-high temperature (HPHT) techniques...that's where all those colored diamonds they sell on the shopping TV channels come from. A good number of "brownies" that range from dark brown to light as well as into the "fancy" champagne, yellow and orange colors occur naturally in Australia. They're marketed in the U.S. by Argylle Diamonds.

Most "black" diamonds which are so popular now are nuked. Beautiful pink and red diamonds are found naturally in Australia and elsewhere, and are among the earth's rarest and most valuable treasures.

49 posted on 08/18/2003 10:00:21 AM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: balrog666; RightWhale
Small, included, off-color fakes have been a lucrative business. Easier to pass off fakes in that market.
50 posted on 08/18/2003 10:00:37 AM PDT by DPB101
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