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Survey: few men, minorities seek teaching careers
Houston Chronicle ^ | August 28, 2003 | Ben Feller

Posted on 08/28/2003 3:16:03 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

The NEA report, the "Status of the American Public School Teacher," aims to help education groups shape their agendas and mold the country's image of teachers. Updated every five years, the report draws its latest findings from the 2000-01 school year. The NEA and others are pursuing ways to improve diversity, such as trying to improve college access for minorities and encouraging classroom aides to get teacher certifications.

WASHINGTON -- Know anyone having trouble finding a man? Add public school leaders to the list.

Only two out of 10 teachers in America's classrooms are men, the lowest figure in 40 years, according to a National Education Association survey. Just one in 10 teachers is a minority, another sign that teachers have far less diversity than the people they educate.

About half of students are male and almost 40 percent are minorities, according to government figures. The lopsided representation of whites and females in teaching is troubling, NEA President Reg Weaver said, because it denies students a range of role models.

So what makes teaching less attractive to men and minorities? A mix of factors, but mainly the fact that it's easier to earn more money with less stress in other fields, says the NEA, the nation's largest union with more than 2.7 million teachers and other members.

"It takes so many years to finally get a salary that is high enough to support a family," said Edward Kelley, a teacher at A.B. Combs Elementary in Raleigh, N.C. A nationally board certified teacher with a master's degree, Kelley makes a salary of $65,000 in his 30th year.

"Young people are going to look at that and say, 'I want a house and a car, what's the fastest way to do it?' Teaching is not the way to do it, unfortunately," Kelley said.

The average contract salary for teachers in 2001 was $43,262.

Kelley, who spent years in Maine before starting in North Carolina this year, finds himself in a group with one of the smallest shares of men. Only 9 percent of elementary school teachers are men, and the Southeast has the lowest share of male teachers, 14 percent.

The NEA report, the "Status of the American Public School Teacher," aims to help education groups shape their agendas and mold the country's image of teachers. Updated every five years, the report draws its latest findings from the 2000-01 school year.

The NEA and others are pursuing ways to improve diversity, such as trying to improve college access for minorities and encouraging classroom aides to get teacher certifications.

Male teachers made up about one-third of the teaching force in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, but their numbers slid through the 1990s and hit the low of 21 percent in 2001.

Whites have accounted for about 90 percent of all teachers for the past three decades, including in 2001. Six percent of teachers were black, a number on the decline.

Five percent of teachers said they were Hispanic.

Overall, students are most likely to be taught by a 15-year veteran with a growing workload and slightly eroding interest in staying in teaching, the work force portrait shows.

From the union's perspective, the findings show the effort teachers give to their jobs.

Teachers said they typically spent 50 hours a week on their duties and put up $443 of their own money to help students during the school year. Fifty-seven percent hold at least a master's degree, and 77 percent took courses through their school districts during the year.

Six in 10 teachers said they would choose teaching again if they could go back to their college days and start over, but that number dipped in 2001 after rising steadily since 1981.

Virginia Beauchamp is one of those who has started over with teaching. She returned to the classroom a few years ago after 25 years in teaching and nine more in private industry.

"I love the art of convincing and explaining. That's a big part of teaching," said Beauchamp, a social studies teacher at Nicholas Orem Middle School in Hyattsville, Md. "I enjoy seeing kids accomplish."

Teachers face rising expectations. Federal law requires that every teacher of a core academic subject must be highly qualified by the end of the 2005-06 school year. That includes a provision that teachers must prove their competence in every subject they teach.

The survey results, based on responses from a nationally representative sample of 1,467 teachers, have a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.

On the Internet: National Education Association: www.nea.org


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: education; males; teachers
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
With only 20% of the teachers men, it shows why schools are out of control. Some students need the back of the hand before you hand them a book.
21 posted on 08/28/2003 6:40:53 AM PDT by sergeantdave
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To: ladylib
If he wants to improve it, he can't under current conditions.
22 posted on 08/28/2003 7:12:26 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: knarf
The root to communication is ... COMMON.

And makes us cohesive as a country.

23 posted on 08/28/2003 7:13:22 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
"Kelley spent a year in Maine..." See how desperate we are in NC? We're importing Yankee teachers to fill slots!
Seriously, I attended a traditional teacher's college for my math degree, maintained a straight-A average, and the pressure to enter the education department was intense. I got visits from the Dean between classes, letters, and phone calls at home from instructors in that department. I wasn't there to become a teacher, so I didn't bite, but it wasn't for their trying.
24 posted on 08/28/2003 8:16:14 AM PDT by warchild9
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To: bimbo
If you attempt to tell these teachers how well paid they actually are, based on a mandated 182 day a year plate compared to the 235/240 day a year for the average working stiff (average teacher salaries exceed fifty thousand in Penna.)it goes in one ear and out the other...I say "I work 235 days a year for X amount;you work 182 days and make Y amount, which exceeds X (yet requires no more educational level) and I receive a shrug and "that's your problem, buddy,"...Ann Coulter said it best, something to the effect now that teachers make more and work less than most others, maybe we can stop treating them like Mother Teresa washing the feet of the Calcutta poor...
25 posted on 08/28/2003 8:30:47 AM PDT by IrishBrigade
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To: warchild9
Thanks for more insight.

Bump!

26 posted on 08/29/2003 3:07:05 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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