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Vouchers will help public schools - Fear loss of MONEY - But what of “for the children?”
Christian Science Monitor ^ | August 28, 2003 | Jay P. Greene and Marcus A. Winters

Posted on 08/28/2003 3:57:29 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

The study found that public schools whose students were eligible for vouchers made significantly larger test-score gains than other public schools in the state. Even public schools that had only one failing grade but faced the threat of vouchers if they failed again made exceptional improvements. Similar low-scoring schools that did not face the prospect of voucher competition, however, did not make similar gains. In Florida, vouchers have provided public schools with powerful incentives to improve. If schools don't improve, they stand to lose students - and the funding they generate - to other schools.

WASHINGTON - Few question whether school vouchers are beneficial for the students who use them to leave failing schools. Rather, the debate has focused on the effect vouchers will have on public schools.

Opponents contend that vouchers will drain resources and talent from public schools, hindering their ability to improve. Proponents argue that the need to attract and retain students will provide public schools with an incentive to improve.

This debate will only intensify as more states look toward vouchers as a means to improve the education provided to their children. Colorado recently passed a pilot voucher program, and similar programs have been debated in Texas, Louisiana, and Washington, D.C.

Both opponents and proponents make plausible arguments, but such an important policy decision should not be based only on convincing rhetoric. Examining the experiences of other communities with voucher programs can show whether expanded choice and competition leads to public-school improvement. A new study by the Manhattan Institute provides valuable evidence that vouchers do work to improve education provided by public schools.

The study examined one of the nation's most important voucher programs - a Florida program that offers vouchers to students in any public school that receives two failing grades in a four-year period. The study found that public schools whose students were eligible for vouchers made significantly larger test-score gains than other public schools in the state. Even public schools that had only one failing grade but faced the threat of vouchers if they failed again made exceptional improvements. Similar low-scoring schools that did not face the prospect of voucher competition, however, did not make similar gains.

In Florida, vouchers have provided public schools with powerful incentives to improve. If schools don't improve, they stand to lose students - and the funding they generate - to other schools.

These results in Florida echo those of other studies, including an analysis of the nation's largest voucher program in Milwaukee by Harvard University's Caroline Hoxby, showing that competition improves public schools.

In fact, no study has ever proven that vouchers harm public-school student achievement. Vouchers may place public-school resources in jeopardy, but that is a different issue. It stands to reason that making public schools earn their resources ensures that public-school students will be better served overall.

Of course, public schools need sufficient resources to do their job well. But when public schools are ensured ever-larger sums of money regardless of student performance, we are likely to end up with schools that fail to educate while costing taxpayers dearly.

Fixing our nation's public schools requires real reform to the education system. Lavishing ever-larger sums of money on public schools alone hasn't worked. Schools also need incentives to use that money effectively.

• Jay P. Greene is a senior fellow and Marcus A. Winters is a research associate at the Manhattan Institute's Education Research Office


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: education; testing; vouchers
Survey: few men, minorities seek teaching careers***The NEA report, the "Status of the American Public School Teacher," aims to help education groups shape their agendas and mold the country's image of teachers. Updated every five years, the report draws its latest findings from the 2000-01 school year. The NEA and others are pursuing ways to improve diversity, such as trying to improve college access for minorities and encouraging classroom aides to get teacher certifications.***
1 posted on 08/28/2003 3:57:30 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
The NEA does not care about education or children. Organizational power is all that matters to them. They will block any action that threatens that power, even if it means making the kids suffer.
2 posted on 08/28/2003 3:59:29 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: samtheman
Yes. The NEA and local teachers' unions it's absorbing, are little more than a wing of the DNC political machine.
3 posted on 08/28/2003 4:06:53 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
This shocking news just in:

Competition can provide motivation to improve service.

.

.

"We have your children... so don't make any trouble."

The NEA.

4 posted on 08/28/2003 4:12:41 AM PDT by tcostell
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To: samtheman
The NEA does not care about education or children.

So true - a few years ago, I saw a TV interview with the guy Clinton had in charge of education. When asked if he thought it was Ok to keep implementing the "alternative" teaching styles, which had a terrible record of not imparting knowledge to students, he said he thought it was also "important for teachers to self-actualize, so yes, it was a good thing to leave these methods in place even if it meant students didn't learn." This was on TV and I never heard any uproar...

5 posted on 08/28/2003 4:13:07 AM PDT by trebb
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To: tcostell
"No child left behind" is very appealing to parents thaqt want government to raise their kids.

I wish there were a national "Leave my kid alone" movement.

6 posted on 08/28/2003 4:17:28 AM PDT by Ed_in_NJ
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Does anybody worry about vouchers being used for Islamic religious schools?
7 posted on 08/28/2003 4:28:44 AM PDT by tkathy
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To: Ed_in_NJ; trebb
If it's plastered on the car it must be true. Unfortunately, grades do not reflect knowledge learned.

Honor Student Stickers

School Bumper Stickers

8 posted on 08/28/2003 4:34:13 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
It stands to reason that making public schools earn their resources ensures that public-school students will be better served overall.
Responsibility and authority must never be seperated. That's another way of saying that you never blame someone for something they didn't have control over.

In the context of schools and other government agencies, money is authority--and nothing less than the possibility of loss of funding can constitute responsibility.

The Democratic Party exists to displace all responsibility onto the scapegoat known as "middle class white men". Naturally such a movement requires southern white male front men such as x42 to succeed electorally. It doesn't look like the Democratic Party has the ability to nominate a southern white male to head their ticket next year--and if not they will undoubtedly lose big.

All the Republican Party must do is stand proudly and adamantly for the middle class as a reality and a realizable universal aspiration against the rich. The Warren Buffet rich, the Pinch Saltzberg rich, and the Jesse Jackson pseudopoor rich.


9 posted on 08/28/2003 4:42:17 AM PDT by conservatism_IS_compassion (The everyday blessings of God are great--they just don't make "good copy.")
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To: tkathy
Does anybody worry about vouchers being used for Islamic religious schools?

Public schools are turning out anti-Ameican kids now. Schools competing with public institutions are being very closely scrutinized because LIBERLS fear a stampede. So I'm sure it would be something that could be monitored. A lot of kids go to Catholic schools who aren't Catholic and who don't convert to Catholicism. Look at Jihad Johnny. After he came to light, it was exposed how public school teachers are teaching Islam and having students dress up and pick out new names. Time to shake-up this fraud called education.

10 posted on 08/28/2003 4:44:08 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
- Fear loss of MONEY - But what of “for the children?”

Pick any school district in the US. When it comes down to "how much" each kid's attendance is worth in funds from the state versus how much knowledge can be imparted to the student, the cash will win out every time, everywhere.

11 posted on 08/28/2003 4:45:09 AM PDT by woofer
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To: conservatism_IS_compassion

Democratic Party

12 posted on 08/28/2003 4:52:32 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: woofer
the cash will win out every time, everywhere.

Students are merely the vehicle to transport it.

13 posted on 08/28/2003 4:53:47 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
I have always understood that many parents would have killed for honor-roll-class report cards for their children such as we were able to take pretty much for granted for our own kids. For that reason, I think,
Honor Student Stickers
. . . have always struck me as somehow tacky.

14 posted on 08/28/2003 4:54:15 AM PDT by conservatism_IS_compassion (The everyday blessings of God are great--they just don't make "good copy.")
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To: trebb
important for teachers to self-actualize

I keep seeing this phrase - does it actually have a meaning, or is it just Lib feelgood newspeak?
15 posted on 08/28/2003 4:57:15 AM PDT by GodBlessRonaldReagan (where is Count Petofi when we need him most?)
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To: conservatism_IS_compassion
Honor Student Stickers . . . have always struck me as somehow tacky.

But it a cheap way to keep parents happy and their kids in public schools.

16 posted on 08/28/2003 5:00:31 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: tkathy
Does anybody worry about vouchers being used for Islamic religious schools?


Not Me.

Nor do I worry about parents who choose to send their children to schools because they have a good football team, a good arts program, a superior math education, a great science program, or even because the school has a reputation for being a party school.

Those are reason parents and students choose colleges. Wh not high schools. Just let the parents have the choice. I think in most cases they will choose wisely.

17 posted on 08/28/2003 5:01:33 AM PDT by 9999lakes
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To: tkathy
I have no problem with Islamic religious schools. Do you?
We have an Islamic charter in Michigan. No terrorists are coming from there. Just because they are teaching the religion does not mean they are making terrorists.
18 posted on 08/28/2003 5:09:08 AM PDT by netmilsmom (God Bless our President, those with him & our troops)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
As the parent of two Catholic school children who also pays a whopping $9,000/year in school taxes (for a 4BR cape on 1/3 acre), I have asked the following question of every politician I see:

Why is it OK to use "public money" to pay for sending my kids to Notre Dame University, but NOT OK to use "public money" to send them to Notre Dame High School?

None of them has been able to give me an answer yet. Of course, that would require them to admit that all that "public money" is really MY money in the first place, and they certainly aren't going to admit THAT.

Regards,

19 posted on 08/28/2003 5:15:44 AM PDT by VermiciousKnid
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To: tkathy
Does anybody worry about vouchers being used for Islamic religious schools?

No. It doesn't bother me a bit.

20 posted on 08/28/2003 5:24:17 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: trebb
A couple of years ago, when Algore was running for President, I believe it was Tim Russert who asked him "You'd still be against vouchers even if they proved beneficial for poor children?" Algore, with the most pained expression on his face (because his response would prove that he was in bed with the teachers unions) finally squeaked out a strangulated "Yes."

Algore could give a flip for children's education.
21 posted on 08/28/2003 5:30:59 AM PDT by ladylib
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To: trebb
When asked if he thought it was Ok to keep implementing the "alternative" teaching styles, which had a terrible record of not imparting knowledge to students, he said he thought it was also "important for teachers to self-actualize, so yes, it was a good thing to leave these methods in place even if it meant students didn't learn."

This is an amazing factoid and I fault the RNC for not picking up this kind of thing and running hard with it.

Just as the Bush administration is failing to deliver a clear message to the Iraqi people, that we are on their side and our common enemy is Islamic extremism, so the Republican Party fails over and over again to respond to the most blatant expression of Leftist Idiocy in this country and trumpet them loudly and make them known commonly throughout the land.

My suggestion to George Bush and to all Republican leaders: set aside an hour or so a day and read the posts on this site!

22 posted on 08/28/2003 6:01:22 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: VermiciousKnid
None of them has been able to give me an answer yet. Of course, that would require them to admit that all that "public money" is really MY money in the first place, and they certainly aren't going to admit THAT.

Next time ask them, as well as public school teachers, why it's better for their children to attend private schools and not OK for their constituents/students.

23 posted on 08/28/2003 7:15:34 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: GodBlessRonaldReagan
Just feel good newspeak. The profession is rife with it.

This asinine self-aborbed stupidity is one of the reasons the feds took over public education under No Child Left Behind.

I bet this guy isn't sprouting this nonsense now. He is probably exhorting his students to do well on their high-stakes tests because his job is on the line.

Nothing like threatening your job to get your @$$ in gear.
24 posted on 08/28/2003 7:53:00 AM PDT by ladylib
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Instead of obsessing over parents pursuing alternatives to government schools, maybe the NEA should actually start teaching reading, writing, and arithmetic to children instead of politically correct propaganda.



25 posted on 08/28/2003 9:15:43 AM PDT by Kuksool
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To: Kuksool
....maybe the NEA should actually start teaching reading, writing, and arithmetic to children instead of politically correct propaganda.

The NEA is only concerned about promoting the democratic agenda, keeping its membership roster filled with a marching army of teachers and its bank accounts brimming with dues.

26 posted on 08/29/2003 3:12:54 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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