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To Parents with Children in Public School - by a student
Arkansas Publik Skulz ^ | 30 Aug 2003 | Ashley Anderson

Posted on 08/30/2003 7:18:10 AM PDT by steplock

Arkansas Publik Skulz
To Parents with Children in Public School
Date: Saturday, August 30 @ 07:12:31
Topic Letters to Editor
"I will stand and fight until the end, because I owe it to my country."

Dear Editor:

This is for all the parents and their children who attend public school.

I have gone to public school all my life, until last September when I began private school. The differences are incredible! I will attempt to inform your readers as to what children in the government’s schools are doing every day.

Reading, writing, and arithmetic were the three basics every school used to go by. Are they what you think of when you think about what your child is learning?

Throughout most of my attendance In public school, the kids in my class only read one or two books throughout the whole year, until I was privileged with going to an AP class. The Advanced Placement courses have now been replaced with IB classes, which is short for the International Baccalaureate Organization, a part of UNESCO, United Nations. In this class, we were assigned numerous short stories to read, mostly about the myths of other countries, and some about their religions.

This class was intended to be a higher-level class, in which advanced students could “maximize” their learning capacity. Learning about the religions and cultures of other countries, and not names like Henry van Dyke, Washington Irving, O. Henry, or even Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, names which I never heard until I attended private school. These authors, among others such as Mark Twain and Emily Dickinson are purely American, and the basis for all literary writings in America to date.

Why were they never taught to me? Even in the advanced class we never read “Rip van Winkle.” Instead, we were assigned books like “The Giver” by Lois Lowry, which gave the details of killing babies and living in a world where no one was special and a person’s worth was based on his/her ability to conform to the group. Was I being conditioned?

When my mother was in school, she was taught phonics. In public school, I was taught to memorize the look of words and how they sounded. I was taught to remember the answer, not understand the question. I didn’t have spelling or vocabulary words to learn past the sixth or seventh grade. Why not?

In my private school, everyone has spelling and vocabulary words, in every grade, every week, to understand and learn how to use them in sentences. Words like philanthropy, misanthropic, and ameliorate were never taught to me in public school, despite the so-called “advanced” classes I was in. My mother, however, insisted on my having vocabulary words, even though it was not provided in public school.

Learning arithmetic has taken on a whole new meaning in public schools. It means that the more advanced students are made to wait for the others to catch up, and the advanced students are given “busy” work. The textbook often goes unfinished, and the students are passed anyway, because they tried their best. Grading on a curve is commonplace in public schools, so the students don’t know if they’re doing anything wrong. They are taught to be mindless and to accept whatever they are given.

I took Algebra in the eighth grade in public school, geometry in the ninth. When I changed to private school, I retook Algebra because my new school taught it differently, with more of the textbook. This year I’m taking trigonometry and Algebra II, both of my own choice. I know I’ll be getting the most out of them because we won’t be waiting for everyone to catch up like we did in public school. I can learn at my own pace.

Most kids in public schools are uncontrollable. How can any learning actually take place? Respect for authority, integrity, and honor are not words generally practiced by students who attend public school. If the administrators were to enforce the rules they have, they wouldn’t need to make more. Total control is the only thing gained when making more rules than needed.

I was amazed at how well-behaved the students at my private school were. Not only did they work hard, but were courteous, polite, and obedient. These things are a direct result of the proper atmosphere that this school provides. Christian values are taught, along with studying the Bible, which, needless to say, is strictly taboo in a public school.

Although I had some great teachers in public school, which are extremely hard to find, they could do nothing with the curriculum they were given from their superiors, not to mention the state, and the Department of Education, which is a part of the federal government. The department itself is unconstitutional; “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” The United States as is written here means the federal government, or national government. The Constitution gave no such power to the federal government as to run a federal department of education. Therefore, it is unconstitutional. The Constitution, since 1787, is and has been the Supreme Law of the land.

I encourage all those who care about their children and grandchildren to go searching for the answer. There is a lot of information available; but you may have to look no further than a book by Charlotte Iserbyt called “The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America”. It gives a detailed account of what really happens in public schools, why, and where the corruption comes from.

Students: no one can tell you who you are. If you don’t think for yourself, someone else will, be it a strong-willed friend, the media, or even our own government. Some people would have us believe that we’re too young to do anything about it, even if we wanted to. Well, there is one thing we know how to do, and that’s spread the word about what is going on; you have to learn more about it.

Even though it may be difficult to fund attending a private school or homeschooling, it is the only immediate way to stop what is being shoved down the throats of America’s youth. Soon even these may be forbidden. The way to avoid being institutionalized while attending a public school is not easy, but what is the most important thing? Is it more important to play football or be a cheerleader and end up flipping hamburgers in a fast food joint, or actually learning something that will be valuable to you the rest of your life?

Defend your mind, and ask questions. Don’t take anything for granted. Public school is not going to change, because it is running exactly how the government wants it to. Follow the money.

I am a Christian. This is not the time for believers to stick their heads in the dirt and hope that everything goes all right. The remnant of Christ’s followers exists today as foretold in the Bible. This is the time for believers in Christ to rise up and defend the rights our Forefathers died so that we may keep. I will stand and fight until the end, because I owe it to my country. What will you do?

Sincerely,
Ashley Anderson
This article comes from Arkansas Publik Skulz
http://www.gohotsprings.com/school/

The URL for this story is:
http://www.gohotsprings.com/school/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=266


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: aps; education; educationnews; homeschool; hope; privateschool; public; teacher; un; unesco
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1 posted on 08/30/2003 7:18:11 AM PDT by steplock
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To: steplock
Good letter.

Was it written by an adult activist, or is there really a student who can be shown to have written this?
2 posted on 08/30/2003 7:21:28 AM PDT by Atlas Sneezed
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To: steplock
I am a Christian. This is not the time for believers to stick their heads in the dirt and hope that everything goes all right. The remnant of Christ’s followers exists today as foretold in the Bible. This is the time for believers in Christ to rise up and defend the rights our Forefathers died so that we may keep. I will stand and fight until the end, because I owe it to my country. What will you do?

AMEN!!

3 posted on 08/30/2003 7:21:46 AM PDT by The Mayor (God uses ordinary people to carry out his extraordinary plan. I am willing Lord, use me!)
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To: The Mayor
AMEN!!

Big, bold, capital AMEN!

4 posted on 08/30/2003 7:24:21 AM PDT by WestPacSailor (We are Microsoft. Resistance is futile! You will be assimilated.)
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To: steplock
Very true. I have grandchildren in a school system that is political correctness run amok.

In December of the FIRST GRADE my grandaughter was learning about the Civil Rights Movement.Astonishing!
5 posted on 08/30/2003 7:25:17 AM PDT by Mears (J)
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To: steplock
Sad sad sad, how public schools have gotten.

I'm homeschooled, and that's a wondeful thing for me. I'm just 13, but I'm very "advanced" by public school standards. I'm in grades 8-10 (we're going to do summer school and get everything up to tenth); I have Algebra and Geometery down, and am startng basic trig (sine, cosine, tangent, etc); I've finished physical science and am going on to Biology; and it is a very real possibility I could be out of high-school by the time I'm 16.

Cool, eh?
6 posted on 08/30/2003 7:28:06 AM PDT by 4mycountry (You say I'm a brat like it's a bad thing.)
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To: TigersEye; SpookBrat; MeeknMing; rond; anniegetyourgun
Must read!
7 posted on 08/30/2003 7:32:47 AM PDT by .30Carbine (and through the truth that comes from God mankind shall then be truly free)
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To: 4mycountry
Very cool.
8 posted on 08/30/2003 7:33:59 AM PDT by .30Carbine (and through the truth that comes from God mankind shall then be truly free)
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To: Beelzebubba
THis *IS* the daughter of a friend here in Hot Springs, Artkansas.

This is a portion of the letter from her MOTHER giving me permission to publish:
======

Ashley has been working on a letter to the editor for the last week ... I asked her to try to tell parents a few things to look for as their children start school again this fall.

I helped her with a few word choices and did some editing for her to keep it down to 2 pages, but other than that, she wrote it herself, drawing on her own experiences.

======

9 posted on 08/30/2003 7:35:14 AM PDT by steplock (www.FOCUS.GOHOTSPRINGS.com)
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To: steplock
step buddy,

GREAT post. Is she actually describing an Arkansas school? If they have replaced AP with IB, and it is a UNESCO program, we need to know the district. Please freepmail me.
10 posted on 08/30/2003 7:37:24 AM PDT by Ahban
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To: 4mycountry
Sweet!
Congrats!
11 posted on 08/30/2003 7:38:26 AM PDT by netmilsmom (Hand me my smelling salts.)
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To: Beelzebubba
Was it written by an adult activist, or is there really a student who can be shown to have written this?

When I was fourteen, I wrote best like an adult activist.

12 posted on 08/30/2003 7:44:18 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: steplock
bttt
13 posted on 08/30/2003 7:49:55 AM PDT by Phyto Chems
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To: cornelis
"When I was fourteen, I wrote best like an adult activist."

Cool of you to say that. Let's be vain for a sec, I always wrote well too. In fact one of my fave school assignments was to get random spelling words, and you'd have to write a story using them all. I wrote great 5 or 6 page adventure stories. They were always well received by my schoolmates. That was in public school too, about 35 years ago, but it was already much deteriorated.

We be self-esteeming!




14 posted on 08/30/2003 7:53:12 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: Ahban
My son's HS has the IB now rather than the AP. Can you explain to me exactly what it is that I need to be concerned with? I am asking with sincerity.
15 posted on 08/30/2003 8:02:19 AM PDT by PleaseNoMore
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To: cornelis
When I was fourteen, I wrote best like an adult activist.

Would it be correct to assume that most adult activists write like fourteen year olds. They certainly think like juveniles.

16 posted on 08/30/2003 8:03:21 AM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all things that need to be done need to be done by the government.)
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To: steplock
This is a good letter but I have one quibble. I have read The Giver, it is NOT utopian propaganda. Just the opposite, it is a cautionary tale about the horror and force underlying any ultra-controlled utopian society.

The part about killing babies is where the young hero sees, with shock, that the apparently benevolent man who is his assigned "father" has duties that include "release" of (murder of) unwanted children. The boy snatches up another child marked for "release" and tries to escape The Community. It's as anti-utopian and cautionary as 1984, Brave New World, and Fahrenheit 451. I'm surprised a girl like this didn't catch that.

17 posted on 08/30/2003 8:04:47 AM PDT by wizardoz (Bomb Hollywood!)
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To: 4mycountry
I'm homeschooled, and that's a wondeful thing for me. I'm just 13, but I'm very "advanced" by public school standards.

Having seen quite a few of your posts on FR, I never would have guessed that you were as young as 13. I'd say that you're "advanced" by a lot more than just public school standards.

Maybe there really is hope for the future after all. :=)

18 posted on 08/30/2003 8:07:12 AM PDT by Bob (http://www.TomMcClintock.com)
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To: steplock
While this may be Ashley's experience in her school in Arkansas, this isn't true for all public schools. My children have been in public school in Texas and in Pennsylvania, and we homeschooled for awhile, and may possibly again in the future.

My daughter takes honors classes in her High School and has read many classic books. The kids here are required by the State to read 25 books each year. Depending upon the age/grade of the student, each book must be a certain length.

My daughter has vocab/spelling words each week in an English Comp class and I help her study - the words are very impressive -

Yes, many many kids are out of control - I have seen more of a "private school" experience in her Honors classes -

I wish Ashley great luck in her new school but hope she recognizes that there are varying degrees within the public school system.

19 posted on 08/30/2003 8:08:57 AM PDT by WhyisaTexasgirlinPA
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To: steplock
INTSUM -EDUCATION
20 posted on 08/30/2003 8:31:03 AM PDT by LiteKeeper
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Comment #21 Removed by Moderator

To: WhyisaTexasgirlinPA
Thank you for speaking up in favor of your public school.

Our four children have gone through public school (3 have graduated), and their experience has been NOTHING like the ones that apparently are widespread around the country.

They have graduated, prepared for college in writing skills, history, literature, science and math. Their teachers, even if liberal, have been respectful of their conservative point of view, though most of the teachers are conservatives as well, and many Christian. In addition, they have grown strong by defending their faith among non-believing fellow students.

By contrast, the local Christian school limited in course options, and much easier than our kids' school.

While in general the presumption that public schools are bad may be true, it is definitely NOT universal......

22 posted on 08/30/2003 8:42:17 AM PDT by ohioWfan (Have you prayed for your President today?)
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To: wizardoz
Maybe it was the presentation by the teacher that warped the real meaning of the book.
23 posted on 08/30/2003 8:42:49 AM PDT by DLfromthedesert
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To: DLfromthedesert
Well, maybe, but it would be awfully hard to warp it, it's very straightforward. Like 1984, you'd have a hard time reading it and coming to the conclusion that the Ministry of Love was a pretty neat place.
24 posted on 08/30/2003 8:46:30 AM PDT by wizardoz (Bomb Hollywood!)
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To: ohioWfan
I actually pulled my kids out of public school when we were in Texas - not a condemnation of all Texas schools - in fact, a friend moved from our hometown to north of Houston and feared her daughter might have to be held BACK! lol

I am amazed that schools can be so different in various areas - I wouldn't allow my kids to go near a public school in Philadelphia - but my daughter's choir sang gospel songs in her public school choir! I realize some claim that can NEVER happen, but I've got it on video.....lol - in fact, more than half of their spring concert was either overtly religious songs or patriotic ones........ it was a beautiful concert.

Thanks for your comments as well -

25 posted on 08/30/2003 8:46:42 AM PDT by WhyisaTexasgirlinPA
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To: steplock
I've found that it is near impossible for adults to find out what is really going on in their kid's school. They are adept at presenting parents with the sanitized version, even if the parents are very involved in their child's education.
26 posted on 08/30/2003 8:50:21 AM PDT by gitmo (Americans are learning world geography ... one war at a time.)
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To: Mears; Luis Gonzalez; habs4ever
In December of the FIRST GRADE my grandaughter was learning about the Civil Rights Movement.Astonishing!

How dare them expose the fact that blacks were previously denied the right to vote and the legal ability to participate in the economy of their local communities, all before the adults in the lives of those first graders can indoctrinate them as to the innate inferiority of blacks. The shock! The gall! The horror!

27 posted on 08/30/2003 8:51:51 AM PDT by Chancellor Palpatine (Give death the finger. Try new things, live, enjoy simple pleasures.)
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To: steplock
A letter of great excellence...showing the insight and admirable character of the author...
What a great kid...
May the God of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and His Son Jesus...Bless and Keep you..
28 posted on 08/30/2003 8:52:39 AM PDT by joesnuffy (Moderate Islam Is For Dilettantes)
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To: WhyisaTexasgirlinPA
I agree. While my daughter is only in 1st grade, I have not found much to complain about yet.

She has a homework folder that she is required to complete and hand in on Fridays and must read four books and/or chapters of a book a week. I do not think I was assigned homework until somewhere around fourth grade.

I find the school setting very unnatural. If you think back to your school days-What stands out the most? For me, it isn't time spent in the classroom. It is more the bizarre social interactions that are taking place between classes, at lunch and at recess. It is hard enough for a child to learn all they have to learn without all that static going on in the background.

On another note, my neice just graduated from high school two years ago. (NYU, now). My sister and I got on the subject of schooling and began talking about private school. My neice piped in and said. "Please, private school kids are the worst..more drugs, more sex and more money to do all those things"...

29 posted on 08/30/2003 8:56:25 AM PDT by riri
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To: jocon307
random spelling words

My grandest prose came from piling up words out of a thesaurus. It was great.

30 posted on 08/30/2003 8:59:36 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: Chancellor Palpatine
How dare them expose the fact that blacks were previously denied the right to vote and the legal ability to participate in the economy of their local communities, all before the adults in the lives of those first graders can indoctrinate them as to the innate inferiority of blacks.

I suspect that the poster's point was that in first grade the curriculum would have to go to a lot of trouble to explain what 'the right to vote' was (well, what a 'vote' was, for that matter), some inkling of what 'the legal ability to participate in the economy of their local communities' was (what is an economy? what is a legal ability?), and the historical and political circumstances surrounding blacks before and after the Civil War.

Whereas they could have spent the time learning how to tell time or something and have gotten a lot more use out of it.

31 posted on 08/30/2003 9:08:44 AM PDT by SedVictaCatoni (And now, children, we'll do a unit on the Schleiswig-Holstein Question.)
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To: riri
What stands out the most? Sitting next to her. We were both aces at the front of the class. In the next grade, she disappeared, and so did my grades.
32 posted on 08/30/2003 9:09:04 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: riri
I agree. While my daughter is only in 1st grade, I have not found much to complain about yet.

I know absolutely nothing about your circumstances or those of WhyisaTexasgirlinPA, but please keep in mind that there are millions of parents all over America who sigh and shake their heads at stories in the newspaper about how bad the public schools are...

... and then say "thank goodness the schools are good in my area!"

33 posted on 08/30/2003 9:10:41 AM PDT by SedVictaCatoni (They are none so blind.)
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To: steplock
I was kind of disappointed in this article. I've heard plenty worse coming out of public schools. Even my own personal experience with my oldest son in high school where a required book on careers detailed protitution as a legitimate career option. That is no joke it really happened.
There are countless stories that tell far worse than what this student describes.
34 posted on 08/30/2003 9:11:51 AM PDT by Boxsford
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To: steplock
Don't mean to be a wet blanket here, but she said she just tranferred out of a public school last year........that means she learned her excellent writing skills IN her public school.......

Not being an apologist for all, or even most public schools, nor saying that her experiences aren't valid (I'm sure they are). Just pointing out a fact that seems to be being overlooked........

35 posted on 08/30/2003 9:11:59 AM PDT by ohioWfan (Have you prayed for your President today?)
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To: Boxsford
protitution= prostitution
36 posted on 08/30/2003 9:14:39 AM PDT by Boxsford
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To: gitmo
Talk to the teachers AND to your kids. Walk in to the classroom once in a while, and volunteer as a tutor. You find out what's going on.
37 posted on 08/30/2003 9:15:32 AM PDT by ohioWfan (Have you prayed for your President today?)
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To: jocon307
Some children write well. My Dad was a professional writer so all through school my teaher's assumed my Father was helping me write my essays. He NEVER helped me. I never asked.
38 posted on 08/30/2003 9:16:28 AM PDT by Hildy
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To: SedVictaCatoni
There is no doubt in my mind most are pretty horrible. I don't have much to go on as she is in first grade. I haven't seen anything too strange, as of yet, but believe me I am keeping my eye out.

Truth is, I worry more about the fact that she is in a room full of kids who--god knows what is going on inside their homes each night--Well, I worry more about that.

39 posted on 08/30/2003 9:16:48 AM PDT by riri
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To: riri
How interesting that you think homework is so wonderful. It is mostly assigned because the teachers aren't doing their jobs in the several hours they have your kids in school in addition to the fact that it will increasingly,as she gets into upper grades, take time away from the family. But as long as your cool with that, whatever.
40 posted on 08/30/2003 9:18:48 AM PDT by Boxsford
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To: ohioWfan
This is exactly what is necessary. I was continually watching over what was being dished out to my son in public school until I finally convinced my husband that it would just be easier to home school.
41 posted on 08/30/2003 9:20:47 AM PDT by Boxsford
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To: steplock
Was I being conditioned?

Yes Ashley, you were being conditioned. Our nation has sold it's soul to the world for a bowl of stew.

42 posted on 08/30/2003 9:22:47 AM PDT by slimer (i'm mad as hell and i'm not going to take it anymore!)
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To: Boxsford
Homework, is a fact of life. It only will get worse as she gets older. It gives me an opportunity to sit with her and see how she is progressing, how she is grasping, where she is struggling and how she reasons, in general.

I think homework instills a sense responsibilty. I don't see a problem with it.

43 posted on 08/30/2003 9:23:01 AM PDT by riri
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To: Chancellor Palpatine
OPH, does a kind, positive thought ever cross the recesses of your mind and heart? I recall, in days long past, when you weren't quite so cynical and were actually fun to read.
44 posted on 08/30/2003 9:24:23 AM PDT by Boxsford
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To: riri
That's your responsibility as a parent whether there is homework to be done or not. That, is the fact of life.
45 posted on 08/30/2003 9:26:46 AM PDT by Boxsford
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To: Boxsford
Right....... and in our case, we found out that we liked what was going on. Not that we agreed with everything, of course, but the problems were small enough to deal with at home in our many conversations with our kids.

I am very aware that our situation is not typical, but in our case, the best thing for the kids was to leave them in public school to be a witness of the love of Christ to a whole lot of kids who desperately needed it.....

And they ALL agree that it was the best thing for them.

46 posted on 08/30/2003 9:32:02 AM PDT by ohioWfan (Have you prayed for your President today?)
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To: Boxsford
Palpatine becomes the Emperor. Like Sophocles' Creon, barking against dangers and secretly admiring them.
47 posted on 08/30/2003 9:32:33 AM PDT by cornelis
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To: Chancellor Palpatine
The sarcasm of your post astonishes me. The problem is teaching the civil rights movement 3 months into the first grade. They are just too young at 6 years old to really understand the concept.

Teaching first graders to be kind to eachother,no matter what race,is enough. The teaching of the civil rights movement would be best taught at 4th grade at the very minimum.

A first grader has enough on their plate with the adjustment to school and learning to read.
48 posted on 08/30/2003 9:33:41 AM PDT by Mears (J)
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To: ohioWfan
Perhaps her parents provided her education in writing. Schools didn't teach my children to read. I did. I imagine the same thing may happen as they progress through other subjects.
49 posted on 08/30/2003 9:35:41 AM PDT by secret garden (giddy up)
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To: Hildy
"He NEVER helped me. I never asked."

I didn't need help with English, I desperately needed help with Math. Unfortunately for me, as my mother often pointed out, I was better at math than anyone else in my family, including my parents.

There were many tears and broken pencils, I tell you that, for a fact. Luckily for me some genius (at Texas Instruments wasn't it?) invented the calculator. I have actually been gainfully employed for my entire career as a bookkeeper. I meet people I went to school with and they are astonished!

But I always point out the job is BOOK-KEEPER, not mathemetician. I am living proof that technology not only ends jobs, but creates them.

50 posted on 08/30/2003 9:36:28 AM PDT by jocon307
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