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Farah tried to plead with the US troops but she was killed anyway
The Observer ^ | 9/7/2003 | Peter Beaumont

Posted on 09/07/2003 9:08:16 AM PDT by tyen

The death of two innocent Iraqis was thought so unremarkable the US military did not even report it, but Peter Beaumont says it reflects an increasingly callous disregard of civilian lives in coalition operations

Sunday September 7, 2003

The Observer

Farah Fadhil was only 18 when she was killed. An American soldier threw a grenade through the window of her apartment. Her death, early last Monday, was slow and agonising. Her legs had been shredded, her hands burnt and punctured by splinters of metal, suggesting that the bright high-school student had covered her face to shield it from the explosion.

She had been walking to the window to try to calm an escalating situation; to use her smattering of English to plead with the soldiers who were spraying her apartment building with bullets.

But then a grenade was thrown and Farah died. So did Marwan Hassan who, according to neighbours, was caught in the crossfire as he went looking for his brother when the shooting began.

What is perhaps most shocking about their deaths is that the coalition troops who killed them did not even bother to record details of the raid with the coalition military press office. The killings were that unremarkable. What happened in Mahmudiya last week should not be forgotten, for the story of this raid is also the story of the dark side of the US-led occupation of Iraq, of the violent and sometimes lethal raids carried out apparently beyond any accountability.

For while the media are encouraged to count each US death, the Iraqi civilians who have died at American hands since the fall of Saddam's regime have been as uncounted as their names have been unacknowledged.

Mahmudiya is typical of the satellite towns that ring Baghdad, and the apartment block where Farah died was typical of the blocks to be found there - five storeys or so high, set among dusty paths lined with palms and stunted trees. In Saddam's time, the people who lived here were reasonably well-off - junior technicians for the nearby factories run by the Ministry of Military Industrialisation. These are not the poorest, but they are by no stretch of the imagination well-off.

When the Americans arrived, say neighbours, the residents of this cluster of blocks liked the young GIs. They say there were no problems and that their children played with the troops, while residents would give them food as the patrols passed by.

But all that came to a sudden bloody end at 12.30am last Monday, when soldiers arrived outside the apartment block where Farah and her family lived. What happened in a few minutes, and in the chaos of the hours that followed, is written across its walls. The bullet marks that pock the walls are spread in arcs right across the front of the apartment house, so widely spaced in places that the only conclusion you can draw is that a line of men stood here and sprayed the building wildly.

I stood inside and looked to where the men must have been standing, towards the apartment houses the other way. I could not find impacts on the concrete paths or on the facing walls that would suggest that there was a two-way firefight here. Whatever happened here was one-sided, a wall of fire unleashed at a building packed with sleeping families. Further examination shows powder burns where door locks had been shot off and splintered wood where the doors had been kicked in. All the evidence was that this was a raid that - like so many before it - went horribly wrong.

This is what the residents, and local police, told us had happened. Inside the apartment with Farah were her mother and a brother, Haroon, 13. As the soldiers started smashing doors, they began to kick in Farah's door with no warning. Panicking, and thinking that thieves were breaking into the apartment, Haroon grabbed a gun owned by his father and fired some shots to scare them off. The soldiers outside responded by shooting up the building and throwing grenades into Farah's apartment.

The randomness of that firing is revealed by a visit to the apartments. Windows are drilled with bullet holes; ceilings in kitchens and bedrooms and living areas are scarred where the rounds smashed in. Hodhbain Tohma was on the roof, fiddling with his new satellite dish to make it work, when the soldiers came. 'I heard the shooting first, then an explosion. Then I heard women screaming. I looked over the roof and saw a line of soldiers on the path firing weapons wildly towards the building as a helicopter arrived above us. The shooting all seemed to me to be on one side.'

Abdul Ali Hussein was in the apartment next door to Farah's when the shooting began. 'I was asleep when we heard the shooting, and then an explosion blew open my door and filled my apartment with smoke. I grabbed my family and took them to another room and covered them with my body.

'I went to see if anyone needed my help next door. I went into three rooms, saw Farah lying in the kitchen near the window. She was injured and burnt, but still alive. I ran to get cotton wrapping and bandages to try and treat her. We didn't have enough and so tore up a head-cloth to try and stop the bleeding. The soldier shouted at me: "Where are the fedayeen ?" They told me to leave her because she was dead.'

As we were talking, a weeping man in a head-cloth arrived - Qasam Hassan, the brother of the second fatality, Marwan. Qasam told us how Marwan died. 'When I heard the heavy shooting, I was in another apartment building visiting friends. My brother was worried, so he went out to look for me. He was not carrying any arms. He could not find me, and as he came back to the building the Americans shot him. He ran and fell behind the building and died. Among all of them they only had one translator. How could people know what was going on?'

What is most curious about this story is that, when I called the US military press office in Baghdad, it said it could find no record of the raid or of the deaths. It is curious because the police in Mahmudiya have told us how US military policemen delivered the bodies to their station the next morning; how the local commander had expressed his commiserations; how the same Iraqi police had complained that the new troops from the 82nd Airborne Division, who arrived fresh from the US last month, had apparently reversed the policy of the previous US unit in the town to take local police on raids.

It became less puzzling when I spoke to Nada Doumani, spokeswoman for the International Committee for the Red Cross, who confirmed what she has said before - that despite repeated requests from the Red Cross, it can neither get information nor figures on civilian deaths during raids.

What happened at Mahmudiya would be disturbing enough if it was unique, but it is not. It is part of a pattern that points not to a deliberate policy but perhaps to something equally worrying, an institutional lack of care among many in the US military for whether civilians are killed in their operations. It is not enough to say, as some defenders of the US military in Iraq do, that its soldiers are tired, frightened and under pressure from the simmering guerrilla attacks directed against them. For it is the impression that the US military gives of not caring about those innocent Iraqis that they kill that is stoking resentment.

Iraqis have been killed at vehicle checkpoints and killed in their homes in night-time raids. Policemen have been shot down doing what US forces have asked them to do, trying to keep the peace. Indeed, the allegations that US soldiers are too 'trigger happy' even led to complaints, in mid-August from Ibrahim al-Jaffri - then holding the rotating presidency of the Iraqi provisional government - urging US troops to exercise more care before firing.

'All we want are answers,' said Qassam Hassan. 'All we are asking for is justice.'


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: civiliancasualties; iraq
This article is very scanty on specifics when it talks about U.S. forces; no names, no ranks, no nothing. Yet it gets extremely specific when it talks about those harmed. It makes me very skeptical. Does anyone here have any connections to the armed forces who can debunk or (heaven forbid) substantiate these claims? If there was a breakdown in military discipline, it needs to be addressed and nipped in the bud. If this was actually an attack by Islamists and we're seeing the results of outrageously biased reporting, we need to shut it down pronto by debunking it completely and thoroughly.
1 posted on 09/07/2003 9:08:17 AM PDT by tyen
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To: tyen
Yeah, we kill babies too.
2 posted on 09/07/2003 9:10:56 AM PDT by mystery-ak (Happy Birthday, Mike...I'll blow your candles out for you this year.)
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To: tyen
Haroon grabbed a gun owned by his father and fired some shots

Bad move dude.

3 posted on 09/07/2003 9:11:22 AM PDT by Drango (McClintock is my first choice, but given the numbers I'm voting for Arnold.)
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To: tyen
They should place the blame where it belongs. On the cowardly ambushers who dress like civilians and hide among the civilians.
4 posted on 09/07/2003 9:18:05 AM PDT by lady lawyer
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To: mystery-ak
Yeah, we kill babies too.

And then our troops eat them. :)

5 posted on 09/07/2003 9:40:56 AM PDT by AmericaUnited
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To: AmericaUnited
Yeah, we kill babies too.

And then our troops eat them. :)

Just try eating MREs day after day.

Any way some we give to the Israelis to make bread out of.


6 posted on 09/07/2003 9:46:14 AM PDT by tet68
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To: tyen
http://www.parlorsongs.com/content/h/hrtsflrs.mid
(for those of You who know the tune 'Hearts and Flowers')
7 posted on 09/07/2003 10:03:27 AM PDT by solitas
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To: tyen
This is horsecrap. I hate the Leftist media.
8 posted on 09/07/2003 10:06:41 AM PDT by faithincowboys ( Are we going down hill like a snow ball headed for Hell?)
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To: tyen
The story is certainly slanted to imply that this sort of incident is a standard occurrance in Iraq. American soldiers are trigger happy, unthinking and unfeeling brutes etc.. etc.. Yawn.

Not everthing goes smoothly. I shudder to think of how the Chinese, Russian or any Arab army would conduct an occupation and reconstruction effort in a nation of 24 million.
9 posted on 09/07/2003 10:08:35 AM PDT by moni kerr (Lead, follow or get the hell out of the way)
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To: tyen
In the early part of the war, US uniforms were found and there were indications that the Fedayeen were going to use them to committ atrocities in our name. This raid was done in the dark with appearant indiscriminate firing. Very unlike our usual disciplined attack. To me, if this incident actually happened, it looks like a Fedayeen attemt to turn the locals against us.
10 posted on 09/07/2003 10:12:13 AM PDT by tbpiper
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To: tyen
War is hell - people get killed - innocent people.

I suspect these people had been aiding or hiding a relative and were reluctant to give him up or to even tell the military where he had gone. These people do it to themselves, and scum media like "The Observer" are always there to try to make a federal case out of it.

And .. I agree - no identification of military operation - just minute details about the "innocent" civilians. It does not pass the smell test!
11 posted on 09/07/2003 10:21:34 AM PDT by The Final Harvest ( America - "The Greatest Nation on the Face of the Earth")
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To: tyen
This article is very scanty

It achives its goal to send a message: Americans are baby-killers.

As usual, it started with the Jews: everyone "knows" today that Israelis have no regard for human life, they simply kill "Palestinian" babies at will.

The world did not revolt against that propaganda, and it took hold. Now the cancer is spreading to include us, Americans. As the famous saying goes, "When they came for the Jews, I said nothing because I was not Jewish, when they came for..., and when they came for me, there was nobody left to speak.

This cancer is much like that of terrorism: it was rampant in Europe since 1960s, but everyone, ourselved included, behaved as if it were someone else's problem. We paid for that with Sep 11.

Why be so surprised: whenever you do not fight cancer, it spreads.

12 posted on 09/07/2003 10:25:44 AM PDT by TopQuark
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To: TopQuark
"But all that came to a sudden bloody end at 12.30am last Monday, when soldiers arrived outside the apartment block where Farah and her family lived.... thinking that thieves were breaking into the apartment, Haroon grabbed a gun owned by his father and fired some shots to scare them off. The soldiers outside responded by shooting up the building and throwing grenades into Farah's apartment.

So Haroon's machismo got his sister killed. What an idiot. And this family was not to be considered hostile by the soldiers?

So why did he do it? Likely because he knew it would earn him respect in the neighborhood.

13 posted on 09/07/2003 11:02:45 AM PDT by Justa
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To: TopQuark
"But all that came to a sudden bloody end at 12.30am last Monday, when soldiers arrived outside the apartment block where Farah and her family lived.... thinking that thieves were breaking into the apartment, Haroon grabbed a gun owned by his father and fired some shots to scare them off. The soldiers outside responded by shooting up the building and throwing grenades into Farah's apartment.

So Haroon's machismo got his sister killed. What an idiot. And this family was not to be considered hostile by the soldiers?

So why did he do it? Likely because he knew it would earn him respect in the neighborhood.

14 posted on 09/07/2003 11:02:58 AM PDT by Justa
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To: tyen
Is that Blair guy that workred for the Times now working at the Observer?
15 posted on 09/07/2003 11:48:26 AM PDT by fella
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To: tyen
I thought for a second this was an account of a BATF raid.
16 posted on 09/07/2003 12:13:00 PM PDT by Free Vulcan
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To: Free Vulcan
I thought for a second this was an account of a BATF raid

reminded me of Waco for one.

17 posted on 09/07/2003 12:33:51 PM PDT by takenoprisoner (illegally posting on an expired tag)
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To: tyen
Didn't happen.

Any enaggement of this nature would certainly have been logged at the TOC, and events of this nature are briefed to the leadership up the chaim, and embedded troops and daily breifings would have made note of this supposed exchnage and supposed firefight.
That the "press office" has no record, no biggee, all one need do is provide date and time and location and the press office can locate the supposed engaged troops.
However, this supposed event certainly did not happen; i.e., a group of American troops went about firing wildly and tossing grenades and inocents were harmed. No way that happened without a record, from radio traffic to SITREPS to greandes tossed, everything is logged.
This silly story is part of an overall plan to inflate supposed innocent casualties to very high numbers.
It is a lie.
18 posted on 09/07/2003 3:08:45 PM PDT by Gunrunner2
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To: Gunrunner2
"embedded troops" = "embedded media"
19 posted on 09/07/2003 3:10:09 PM PDT by Gunrunner2
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