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Cardinal: Pope in "a bad way"
Reuters/Fox News ^

Posted on 09/30/2003 7:15:09 AM PDT by Dog

German Cardinal Says Pope 'In a Very Bad Way' Tue September 30, 2003 08:23 AM ET BERLIN (Reuters) - Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the German head of the Vatican body which oversees doctrinal matters, was quoted on Tuesday as saying Pope John Paul was in very poor health and the faithful should pray for him. "He is in a very bad way," Ratzinger told Germany's Bunte magazine in an interview. "We should pray for the pope."

Ratzinger, who heads the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, told the magazine that the 83-year-old pope had taken on too much, but he was unable to stop him.

The increasingly frail pope was particularly weak earlier this month on a trip to Slovakia and needed help reading his sermons. Last week, he skipped his general audience because of what the Vatican said was an intestinal problem.

Ratzinger's private secretary, Georg Gaenswein, said it was amazing how the pope, who suffers from Parkinson's Disease, kept going.

"He can't walk and stand anymore but he is a hero for the faithful. The fact that he doesn't give up despite his illness makes him even more credible," Gaenswein told Bunte.

He said the pope would not give up traveling. "When he is no longer allowed to travel, then dear God will come for him," Gaenswein said.

The leader of the world's one billion Roman Catholics, who marks his 25th anniversary next month, appointed 31 new cardinals on Sunday, possibly putting his last stamp on the group that will one day choose his successor.


TOPICS: Breaking News; Front Page News
KEYWORDS: biggotry; catholic; catholicchurch; catholicism; catholiclist; dogma; johnpaul; nobel; nobelprize; pax; peace; pope; popejohnpaul; rc; rcc; romanempire; rome; snakehandling; vatican
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This is breaking on Fox...
1 posted on 09/30/2003 7:15:09 AM PDT by Dog
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To: Dog
God bless the Holy Father.
2 posted on 09/30/2003 7:15:58 AM PDT by Coop (God bless our troops!)
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To: Dog
Ratzinger is one of the Pope's closest advisors...
3 posted on 09/30/2003 7:16:05 AM PDT by Dog (This wednesday is my birthday and I officially become older than dirt....)
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To: Coop
Amen..
4 posted on 09/30/2003 7:16:29 AM PDT by Dog (This wednesday is my birthday and I officially become older than dirt....)
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To: xsmommy
ping.
5 posted on 09/30/2003 7:18:45 AM PDT by hobbes1 ( Hobbes1TheOmniscient® "I know everything so you don't have to" ;)
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To: hobbes1
just saw it, thanks.
6 posted on 09/30/2003 7:19:20 AM PDT by xsmommy
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To: xsmommy
'The pope is in really bad shape'

September 30 2003 at 04:04AM




By Peter Popham


Rome - Pope John Paul II is the hottest tip as winner of this year's Nobel Peace Prize to be announced in 10 days' time, but there are major fears for his health.

His appointment of 31 new cardinals on Sunday is being taken as a clear sign that his days are numbered, according to a Vatican insider.

The 83-year-old pontiff's health has deteriorated sharply in recent weeks. He has been suffering from Parkinson's disease for a decade, and speculation last week that he now also has cancer of the intestines has not been denied.

The director of the independent Peace Research Institute in Oslo said he believed the pope was the most likely Nobel winner, even though he thought the committee wanted a Muslim winner.

'No Muslim candidate sent a message of peace in Iraq to the same degree'
"No Muslim candidate sent a message of peace in Iraq to the same degree as the pope."

The pope was a staunch, often fiery opponent of the war. Despite his poor health, he mounted a sustained diplomatic campaign of resistance, sending envoys to both Baghdad and Washington.

Rumours of the Nobel award came one day after the pope made arrangements for what one insider called his "final sprint".

The decision to hold a consistory next month instead of in February as planned was interpreted by Vatican observers as a clear sign that John Paul knows his time is running out. A consistory is the process during which the appointment of new cardinals - the "princes" of the Catholic Church - is confirmed.

It is the conclave of cardinals, meeting a fortnight after a pope's death, that chooses the successor to St Peter's throne.

'The pope is reaching the end of the road'
An Italian Vatican expert wrote on Monday that the decision to hold the consistory four months ahead of schedule was strongly rumoured to have been at the insistence of the pope himself.

One of the newly appointed cardinals, Archbishop Phillippe Barbarin, of Lyons, France, told Europe 1 Radio on Monday: "The pope is reaching the end of the road. It's a big responsibility for us. The pope is in really bad shape."

He has forced himself forward through many years of his failing health by giving himself new goals.

The major milestones next month - his own jubilee and the beatification of Mother Teresa - may have given him the will to continue thus far.

Thus far, but perhaps no further.



This article was originally published on page 1 of The Star on September 30, 2003

7 posted on 09/30/2003 7:19:58 AM PDT by alisasny
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To: alisasny
that makes me very sad.
8 posted on 09/30/2003 7:21:52 AM PDT by xsmommy
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To: xsmommy
Most catholics alive today, have nothing but vague memories of anybody but John Paul II as pope. There are adults now who were born after he took office. His eventual passing will profoundly affect the church.
9 posted on 09/30/2003 7:23:08 AM PDT by dogbyte12
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To: Dog
I was able to see the Pope in Italy at his weekly Wednesday audience on September 3rd. He looked bad, but even as a protestant, I was touched by the love of God in his words. It was a very touching moment for me. I pray for him and that God will take him according to His plan.
10 posted on 09/30/2003 7:33:48 AM PDT by TexasGunLover ("Either you're with us or you're with the terrorists."-- President George W. Bush)
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To: Dog
It will be very intersting to see who his successor will be. Pope John Paul II is a very good man, amazing how he has held on the way he has in spite of his fragile health. God bless him.
11 posted on 09/30/2003 7:34:06 AM PDT by Delbert
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To: Dog
May God bless this Pope, and comfort him in his time of illness.

And may God guide the College of Cardinals to allow God to work through them, and elect as good and Godly a Pope as this one has been, to serve as the successor of the Fisherman.

12 posted on 09/30/2003 7:34:27 AM PDT by Malacoda
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To: dogbyte12
I respect the Pope emensely even though I am a Baptist. The man is an authority for principal and morals. When his time is up, God will take him home as he is a faithful servent to his Kingdom. May Christs love continue to spread across the globe.
13 posted on 09/30/2003 7:34:56 AM PDT by smith288 ("The key to our success will be your execution." -Scott Adams)
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To: Dog
I am not Catholic but I ,too respect the Pope as a good and godly man.May God be with him always.
14 posted on 09/30/2003 7:41:33 AM PDT by MEG33
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To: Dog
May God bless him and take him to Himself when it is time.

Cardinal Ratzinger has been a faithful friend and right-hand man to the Pope. He too is getting old and would have retired if it were not for his sense of duty.

God bless them both, and may the next Pope be faithful too. The Church and the world need it.
15 posted on 09/30/2003 7:42:41 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Dog
"The Pope Has No Complex About Appearing Frail"
16 posted on 09/30/2003 7:49:00 AM PDT by Int (Ever notice how the Freepers that have been here longest are the most 'moderate'?)
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To: MEG33
To all of you who are not Catholic but have posted such kind words: God bless you and thank you for your charity toward my pastor, John Paul.
17 posted on 09/30/2003 7:51:12 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Dog; newgeezer
He is the most Marian pope they've had in a long time. I wonder if the next one will be more so.
18 posted on 09/30/2003 7:53:48 AM PDT by biblewonk (Spose to be a Chrisssssssstian)
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To: Cicero
***God bless them both, and may the next Pope be faithful too. The Church and the world need it.***

There are those who seek to destroy the Church and all religion. Prayers are desperately needed that the College of Cardinals choose a new Pope who will refute the liberals among them.
19 posted on 09/30/2003 7:54:04 AM PDT by kitkat
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To: Dog
I could have sworn that I heard on the radio news the other day that the Pope delivered a sermon and he sounded a lot stronger than he has in the recent past.
20 posted on 09/30/2003 7:54:33 AM PDT by jmc813 (How ironic is it that Arnold turned out to be the spoiler?)
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To: alisasny; Thinkin' Gal

Pope John Paul II is one of the main contenders for the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize.(AFP/File/Vincenzo Pinto)

21 posted on 09/30/2003 8:00:40 AM PDT by Jeremiah Jr (613)
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To: Notwithstanding
I think that when one of the most important of Cardinals makes this statement the end is truly very close.

I'll never forget this Pope's contribution to the freedom of Poland and other communist slave-nations.

He's being a fighter to the end. I'm Missouri Synod Lutheran and we've always held the Pope in deepest admiration and respect.

God bless Pope John Paul. I hope he receives the Nobel Prize to cap the achievements of his productive and conscientious life.

Leni

22 posted on 09/30/2003 8:01:37 AM PDT by MinuteGal
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To: biblewonk
Thanks for trolling on by.
23 posted on 09/30/2003 8:02:45 AM PDT by Notwithstanding
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To: Dog
Prayers that his travails on earth will end peacefully, and that he will be safe in the arms of Jesus.
24 posted on 09/30/2003 8:02:48 AM PDT by Jim Noble
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To: Notwithstanding
He is a fine pastor, and a Godly man.

I am praying for him right now. May God comfort, sustain, and bless him.

25 posted on 09/30/2003 8:04:00 AM PDT by ohioWfan (Have you prayed for your President today?)
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To: Dog
Prayers for the Pope.
26 posted on 09/30/2003 8:06:36 AM PDT by b4its2late
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To: dogbyte12
Most catholics alive today, have nothing but vague memories of anybody but John Paul II as pope. There are adults now who were born after he took office. His eventual passing will profoundly affect the church.

You are correct. I am 33 and barely remeber the prior Pope(not even the name off the top of my head) who only lasted 1 month or so. I too love the pope, the only complaint I have is that he is too far away to see the damage the priest/pedophilia scandal has done to the church. Taking a hard stand against those priests and the bishops who just shuffled the offending priests off to a new parish to diddle again, would have sent the best message possible. Instead it appears that the pope doesn't care. When really it's more like he is out of touch with the people.

27 posted on 09/30/2003 8:08:13 AM PDT by SengirV
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To: jmc813
I heard the Pope speak on the radio just the other day and I thought he sounded awful; very poor health. I have liked and admired this Pope; he has remained faithful to his calling.
28 posted on 09/30/2003 8:09:50 AM PDT by twigs
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To: Dog
Let's see.

1. The pope is apparently about to die.

2. We have major power outages in every coalition country.

3. The mad iman is seen walking about the mountain flowers.

4. Hizbollah is frantically trying to get a prisoner swap done.

5. Ramadan features the extraordinary double eclipse this year.

6. Islamists warn muslims of impending shortages timed to coincide with what they have traditionally used as a practice time for hardship, Ramadan.

7. Gold is pegging through the roof, or should we say the dollar is dropping.

8. The main conspirator behind the Sadat Assasination is released.

What does all this mean? I think it means some folks in the Axis of Evil expect the USA and her allies to suffer a serious attack in the time between now and Ramadan. We are talking historical. Epic. The big one.

What do you think?
29 posted on 09/30/2003 8:13:10 AM PDT by kinghorse
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To: Malacoda
And may God guide the College of Cardinals to allow God to work through them, and elect as good and Godly a Pope as this one has been, to serve as the successor of the Fisherman.

HOLY SPIRIT BUMP!!!

30 posted on 09/30/2003 8:13:41 AM PDT by SuziQ
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To: biblewonk
He is the most Marian pope they've had in a long time. I wonder if the next one will be more so.

Pope John Paul II should have been one of the greatest Pope's in history, with a mind and a heart like his. God has blessed him greatly with intelligence and compassion.

If only he had consulted scriptures more frequently before making his pronouncements. Ah, but we should place our hopes only in Jesus Christ, for men will ever let us down.

Prayers for the Pope's quick recovery, or easy passing.

31 posted on 09/30/2003 8:18:02 AM PDT by bondserv
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To: TexasGunLover
Altho not a Christian I remember being profoundly moved at getting the chance to hear Pope Montini in 1969. His voice booming out over the square was awe inspiring.

This Pope, John Paul II touched children all over the world and was an inspiration to the afflicted!

32 posted on 09/30/2003 8:21:43 AM PDT by OldFriend (DEMS INHABIT A PARALLEL UNIVERSE)
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To: Notwithstanding
Thank you for your kindness and generosity.

His Holiness, John-Paul II, is surely -- with such great men as President Reagan and Lech Walesa with both of whom he stood with great courage and in unwavering strength against the evil Soviet Empire, which the three of them effectively brought to its knees -- one of the modern era's absolutely most important men.

And such a wonderfully good humored and beautiful man, at that -- and a loving and beloved pastor. Every member of my "home" [From home] clergy and congregation of Saint Andrews Anglican Cathedral, Singapore, prays for him at every service -- and thanks God for him.

May God continue to bless him and, when it is time, see him safely home -- and see to his rest -- and love and care for him for ever.
33 posted on 09/30/2003 8:22:51 AM PDT by Brian Allen ( Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: bondserv
If only he had consulted scriptures more frequently before making his pronouncements. Ah, but we should place our hopes only in Jesus Christ, for men will ever let us down.

Yes they will even when they are suppose to be representing the Church.

34 posted on 09/30/2003 8:25:10 AM PDT by biblewonk (Spose to be a Chrisssssssstian)
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To: Jeremiah Jr
Pope John Paul II is one of the main contenders for the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize

He is truly a man of peace. Though I didn't agree with him that the U.S. shouldn't go into Iraq, if you paid very close attention to what he actually said, rather than what was written about what he said, he was giving the usual teaching about 'Love one another' and 'love your enemies', but at the same time was acknowledging that sovereign nations have the right to conduct war as long as it is not aimed at the citizens of a nation, but rather at the leaders and armies of a nation that has become a threat to its neighbors.

To all those liberals who thought that his pronouncements proved that America was evil for going into Iraq, I'd point out that he NEVER declared participation in the war as being sinful, which he could have done had he truly thought that prosecution of the war was fully against Church teaching.

35 posted on 09/30/2003 8:25:30 AM PDT by SuziQ
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To: kinghorse
What do you think?

It will be interesting to see how the Arab street reacts to the Popes eventual passing. Their reaction (especially Palistinian) may illustrate to Westerners what kind of war we are actually fighting and who our true enemies are.

36 posted on 09/30/2003 8:29:11 AM PDT by germanicus
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To: bondserv
If only he had consulted scriptures more frequently before making his pronouncements.

What? He would have turned into a Protestant? Maybe you might pause to reflect that the Pope knows a good deal about Scripture. Have you ever actually read any Papal documents? They're thick with Scripture citations.

Ah, but we should place our hopes only in Jesus Christ, for men will ever let us down.

That's funny, because Scripture says (Hebrews 13:17) that we are to obey our leaders and submit to them, not ignore them, toss them aside, and declare them irrelevant "for men will ever let us down".

Perhaps you should consult Scripture before making your pronouncements.

37 posted on 09/30/2003 8:29:21 AM PDT by Campion
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To: Dog
Why does he hang on so long. What is he protecting his flock from ?
38 posted on 09/30/2003 8:33:06 AM PDT by VRWC_minion (Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and most are right)
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To: Dog
Why don't they allow this man some dignity? Instead of watching him fall apart, let him appoint a successor and allow him to take it easy. Why be so cruel as to try and get every last breathe out of him for performance reasons?
39 posted on 09/30/2003 8:36:24 AM PDT by nmh
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To: kinghorse
What does all this mean...

Revelation 11


The Two Witnesses


The Two Witnesses; the Seventh Trumpet

1 Then I was given a reed like a measuring rod. And the angel stood, saying, "Rise and measure the temple of God, the altar, and those who worship there. 2But leave out the court which is outside the temple, and do not measure it, for it has been given to the Gentiles. And they will tread the holy city underfoot for forty-two months. 3And I will give power to my two witnesses, and they will prophesy one thousand two hundred and sixty days, clothed in sackcloth."
4These are the two olive trees and the two lampstands standing before the God of the earth. 5And if anyone wants to harm them, fire proceeds from their mouth and devours their enemies. And if anyone wants to harm them, he must be killed in this manner. 6These have power to shut heaven, so that no rain falls in the days of their prophecy; and they have power over waters to turn them to blood, and to strike the earth with all plagues, as often as they desire.


The Witnesses Killed

7 When they finish their testimony, the beast that ascends out of the bottomless pit will make war against them, overcome them, and kill them. 8And their dead bodies will lie in the street of the great city which spiritually is called Sodom and Egypt, where also our Lord was crucified. 9Then those from the peoples, tribes, tongues, and nations will see their dead bodies three-and-a-half days, and not allow their dead bodies to be put into graves. 10 And those who dwell on the earth will rejoice over them, make merry, and send gifts to one another, because these two prophets tormented those who dwell on the earth.


The two witnesses are Jews and Christians

40 posted on 09/30/2003 8:38:17 AM PDT by Jeremiah Jr (613)
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To: kinghorse
taking my theory further, if you look at two events in particular, the Hizbollah Israeli swap and Hizbollah's apparent bending of their stone hard stance and Mubarek releasing the equivalent of the US releasing Lee Harvey Oswald, you have to wonder two things.

Is Hizbollah trying to save their people from some cataclysm about to befall Israel?

Is Mubarek and his ilk trying to get right with who could turn out to be the real muscle in Egypt once the USA suffers a terrible blow, that being the religious sect?

This is all looking rather ominous. The sad part is most every Muslim probably knows what is planned (by way of the preachings at their Mosques) but their fear and true allegiances are keeping them from talking. Truly the face of evil.
41 posted on 09/30/2003 8:38:51 AM PDT by kinghorse
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To: Dog
Prayers.
42 posted on 09/30/2003 8:40:01 AM PDT by DoctorMichael (Thats my story, and I'm sticking to it.)
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To: VRWC_minion
The next pope.
43 posted on 09/30/2003 8:40:45 AM PDT by firebrand
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To: alisasny
The director of the independent Peace Research Institute in Oslo said he believed the pope was the most likely Nobel winner, even though he thought the committee wanted a Muslim winner.

'No Muslim candidate sent a message of peace in Iraq to the same degree'
"No Muslim candidate sent a message of peace in Iraq to the same degree as the pope."

Oh, for the love of Mike -- what manner of sh*theads do they hire over there?

44 posted on 09/30/2003 8:41:07 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: Dog
It's always a sad day when we lose an important religious leader. I remember two papal selections. The process of selecting a new pope is very interesting, and right now, the news networks are scrambling to find out just how it happens, since few of their staff even remember the last papal selection.

For those who do not remember how a new pope is selected, I recommend paying close attention to the stories that will appear. It is a fascinating, medieval process.

45 posted on 09/30/2003 8:44:04 AM PDT by MineralMan (godless atheist)
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To: All
For a rundown on the process of selecting a new pope, this is a good source:

http://www.time.com/time/daily/special/papacy/how.html
46 posted on 09/30/2003 8:46:19 AM PDT by MineralMan (godless atheist)
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To: MEG33
I'm an agnostic ex-Catholic, but he's still without a doubt one of the great men of the last 100 years. He was as critical as anyone except Reagan and maybe Thatcher in bringing about the fall of the Soviet Empire.

-Eric

47 posted on 09/30/2003 8:49:49 AM PDT by E Rocc (If we let government take on the parental role, we will all become "honorary children")
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To: MineralMan; Dog
thanks for heads up Dog.

The pope has been a loved and worthy leader for his people. He kept the boundaries of the faith intack. As a non denominational Christian, I don't' always agree with the theology but I do agree he is my Christian brother & will soon be welcomed by & glorified in the hands of his creator.

May god give strenth and peace to his flock and guidance to those who will be chosing a successor.
48 posted on 09/30/2003 8:54:37 AM PDT by DollyCali ( authenticty: to have arrived)
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To: E Rocc
I consider him a Saint. I consider the way that communism fell under his lash to be nothing short of miraculous. I credit Reagan too, of course, but Poland was the prime mover and John Paul was very much involved in that.
49 posted on 09/30/2003 8:57:09 AM PDT by johnb838 (Deconstruct the Left)
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To: firebrand
Amen to that.
50 posted on 09/30/2003 9:00:27 AM PDT by ShakeNJake
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