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SLAIN EAGLE FOUND IN N.J.
AP ^ | October 2, 2003

Posted on 10/02/2003 6:41:59 AM PDT by presidio9

Edited on 05/26/2004 5:16:57 PM PDT by Jim Robinson. [history]

A dead bald eagle with a bullet wound was found behind a shopping center Monday. Authorities said the male bird, believed to be about 3 years old, was probably shot elsewhere Sunday or Monday, but then left in Pennsville.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Department Special Agent Dorothy Manera said the eagle was believed to have nested in rural Salem County.


(Excerpt) Read more at nypost.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; Miscellaneous; Philosophy; US: New Jersey
KEYWORDS: baldeagle; buzzard

1 posted on 10/02/2003 6:42:00 AM PDT by presidio9
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To: presidio9
Is it time for Eagle recipes yet?
2 posted on 10/02/2003 6:44:28 AM PDT by cajungirl (no)
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To: All
Lighten Up, Francis!
Fundraising posts only happen quarterly, and are gone as soon as we meet the goal. Help make it happen.

3 posted on 10/02/2003 6:44:55 AM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: presidio9
This is horrible.

However, look in its belly. Osama bin Laden said he would martyr himself in the belly of the eagle this year.

4 posted on 10/02/2003 6:45:38 AM PDT by LurkedLongEnough (American-American.)
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To: presidio9
SLAIN EAGLE FOUND IN N.J.

Limbaugh did it!!!

5 posted on 10/02/2003 6:46:59 AM PDT by wayoverontheright
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To: cajungirl
Young eagles resemble vultures/buzzards. An inexperienced hunter might not know the difference.
6 posted on 10/02/2003 6:47:43 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: wayoverontheright
Well, young eagles are black, after all...
7 posted on 10/02/2003 6:48:15 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Young eagles resemble vultures/buzzards.

There are no buzzards indigenous to the United States, only vultures. This is a common misconception.

8 posted on 10/02/2003 6:54:34 AM PDT by Thermalseeker
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To: presidio9
The Bald Eagle is HUGE - not easy to mistake. Occasionally we have them fly thru here (central Fl.) but the real local beauty is the Red Tail or the Red Shoulder hawks. Beautiful birds.
9 posted on 10/02/2003 7:07:51 AM PDT by sandydipper (Never quit - never surrender!)
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To: Thermalseeker
There are no buzzards indigenous to the United States, only vultures. This is a common misconception.

"Buzzard" has been common slang for 150 years.

10 posted on 10/02/2003 7:15:33 AM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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To: sandydipper
"Bald Eagle is HUGE - not easy to mistake..."

Kayak down the Delaware every year, see them all the time. They usually fly high, catching the thermals to glide.

However, two years ago I got within 10 feet of one feeding in a tree. Majestic is the only word that comes to mind.
11 posted on 10/02/2003 7:20:44 AM PDT by PigRigger (Send donations to http://www.AdoptAPlatoon.org)
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To: PigRigger
I get them confused with turkey vultures here on Long Island.
12 posted on 10/02/2003 7:22:31 AM PDT by cyborg (Xtra-strength 10 gauge tinfoil hat)
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To: cyborg
I have to look carefully to make sure its not an osprey.
13 posted on 10/02/2003 7:27:55 AM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: Calvin Locke
A friend of mine who is president of an Audubon chapter advised me about the turkey vultures. Ospreys too! They had a pair of either ospreys or peregrine falcons living on the top of Nassau County Medical Center.
14 posted on 10/02/2003 7:30:06 AM PDT by cyborg (Xtra-strength 10 gauge tinfoil hat)
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To: presidio9
If it flies, it dies? Even rookie bird hunters can tell the difference between a crow and an eagle. It can get a little tricky with geese sometimes, but not eagles????
15 posted on 10/02/2003 7:30:22 AM PDT by showme_the_Glory (No more rhyming, and I mean it! ..Anybody got a peanut.....)
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To: presidio9

A person convicted of killing a bald eagle can be fined up to $250,000 and receive a two-year prison term.

HOLOCAUST - The Moral Question of Abortion

16 posted on 10/02/2003 7:33:13 AM PDT by Vindiciae Contra TyrannoSCOTUS
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To: Thermalseeker
In the south, we refer to turkey vultures as turkey buzzards.

They aren't buteo-butoes, but that's what we call them.

Did you find any thermals, yet?
17 posted on 10/02/2003 7:34:01 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
What on Earth is gained by hunting vultures? Is it just to kill something? I hunt deer and elk, but have zero respect for an idiot who views the world as his or her private shooting gallery.

That sort of person should not own guns. Period.

18 posted on 10/02/2003 7:47:29 AM PDT by bicycle thug (Fortia facere et pati Americanum est.)
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To: presidio9
A person convicted of killing a bald eagle can be fined up to $250,000 and receive a two-year prison term.

After the fine and prison sentence, the individual would have a visit from PETA.

19 posted on 10/02/2003 8:00:23 AM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (I am ashamed the dixie chicks are from Texas!)
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To: presidio9
Hope he wasnt killed.......... by a Pit Bull ;)
20 posted on 10/02/2003 8:02:56 AM PDT by joesnuffy (Moderate Islam Is For Dilettantes)
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To: presidio9
Where was Limbaugh?
21 posted on 10/02/2003 8:17:34 AM PDT by zook
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
And what kind of hunter is out hunting vultures?
22 posted on 10/02/2003 8:28:54 AM PDT by GovernmentShrinker
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To: presidio9
"Buzzard" has been common slang for 150 years.

True, but it's been wrong for 150 years. The term "buzzard" was used by European settlers for vultures, but they are two different birds. One is indigenous to Europe, the other the the Americas.

23 posted on 10/02/2003 8:37:10 AM PDT by Thermalseeker
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Comment #24 Removed by Moderator

Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

To: GovernmentShrinker
Ted Nugent? Out in the middle of nowhere, it happens. I don't know the reason for it; maybe farmers shoot em so they don't spread disease? Not certain. I just know from visiting aviarys that young eagles get mistaken for BUZZARDS :o)
26 posted on 10/02/2003 8:37:44 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Thermalseeker
The term "buzzard" was used by European settlers for vultures

You mean Hawks, I think.

27 posted on 10/02/2003 8:38:33 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Thermalseeker
True, but it's been wrong for 150 years. The term "buzzard" was used by European settlers for vultures, but they are two different birds. One is indigenous to Europe, the other the the Americas.

That's all well and good for scientific names, but there is nothing wrong with colloquial names. We have 6 names for cougars that I can think of, and one of them is "Moutain Lion."

From Websters:
Main Entry: buz·zard
Pronunciation: 'b&-z&rd
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English busard, from Old French,
alteration of buison, from Latin buteon, buteo hawk
Date: 14th century
1 chiefly British : BUTEO
2 : any of various usually large birds of prey (as the turkey vulture)

28 posted on 10/02/2003 8:43:54 AM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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To: presidio9
Hey, look at me! I get called all kinds of things for example!
29 posted on 10/02/2003 8:52:07 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
In the south, we refer to turkey vultures as turkey buzzards.

Yeah, I know, I grew up in Georgia and now reside in Tennessee, but refering to these birds as buzzards is factually incorrect. Did you find any thermals, yet?

Quite a few, actually. It's been soarable here every day since Sunday.........

30 posted on 10/02/2003 8:57:21 AM PDT by Thermalseeker
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Hey, look at me! I get called all kinds of things for example!

And, believe me, you usually deserve it.

31 posted on 10/02/2003 8:57:29 AM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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To: presidio9
There is an eagle's nest on property near where I live that is holding up development on a certain piece of land. I keep waiting for those eagles to turn up wearing "cement overshoes."
32 posted on 10/02/2003 9:00:04 AM PDT by hemogoblin (The few, the proud, the 537.)
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To: presidio9
any of various usually large birds of prey (as the turkey vulture)

Turkey Vulures are not birds of prey. They eat carrion.

33 posted on 10/02/2003 9:02:32 AM PDT by Thermalseeker
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To: Thermalseeker
"carrion"

"carrion waywardson"? Isn't that a recipe by Kansas?
34 posted on 10/02/2003 9:15:04 AM PDT by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Thermalseeker
Turkey Vulures are not birds of prey. They eat carrion.

I can see that you're one of those people who can't admit when he's wrong. Webster's told us you were wrong about the correct use of the word "buzzard." It also tells us you are wrong about he correct use of the term "birds of prey."

Again, from Websters:

Main Entry: bird of prey
Date: 14th century
: a carnivorous bird (as a hawk, falcon, or vulture) that feeds wholly or chiefly on meat taken by hunting or on carrion

35 posted on 10/02/2003 9:58:11 AM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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To: Thermalseeker
Turkey Vulures are not birds of prey. They eat carrion.

I can see that you're one of those people who can't admit when he's wrong. Webster's told us you were wrong about the correct use of the word "buzzard." It also tells us you are wrong about he correct use of the term "birds of prey."

Again, from Websters:

Main Entry: bird of prey
Date: 14th century
: a carnivorous bird (as a hawk, falcon, or vulture) that feeds wholly or chiefly on meat taken by hunting or on carrion

36 posted on 10/02/2003 9:58:46 AM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Young eagles resemble vultures/buzzards. An inexperienced hunter might not know the difference.

As if that's an excuse. What kind of an idiot would should a vulture? What on earth for? Those things are harmless and great to have around, unless you just happen to like the smell of roadkilled skunks and opossums and like the appearance of the occasional racoon-corpse sludgepile by your mailbox.

37 posted on 10/02/2003 11:17:39 AM PDT by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge.)
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
Young eagles resemble vultures/buzzards. An inexperienced hunter might not know the difference.

Yeah, but none of the above are legal to shoot... or even good to eat.

38 posted on 10/02/2003 11:20:14 AM PDT by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: hemogoblin
Call your nearest Indian Reservation. Indians can kill them as long as they use them in a ceremony.

We have a big "ceremony" about 6:00 every evening. :-)

39 posted on 10/02/2003 11:52:25 AM PDT by Sacajaweau (God Bless Our Troops!!)
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To: cajungirl
Eagles taste just like Spotted Owl.
40 posted on 10/02/2003 11:54:30 AM PDT by Solson (Our work is the presentation of our capabilities. - Von Goethe)
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To: presidio9
What I really hate is bird hunters who don't eat their kill.
41 posted on 10/02/2003 11:56:27 AM PDT by JoeGar
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To: JoeGar
What! No movie references to "bustard" and Cagney's "...mispellings" so far?
42 posted on 10/02/2003 1:08:21 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: presidio9
I can see that you're one of those people who can't admit when he's wrong.

No, I'm one of those people who is the first to admit when he is wrong. In this case I am not wrong. According to the late Roger Tory Peterson, world renound authority on birds and author of several books on the subject at hand, vultures are not birds of prey.

Webster's told us you were wrong about the correct use of the word "buzzard." It also tells us you are wrong about he correct use of the term "birds of prey."

Websters is simply wrong here. They are including a species of bird that is not a bird of prey into a group that are birds of prey. You sir, are wrong.

Again, from Websters: Main Entry: bird of prey Date: 14th century : a carnivorous bird (as a hawk, falcon, or vulture) that feeds wholly or chiefly on meat taken by hunting or on carrion

Interesting that you included the part about carrion in your second post, but not your first. I suggest that you review Field Guide to North American Birds published by National Geographic, or the National Audubon Society's Field Guide to North American Birds or Roger Tory Peterson's Peterson's Field Guide to Birds of Eastern Norht America. These books are considered by most to be the most informative on the subject. I seriously doubt anyone in the birding world would recognize or even consider Webster's Dictionary as a plausable replacement.

Once you have read up on the subject, then go fly with them for 28 years as I have. Observe them. Watch their behavior. Learn to identify each and every species of soaring bird at a casual glance, then come back and we'll talk birds. You'd better get busy, you've got a lot to learn.

43 posted on 10/03/2003 7:01:30 AM PDT by Thermalseeker
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To: Thermalseeker
I am done with this conversation. You are welcome to continue speaking your own language of falconry, and the rest of us will be content to speak American English as defined by Webster's. I'm sure we have enough in common otherwise to get along just fine.
44 posted on 10/03/2003 7:11:34 AM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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