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1 posted on 10/02/2003 5:07:54 PM PDT by SJackson
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To: dennisw; Cachelot; Yehuda; Nix 2; veronica; Catspaw; knighthawk; Alouette; Optimist; weikel; ...
If you'd like to be on or off this middle east/political ping list, please FR mail me.
2 posted on 10/02/2003 5:09:41 PM PDT by SJackson
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3 posted on 10/02/2003 5:10:56 PM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: SJackson
"It should come as no surprise that few politicians really care about the structural issues governing the division of power among the branches, and between the federal government and the states. Politicians get elected because of the immediate results demanded by their constituents, not the long-term structural arrangements debated by constitution-makers and political theorists." - Alan Dershowitz

Which is why it is obvious that we are living in post-Constitutional America. What this nation is coming down to is governance by the "rule of brute force" instead of the "rule of law". That, in my humble opinion, is a recipe for disaster. We have already seen several stark examples of it, including Ruby Ridge, Waco, and the Elian affair, Campaign Finance Reform, the Patriot Act (I know, I know, its a good tool to root out terrorists; think of what a President Hillary would do with that kind of discretionary authority), the Brady Law, the Enviro-fraudulent theft of private property in order to save some little vermin, all are examples of government run amuck. Sure, we have a decent man as president, currently; but what of the near future? Without some sort of basic, absolute principles to guide the law enforcers, the lawmakers, and the law-interpreters, respect for the law will dwindle to the point where balkanization, anarchy, chaos, civil war, and tyranny may be in our future. The Supreme Court has but one task: To safeguard the Constitution from the encroachment of ambitious politicians.

When they abrogate that responsibility and instead become the ultimate and arbitrary source of all law, taking on the role of a little oligarchy of dictators, liberty is lost. And liberty, once lost, can only be regained through extraordinary means.

4 posted on 10/02/2003 5:38:36 PM PDT by 45Auto (Big holes are (almost) always better.)
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To: SJackson
Bartley's "But somehow the Republic survived" is, to me, unpersuasive.

Over the years this country has, in the judicial arena along with others, altered and compromised the fairly carefully thought-out structure handed down to us. That the house still remains standing is not proof that it is still structurally sound -- it is only proof that at the time of each encounter it has been strong enough to withstand what it has encountered... thus far.

We've gained a fair amount of knowledge by observation of how such a system of government as we have ought to work, and what its strengths and weaknesses are.

But we are also overrun with those who have much invested in the present alterations of the original structure. Putting the pieces back or revamping the system "live" do not appear to be options. Neither, for the same reason, is it possible to take the original plan, revise it with the knowledge we've acquired, and overnight move into that structure.

It seems to me (please show me how I'm wrong) we are committed to keep tinkering with the system until it eventually collapses.

And the worst aspect of this is that it might be so slow and gradual we won't even be (quite) aware of it -- until it is too late. It has happened before, to a people who thought they were free.

5 posted on 10/02/2003 5:40:32 PM PDT by Eala (If used-car salesmen misrepresented cars the way the press does truth, they'd be jailed.)
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To: SJackson
The United States was founded as a Republic. That lasted until Marbury v Madison where the Supreme Court usurped the power of the people and the other branches of government.

Today we live in an Oligarcy where our natural rights are rented from a small group of black robed self-styled aristrocrats who believe in their pre-eminent rights to rule us by fiat.

Revolutions have sprung from less.
7 posted on 10/02/2003 6:24:08 PM PDT by jimkress (Go away Pat Go away!)
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To: SJackson
Ping for later.
12 posted on 10/02/2003 9:03:50 PM PDT by Torie (B)
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To: SJackson
“the end of democracy.”

Democracy is the problem, not the solution. We now have judges who do what the majority wants, not what the law says.

SCOTUS should have never intervened in the 2000 elections - Florida law was more than adequate to deal with the situation. The florida kangaroo supreme court could have (and should have) been impeached.

16 posted on 12/13/2003 3:26:37 PM PST by snopercod (The federal government will spend $21,000 per household in 2003, up from $16,000 in 1999.)
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BTTT
17 posted on 12/13/2003 4:36:20 PM PST by StriperSniper (The "mainstream" media is a left bank oxbow lake.)
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