Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Mystery blood clots felling U.S. troops
United Press International ^ | Tue, 7 Oct 2003 | Mark Benjamin, UniPresser

Posted on 10/07/2003 8:57:15 AM PDT by archy

Mystery blood clots felling U.S. troops

By Mark Benjamin
Investigations Editor
Published 10/6/2003 12:41 PM
View printer-friendly version

WASHINGTON, Oct. 6 (UPI) -- Unexplained blood clots are among the reasons a number of U.S. soldiers in Operation Iraqi Freedom have died from sudden illnesses, an investigation by United Press International has found.

In addition to NBC News Correspondent David Bloom, who died in April of a blood clot in his lung after collapsing south of Baghdad, the Pentagon has told families that blood clots caused two soldiers to collapse and die. At least eight other soldiers have also collapsed and died from what the military has described as non-combat-related causes.

A disturbing parallel has also surfaced: soldiers becoming ill or dying from similar ailments in the United States. In some cases, the soldiers, their families and civilian doctors blame vaccines given to them by the military, particularly the anthrax or smallpox shots.

Some of the soldiers who died suddenly had complained about symptoms suffered by Bloom -- including pain in the legs that could indicate problems with blood clots.

"If there is a significant number of deaths of this type, it would make you wonder what was going on," said Rose Hobby, whose brother-in-law, Army Spc. William Jeffries, died of a massive lung blood clot and swelling of his pancreas on March 31 after being evacuated from Kuwait.

"How many others are out there?"

"I would say that that number of cases among young healthy troops would seem to be unusual," Dr. Jeffrey Sartin, an infectious diseases doctor at the Gundersen Clinic in La Crosse, Wis., said about blood clot deaths. Sartin, a former Air Force doctor, last spring treated a soldier who might have died from anthrax or smallpox side effects.

"I am not aware that there were this many cases" during the first Gulf War, Sartin said.

The Pentagon has been investigating cases of a mysterious pneumonia that has killed two soldiers and put 17 more on ventilators. Besides the pneumonia, there do not seem to be any unexpected health trends given the number of troops in the region, said Army Surgeon General spokeswoman Virginia Stephanakis.

"We are not seeing larger numbers of most illnesses than we could have expected," Stephanakis said. "We have not seen any red flags. As far as I know, there has not been a huge red flag other than the pneumonia."

UPI's investigation found 17 soldiers who died of sudden illnesses. Families say they are bewildered by the deaths.

"Bill just dropped. They thought he had been shot. That is how suddenly it happened," said Rose Hobby, the woman whose 39-year-old brother-in-law William Jeffries collapsed in Kuwait.

After being evacuated from Kuwait to Rota, Spain, he was in intensive care for a week before dying, Hobby said in a telephone interview from Evansville, Ind. A doctor in Spain said Jeffries had "the largest pulmonary embolism he had ever seen," Hobby said. Jeffries also had a swelling of the pancreas, often caused by heavy drinking or some drugs. Jeffries was not a drinker, Hobby said.

Jeffries was back in the United States just days before his death to attend his own father's funeral. He had a scab on his arm from his recent smallpox vaccination. Hobby said she does not know if he got anthrax shots also, like most soldiers in the region.

Patrick Ivory arrived in Germany Aug. 16 to see his 26-year-old son, Army Spc. Craig S. Ivory, before he died. By then, Craig Ivory was already brain dead from a blood clot that hit his brain on Aug. 11.

"I had to make a decision to turn off life support, which was the most difficult thing I have ever done in my life," Patrick Ivory said in a telephone interview from his home in Port Matilda, Pa.

In other cases of apparently healthy soldiers who died suddenly in Operation Iraqi Freedom, families told UPI they have gotten few answers from the military. Local media reports have quoted military officials saying some of the deaths were apparent heart attacks; they have occurred from the beginning of the conflict through last week.

"If anybody has a right to know what my husband died of, it is me," said Lisa Ann Sherman, whose husband, Lt. Col. Anthony Sherman, suddenly clutched his chest and died Aug. 27 in Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. "The only thing they (the military) had to tell me was severe myocardial infarction," or a heart attack.

Anthony Sherman, 43, was a marathon runner and a triathlete.

Sherman said her husband complained of pain in his legs after getting anthrax shots. She said she has since learned that he went to sick call complaining of pain in his legs on the day he died. NBC's Bloom, who also got the anthrax and smallpox vaccines, complained of pain in his legs, presumably from a blood clot that has been attributed to cramped quarters in his armored vehicle.

"I am very suspicious about the true reason behind my husband's death," Sherman said.

The Pentagon said side effects from the anthrax vaccine are generally mild and rare.

In one case, however, the military said the anthrax vaccine did cause a soldier's chronic blood-clot condition.

Capt. Jason M. Nietupksi says he has suffered severe reactions to three anthrax shots given to him in the Army Reserves in February 2000, when he was 29 years old. Nietupski said the vaccine caused chronic fatigue, a skin reaction and a blood clot condition called Deep Vein Thrombosis. Nietupski described intense pain in his legs caused by the clots from that condition.

Nietupski is on blood thinners for the rest of his life. His records from the military state his blood clot condition was caused by the anthrax shots.

"CPT Nietupski had multiple adverse medical problems associated with three anthrax vaccinations he received while assigned to the 8th United States Army," read the results of a military line-of-duty inquiry report. "A condition described as Deep Vein Thrombosis, chronic fatigue and Steven Johnson's Syndrome all are adverse reactions that developed in this previously healthy individual from the anthrax vaccine. Evaluation by Walter Reed Physicians state (sic) that his symptoms are related to the anthrax vaccine."

The anthrax vaccine label warns of infrequent reports of heart attacks or strokes among people who have taken that vaccine. Both heart attacks and strokes can be caused by blood clots.

With smallpox shots, top Pentagon health officials released a study in June that said 37 soldiers have had a swelling of the tissue around the heart probably caused by the vaccine and eight other "cardiac events" occurred within a fortnight of getting the vaccine, including heart attacks. The Pentagon said they had seen no deaths that might have been caused by the smallpox vaccine.

Civilian officials have disagreed, at least in one case.

In the April 4 death of Army Spc. Rachael Lacy of Lynwood, Ill., a civilian doctor who treated her and the civilian coroner who performed her autopsy said the smallpox and anthrax vaccines the Army gave her March 2 in preparation for her deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom might have caused her death. Lacy had pneumonia and a swelling of the tissue surrounding the heart, among other things.

The Deputy Director of the Military Vaccine Agency, Col. John D. Grabenstein told UPI in August that Lacy's death has not been classified by the military as related to either vaccine.

"Rachael Lacy is still in the unexplained death program" at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Grabenstein said.

After two health care workers died of heart attacks after getting smallpox shots, in March the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that people with a risk of heart disease not take the vaccine.

Copyright © 2001-2003 United Press International


TOPICS: Anthrax Scare; Breaking News; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events; US: District of Columbia
KEYWORDS: allergy; anthrax; anthraxvaccine; army; atypicalpneumonia; bioport; biowar; blood; bloodagent; bloodclot; cbr; cdc; clot; clots; dvt; embolism; felling; iraq; iraqifreedom; kuwait; marines; mystery; mysteryillness; pulmonaryembolism; reaction; smallpox; troops; us; vaccination; vaccine
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-53 next last
This is a lengthier version of a similar UniPress article with a slightly different title. I'll try to find it and post a link.
1 posted on 10/07/2003 8:57:15 AM PDT by archy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: All


How we have, and can, change the world


History of Free Republic


Click The Logo to Donate
Click The Logo To Donate


2 posted on 10/07/2003 8:59:03 AM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: archy
Probably from sitting in cramped humvees and tanks and not getting the chance to move around.
3 posted on 10/07/2003 9:02:55 AM PDT by July 4th
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: July 4th
Not to mention dehydration. Plus, I wonder if troops are screened for heart disease, especially the older ones.
4 posted on 10/07/2003 9:04:10 AM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: archy
I think we need to keep in mind the FACT that in any large group of people, there are going to be deaths from many causes, and there will be unexplained clusters of certain diseases in any group too.

If all the soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines now engaged in the occupation of Iraq were home and on leave, many more would be dying of recreational/home maintenance accidents than are dying of illness or by facing enemy fire. It's a fact. Those who are worried about a serviceman or woman should bear in mind that even taking a bath in your own home isn't "safe." Our military is doing a fine job of limiting casualties under these conditions, better than we do of limiting casualties on interstates during holiday weekends.
5 posted on 10/07/2003 9:05:00 AM PDT by ChemistCat (Oklahoman by chance, not Californian by grace of God!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: archy
Man, those folks need to be dosing on aspirin. I know that makes it worse if you're shot but this is all rather odd.
6 posted on 10/07/2003 9:05:48 AM PDT by wardaddy (The Lizard King it was.....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: July 4th
Or it could be a side effect from vaccines. I wouldn't shy away from that. It happens. I prefer to look at it as a necessary evil.

Some children die from immunizations. It doesn't mean that we should stop immunizations.

It's rare. It just seems cold hearted when your family is the unfortunate victim of that rarity. That's what makes it a headline. You can't help but feel their pain and sorrow.

If one person in a million dies because of something that was necessary for the greater good, it isn't a comfort to the family of the one that died.
7 posted on 10/07/2003 9:09:51 AM PDT by GOP_Proud (Those who preach tolerance seem to have the least for my views.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: July 4th
Probably from sitting in cramped humvees and tanks and not getting the chance to move around.

Doesn't sound like the case with Jeffries in Kuwait, though.

And I've known plenty of guys who overheated and dehyrdrated themselves in tanks and APCs just as cramped in Vietnam without exhibiting such conditions, though heat stroke and heat exhaustion was not at all unknown. Likewise there's plenty of experience with US troops in Saudi Arabia and on the *Bright Star* exercises in Egypt that there should have been similar occurances in those locales, had that been the cause.

"Bill just dropped. They thought he had been shot. That is how suddenly it happened," said Rose Hobby, the woman whose 39-year-old brother-in-law William Jeffries collapsed in Kuwait.

After being evacuated from Kuwait to Rota, Spain, he was in intensive care for a week before dying, Hobby said in a telephone interview from Evansville, Ind. A doctor in Spain said Jeffries had "the largest pulmonary embolism he had ever seen," Hobby said. Jeffries also had a swelling of the pancreas, often caused by heavy drinking or some drugs. Jeffries was not a drinker, Hobby said.

Jeffries was back in the United States just days before his death to attend his own father's funeral. He had a scab on his arm from his recent smallpox vaccination. Hobby said she does not know if he got anthrax shots also, like most soldiers in the region.

-archy-/-
8 posted on 10/07/2003 9:11:04 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: archy
The Pentagon has been investigating cases of a mysterious pneumonia that has killed two soldiers and put 17 more on ventilators. Besides the pneumonia, there do not seem to be any unexpected health trends given the number of troops in the region, said Army Surgeon General spokeswoman Virginia Stephanakis.

The Bible codes say SARs will learn to mutate, too. Mutating diseases are politically correct these days. All they need is a host that carries a mutating disease to bond to.
In my opinion, we're in for a lot worse.

9 posted on 10/07/2003 9:11:49 AM PDT by concerned about politics (Lucifers lefties are still stuck at the bottom of Maslow's Hierarchy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wardaddy
Man, those folks need to be dosing on aspirin. I know that makes it worse if you're shot but this is all rather odd.

If I had been given the experimental Bioport anthrax *vaccine* I'd be eating asprin like candy.

-archy-/-

10 posted on 10/07/2003 9:12:47 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: archy
I think, though, that often times the clots that lodge in the lungs form in the legs.
11 posted on 10/07/2003 9:12:54 AM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: archy
And I've known plenty of guys who overheated and dehyrdrated themselves in tanks and APCs just as cramped in Vietnam without exhibiting such conditions, though heat stroke and heat exhaustion was not at all unknown.

I dunno -- I think there's probably something about standing around in helmets and body armor in temps of 130+ that could probably explain a lot of this....

12 posted on 10/07/2003 9:14:16 AM PDT by r9etb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: archy
Remember that reporter died from a pulmonary embolism...
13 posted on 10/07/2003 9:15:18 AM PDT by 2Jedismom (Egg Watch Day 6)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: archy
This is a lengthier version of a similar UniPress article with a slightly different title. I'll try to find it and post a link.

Here's the earlier posting of yesterday's article by Destro, Mystery blood clots kill U.S. troops.

14 posted on 10/07/2003 9:15:56 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2Jedismom
Remember that reporter died from a pulmonary embolism...

See the second paragraf of the story posted above:

In addition to NBC News Correspondent David Bloom, who died in April of a blood clot in his lung after collapsing south of Baghdad, the Pentagon has told families that blood clots caused two soldiers to collapse and die. At least eight other soldiers have also collapsed and died from what the military has described as non-combat-related causes.
*More on Bloom here*.

-archy-/-

15 posted on 10/07/2003 9:27:16 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: archy
The post below may be of interest (how journalists are expected by their editors to only report deaths/injuries to US soldiers, and not report anything positive)

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/995930/posts

16 posted on 10/07/2003 9:29:28 AM PDT by Born Conservative ("Forgive your enemies, but never forget their names" - John F. Kennedy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ChemistCat
It would be interesting to know statistically how the number of PEs stack up against other conflicts, and I suppose training exercises. This being Iraq, and having prior experience with Gulf War Syndrome, I think we should be not hasty to accept NOR dismiss this question.
17 posted on 10/07/2003 9:30:14 AM PDT by johnb838 (sarcasm tags are for wimps)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: r9etb
I dunno -- I think there's probably something about standing around in helmets and body armor in temps of 130+ that could probably explain a lot of this....

The current *Interceptor* body armor is a LOT worse than the sleeveless/collarless M1968 flak vests we wore, about half the weight, though the Vietnam era tanker's helmet was fully enclosed and heavier than either the present issue Combat Vehicle Crewman's helmet or the Kevlar K-pot helmet that replaced the pound-and a half heavier M1 steel helmet in use since WWII. The newer armor is a lot better at stopping AK projectiles, of course: an AK round would go right through the front of a flak jacket, made for stopping shell fragments rather than bullets, and right out the second layer in back, too.

I doubt the crews inside the tanks are wearing full body armor, that makes it near-impossible to get out in a hurry. It's usually those detailed to groundpounder details or external security of their tanks so burdened. But tank crews may indeed be less used to operating in full armor outside their vehicles, and may be accounting for some, if not all, of the casualties.


18 posted on 10/07/2003 9:39:04 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: July 4th
Probably from sitting in cramped humvees and tanks and not getting the chance to move around.

Exactly. Add getting dehydrated in the desert heat on top up that and the blood becomes even more prone to thrombosis.

In the airline business, this has the nickname "Economy Class Syndrome".

19 posted on 10/07/2003 9:41:20 AM PDT by Polybius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: July 4th
Yup. Real common in airline travelers.
20 posted on 10/07/2003 9:41:51 AM PDT by pfflier
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: archy
Is it possible that AP could actually find something nice to report on out of Iraq? Over the years we can only hope. I'm still waiting.

While I do have some concern over this, this still looks for all the world like more propaganda. The troops are dying, it's a quagmire. It's costing lots of money. What are we doing there?

If the print media can't find a decent story to report out of the region, the U.S. should revoke their passes and send them packing. AP should be working for Al Jazeera. Their stories seem to have that same cutting edge, always cutting our side to shreds.
21 posted on 10/07/2003 9:44:39 AM PDT by DoughtyOne
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mewzilla
I think, though, that often times the clots that lodge in the lungs form in the legs.

That's the condition known as DVT, as I recall. We got briefings about it prior to hot weather training exercises at the National Training Center at Ft Irwin, CA, chosen because of it's similarity to Middle Eastern desert terrain and conditions.

See the FReeppost response *here*

-archy-/-

22 posted on 10/07/2003 9:46:12 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: DoughtyOne
Is it possible that AP could actually find something nice to report on out of Iraq? Over the years we can only hope. I'm still waiting.

While I do have some concern over this, this still looks for all the world like more propaganda. The troops are dying, it's a quagmire. It's costing lots of money. What are we doing there?

Remember that the AP is not a monolithic entity unto and of itself, but a cooperative membership of affiliated newspapers. If there's something about the AP's coverage you're upset with, let your local newspaper know about it, and it does indeed start getting back to the AP personnel in the field.

But note that this story is sourced from United Press International, and in the past, Unipressers have been both better sources of accurate reporting, and often former military participants themselves, who tricky PAO officers found it hard to prevaricate their way past. And other UniPressers, like UPI staffer Kate Webb, tasken as a POW in Cambodia and who surprisingly lived to tell about it, were often equally dedicated and knowledgable. We'll see if a sharp UPI reporter who meets those standards comes out of this war as well.

Interesting, though that out of all of the 1991 Desert Shield/Desert Storm period, not one AP guy's story was even nominated for a Beidler for their war reporting; only freelancer/semiretired cartoonist Bill Mauldin and one other newspaperman.

-archy-/- -archy-/-

23 posted on 10/07/2003 9:56:26 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: archy
Folks let's see what is happening with these deaths. I am one not to forget how we sprayed Agent Orange all over ground troops in Vietnam, or the troops came in on patrol after a spraying and were exposed to it. I know I was one of them.

Also let's not forget how Agent Orange exposure was played down for years. Do you Vietnam era vets know that if you are type II Diabetic, you need to call the VA and get signed up for disability pay and medical treatment? Thanks once again to exposure in Vietnam.

I'm not bad mouthing the military, but not everyone has the troops health in their hearts. We need to apply what we've seen historically to the present, or we haven't learned anything.

24 posted on 10/07/2003 9:59:38 AM PDT by Tactical
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2Jedismom
First thing I thought of was David Bloom from NBC who had pain behind the knees first!
25 posted on 10/07/2003 10:00:13 AM PDT by PhiKapMom (Vote for Arnold -- Republican by Choice!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Tactical
I'm not bad mouthing the military, but not everyone has the troops health in their hearts. We need to apply what we've seen historically to the present, or we haven't learned anything.

Concern for the welfare of the troops, active duty or former, is hardly *bad mouthing the military;* neither is the ferretting out of criminal war profiteers who accept personal gain from suffering and injury to American troops, even if highly placed General or Flag Rank officers are implicated. Or higher.

But neither has the VA exactly established itself as either an agency whose first loyalty is to those veterans it serves, or an impartial one. There's plenty of room for some very valid criticism in both departments.

-archy-/-

26 posted on 10/07/2003 10:09:19 AM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: wardaddy
Yep...just a coated baby asprin per day should do it...
27 posted on 10/07/2003 10:20:47 AM PDT by joesnuffy (Moderate Islam Is For Dilettantes)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ChemistCat
You may be right regarding deaths from all causes. But deaths from specific causes are another matter. 18 deaths from blod clots may be statistically insignificant in the general population over time, but it is probably significant in the short period of time with which they occurred, the smaller unique subset of the population in which they occurred and where they occurred.

I hope someone keeps an eye on this with periodic updates.
28 posted on 10/07/2003 10:23:31 AM PDT by stylin19a (is it vietnam yet ?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: archy
We've got what 100-150 thousand troops over there? They mention about ten to fifteen troops who have exhibited problems. While I think this may be something to watch for, it's not nearly as desperate as the headline makes it look.

There isn't an epidemic of problems. The whole body of troops isn't coming down with symptoms by any means.

This just seems like shody journalism to me. They're trying to build another key issue to take the US down over. I resent it.

Had the title been something like, "A Few Servicement Experience Circulation Problems" I would have read it and moved on.

Perhaps I'm overreacting to it. I do care what's happening to our troops, but I don't want a small instance of circulation problems to be exploited to basicly undercut their efforts. The media's fave tactic IMO.
29 posted on 10/07/2003 10:28:54 AM PDT by DoughtyOne
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: mewzilla
No, they arent.
30 posted on 10/07/2003 10:48:14 AM PDT by EuroFrog (Im in the know! I think.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: EuroFrog
Take pity, I'm decaffeinating. What aren't what? :)
31 posted on 10/07/2003 10:49:18 AM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: ChemistCat
Don't let common sense enter the discussion. Shame on you!
32 posted on 10/07/2003 11:09:26 AM PDT by RobbyS (CHIRHO)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: EuroFrog
Oh, did you mean screened for heart disease? If so, might not be a bad idea.
33 posted on 10/07/2003 11:12:45 AM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: July 4th
We must also remember David Bloom seemed the first to die from this.
34 posted on 10/07/2003 11:30:38 AM PDT by JustPiper (18 out of 19 HiJacker's had State issued Driver's License's !!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: archy
The doctors that refused orders to take the anthrax vaccine and had their military careers ruined because of it may know something we don't. Why else would they have been so adamant?
35 posted on 10/07/2003 11:30:57 AM PDT by Excuse_My_Bellicosity (Stop the violins!! Visualize whirled peas...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: joesnuffy
Folks should talk to their doc before starting a low dose aspirin regimen, though :) Aspirin can have side affects even at low doses.
36 posted on 10/07/2003 11:32:40 AM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Excuse_My_Bellicosity
The doctors that refused orders to take the anthrax vaccine and had their military careers ruined because of it may know something we don't. Why else would they have been so adamant?

As do the Air National Guard and Reservist pilots who fly for civilian airlines, and have been told that if they receive the experimental anthrax *vaccine* and exhibit the reactions some have reported, they'll lose their company flight status immediately. Those are the military pilots who've refused the shots, for the most part.

It's interesting that you can't force the experimental drugs on an enemy prisoner of war or it's a war crime, can't force it on a convicted prisoner or it's a felony federal civil rights violation, but military enlisted personnel who refuse the shots are court-martialed and jailed. Makes you real proud to be an American.

-archy-/-

37 posted on 10/07/2003 12:00:46 PM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: JustPiper
We must also remember David Bloom seemed the first to die from this.

Or the first whose death couldn't be kept concealed from the press and public.

-archy-/-

38 posted on 10/07/2003 12:02:00 PM PDT by archy (Keep in mind that the milk of human kindness comes from a beast that is both cannibal and a vampire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: CholeraJoe
Ping.
39 posted on 10/07/2003 1:26:39 PM PDT by Lucy Lake
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: archy
btt

God bless our troops.

40 posted on 10/07/2003 3:06:34 PM PDT by Ferret Fawcet ("A wise man's heart inclines him toward the Right, but a fool's heart...to the Left" ~Ecc. 10:2)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mewzilla
They are no good and cheap tests to screen for heart disease. I recently took an Armed Forces physical without even an electrocardiogram, a.k.a. ecg or ekg, and I'm 51 years old.

Without a history of heart disease or current signs and symptoms screening exams are very expensive and find very small numbers of patients with asymptomatic disease.

Even the annual physical exam is now being called into question. Doctors in private practice still like them only if they can bill separately for the tests and the re-imbursement rate is profitable.
41 posted on 10/07/2003 3:29:36 PM PDT by neverdem (Say a prayer for New York both for it's lefty statism and the probability the city will be hit again)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: archy
Eating aspirin like candy would invite gastrointestinal ulcers and possibly fatal hemorrhage. It almost happened to my mother.
42 posted on 10/07/2003 3:45:37 PM PDT by neverdem (Say a prayer for New York both for it's lefty statism and the probability the city will be hit again)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: mewzilla
You're correct. That's what the story was referring to when it mentioned deep vein thrombosis(DVT). These large clots are thought to form typically in the thighs from prolonged immobization or a relative stasis in the venous circulation. Some people also have inherited or acquired diseases which causes their blood to be hypercoagulable. A DVT in the thigh has about a 50% incidence of causing a pulmonary embolism, i.e. the clot dislodges from the thigh and manages to traverse through the rigth side of the heart and then plugs up the pulmonary arteries.
43 posted on 10/07/2003 4:11:44 PM PDT by neverdem (Say a prayer for New York both for it's lefty statism and the probability the city will be hit again)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: neverdem
How about a lipid profile? Do the troops get that routinely with their physicals? And maybe more tests for service folks over forty, or with a strong family history? If we're asking people to take these vaccinations, serve in these conditions, the least we can do is offer testing to nminimize risk. I for one wouldn't mind spending the money.
44 posted on 10/07/2003 4:17:04 PM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: stylin19a
Oh, I'm just saying that even if they were scattered over the US there would still be disease clusters in the population. In Iraq it is this blood clot/pneumonia thing, at home it might be something else, or might not.
45 posted on 10/07/2003 4:41:08 PM PDT by ChemistCat (Oklahoman by chance, not Californian by grace of God!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: mewzilla
I know they drew my blood for cholesterol testing, and I'm pretty sure they did a complete lipid profile, as they did 12 years ago. They will ask if you smoke.

The Report of Medical History, Standard Form 93, has nothing for family history, which is the form used routine screening examinations prior to entrance into and separation from the Armed Forces.

A doctor in private practice will ask for family history usually at the first office visit or admission to the hospital. The patient usually comes with a chief complaint.
46 posted on 10/07/2003 4:56:25 PM PDT by neverdem (Say a prayer for New York both for it's lefty statism and the probability the city will be hit again)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: stylin19a
I hope someone keeps an eye on this with periodic updates.

I'm sure those of us that have love ones over there will. I am one that wants to be in the know.

47 posted on 10/07/2003 6:12:57 PM PDT by TexKat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: archy
Ping!

I've got two sons who were "treated" with both the smallpox and anthrax shots.

One (23 years old and otherwise in perfect health) is having strange symptoms mimicking a heart attack.

He is still on active duty. He just got back from Saudi two months ago.

When he runs for aerobics, muscles in his chest around his heart tense up. He has been to the E.R. twice now for it.

He never had the problem before the shots.

Really makes me wonder.

Thanks for the post!

48 posted on 10/08/2003 7:04:57 AM PDT by Happy2BMe (LIBERTY has arrived in Iraq - Now we can concentrate on HOLLYWEED!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DoughtyOne
You wrote:

"While I do have some concern over this, this still looks for all the world like more propaganda.".

 

I agree with this sentiment. Below, I have analyzed the original article, to support this opinion.

[I am not dismissing anyone's death or suffering. Nor, am I attempting to make the case that these vaccines are harmless. I am merely analyzing the article.]

 

 

WASHINGTON, Oct. 6 (UPI) -- Unexplained blood clots are among the reasons a number of U.S. soldiers in Operation Iraqi Freedom have died from sudden illnesses, an investigation by United Press International has found.

"Blood clots are among the reasons..." Below, we see that: the "Pentagon" "told families" that blood clots were the cause of TWO deaths:

In addition to NBC News Correspondent David Bloom, who died in April of a blood clot in his lung after collapsing south of Baghdad, the Pentagon has told families that blood clots caused two soldiers to collapse and die.

This apparent fact is coupled with another apparent fact:

At least eight other soldiers have also collapsed and died from what the military has described as non-combat-related causes.

This juxtaposition of two facts leads the reader to ASSUME that these "eight other" deaths are ALSO from blood clots. The fact that "the military" described these eight deaths as "non-combat related" merely means not shot or blown up. The "cause" could be anything--accident, camel bites, malaria, etc. etc.

 

A disturbing parallel has also surfaced: soldiers becoming ill or dying from similar ailments in the United States. In some cases, the soldiers, their families and civilian doctors blame vaccines given to them by the military, particularly the anthrax or smallpox shots.

There is NO "parallel" shown here. Soldiers got sick, or died, both here, and in Iraq. "In some cases..." "families and civilian doctors blame vaccines..." Whether "some cases...in the United States..." were caused by vaccines does not mean there is any connection with eight otherwise unexplained deaths in Iraq.

Further, what does "similar ailments" actually mean? Unexplained blood clots? Or unexplained deaths? We are forced to make ASSUMPTIONS, which are not supported by any actual evidence.

 

Some of the soldiers who died suddenly had complained about symptoms suffered by Bloom -- including pain in the legs that could indicate problems with blood clots.

Which are "some of the soldiers?" Were they the ones in the US, whose illness was blamed on vaccines? Or, maybe, were they the TWO deaths known to have been caused by blood clots? A real "journalist" should be able (and WILLING) to make that clear.

 

"If there is a significant number of deaths of this type, it would make you wonder what was going on," said Rose Hobby, whose brother-in-law, Army Spc. William Jeffries, died of a massive lung blood clot and swelling of his pancreas on March 31 after being evacuated from Kuwait.

"How many others are out there?"

Do you imagine that this lady just HAPPENED to ask this question, when this reporter just happened to be there? This case must be one of the TWO known cases of "blood clots." Merely because she was induced into asking these questions does not imbue the questions with any actual significance. This is no more than a propaganda technique intended to make us ASSUME that there are hordes of relatives demanding THE TRUTH.

 

"I would say that that number of cases among young healthy troops would seem to be unusual," Dr. Jeffrey Sartin, an infectious diseases doctor at the Gundersen Clinic in La Crosse, Wis., said about blood clot deaths. Sartin, a former Air Force doctor, last spring treated a soldier who might have died from anthrax or smallpox side effects.

"I am not aware that there were this many cases" during the first Gulf War, Sartin said.

This is very shabby reporting. "That number of cases..." "This many cases..." Is the good doctor talking about TWO cases? Or is he talking about some number made up by this "journalist?" Did he "treat a soldier" IN Iraq? In Wisconsin? Did "the soldier" die? Was he sick, with an unknown illness, and "might have died?" was the doctor induced (by leading questions) to state that the soldier's illness "might have" been caused by "anthrax or smallpox side effects?" Notice that he didn't even say "VACCINES side effects."

There is no actual connection between what this doctor said, and the rest of the story. It merely SEEMS as if there were.

 

The Pentagon has been investigating cases of a mysterious pneumonia that has killed two soldiers and put 17 more on ventilators. Besides the pneumonia, there do not seem to be any unexpected health trends given the number of troops in the region, said Army Surgeon General spokeswoman Virginia Stephanakis.

"We are not seeing larger numbers of most illnesses than we could have expected," Stephanakis said. "We have not seen any red flags. As far as I know, there has not been a huge red flag other than the pneumonia."

There does not seem to be any actual connection between these pneumonia cases, and the TWO blood clot cases. The juxtaposition makes it SEEM as if there were one.

 

UPI's investigation found 17 soldiers who died of sudden illnesses. Families say they are bewildered by the deaths.

OK. We have TWO blood clot deaths. We have TWO pneumonia deaths. We have the already mentioned "...eight other soldiers have also collapsed and died..." So, "UPI's investigation" found FIVE more "soldiers who died of sudden illnesses." The article does not mention whether these five deaths had a known cause, OR, whether they were in Iraq, or here, in the US.

Of course, the families will feel "bewildered," especially, if the cause of death is not known.

"Bill just dropped. They thought he had been shot. That is how suddenly it happened," said Rose Hobby, the woman whose 39-year-old brother-in-law William Jeffries collapsed in Kuwait.

After being evacuated from Kuwait to Rota, Spain, he was in intensive care for a week before dying, Hobby said in a telephone interview from Evansville, Ind. A doctor in Spain said Jeffries had "the largest pulmonary embolism he had ever seen," Hobby said. Jeffries also had a swelling of the pancreas, often caused by heavy drinking or some drugs. Jeffries was not a drinker, Hobby said.

Jeffries was back in the United States just days before his death to attend his own father's funeral. He had a scab on his arm from his recent smallpox vaccination. Hobby said she does not know if he got anthrax shots also, like most soldiers in the region.

What does "just days before his death," mean? A legitimate "journalist" would ask the question, and record the answer. Is it just THREE days? Or maybe THREE HUNDRED days? We must ASSUME what is meant.

 

Patrick Ivory arrived in Germany Aug. 16 to see his 26-year-old son, Army Spc. Craig S. Ivory, before he died. By then, Craig Ivory was already brain dead from a blood clot that hit his brain on Aug. 11.

"I had to make a decision to turn off life support, which was the most difficult thing I have ever done in my life," Patrick Ivory said in a telephone interview from his home in Port Matilda, Pa.

Obviously, this soldier is the other (of TWO) deaths known to be caused by a blood clot. It is touching, as any death is, but has no evidentiary value.

 

In other cases of apparently healthy soldiers who died suddenly in Operation Iraqi Freedom, families told UPI they have gotten few answers from the military. Local media reports have quoted military officials saying some of the deaths were apparent heart attacks; they have occurred from the beginning of the conflict through last week.

Maybe, there is no conspiracy. Maybe, "the military" just doesn't know. The second sentence makes it SEEM that there have been MANY unexplained deaths, even though the writer has only come up with ten.

 

"If anybody has a right to know what my husband died of, it is me," said Lisa Ann Sherman, whose husband, Lt. Col. Anthony Sherman, suddenly clutched his chest and died Aug. 27 in Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. "The only thing they (the military) had to tell me was severe myocardial infarction," or a heart attack.

Anthony Sherman, 43, was a marathon runner and a triathlete.

A close relative (of mine) had a heart attack, at 45, even though he was a highly conditioned mountain climber.

Sherman said her husband complained of pain in his legs after getting anthrax shots. She said she has since learned that he went to sick call complaining of pain in his legs on the day he died. NBC's Bloom, who also got the anthrax and smallpox vaccines, complained of pain in his legs, presumably from a blood clot that has been attributed to cramped quarters in his armored vehicle.

****This evidence has a lot more evidentiary value that ALL of the article above. Remember, the heart will be damaged in the same way, whether a coronary artery is blocked by plaque, or by a blood clot. A blood clot in the lungs will be called a "pulmonary embolism," and a blood clot in a coronary artery will be called a "coronary embolism," or a "heart attack."

 

"I am very suspicious about the true reason behind my husband's death," Sherman said.

And I am very suspicious about an "investigator," or "journalist," who uses the pain of a new widow to make a propaganda piece.

 

The Pentagon said side effects from the anthrax vaccine are generally mild and rare.

When did "The Pentagon" say this? Two years ago, or last month? Although I, personally, think that there is more likelihood of harm from these vaccines, the "Pentagon" statement is not proof of a cover-up.

 

In one case, however, the military said the anthrax vaccine did cause a soldier's chronic blood-clot condition.

Capt. Jason M. Nietupksi says he has suffered severe reactions to three anthrax shots given to him in the Army Reserves in February 2000, when he was 29 years old. Nietupski said the vaccine caused chronic fatigue, a skin reaction and a blood clot condition called Deep Vein Thrombosis. Nietupski described intense pain in his legs caused by the clots from that condition.

Nietupski is on blood thinners for the rest of his life. His records from the military state his blood clot condition was caused by the anthrax shots.

"CPT Nietupski had multiple adverse medical problems associated with three anthrax vaccinations he received while assigned to the 8th United States Army," read the results of a military line-of-duty inquiry report. "A condition described as Deep Vein Thrombosis, chronic fatigue and Steven Johnson's Syndrome all are adverse reactions that developed in this previously healthy individual from the anthrax vaccine. Evaluation by Walter Reed Physicians state (sic) that his symptoms are related to the anthrax vaccine."

****This particular case is again, much more valuable that the rest of the article. It ties "blood clots" to the anthrax vaccine. But, remember, this article has only presented TWO cases (probably three, counting the "heart attack" case) of death by "blood clots."

 

The anthrax vaccine label warns of infrequent reports of heart attacks or strokes among people who have taken that vaccine. Both heart attacks and strokes can be caused by blood clots.

With smallpox shots, top Pentagon health officials released a study in June that said 37 soldiers have had a swelling of the tissue around the heart probably caused by the vaccine and eight other "cardiac events" occurred within a fortnight of getting the vaccine, including heart attacks. The Pentagon said they had seen no deaths that might have been caused by the smallpox vaccine.

****This, also constitutes important evidence of disease (at least, apparently) caused by the smallpox vaccine.

Civilian officials have disagreed, at least in one case.

In the April 4 death of Army Spc. Rachael Lacy of Lynwood, Ill., a civilian doctor who treated her and the civilian coroner who performed her autopsy said the smallpox and anthrax vaccines the Army gave her March 2 in preparation for her deployment for Operation Iraqi Freedom might have caused her death. Lacy had pneumonia and a swelling of the tissue surrounding the heart, among other things.

"MIGHT have caused her death." This is written in such a way that we ignore the "MIGHT," and ASSUME that it DID CAUSE here death.

The Deputy Director of the Military Vaccine Agency, Col. John D. Grabenstein told UPI in August that Lacy's death has not been classified by the military as related to either vaccine.

"Rachael Lacy is still in the unexplained death program" at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Grabenstein said.

All this means is that "the military" has not (yet) changed the autopsy's "MIGHT have caused her death," to a DID CAUSE.

 

After two health care workers died of heart attacks after getting smallpox shots, in March the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that people with a risk of heart disease not take the vaccine.

****This, again, is actual evidence in the case against these vaccines.

 

There is some sort of connection between these vaccines, and blood clots (and, I believe, other disease states). The four cases marked with asterisks **** have actual evidentiary value. The remainder of this piece is either horribly badly written, or constitutes propaganda, aimed at inflaming public opinion against the military, or the Iraq war.

DG

49 posted on 10/08/2003 10:57:43 AM PDT by DoorGunner ( (Non Hæretico Comburendo))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: DoorGunner; DoughtyOne; archy; All
The writer of the original article seems to have a penchant for writing articles which are used as propaganda for various anti-war/anti-Bush/anti-America outfits:

 

 

4,000 U.S. Non-Combat Evacuations in Iraq
Mark Benjamin
United Press International
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20031003-024528-3543r
Posted 10/5/2003

October 3, 2003, Summary: The article below is very important because it
reveals how the US Department of Defense is intentionally misleading
American citizens and reporters about the scope of the carnage inflicted on US
soldiers by President George Bush's unilateral invasion and occupation of
Iraq. The article confirms nearly 4,000 non-combat evacuations from Iraq
since March 2003. When added to the more than 2,000 killed in action and
wounded in action, the total casualty count exceeds 6,000. Indeed, the high
price of Bush's war escalates steeply every day ...


Washington, DC (UPI) - Nearly 4,000 U.S. troops have been medically
evacuated from Operation Iraqi Freedom for non-combat reasons -- with more
than one in five of those for psychiatric or neurological problems, according to
Pentagon data.

A total of 3,915 evacuations from the region have been for non-combat medical
problems. A combination of what the Pentagon is calling evacuations for
"psychiatric" and "neurological" problems make up 22 percent of the total,
with 478 and 387 evacuations, respectively.

Another 544 evacuations have been for "general surgery," 290 for gynecological
reasons and 118 for orthopedic problems.

Army Surgeon General spokeswoman Virginia Stephanakis, who supplied the
data, said on Friday that she had few details, but that the Pentagon had not
detected any "red flags" indicating troubling or unexpected health patterns.

Some of the evacuations were for accidental injuries, she said, adding that
orthopedic, or bone, problems might reflect vehicle accidents.

A leading veterans' group said the data needed to be studied to understand
the true cost of the war and potential health hazards.

"Clearly there is more detail that needs to be given about the nature and
causes of these evacuations," said Steve Robinson, executive director of the
National Gulf War Resource Center.

In August, the Pentagon announced an investigation into a mysterious
pneumonia that killed two soldiers and made 17 others so sick they needed
ventilators to breathe. The probe is focusing on the role of smoking, those
officials said.

An investigation by United Press International found that 17 soldiers in
Operation Iraqi Freedom have died from sudden illnesses, including three
with fluid in the lungs, eight who suddenly collapsed and three who were found
dead in their cots.

Robinson questioned whether any of the psychiatric or neurological problems
might be related to Lariam, a common anti-malaria drug given to many
soldiers in the region. Lariam's FDA-approved product label warns of reports
of hallucinations, seizures, paranoia, aggression, delusions and suicide.

Published reports this summer said the military was investigating several
suspected suicides. UPI found that at least 15 service members in Operation
Iraqi Freedom have died from what were described as non-combat gunshot
wounds, the latest on Sept. 30.

The Pentagon says it sometimes uses Lariam, known generically as
mefloquine, over other anti-malaria drugs because side effects are rare and
must be weighed against the risk of getting malaria.

A total of 318 soldiers have died in Operation Iraqi Freedom since March 20,
according to the Pentagon. Another 1,380 soldiers have been wounded in
action as of Oct. 1.

Contributing: Christine Moyer

http://www.veteransforcommonsense.org/newsArticle.asp?id=1155




Published on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 by UPI
Pentagon Papers Leaker Seeks
Leaks on Iraq
by Mark Benjamin

WASHINGTON -- Daniel Ellsberg, who in 1971 leaked the Pentagon Papers, on
Tuesday called on government officials to leak documents to Congress and the
press showing the Bush administration is lying in building its case against
Saddam Hussein.

Ellsberg, an ex-Marine and military analyst, said he held out hope that exposing
alleged lies by the Bush administration could still avert an unjust war. He warned
that whistleblowers may face ruin of their careers and marriages and be
incarcerated.

"Don't wait until the bombs start falling," Ellsberg said at a Tuesday press
conference in Washington. "If you know the public is being lied to and you have
documents to prove it, go to Congress and go to the press."

Ellsberg did not leak the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times until 1971,
although he says he had information in the mid-1960s that he now wishes he had
leaked then.

"Do what I wish I had done before the bombs started falling" in Vietnam, Ellsberg
said. "I think there is some chance that the truth could avert war."

The thousands of pages in the Pentagon Papers showed the government's secret
decision-making process on Vietnam since the end of World War II. Their
publication -- the government sued and lost to prevent it -- is widely credited with
helping to turn public opinion against the war in Southeast Asia.

Ellsberg's press conference comes a little more than a week after the London
Observer reported on what it said is a top-secret memo showing that the United
States planned to spy on U.N. delegates to gain an advantage in the debate over
Iraq.

The Observer reported the electronic memo dated Jan. 31, by high-ranking
National Security Agency operative Fank Koza, says the agency is "mounting a
surge" of intelligence activities mostly focused on U.N. Security Council members
for "information that could give U.S. policy-makers an edge in obtaining results
favorable to U.S. goals or to head off surprises."

NSA spokesman Patrick Weadon wouldn't comment on the authenticity of the
e-mail memorandum. "We have no statement," he said.

U.N. ambassadors have mostly shrugged off the memorandum as reflecting the
regular course of business at the United Nations.

Ellsberg said this story on spying at the United Nations is potentially more
significant than the Pentagon Papers because it comes before a war has begun
and it shows a desperate Bush administration. "This leak is potentially more
significant than the release of the Pentagon Papers, since it is extraordinarily
timely," Ellsberg said.

This past Sunday, the Observer reported that an employee at the top-secret
British Government Communications Headquarters had been arrested following
publication of the story. Ellsberg said reporters at the Observer told him the
28-year old woman arrested was not the source of the leak.

A second U.S. diplomat resigned yesterday in protest against the Bush
administration's war stance. John H. Brown, who served in the diplomatic corps
since 1981, said Bush's disregard for the views of other nations was giving birth to
"an anti-American century." Last month, a senior U.S. diplomat based in Athens,
political counselor John Brady Kiesling, resigned with similar complaints.

Last week, Mohamed ElBaradei, director general of the International Atomic
Energy Agency, rejected a Bush administration claim that Iraq had tried to
purchase high-strength aluminum tubes to use in centrifuges for uranium
enrichment.

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0311-11.htm

DG

50 posted on 10/08/2003 11:32:18 AM PDT by DoorGunner ( (Non Hæretico Comburendo))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-53 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson