Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The anti-Catholicism of the "National Catholic Reporter"

Posted on 01/28/2004 12:46:44 PM PST by heyheyhey

In my opinion, the NCR (different from the National Catholic Register and from the Catholic World Report) appears to be classic type of a wolf in sheep's clothing. It is the most anti-Catholic weekly publication that I know, and yet it continues pretending to be "Catholic." The evidence of NCR's anti-Catholic and anti-Christian agenda is somewhat camouflaged, so let it be dug up and brought to daylight in this thread.

- Why, and who cares? Under normal circumstances I couldn't care less, but very many American priests and religious read the NCR, and it has poisonously influenced a generation or two of priests. When we see the sorry state of affairs in our Church we should know, for our own protection, where the devil dwells. Many screwy things (most of all the disdain for the Teaching Magisterium) originated and/or have been, or continue to be, sponsored by the NCR.

There is only one FReeper, as far as I know, vigorously defending the NCR, so he is rare and dear - let's be respectful to him.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Moral Issues; Religion & Politics
KEYWORDS: anticatholic; catholic; catholiclist; ncr
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-200 ... 451-489 next last

1 posted on 01/28/2004 12:46:44 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: american colleen; ninenot; BlackElk; k omalley
A sampler of self-explanatory utterances by NCR's Tom Fox (I posted them before on another NCR-related thread),
September 24, 2003 - on sexual morality

With so many Catholics rejecting an official church teaching, and the pope insisting on it at the same time, questions of authority and its proper role cannot be avoided. As a matter of fact, the authority issue has been connected to the sexuality issue for more than a quarter of a century, raising the importance of trying to sort out and resolve the human sexuality questions.

There is a tradition within Catholicism that speaks of the sensus fidelium. It literally means "sense of the faithful." It means that the faithful, as a whole, have an instinct or "sense" about when a teaching is -- or is not -- in harmony with the true faith. At a minimum, the sensus fidelium has been demanding that the church reconsider its teachings on human sexuality.

Prominent Catholics have made repeated efforts to do just this since the 1968 papal encyclical. Those who have dared enter these waters have more often than not been denigrated by church authorities for setting forth. Connected to any reassessment has been considerable fear and trauma. Theologians who have dared have found their careers thwarted. As a result, as pressure has grown to probe church teachings on sexuality so has the resistance by key authority figures.

October 10, 2003 - on Church authority

The process reminds me of a statement that the spiritual guru, Edwina Gately, once made, referring to today's Catholic hierarchy. "The God they give us is too small to worship."

November 18, 2003 - on priestly celibacy

Our bishops have become cafeteria Catholics. They seem to think we can do without the Eucharist......
The bishops, however, are so resistant to considering optional celibacy that they view Catholics who raise the issue as "having an agenda," implying that those who seek change really, deep down, want to hurt the church, not extend its mission to build the Reign of God.
This is crazy. No, it's worse. It's scandalous. Let me be clear: to place an arbitrary church discipline in the way of the building of Eucharistic-centered Christian communities is offensive to God.

November 20, 2003 - on homo "marriage,"

We who profess a relationship with a Diety must be especially diligent to remind ourselves that no one has the full picture, no one can claim an inside track. Believers and non-believers alike will be better off when humility reins in certainty, when policies are shaped by attempts to understand and offer care to the hurting and insecure.

2 posted on 01/28/2004 12:49:50 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
These folks are left over 1960's radicals. Too bad, many in the Church of all ages are to quick to agree with their relativist agenda.

When will they grow up?
3 posted on 01/28/2004 12:56:36 PM PST by johnb2004
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Where the heck do you start?!?

How about the current issue and "Liturgical coup is a lousy way to do business"

Five years ago, when our now Vatican writer John L. Allen Jr. first began to uncover exactly how the revisionists were attacking the reform, he discovered that a secretly appointed committee of 11 men -- no women included -- met quietly at the Vatican to overturn decades of work on translation, work that had been done under the approving mandate of Pope Paul VI.

Of those 11, only one held a graduate degree in scripture studies, two were not native English-speakers, one of the advisers was a graduate student and several had a history of objecting to inclusive-language translations, including two of the American archbishops and the lone scripture scholar. A rather poor representation of scholarship and pastoral sensitivities,, given the dimensions of the English-speaking segment of the church.

“What has also become clear,” our story reported, “is that the elaborate consultative process used in developing English-language translations for nearly three decades meant little. Powers in Rome handpicked a small group of men who in two weeks undid work that had taken dozens of years.”

The unfortunate thing is that the new translations, or the return to old translations, is being done in the style of the pre-Vatican II church, heavy-handed and at the whim of those in power.

It’s a lousy way to do the church’s business -- and it doesn’t withstand the scrutiny of serious, adult, educated Catholics in the early 21st century.

Round off whining and condescending pieces like the above with regular contributors like Gumbleton, Chittister, McBrien and you got yerself National AmCatholic Distorter!

Average age of subscriber: 68

4 posted on 01/28/2004 12:58:55 PM PST by american colleen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: johnb2004
I believe that they are more than just a bunch of disillusioned aging hippies.
5 posted on 01/28/2004 1:00:16 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: johnb2004
When will they grow up?

Oh no, johnb2004, you must be one of those uneducated childlike and non degreed members of the great unwashed who can't think for yourself, has to have rules and is positively rigid and medieval.

And you probably like Mother Angelica and Bishop Bruskewitz, appreciate Latin and tradition. Don't take this personally or anything. ;-)

6 posted on 01/28/2004 1:02:18 PM PST by american colleen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Close your eyes!


7 posted on 01/28/2004 1:04:09 PM PST by american colleen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
Where the heck do you start?!?

LOL!
I know :)
Here's what I found,

January 27, 2004 - Rita Larivee, NCR associate publisher wrote,

The universe is a sacred dance involving all of creation. Quantum theology invites us to be participants, encouraging us to suspend for a moment our inhibitions in fear that we might miss a step or stumble and fall. We must go beyond a comparison of the great wisdom traditions, as if sharing notes on who said what first and stopping there. Quantum theology is suggesting that the solutions to our world and church problems can only be found in the mosaic of the world community.

Imagine what we could learn if we accepted to discuss the issues of war, abortion, and homosexuality from the perspectives of Jainism, Buddhism and Confucianism. Is it possible that part of the reason we cannot find answers is that we are asking the wrong questions? Quantum theology is not for those seeking to justify a particular perspective. It forces us to go beyond our usual comfort zone and to venture onto a dance floor whose music we have yet to understand.

No comment necessary.
8 posted on 01/28/2004 1:04:25 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Stop! Please! I can't take anymore!!!
9 posted on 01/28/2004 1:06:10 PM PST by american colleen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
The people at NCR took the 60's way too literally. I'm not sure if chemicals were involved or not.
10 posted on 01/28/2004 1:07:16 PM PST by Desdemona (Kempis' Imitation of Christ online! http://www.leaderu.com/cyber/books/imitation/imitation.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
OK. Here goes - this is fighting fire with fire to see who can outgross eachother!

Your serve.

11 posted on 01/28/2004 1:08:05 PM PST by american colleen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
What has also become clear,” our story reported, “is that the elaborate consultative process used in developing English-language translations for nearly three decades meant little.

Means little? They sell themselves short. This "consulative process" that they enjoy serves as a case study of how NOT to do things.

12 posted on 01/28/2004 1:09:59 PM PST by NeoCaveman (Kerry replaces Pelosi as the botox babe of the Democrat Party)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Perhaps I am to sarcastic or dismissive. They are the folks, by and large, who came of age in the 1960's. They never developed completely partly because they embraced error and many because they are probably immersed in sinful lifestyles. For these types to accept there is an eternal truth would mean they would have to change the way they live their lives.

Should I be more blunt?
13 posted on 01/28/2004 1:14:03 PM PST by johnb2004
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
True and funny. I never claimed to be smarter than anyone. I call 'em as I see 'em.
14 posted on 01/28/2004 1:16:44 PM PST by johnb2004
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
October 10, 2003 - John Allen on the Pope vs. "Educated Catholic Women"
Measured against the expectations of many educated Catholic women, however, especially in the developed world, the pope has often seemed a disappointment. The sense of alienation can be profound.

....

Naturally, not every Catholic woman feels this way. Some believe the pope, with his doctrine of male-female complementarity, as well as his defense of life and of the family, coupled with his fierce devotion to the Virgin Mary, has pointed the way to a more authentic “new feminism.” Defenders also point out that the pope has appointed an unprecedented number of women to pontifical councils and academies.

In 1988, John Paul even published an encyclical letter on the dignity of women titled Mulieris Dignitatem, which affirms the contemporary women’s movement as a positive “sign of the times,” though it also warns against the “masculinization” of women.

At the end of the day, however, even the staunchest defenders of John Paul tend to acknowledge that the Catholic church has a problem with women. A bishops-sponsored survey of Australian Catholics in 1999 reached a conclusion that has parallels across much of the Catholic world, finding a widespread sense of “pain, alienation and often anger resulted from a strong sense of women’s marginalization, struggle, disenfranchisement, powerlessness, irrelevance and lack of acknowledgement in the church.”

15 posted on 01/28/2004 1:29:28 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
widespread sense of “pain, alienation and often anger resulted from a strong sense of women’s marginalization, struggle, disenfranchisement, powerlessness, irrelevance and lack of acknowledgement in the church.”
16 posted on 01/28/2004 1:34:52 PM PST by johnb2004
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
Who's that guy?
17 posted on 01/28/2004 1:37:01 PM PST by ArrogantBustard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: ArrogantBustard
a liberated nun.
18 posted on 01/28/2004 1:39:24 PM PST by johnb2004
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: american colleen; ninenot; BlackElk; k omalley
October 10, 2003 - John Allen on the Pope vs. "Moderate American Bishops"
... many American bishops feel reservations about some aspects of John Paul’s pontificate, especially the way in which it seems to have operated at times on an adversarial model with respect to bishops and bishops’ conferences. The symbol of this approach would be the 1998 document Apostolos Suos, which held that episcopal conferences have no right to teach on matters of faith and morals in their own name.

Most Americans, along with a large chunk of the rest of the Catholic world, regarded this a classic exercise in raw power politics. Faced with a wealthy, respected and influential national conference in the United States, and equally impressive regional conferences in Latin America and Asia, the Vatican wanted to cut them off at the knees. Many American Catholics were proud of the accomplishments of their bishops’ conference in the 1980s, with well-received documents on the economy and on peace. The idea that their bishops were being “punished” for such success was galling.
Personally, I thank God that the Bishops' Conferences do not constitute ecclesiastical authority. In the U.S. for each relatively sound document or idea they come up with at least three heretical ones. Most recent "nugget" is the National Review Board assisted by a bunch of ("former") FBI agents overseeing the bishops.
19 posted on 01/28/2004 1:47:35 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: johnb2004; ArrogantBustard
OK, you guys...you've got Coca-cola going through my nostrils...

Seriously, though, I think the most important thing we can say about the folks at NCR is: they need our prayers most urgently.

20 posted on 01/28/2004 1:48:59 PM PST by B Knotts (Go 'Nucks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: johnb2004
widespread sense of pain, alienation and often anger resulted from a strong sense of women’s marginalization, struggle, disenfranchisement, powerlessness, irrelevance and lack of acknowledgement in the church

Translated to human language it means "the Church doesn’t ordain women priests and doesn’t allow abortions."

21 posted on 01/28/2004 1:53:59 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: B Knotts
I think the most important thing we can say about the folks at NCR is: they need our prayers most urgently.

Well said!

And let’s not forget the many souls affected by the NCR spew.
Priests and bishops especially.

22 posted on 01/28/2004 1:57:00 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
We have to be nice and respectful to our NCR loving Freeper and all new-age Catholic freepers. The new religion forum moderator said so.
23 posted on 01/28/2004 1:58:09 PM PST by k omalley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Uh, I might not be the sharpest tool in the shed but how is quantum theology going to help us form our consciences on the evil of abortion?
24 posted on 01/28/2004 2:02:18 PM PST by k omalley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
One bit of rich irony: it is largely the ecumenically-oriented liberal dissenters who have wanted to downplay veneration of Mary, in order to please non-Catholics.
25 posted on 01/28/2004 2:03:05 PM PST by B Knotts (Go 'Nucks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Long ago, I subscribed to NCR and read it "religiously." It occurred to me that nobody in their right mind would belong to the Church described in the newspaper, so I got out. Years later, much humbled, I returned. But I resolved never to read the thing again, and I make an exception only for the articles posted here. As I recall, a year ago January somebody posted a piece from NCR which endorsed abortion. After that, I don't see how anyone could justify subscribing to it.
26 posted on 01/28/2004 2:08:32 PM PST by madprof98
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: k omalley
how is quantum theology going to help us form our consciences on the evil of abortion?

Darn hard to tell.
I've never heard of "quantum theology" but I'm pretty sure I know what it'd say about homosexuality ;)

27 posted on 01/28/2004 2:08:37 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Is "quantum theology" done at 88 mph?
28 posted on 01/28/2004 2:15:13 PM PST by B Knotts (Go 'Nucks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: madprof98
As I recall, a year ago January somebody posted a piece from NCR which endorsed abortion.

I believe the NCR to be the most anti-Catholic publication. Good thing you got out, but there are still many church people under their influence.

The pro-abortion piece, and I know the NCR is "pro-," would be valuable for this thread.

29 posted on 01/28/2004 2:16:29 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: B Knotts
Whatever that gal took must’ve been medicinal.

Oh, darn... I just broke my pledge to be charitable ;)

30 posted on 01/28/2004 2:20:29 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
My gosh, it's amazing how heretical a guy can look! He has a smile that says, "Go ahead, divorce your wife, dump your kids, and let that 15-year-old homeless boy move into your bedroom."
31 posted on 01/28/2004 2:40:27 PM PST by dangus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Quantum theology?

That would be the belief that you can know either the positions of a heretic, or his momentum, but never both at the same time?
32 posted on 01/28/2004 2:41:50 PM PST by dangus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: ArrogantBustard
LOL!

Bet she has sensible shoes on though. Only way you can tell she is a nun.

33 posted on 01/28/2004 2:59:05 PM PST by american colleen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey; ninenot; Barnacle; sinkspur; saradippity; american colleen; GirlShortstop; Petronski; ...
Obviously the content of the National (Pseudo)Catholic Reporter is a threat to the moral well-being of the fish it is designed to wrap and the birds whose cages it is designed to line. PETA will hear about this.
34 posted on 01/28/2004 3:04:08 PM PST by BlackElk (Dean of Discipline of the Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: american colleen
Yet more proof that the revolution is dead and has simply no stamina left to fall over.
35 posted on 01/28/2004 3:06:00 PM PST by BlackElk (Dean of Discipline of the Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
There was a whole issue about "choice" in NCR last January 17th. Here is just one example of what that issue included. The editors said they were interested in providing readers with alternatives to the standard Catholic teaching against abortion because "Maybe some of the voices in these stories, voices that don’t often get a hearing, convey wisdom that might allow us to get beyond the stalemate of old enmities." Among those "voices that don't often get a hearing," not surprisingly, is Frances Kissling of Catholics for a Free Choice.
36 posted on 01/28/2004 3:18:38 PM PST by madprof98
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: madprof98
Thank you very much for finding it!

Here goes my NCR January 17, 2003 sampler of quotes,

Strategies to break abortion stalemate - EDITORIAL,

The bishops should find a way to work productively with pro-choice Catholics in high office. Politicians like Sens. Tom Daschle and Ted Kennedy and Rep. Nancy Pelosi should not face banishment from public events held on Catholic soil because of their public policy views, nor should they fear refusal at the Communion rail. There’s a lot of good work that can be done outside the abortion arena, and quiet respect, not burnt bridges, is both the prudent and productive course of action.
Medical advances enliven stalemated abortion debate by MARGOT PATTERSON,
Christine Gudorf, a professor of religious studies at Florida International University and the author of Body, Sex, and Pleasure: Reconstructing Christian Sexual Ethics, said there is increasing recognition among feminists that the basis for Roe v. Wade was made on the wrong grounds -- of privacy rather than a woman’s welfare.

A pro-choice Catholic, Gudorf came to her support for abortion rights through personal experience. Twenty-eight years ago she went to her doctor to get fitted for a diaphragm and was told she was six months pregnant. She had just adopted a terminally ill child and had been recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. Although Gudorf eventually decided to go forward with the pregnancy, she said the experience led her to support the pro-choice position.

“It would not have been right for me not to have a choice at that point. Making that choice was an important part of choosing who I was going to be. And that had to be my choice,” Gudorf said.
Back to the future: Post-Roe world would look a lot like today’s by Joe Feuerherd
“The loss of Roe would be a terrible thing,” said Catholics for a Free Choice president Frances Kissling, “but that does not mean that abortion would not continue to be legal in the United States.”

According to Kissling, “It would be extremely difficult for any state, no matter how conservative it might be … to make abortion largely illegal without facing the wrath of the citizens of that state.”

37 posted on 01/28/2004 3:51:07 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Dude, where's my Church?
38 posted on 01/28/2004 4:06:15 PM PST by polemikos (Ecce Agnus Dei)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: polemikos
Dude, where's my Church?

The express purpose of this thread to show that the NCR IS NOT the Church :)

39 posted on 01/28/2004 4:46:44 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

Priests' tough questions are a service to their people - January 9, 2004 EDITORIAL,
We’re not certain why this recent flurry of activity has taken place, but it is one of the healthiest signs we have observed in the priesthood in some time. In an institution aching for leadership, some priests are finding the courage to step up and, in a true example of pastoral service, to raise the deep concerns of the people they serve.

Perhaps no step has been as remarkable or courageous as that taken by 23 Chicago priests who signed a letter strongly objecting to “the increase in the use of violent and abusive language” in Vatican declarations directed at gays and lesbians.
Writing stupid diatribe against 2000 years old Catholic moral teachings is "flurry of activity" and "one of the healthiest signs" according to NCR.
40 posted on 01/28/2004 4:59:33 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
No wonder I couldn't find it at NCReporter ;-)

For a brief, but good (orthodox) review of the major catholic papers, see:
CHOOSING A NATIONAL CATHOLIC WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
41 posted on 01/28/2004 5:03:50 PM PST by polemikos (Ecce Agnus Dei)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: dangus
"That would be the belief that you can know either the positions of a heretic, or his momentum, but never both at the same time?"

That sounds a bit more like Heisenberg's Uncertainty Theology to me.
42 posted on 01/28/2004 5:12:16 PM PST by Tantumergo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: polemikos
Thanks! Nice find.

The "National Catholic Reporter" is somewhat mistitled because there is not really much about it that is Catholic--at least not much that supports the Catholic faith as promulgated by Rome. The "Reporter" plumps for women's ordination, an acceptance of contraception, a more "democratic" structure in the Church, and so on. It's all quite predictable: the Catholic variant of the Democratic Party at prayer, although the "Reporter" does not favor abortion.

The last part needs an update.

Occasionally, I come across Catholic websites that feature the NCR in their “Catholic links.” I always e-mail them and tell what I think about NCR’s “catholicity.” I was successful a few times - the links disappeared ;)

43 posted on 01/28/2004 5:31:04 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

October 10, 2003 - John Allen on the Pope vs. "Educated Catholic Women" - take #2,
Perhaps John Paul’s comparatively enlightened approach to women -- appointing women as his spokespersons at international conferences, opposing discrimination against women in public policy -- is the most one could reasonably expect from a Polish church leader of his generation and life experience.

Measured against the expectations of many educated Catholic women, however, especially in the developed world, the pope has often seemed a disappointment.
Allen doesn't expect too much from the Pope because he is a Pole? What a dude Allen is! I would like to see this dude use comparable phrase for a ......... (fill in the blank ;)). I think he knows what the "career killer" is.

Allen uses a catch phrase, "Educated Catholic Women." Once I went to a discount store with the slogan "An educated consumer is our best customer." The customers there didn't look particularly "educated," but the slogan was nice to any customer.

Allen implies two things, 1. To dislike the Pope is a sign of education, 2. A woman fond of the Pope must be uneducated.

44 posted on 01/28/2004 5:34:08 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: polemikos
You link to a good Catholic Answers article. Are you aware that Keating is being "discussed" over on this thread, Karl Keating v. Gerry Matatics?
45 posted on 01/28/2004 6:08:24 PM PST by Polycarp IV (PRO-LIFE orthodox Catholic--without exception, without compromise, without apology. Any questions?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: CAtholic Family Association
Yeah, I took a peek at it.

Mostly it seemed to be Matatics fans in a group hug with anti-Catholics stirring the pot.

Wasn't sure I had the time or patience for such nonsense.
46 posted on 01/28/2004 6:24:04 PM PST by polemikos (Ecce Agnus Dei)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: polemikos
You're calling the guy who corrected your "Ecce Anus Dei" an anti-Catholic?

I'm crushed.
47 posted on 01/28/2004 6:29:10 PM PST by drstevej
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: drstevej
Were you stirring the pot?
48 posted on 01/28/2004 6:31:30 PM PST by polemikos (Ecce Agnus Dei)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: polemikos
Nope, but the other posters are Catholics. Were you referrring to one of them?
49 posted on 01/28/2004 6:32:59 PM PST by drstevej
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: drstevej
Then your post 47 is irrelevant.
50 posted on 01/28/2004 6:34:51 PM PST by polemikos (Anti-Catholicism is as anti-Catholicism does.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-200 ... 451-489 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson