Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Passion of the Christ: Notes on the Symbolism
Mom's Trad-Cath email lists | Legionaries

Posted on 03/23/2004 1:49:40 PM PST by Askel5

NOTES ON THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST SYMBOLISM


These are personal notes from a group discussion with a priest called Fr. Sean of the Legionaries of Christ. The discussion took place on Friday, February 27, 2004 at the St. Joseph Center in Alhambra. Fr. Sean said he has seen the movie 6 times and that his order had a priest on the set every day that Mel Gibson was shooting the movie. Because of this, he was privy to much information about the symbolism throughout the picture. Please forgive me if the notes seem to ramble. They are merely a guide to ideas brought up in discussion that night and are by no means a comprehensive list.

  1. What was the meaning of the evil baby that Satan was holding?

    That image of Satan holding an ugly child is an anti-Madonna image. The child represents the future persecutions of the body of Christ, the Church. The child is ugly because evil is a deformation of good. The child is stroking the face of Satan because evil perverts what is good. The stroking symbolizes the love of evil, much like a child would love its mother, but in a perverted way. Remember this image happens when Jesus is being scourged. His body is being wounded. His body is being persecuted. It is an image used by Mel Gibson to show Satan flaunting his future plan of persecution of the Church in the face of the sacrifice of the Lord.

  2. Why is this movie so violent?

    The violence you see Jim Caviezel endure as Jesus is really a reflection of the violence that sin does to our souls. Violence is the effect of sin on our souls. It destroys and disfigures us. It maims us. It makes us look inhuman, ugly and hideous before the Father. The violence also represents the price of our redemption. Since Jesus took on our sin, He was made sin for us according to St. Paul, He took on the punishment of that sin. For our sake he made him to be sin who did not know sin, so that we might become the righteousness of God in him. (2 Corinthians 5:21) This is the purpose of the violence in the film, to get people to realize the price that is paid by the body of Christ when people commit sin and the price paid by the Savior to set us free.

    There was a discussion about the Agony in the Garden scene.

    Fr. Sean brought up the idea that the reason Jesus suffered in the Garden was because that is the moment He took on sin for us. St. Paul says that God the Father made Jesus to be sin. This is the moment when it happens in the Garden. Since Jesus is the Son of God and God is pure love, taking on the sin of the world, yours and mine, the sin of a Hitler, a Stalin, a Genghis Kahn, etc., was an excruciating experience for Him. At that moment, pure Love was forced to coexist with the evil effect of sin in the agony Jesus experienced in the Garden of Gethsemane.

  3. In the Garden of Gethsemane, what is the snake a reference to?

    Genesis 3:15 "And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel. Notice that Jesus suffers immensely while Satan adds to His burden but then Jesus makes a decision to do the will and with that resolve he stomps on the snake to kill it.

  4. There are plenty of Mass references in this picture.

    When Jesus is being stripped, the movie flashes back to the Last Supper when the bread is brought to the table and uncovered. When Jesus is being elevated on the cross after being nailed to it, we see a flashback to the Last Supper when Jesus raises the bread and says, This is my body. The apostle John is shown as the one who remembers these flashbacks and who makes the connection between the Bread of Life on the cross and the Breaking of the Bread at the Last Supper.

  5. When is the first time we see Mary?

    Just as Jesus is arrested and put into chains. She wakes up saying, "Why is this night different than any other?" And Mary Magdalene responds that this is the night that they were set free from slavery. Where do these lines come from? They are the words that the youngest says to the oldest at a Jewish Passover/Seder supper ritual. In this case, the oldest was saying them to the youngest because this was THE night that would set in motion the plan of salvation to set us free from sin. The new Passover had begun with Jesus as the Lamb. Maia Morgenstern, a Jewess herself, had the idea to use these lines in the scene and when she explained them to Mel, he agreed they had to be included in the picture to tie everything together.

  6. When is the first time we see a maggot?

    In the Garden of Gethsemane when you see one crawling in and out of the nostril of Satan. It is a very quick scene. When do we see a maggot again? When Judas finds himself sitting next to a maggot infested mule. The maggot represents death and corruption.

  7. In this picture Pontius Pilate was portrayed sympathetically. Why so?

    Mel Gibson wanted him to represent the struggle of every man when faced with moral choices. It was obvious to Pilate that Jesus was an innocent man. It was obvious to Pilate that Barabbas was corrupt. (It was no accident that his makeup made Barabbas look even more evil and deranged.) To Pilate the right choice was obvious but he did not make it because of his own fears and the pressure from an unruly crowd he wanted to appease. Mel's message was that every time we choose sin, the choice is always obvious like the choice between Barabbas and Jesus. Of course there are times when the temptation that approaches us is very beautiful in appearance, but down deep inside, we know what the choice should be and very often we do exactly what Pilate did and afterwards try to wash our hands to relieve our guilt.

  8. Why was there a scene when Jesus falls over the bridge only to find Judas at the bottom?

    Judas has just denied Jesus in the Garden. At this moment, Judas represents every man who when faced with the truth denies it. In this scene, he represents every man who runs away from the truth and Mel Gibson wanted to remind the audience that you cannot run away and hide from the truth because the truth will always find you. In this case, Jesus has been arrested, is beaten and falls from the bridge while hanging in chains right in front of Judas. The Truth found Judas even though he had denied Him and tried to hide from Him.

  9. [Notes on Satan's Placement]

    Notice that in the picture whenever Satan is shown, he is always in the background moving behind the scenes. Notice he is always in the background whenever there is intensity and anger in the foreground directed towards Jesus. This is symbolic of his actions motivating the aggression and intensity of persecution against the Body of Christ, the Church, and also is symbolic of his responsibility behind all evil motivations.

  10. The Dove

    When Jesus is before Pilate, He notices a dove in the sky above Him. It represents a reminder of the vertical dimension, the relationship between man and God. We as human beings are often caught up in the horizontal dimension (relationships with men and worldly affairs) and forget there is a vertical dimension. The vertical dimension represents the spiritual life, the relationship of a soul with the Father. The vertical dimension is what is more important and the dove is a reminder to Jesus that the vertical dimension is in control despite the appearance of the situation.

  11. Why do Mary and Mary Magdalene clean up the blood on the cobble stones after Jesus is scourged?

    It is because it is Jewish tradition to save the blood. Life is in the blood. Blood had to be collected. This is also representative of the cleaning of the vessels at Mass when a priest is done with the consecration and giving out the Eucharist. The blood was precious and Jesus' blood particularly is precious. Notice that they also collected the instruments that made Him bleed at the very end of the film when you see the crown of thorns, the nails and the hammer at the foot of the cross as they take down the body of Jesus.

  12. [The Miraculous at Golgotha]

    There is a scene at the crucifixion where Mary Magdalene is the only one who sees a miracle happen. It is a very quick scene and it happens when she is on her knees (notice that the only ones on their knees are Mary, John and the Magdalene at the crucifixion). Jesus has been nailed to the cross and the Romans are turning it over. You expect Jesus to smash His face into the ground when the cross falls over but it does not happen. Instead what you see is the Magdalene looking up to see that the cross is floating above the ground. She is the only one to see that Jesus is floating a few inches above the ground the entire time that they are hammering the nails on the back of the cross to secure them. It is a representation of God still in control of the whole crucifixion process.

  13. [Jesus Meets his Mother on the Via Dolorosa]

    Every time that Jesus meets His mother Mary along His Passion He is strengthened and has new resolve. This is especially noticeable after Jesus is scourged the first time. The Romans have beat him over 70 times and He has collapsed. He sees Mary and finds the strength to stand up much to the dismay and surprise of the Roman soldiers who then decide to use a more vicious whip with metal tips. This scene represents the idea that Mary is living proof to Jesus that the sacrifice He is about to make for mankind is not in vain. The film shows that Jesus comes to a decision to continue on the path to Calvary each time they look at each other. Some say it reinforces the idea of Mary as co-redemptrix.

  14. [Simon of Cyrene]

    Simon of Cyrene represents every man who is faced with the cross and does not want to carry it. He also represents those who do not want to help others carry their crosses. Yet, in this film he also represents the person who is forced to carry the cross and then becomes so engaged with Christ that he wants a deeper relationship with Him. The arms of Jesus and Simon the Cyrene are intertwined as they carry the cross together and that image represents the efforts of each soul carrying its cross with the help of the Savior. That final look that Simon gives Jesus after he has finished helping Him, represents the longing of every soul to have a deeper relationship with the Lord after coming face to face with Him. It was through carrying the cross that Simon came to have a desire to have an intimate relationship with Jesus much like that of the soul who longs to know Christ better in the midst of suffering.

  15. [Judas]

    Notice in the Garden of Gethsemane scene when Judas denies Jesus that the Lord never takes His eyes off of him when he denies Him. The Lord never takes His eyes off of Judas even when Judas runs away. That is representative of the Lord's own relationship with us. Jesus never takes His eyes off of us when we deny Him or turn away from Him.



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: gibson; legionaries; melgibson; movie; passion; thepassion; thepassionofchrist
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-77 next last

1 posted on 03/23/2004 1:49:41 PM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: truthandlife
I searched but hadn't seen this posted yet. If so, sorry ... perhaps you'll know the article to which it should be linked?
2 posted on 03/23/2004 1:50:38 PM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Thank you very much Askel. I watched the movie closely and a lot of this went right by.
3 posted on 03/23/2004 2:03:23 PM PST by Desdemona (Music Librarian and provider of cucumber sandwiches, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary. Hats required.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Desdemona
I was really happy to see it too.

The second time I went, I had notebook in hand and a far more critical eye than upon first seeing with my grandfather on Ash Wednesday. Still, I too was impressed to find the depth of care taken to "witness the Word" as it were.

It's the not-so-little things like these which--combined with what is a truly beautiful and magnificently executed film on its face--make for such a powerful impact on viewers.
4 posted on 03/23/2004 2:09:26 PM PST by Askel5 (Zviadist says hell to all his old trad Cath friends at FR. You are missed.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Desdemona
I was really happy to see it too.

The second time I went, I had notebook in hand and a far more critical eye than upon first seeing with my grandfather on Ash Wednesday. Still, I too was impressed to find the depth of care taken to "witness the Word" as it were.

It's the not-so-little things like these which--combined with what is a truly beautiful and magnificently executed film on its face--make for such a powerful impact on viewers.
5 posted on 03/23/2004 2:09:41 PM PST by Askel5 (Zviadist says hello to all his old trad Cath friends at FR. You are missed.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Damn ... Zviadist says HELLO ... HELL if can post yet, though.
6 posted on 03/23/2004 2:10:29 PM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Very interesting and enlightening. Thank you for posting this. I caught some of these when I saw the movie, but there are many I hadn't thought of. I didn't even notice the cross floating when they flipped it over.
7 posted on 03/23/2004 2:23:11 PM PST by B Knotts (Salve!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Other symbolism not mentioned above:

Upright and crossbeam of Jesus' Cross are fastened with three bolts, arranged in a triangle ~ Trinity

During the flagellation, one of Jesus' ribs is exposed ~ New Adam.

Table Jesus built~ Altar (could this also be the same table the office-in-charge at the flogging sat at?)

8 posted on 03/23/2004 2:53:24 PM PST by Between the Lines
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Between the Lines
My ... your handle certainly is apt.

Thanks for the post. I'm hopeful others will add to this thread as you have.

Cheers.
9 posted on 03/23/2004 3:09:21 PM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Very nice list.

Bumpus ad summum

10 posted on 03/23/2004 3:13:37 PM PST by Dajjal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Between the Lines
Table Jesus built~ Altar (could this also be the same table the office-in-charge at the flogging sat at?)

A friend of mine pointed out to me how Jesus sits upon the table he is building, making it an altar, and I had to kick myself for not noticing that. He also said that this scene has the one true joke in this painful story: when Jesus shows the Blessed Virgin the "altar," she quips "It'll never catch on."

But the table the Roman soldier has is smaller and more crudely built. Christ's table has some simple detailing done on the skirting; the soldier's table has no detailing.

11 posted on 03/23/2004 3:42:25 PM PST by Dajjal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Dajjal
bump for later
12 posted on 03/23/2004 3:48:54 PM PST by rogator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Dajjal
But the table the Roman soldier has is smaller and more crudely built.

Thanks for the clarification. I did not catch that when I saw the movie and have wondered every since.

13 posted on 03/23/2004 3:58:25 PM PST by Between the Lines
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Askel5; american colleen; sinkspur; Lady In Blue; Salvation; Polycarp IV; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; ...
Thanks for posting this thread! Here's a Q & A that has always intrigued me. It is addressed in A Guide to the Passion,

Q: In the scene in which Jesus saves the woman caught in adultery from being stoned, we see Him writing in the sand. What is the significance of this act?

The scene is taken directly from the New Testament (John 8:3-11). Some theologians and biblical scholars have speculated that Jesus was perhaps writing down the sins of the men who were about to stone her. Others note that Jesus' action recalls the One who gave the Law in the first place on Mount Sinai, for Exodus describes the Ten Commandments (including "You shall not commit adultery") being written in stone by the "finger of God". Therefore it is fitting that the One who gave the Law, now grants mercy. At any rate, it is from this incident we get the challenging words, "Let him who is without sin ... be the first to throw a stone at her" (John 8:7).

14 posted on 03/23/2004 4:17:29 PM PST by NYer (Prayer is the Strength of the Weak)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NYer
Thanks NYer ... I'm sure I wasn't the only peering at the dust to see what Gibson would make of it.

I love the thought of Mercy writ large by the finger of God.
15 posted on 03/23/2004 4:23:42 PM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: NYer
Some theologians and biblical scholars have speculated that Jesus was perhaps writing down the sins of the men who were about to stone her.

According to the Armenian Catholic tradition, this is true. Jesus was writing down the sins of those men, starting with the highest ranking members.

16 posted on 03/23/2004 4:27:00 PM PST by m4629
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Romulus
Trust you'll weigh in with your thoughts on the "comic relief" scene between Mary and Jesus.
17 posted on 03/23/2004 4:28:11 PM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

Comment #18 Removed by Moderator

To: Dajjal
I was told that the table ended up in Pilate's headquarters.

I saw a table about that size, but forgot to look for the open-work skirting.

19 posted on 03/23/2004 6:02:02 PM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

Comment #20 Removed by Moderator

To: Askel5
Thanks for the very interesting thoughts on symbolism.

When Jesus looked up at the dove, I immediately thought of his Baptism by John and the Holy Spirit descending in the form of a dove . . .

Did anybody else notice the huge double take Pilate and his servant gave when Pilate spoke to Jesus in Aramaic and Jesus responded in beautiful Latin? ("What is this Galilean peasant doing talking like Cicero?") But of course God would speak perfect Latin . . . wouldn't He?

21 posted on 03/23/2004 6:04:48 PM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
Quid est veritas?

[Est vir qui adest]

22 posted on 03/23/2004 6:38:55 PM PST by Cincinnatus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Awesome post. Thanks.
23 posted on 03/23/2004 7:21:21 PM PST by Jaded (My sheeple, my sheeple, what have you done to Me?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinnatus
Cute anagram!

Dicit ei Pilatus quid est veritas et cum hoc dixisset iterum exivit ad Iudaeos et dicit eis ego nullam invenio in eo causam. Jn 18:38

24 posted on 03/23/2004 7:39:13 PM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
I miss your threads and am glad you are posting again.
25 posted on 03/23/2004 7:44:14 PM PST by Coleus (Abortion and Euthanasia, Don't Democrats just kill ya!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Between the Lines; Askel5
Table Jesus built

It is altar and more than altar.

The apocryphal “come to dinner” scene with Jesus and Mary has become one of my favorites. Though I was initially uneasy with the scene I have come to love its inconography.

I like the whole idea of the table imagery, which is so rich, on so many levels. The table signifies the altar -- and Who plops Himself down upon it, of his own free will?

And still more: being a carpenter, it's Jesus's craft to make things from wood. He avails himself of a thing that's supposedly known, a tree, with a finite life and meaning, which he transfigures into something else. The Incarnate Logos orders "woodness" to a new and permanent life, informed with meaning. "Resurrected" as Table, the wood is saved from fire or corruption, and acquires a new life.

The scene ends with a vivid evocation of the Asperges, with specific application IMHO to the Immaculate Conception. It is a scene that keeps on giving, the longer you look.

26 posted on 03/23/2004 8:49:13 PM PST by Romulus ("Behold, I make all things new")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Romulus
Asperges. Very good!

It is a scene that keeps on giving, the longer you look.

You are right. I wonder how much more there might be.

27 posted on 03/23/2004 9:19:08 PM PST by Between the Lines
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Salve Regina
LOL. I don't know what to make of three ribs.
28 posted on 03/23/2004 9:20:17 PM PST by Between the Lines
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
I might add that the whole "come to dinner" theme re-presents in a general sense the Church's eschatological prayer, "maranatha", and in particular Mary's prayer at Cana (Mary at that point constituting in her person the whole Church in union with Christ) that launches her son's public life. Prophetically calling her son to dinner, she calls for more than she knows.

The mopping up of blood has already been commented upon, but I wonder how it's received by Jews who're conscious of the squads of Israeli rabbis whose ministry it is to collect the body parts of those killed in terror bombings.

The film takes great pains to show the blood of Jesus covering a great many people, from Our Lady right down to the Roman torturers, plainly a message that his sacrifice is intended for all.

Speaking of universality, recall the shot of the Golgotha scene from above, in which the camera pans past the Cross while the background swirls by in the opposite direction. This is a visual presentation of the saying "stat crux dum volvitur orbis" (the Cross stands fixed while the earth turns): it illustrates the literal centrality of the crucifixion (not just the Event, but the transcendent Truth made manifest in the Event), its nature as sole fixed reference point in the universe. We know where we are and what we are, if in fact we're anywhere or anything at all, only by reference to the unchanging center where we find the crucified Logos who alone imparts meaning and order to the world. Seen this way, Jesus's judgeship over all souls is far more than a juridical event; it's existential because it's only by reference to him that we know what we are. Appalled and speechless in the presence of the crucifixion, we realise that we cannot judge it because it judges us.

The script has the soldiers, preparing to raise the cross, calling out "Sursum!" which of course evokes the "Sursum corda" from the Mass.

Also, about the scourging scene: I've not yet noticed any comment about the X-shaped welts on the back of the Christ, subliminally conveying the monogram for Cristos.

29 posted on 03/23/2004 9:40:09 PM PST by Romulus ("Behold, I make all things new")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Between the Lines
I wonder how much more there might be.

Help me out here: is the Asperges scene immediately followed by the Last Supper footwashing? Even if it's not, the theme of washing and purification links the two scenes.

30 posted on 03/23/2004 9:48:25 PM PST by Romulus ("Behold, I make all things new")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: NYer; Askel5
Q: In the scene in which Jesus saves the woman caught in adultery from being stoned, we see Him writing in the sand. What is the significance of this act?

Gibson's Jesus begins writing in VERY LARGE letters, so He could not have written much, at least not without moving.

But my favorite answer to this perennial mystery came from an old Jesuit I know, who opined thus:

The Pharisees tell Christ that the woman was caught in the act of adultery (John 8:3-4) and they try to trip Him up by asking, "The Law of Moses says that she deserves stoning, but what do you say?" (John 8:5).

In answer, Christ bends down and writes something in the sand.

My Jesuit friend suspects that Christ wrote either Lev. 20:10 or Deut. 22:22, which is the Mosaic law to which the scribes were referring.

But those verses are quite explicit: If a woman and man commit adultery, they are both to be put to death.

Somehow or other, the Pharisees "caught" only the woman "in the act" of adultery. Very curious.

Or maybe the guy was a friend, and allowed to slip away.

The Jesuit's notion was that by being a "strict constructionist" on His Mosaic law, Christ was able to show mercy and forgiveness upon the woman.

Without her partner, what else could the scribes do, but put down their stones and walk away?

It also puts an edge to Christ's request/advice to her: "Go and sin no more." (Next time, you may not be so lucky.)

As I said, we will never know for sure in this life, but I like my Jesuit's explanation.

31 posted on 03/23/2004 10:01:02 PM PST by Dajjal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother; Between the Lines
I was told that the table ended up in Pilate's headquarters.
I saw a table about that size, but forgot to look for the open-work skirting.

I suspect that table might be at Pilate's palace, but I haven't seen it there (3 viewings so far). But then, 1) we don't see an eating area of the palace, and 2) the table is the right size for a modest family dining room, not the palace of the imperial governor. So maybe it does not recur in the film.

32 posted on 03/23/2004 10:18:48 PM PST by Dajjal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother; Between the Lines
I don't think we get a good look at the table in the Upper Room where the Last Supper is held. But it is the home of a "rich man." The table Christ made in the film would be too small to seat twelve, but if we don't see much of the Upper Room's table in the film, perhaps Gibson reused the prop there.

???

33 posted on 03/23/2004 10:32:17 PM PST by Dajjal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: dansangel
ping
34 posted on 03/24/2004 12:43:56 AM PST by .45MAN (Friends don't let Friends vote democrat!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Dajjal; Victoria Delsoul; GirlShortstop; kstewskis; Dr. Scarpetta; lonevoice; Uncle Jaque; ...

Good thought in regards to the table, but they are reclining at the table during the scene of the Last Supper.

Just bought the coffee table edition of The Passion of The Christ, and it clearly shows the disciples sitting on the floor around the table. (Actually there are 3 tables in this scene! {page 104-105})

I picked up a book on the literature of Christ (1946 copyright) at our local library, and in it are many poems and stories speaking of Jesus's life. During the passion, one writer, Mary Borden writes a tale titled, From Friday to Sunday. In the story she has Mary Magdalene waving a robe to keep the birds from scavenging at Christ on the cross.


35 posted on 03/24/2004 4:26:28 AM PST by Northern Yankee ( "Behold Mother... I make all things new." - Jesus of Nazareth)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Askel5; .45MAN
This is excellent - a lot of it parallels the discussion we had at our own church this past Sunday. Thank you for bringing it to us.

.45MAN - thanks for the ping.
36 posted on 03/24/2004 4:41:36 AM PST by dansangel (*PROUD to be a knuckle-dragging, toothless, inbred, right-wing, Southern, gun-toting Neanderthal *)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
The Truth found Judas even though he had denied Him and tried to hide from Him.

Makes sense. Great post.

37 posted on 03/24/2004 4:48:19 AM PST by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
From Mom's Trad-Cath email lists | Legionaries

Are "Traditional Catholic" and "Roman Catholic" synonyms?

38 posted on 03/24/2004 6:32:08 AM PST by topcat54
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dajjal; NYer; Askel5
My Jesuit friend suspects that Christ wrote either Lev. 20:10 or Deut. 22:22, which is the Mosaic law to which the scribes were referring.

Good point - I've heard that explanation too. I always like to think that Jesus was writing down the names of the mistresses of the would-be stone-throwers.

39 posted on 03/24/2004 6:37:04 AM PST by opus86
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
*BUMP*!
40 posted on 03/24/2004 7:00:40 AM PST by ex-Texan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: topcat54
Are "Traditional Catholic" and "Roman Catholic" synonyms?

The traditionals are a subset, actually. There are a lot of people who do not like all the new age crap that has invaded the church, so we are called traditionals. Not to be confused with schismatics or sede... I can't spell it, but those are the people why deny that JPII is the legitimate successor of Peter and do nothing but criticize what he has done. A lot of times they are lumped together, but truly they are not the same.
41 posted on 03/24/2004 7:07:07 AM PST by Desdemona (Music Librarian and provider of cucumber sandwiches, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary. Hats required.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Good stuff!
42 posted on 03/24/2004 7:28:42 AM PST by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
Fantastic. The single best post on The Passion that I have read I am certain. Bravo!

Also of note is Christ's image in blood on the girl's towel that tends to Him.

43 posted on 03/24/2004 8:01:25 AM PST by PeoplesRep_of_LA (I am no longer afraid to publicly say I love Jesus, thanks Mel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dajjal
I had seen someone else post about the altar and Jesus sitting in the middle of it to show the strength of the altar and the sacrifice (Jesus) would be on it.

I personally thought that the water that Jesus splahed on Mary as they came towards the camera was an indication of Baptism cleansing
44 posted on 03/24/2004 8:11:27 AM PST by franky (Pray for the souls of the faithful departed. Pray for our own souls to receive the grace of a happy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: PeoplesRep_of_LA
Yes, that was a scene where one had to know that Christ' image would be on St Monica's towel. She held it at her lower side and if you did not look, you may have missed it.
45 posted on 03/24/2004 8:14:55 AM PST by franky (Pray for the souls of the faithful departed. Pray for our own souls to receive the grace of a happy)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: franky
St. Veronica, actually. St. Monica was St. Augustine's mother. Her name means "true image."

Veronica was holding it in both hands, low and slightly spread in front of her. I knew to look - the image was as you might imagine from a napkin being pressed against (rather than wiped across) a very bloody face. I noticed that Caviezel was careful to blot the napkin gently against his face rather than scrub.

This is one of those multi-layered movies you can watch again and again.

46 posted on 03/24/2004 8:23:10 AM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: franky
Yes, that was a scene where one had to know that Christ' image would be on St Monica's towel

I am uncertain where you got the St Monica reference. This was what I found on her; http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saintm04.htm

47 posted on 03/24/2004 8:23:31 AM PST by PeoplesRep_of_LA (I am no longer afraid to publicly say I love Jesus, thanks Mel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Coleus
I ran across a couple I posted elsewhere while banned which I'd really like to post here. I'll flag you. About 3-4 little good reads I distilled from a little book on the Trinity.
48 posted on 03/24/2004 8:31:27 AM PST by Askel5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Between the Lines
During the flagellation, one of Jesus' ribs is exposed ~ New Adam.
Also a reference to Psalm 22 -- "I can count my bones."

49 posted on 03/24/2004 9:38:59 AM PST by DallasMike
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Askel5
What is the meaning of the ravin pecking out the eye of the thief on the cross?
50 posted on 03/24/2004 10:10:05 AM PST by abigail2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-77 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson