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A Hothouse Chapel in Hurricane Alley ("Ugly As Sin" At Ave Maria U.)
CruxNews.com ^ | 3/26/2004 | Michael Rose

Posted on 03/26/2004 6:36:22 AM PST by Pyro7480

A hothouse chapel in Hurricane Alley
Ave Maria University needs to return to the drawing board but quick!

This week Ave Maria University announced detailed plans for a proposed chapel on its newly-founded campus near Naples, Florida. Requiring three thousand tons of structural steel and aluminum, the 60,000-square-foot glass-skinned church is set to be the nation’s largest. Unfortunately, the design unveiled by school officials is an impractical eyesore.

Although its floor plan is vaguely reminiscent of a basilica-style church, the unsightly structure otherwise breaks with the history and tradition of Catholic church architecture while tipping its hat to some of the more avant-garde Protestant productions of recent decades. Moreover, it consciously avoids any connection to the rich Spanish mission style so common to Florida for several centuries.

Not only is it ugly, it is certain to be an embarassment to an otherwise promising Catholic institution of higher learning. Quite obviously the chapel is inconsistent with Ave Maria’s reputation for embracing authentic Catholic culture and tradition.

The proposed church is perhaps most reminiscent of Sir Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace, the enormous hall designed to house London’s Great Exhibition of 1851. Constructed entirely of cast iron and glass, the Palace was the largest structure to be built of prefabricated units up to that time. It is generally recognized by architectural historians as the forerunner of industrial construction that has produced many of the unseemly behemoths of the twentieth century. Paxton was a horticulturist, landscape gardener and greenhouse architect. Not coincidentally, his masterpiece resembled a giant hothouse.

Alack, the same can be said of Ave Maria’s proposed church. The 60-foot red-tinted glass cross embedded within the transparent front façade does little to reassure one that this filigree structure isn’t a conservatory full of insectivorous plants and steaming compost piles. In fact, the proposed structure should nicely suit the purpose of cultivating exotic plants out of season. After all, hothouses are designed to be, well, hot. Considering the blistering heat and humidity that characterizes the climate in southern Florida much of the year, a glass building is about as impractical as it gets—not for plants but for people. (Has no one considered the incredible impact of solar heat gain?) Add to that the fact that Ave Maria’s new campus is sprouting in Hurricane Alley, and you’ve got to wonder if this isn’t an early April Fool’s joke.

One call to the university assured me that this is no joke. It’s the real thing—and they’re moving ahead with the project come heat or hurricanes. The chapel is expected to be completed in 2006 along with much of the rest of the new campus.

Ave Maria seems to be making a fuss over the shear enormity of the proposed church. According to a March 24 press release, university officials boasted that the new chapel "will have [the] largest seating capacity of any Catholic church in the country" as well as "the largest crucifix in the world."

The largest crucifix in the world? Come now. If that doesn’t smack of megalomania, I don’t know what does. And why on earth would a small Catholic school with 122 students knocking around 1,000 acres in the remote swamplands of Florida need—or want—to accommodate a whopping 3,300 people? Why would petite Ave Maria aim for more seating than New York’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral or Cardinal Mahony’s celebrated Yellow Armadillo in L.A., both of which serve as the spiritual centerpiece of archdioceses that serve millions of Catholics?

Well, it just so happens that seed money for the mega-project was provided by Thomas S. Monaghan, former owner of the Detroit Tigers and founder of Dominos Pizza. Mr. Monaghan, a generous philanthropist, tends to think big. But one must understand that bigger is not necessarily better nor even desirable.

Wouldn’t it make much more sense for a fledgling school like Ave Maria to build a well-designed, modest-sized chapel for its community? (See Thomas Aquinas College for an excellent example.) After all, who in his right mind would donate even a dollar to a newly established university that appears to be blowing money like a drunken sailor? Three thousand tons of structural steel don’t come cheap.

Given the fact that Ave Maria touts its mission and its curriculum as being steeped in Catholic culture and tradition, its architecture (especially that of a sacred building) deserves to match that right-headed philosophy. Wouldn’t it make sense to patronize one of the architects who has been responsible for the recent renewal of sacred architecture in this country? Despite their major accomplishments in the design of beautiful Catholic churches, architects such as Duncan Stroik, Thomas Gordon Smith, Dino Marcantonio, and Henry Menzies weren’t even as much as invited to compete for this project. Two of these men also have campus chapels on their list of credits. Stroik is responsible for the Thomas Aquinas College’s beautiful new chapel and Thomas Gordon Smith designed the seminary for the Fraternity of St. Peter in Denton, Nebraska. Due in no small part to these talented Catholic architects, many are waking up to the fact that the churches designed and built in the latter half of the twentieth century have miserably failed the Catholic people. Why then settle for an ugly Goliath of a structure that will look dated even before it’s 3,000 tons of structural steel are sheathed in hothouse glass?

A suggestion to Ave Maria: This proposed chapel design is an error so egregious that it requires immediate attention. Dump these hideous plans. Hire a new architect, and start afresh, this time with an eye toward creating a beautiful house of God rather than simply an enormous one. (See my book Ugly As Sin for a few pointers.) Otherwise your school risks losing its hard-earned credibility. Your university is a promising one. Don’t mar your reputation with such an impractical eyesore.

Michael S. Rose is the author a several books including on church architecture including Ugly As Sin. His forthcoming book In Tiers of Glory: A History of Catholic Church Architecture in 100 Pages is due out in November. He is editor of Cruxnews.com.


TOPICS: Catholic; Current Events; General Discusssion; Religion & Culture; Worship
KEYWORDS: avemaria; catholic; chapel; florida; michael; rose; university
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Someone needs to organize all the supporters of Ave Maria in opposition to this hideous piece of "architecture." I recommend that everyone check out Thomas Aquinas College's link above for what a real college chapel should look like.
1 posted on 03/26/2004 6:36:22 AM PST by Pyro7480
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To: Siobhan; Canticle_of_Deborah; BlackElk; Bigg Red; NYer; Salvation; AAABEST; Aquinasfan; Coleus; ...
Ping!
2 posted on 03/26/2004 6:37:26 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: Pyro7480
Yes. I was very disappointed to see this monstrosity proposed.
3 posted on 03/26/2004 6:38:06 AM PST by B Knotts (Salve!)
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To: B Knotts
Let's see how the Ave Maria board reacts to any outcry. If they still try to jam this monstrosity down our throat, we'll know where they really stand.
4 posted on 03/26/2004 6:40:30 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: Pyro7480; american colleen; sinkspur; Lady In Blue; Salvation; CAtholic Family Association; ...
Hothouse ... yes, that was my initial reaction! Why would anyone want to build an all glass church in one of the hotest parts of the country? Just consider the amount of energy that will be required to keep it cool. The whole concept is absurd!
5 posted on 03/26/2004 7:10:44 AM PST by NYer (Prayer is the Strength of the Weak)
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To: NYer
Why would anyone want to build an all glass church in one of the hotest parts of the country?

I didn't even think of it that way! Thanks! Monaghan needs to spend his money a little better!

6 posted on 03/26/2004 7:19:40 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: Pyro7480
As long as liturgical norms are met, I don't see why they can't build whatever style of Church they want? I am as much against wreckovation of historic churches as much as anyone else, and I prefer more traditional church architecture myself, but I don't see why a certain amount of experimentation can't be done on new structures.
7 posted on 03/26/2004 7:32:35 AM PST by Unam Sanctam
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To: Unam Sanctam
The reason I think that people (at least this holds true for me) are reacting so negatively to this is that Ave Maria is to be supposedly a somewhat traditional Catholic university. This design is decidedly untraditional, and sends the wrong message.
8 posted on 03/26/2004 7:41:26 AM PST by B Knotts (Salve!)
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To: B Knotts
Amen!
9 posted on 03/26/2004 7:42:28 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: Pyro7480
Let's see how the Ave Maria board reacts to any outcry. If they still try to jam this monstrosity down our throat, we'll know where they really stand.

Who's "we"? As I recall, this university is being built with Tom Monaghan's money, so it likely reflects his arrogance.

This is the same man that erected a massive cross in the countryside of Michigan, I believe.

This church is an "in your face", no matter how non-functional it might be.

10 posted on 03/26/2004 7:52:38 AM PST by sinkspur (Adopt a dog or a cat from an animal shelter! It will save one life, and may save two.)
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To: sinkspur
Who's "we"? As I recall, this university is being built with Tom Monaghan's money, so it likely reflects his arrogance.
Many of us have fundraising letters from Ave Maria sitting here and there in our house. Monaghan provided most of the seed money, but of course seed money is just the beginning of what they need. This university is supposedly a conservative orthodox university. It will flop if they chose to ignore the smaller donors, most of whom will be repulsed by taking all their money and building a greenhouse. Donations will dry up, some people will lose interest in the new university, etc.
11 posted on 03/26/2004 8:01:34 AM PST by patent (A baby is God's opinion that life should go on. Carl Sandburg)
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To: Pyro7480
To be fair, here is an artist's rendering of the chapel. It looks much more impressive than the plastic model. It is reminiscent of the Perpendicular Gothic style and has illusions of having flying buttresses. Yet it is missing any spires which accentuate that style so well. The very large crucifix alcoved at the front entrance is a nice touch.

Moreover, it consciously avoids any connection to the rich Spanish mission style so common to Florida for several centuries.

Spanish Mission style??? Better look at the rest of the campus buildings. Except for this chapel, it would seem that they went to great lengths to make every building on campus look as if Frank Lloyd Wright had designed them himself. A Spanish Mission style chapel would be as out of place on this campus among all the FLW looking buildings as this chapel is.

It seems they have created a dilemma for themselves. F.L. Wright's architectural style does not lend itself to churches or cathedrals easily. And other styles seldom go with FLW's style.

I do think this building is ugly, just out of place. Very out of place.

12 posted on 03/26/2004 8:27:33 AM PST by Between the Lines
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To: Pyro7480
Yes the design is a bit surprising for what I would have thought would have been a more traditional Church style.

It almost reminds me of the Cadet Chapel at the Air Force Academy.
13 posted on 03/26/2004 8:28:16 AM PST by BobCNY
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To: Between the Lines
I do think this building is ugly...

Correction: I do not think this building is ugly

14 posted on 03/26/2004 8:30:29 AM PST by Between the Lines
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To: Pyro7480
I watched an interview by Father Francis (EWTN)of several of their students at the "Right to Life" march and I was very impressed with them. They were being taught as Catholic College students should be taught.

A problem for a building using that much steel is the price. The steel industry prices are sky-rocketing and most steel companies are telling their customers to call in for quotes on the day of purchasers. This building could go into big money.
15 posted on 03/26/2004 8:39:42 AM PST by franky (Pray for the souls of the faithful departed. Pray for our own souls to receive the grace of a happy)
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To: Unam Sanctam
Requiring three thousand tons of structural steel and aluminum, the 60,000-square-foot glass-skinned church is set to be the nation?s largest.

It would appear that this chapel was designed with Guinness's book of records in mind, and not liturgical ideals.

16 posted on 03/26/2004 8:39:47 AM PST by Between the Lines
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To: sinkspur
As I recall, this university is being built with Tom Monaghan's money, so it likely reflects his arrogance.

Pot, kettle, black. You don't know much about a man who has risen from such humble beginnings and whose faith is much stronger than yours will ever be. Once again, deacon, you've confirmed to us that you're a fool.

17 posted on 03/26/2004 8:40:34 AM PST by A.A. Cunningham
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To: Pyro7480
Quite obviously the chapel is inconsistent with Ave Maria’s reputation for embracing authentic Catholic culture and tradition.

A fine institution like this Ave Maria doesn't deserve a modernist monstrosity like this.

18 posted on 03/26/2004 8:43:24 AM PST by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: A.A. Cunningham
Pot, kettle, black. You don't know much about a man who has risen from such humble beginnings and whose faith is much stronger than yours will ever be. Once again, deacon, you've confirmed to us that you're a fool.

I suppose you like this monstrosity of a church?

Monoghan can do whatever he wants with his money, but building a glass structure in a hot, hurricane-prone area reflects very poorly on his judgment.

19 posted on 03/26/2004 8:44:06 AM PST by sinkspur (Adopt a dog or a cat from an animal shelter! It will save one life, and may save two.)
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To: Between the Lines
I do think this building is ugly, just out of place. Very out of place.

All the warmth of a modern office building or shopping mall. Inappropriate design!

20 posted on 03/26/2004 8:46:14 AM PST by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: Pyro7480
>>And why on earth would a small Catholic school with 122 students knocking around 1,000 acres in the remote swamplands of Florida need—or want—to accommodate a whopping 3,300 people? <<

From the rest of the architecture, I'd say he's expecting a LOT more than 122 students. What kind of an idiot would start construction on a chapel built for only his CURRENT needs. Is 3,300 necessary... It seems like a lot, but if he expects the entire school to go to mass, at once, together, all I can say is... COOL!
21 posted on 03/26/2004 8:50:17 AM PST by dangus
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To: Between the Lines
>> F.L. Wright's architectural style does not lend itself to churches or cathedrals easily. <<

Wright's crowning achievement is the Copley Place church in Boston.
22 posted on 03/26/2004 8:52:14 AM PST by dangus
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To: Aquinasfan
All the warmth of a modern office building or shopping mall. Inappropriate design!

For some reason I keep picturing Rick Warren at the alter of this church in his Hawaiian shirts. Seems this would fit him. He could even wear sunglasses then.

23 posted on 03/26/2004 8:53:56 AM PST by Between the Lines
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To: sinkspur
I suppose you like this monstrosity of a church?

That's an ill-informed assumption masquerading as a question, which is Sinkspur modus operandi.

Monoghan can do whatever he wants with his money, but building a glass structure in a hot, hurricane-prone area reflects very poorly on his judgment.Yet you'll still call him arrogant.

The article indicates that this is still a proposal, doesn't it? Unless you're privy to what is actually going to happen, which we all know you aren't, then I'll give the benefit of the doubt to Monaghan and Father Fessio and continue to reject your heterodoxy and insolence, pal.

Protege tuam pugam, deacon.

24 posted on 03/26/2004 9:48:37 AM PST by A.A. Cunningham
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To: A.A. Cunningham
The article indicates that this is still a proposal, doesn't it?

Not according to Michael Rose, the author of the article:

One call to the university assured me that this is no joke. It’s the real thing—and they’re moving ahead with the project come heat or hurricanes. The chapel is expected to be completed in 2006 along with much of the rest of the new campus.

You just want to fight.

25 posted on 03/26/2004 9:52:49 AM PST by sinkspur (Adopt a dog or a cat from an animal shelter! It will save one life, and may save two.)
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To: A.A. Cunningham
continue to reject your heterodoxy and insolence, pal.

Are you angling to become the Richard Clarke of the Catholic caucus? You seem to be auditioning for the part.

26 posted on 03/26/2004 9:54:19 AM PST by sinkspur (Adopt a dog or a cat from an animal shelter! It will save one life, and may save two.)
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To: dangus; Between the Lines
dangus, I have a large book of FLW's drawings and I do not see a Copley Place church listed in it. Nor do I see it on the FLW plan lists on the web (admittedly a cursory look). The only church in Copley Place is the (quite lovely) Episcopal Church designed by H.H. Richardson.

Our parish church is designed in the "Richardsonian" (Romanesque Revival) style.

Some FLW churches:

I don't think much of the "flying saucer" Greek Orthodox church, but the others aren't too bad.

Not traditional, though.

FWIW, I hate the proposed Ave Maria chapel. It would be possible to do something more traditional in brick or stone that would fit in with the "Prairie style" FLW architecture.

27 posted on 03/26/2004 10:01:33 AM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: AnAmericanMother
That is the church. When I was there they had a huge exhibit about Frank Lloyd Wright. If it is Richardson, it was a very confusing display, because I did think to myself, "It doesn't seem like anything Wright would have done, and it seems too old."
28 posted on 03/26/2004 10:43:47 AM PST by dangus
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To: Maximilian
Unfortunately, you were exactly right in your prediction about this university.

I am disappointed in Father Fessio.
29 posted on 03/26/2004 11:05:13 AM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: Canticle_of_Deborah
We don't know what Fr. Fessio thinks of this. Though he is chancellor, he may have little to no control over this aspect, since Monaghan is the "big man."
30 posted on 03/26/2004 11:07:42 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: Pyro7480
Maybe, but we run the risk of falling into the same argument used with the Pope, "the guy in charge has no power or knowledge to control the problem."

The buck stops with Father Fessio. I can't believe he, as a priest and chancellor, didn't see this drawing from day one. I'll bet money he told the architect what he wanted. This is bigger than Monaghan.
31 posted on 03/26/2004 11:12:12 AM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: Pyro7480
I'll definitely write.

Coral rock would be better to use than glass. That thing is ugly besides.
32 posted on 03/26/2004 12:05:31 PM PST by Desdemona (Music Librarian and provider of cucumber sandwiches, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary. Hats required.)
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To: Pyro7480
From: Ave Maria University to feature largest Catholic church, crucifix---Freep News

Administrators at Ave Maria University, the country's first new Roman Catholic university in four decades, outlined plans Wednesday to build a bold campus that would include one of the nation's largest Catholic churches and crucifixes.

snip- Officials said the oratory would be the largest fixed-seating Catholic church in the nation, holding capacity for 3,333 to 3,500 congregants. Embedded into its front facade would be a 65-foot red-tinted glass cross with a 40-foot corpus, or body of Christ.

Monaghan, the founder of Domino's Pizza and former owner of the Detroit Tigers, said the church would be the center of the university and "the very thing that reminds us of what we're about," symbolizing the campus "like the Golden Dome is the symbol of Notre Dame."

I find it interesting that Monaghan would want to build the world's largest crucifix in two locations. See: Monaghan proposes world's largest crucifix---Detroit News

33 posted on 03/26/2004 12:06:11 PM PST by Between the Lines
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To: Between the Lines
I think he was denied the zoning for the Michigan location.
34 posted on 03/26/2004 12:08:50 PM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: dangus
Wonder why they had an exhibit on Wright. They could do a lovely exhibit on Richardson and the various designers and craftsmen who worked for him. He really made a concerted and thoughtful effort to go back to the Romanesque style, although it does have Victorian accretions.

More Richardson (he could get a little out of hand):

I find the Romanesque style a little bulky and lacking in height for my taste. Churches ought to look more or less like this:

St. Mary Magdalene, Clitheroe, Lancs. (mostly 15th c.)

35 posted on 03/26/2004 1:04:01 PM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: Pyro7480
It may interest you all to know that when St. Patrick's Cathedral (in NYC) was built, there was little but farmland in the area. It was considered the extreme northern limit of civilized Manhattan, and the Archbishop was widely ridiculed for building it, and building it so big, to boot.

Personally, I'm not ecstatic about the design of this one, but it could certainly be a lot worse. We have a small rather similar chapel in my part of Florida, built so it looks out over a lake (it may be the same architect - he's popular in Florida). It's light and very graceful and appropriate.

Florida is a very beautiful place with very beautiful skies and vistas, and I would imagine that part of the architect's intention was to capture this. I'm sure the materials being used will compensate for the problems with sun, etc. Furthermore, a modern building is much more appropriate for that part of Florida.

The "quasi-Mission style" is in use in much of Florida, with the rather hideous modern variation of being built to house a "church in the round" so that everybody surrounds Father's throne as he sits grinning vacuously out at the herd. I mean, flock. And of course, it has no statues, a barely recognizable altar, the Cross has no corpus, etc.

This church appears to be quite traditional in its arrangement of space, and the cross on the front will have a corpus. What I want, of course, is a good Tridentine mass inside, but I guess I'll have to settle for respectful and non-innovative NO.
36 posted on 03/26/2004 1:25:15 PM PST by livius
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To: Pyro7480; B Knotts; Canticle_of_Deborah; Maximilian; Between the Lines; A.A. Cunningham; dangus; ...
I hate the way it looks on paper, but maybe in context it would look good.

I was at the dedication mass for this yesterday. It was truly surreal to be standing literally in the middle of nowhere in a rural tomato field with the Vatican Choir singing live in the background. The mass was facing the altar, yet I've heard that the tridentine won't be allowed.

I'm not quite sure what to make of this whole endeavor yet.... signals are mixed but seems promising.

37 posted on 03/26/2004 1:29:10 PM PST by AAABEST (<a href="http://www.angelqueen.org">Traditional Catholicism is Back and Growing</a>)
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To: AAABEST
How was it? How did the choir sound? That must have been a surreal experience.
38 posted on 03/26/2004 1:35:22 PM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: livius
Florida is a very beautiful place with very beautiful skies and vistas, and I would imagine that part of the architect's intention was to capture this. I'm sure the materials being used will compensate for the problems with sun, etc.

Reading these sentences reminded me of an episode of the Simpsons where Homer and Marge are caught in the open naked, and end up escaping in a hot-air balloon. At one point in their escapade, Homer falls out of the balloon's basket, and grabs onto a rope attached to the balloon, and his naked body gets dragged across the glass roof of a church full of people. It's a very funny scene.

39 posted on 03/26/2004 1:57:18 PM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
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To: livius
I am thankful it is not a church in-the-round. I really do dislike the amphitheatre feel of those modern church churches. I prefer the cruciform, which seems to lead one up toward the Divine.
40 posted on 03/26/2004 2:02:17 PM PST by Unam Sanctam
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To: Pyro7480
LOL! Well, I certainly hope that's never replicated in real life...
41 posted on 03/26/2004 2:03:41 PM PST by livius
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To: AnAmericanMother
How was it? How did the choir sound? That must have been a surreal experience.

It was pretty wild.

I had just seen the choir the night before at the Naples Phil all dressed up, so their was a definite contrast in more ways than one.

There was also a fierce wind that was knocking over and breaking some of the glass.

Here are a few pics from the event.


42 posted on 03/26/2004 2:06:42 PM PST by AAABEST (<a href="http://www.angelqueen.org">Traditional Catholicism is Back and Growing</a>)
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To: Unam Sanctam
I agree. There's a definite lack of focus in the "church in the round" model - to say nothing of the rejection of thousands of years of temple/church architecture.

But I guess that rejection was probably the whole point of the church in the round.
43 posted on 03/26/2004 2:07:04 PM PST by livius
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To: livius
Yeah, I suppose it's the old "let's worship ourselves as community" pablum.
44 posted on 03/26/2004 2:09:24 PM PST by Unam Sanctam
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To: AnAmericanMother; dangus; Canticle_of_Deborah; Between the Lines; Pyro7480
Here's another pic of the interior:


45 posted on 03/26/2004 2:10:24 PM PST by AAABEST (<a href="http://www.angelqueen.org">Traditional Catholicism is Back and Growing</a>)
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To: AAABEST
Is that supposed to be the choir loft above the main floor? Where is the organ?
46 posted on 03/26/2004 2:35:22 PM PST by ELS
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To: AAABEST
You are more optimistic than I am.

Religion aside, I hope your property is zoned commercial. You stand to make some good money.
47 posted on 03/26/2004 2:36:14 PM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: Pyro7480
Good heavens! It looks like a greenhouse -- a very ugly greenhouse.
48 posted on 03/26/2004 2:38:08 PM PST by Bigg Red (Never again trust Democrats with national security!)
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To: ELS
I'm not sure what's what in the pic.
49 posted on 03/26/2004 2:42:48 PM PST by AAABEST (<a href="http://www.angelqueen.org">Traditional Catholicism is Back and Growing</a>)
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To: Canticle_of_Deborah
It's not zone commercial (everything is ag or residential in the area), but it's 2 rental properties which could be good also.

Although it is a blessing of sorts monetarily, I'm more concerned with this being a blessing that glorifies God and is good for our church. I would bulldoze the property in exchange for such if I somehow could.

50 posted on 03/26/2004 2:49:51 PM PST by AAABEST (<a href="http://www.angelqueen.org">Traditional Catholicism is Back and Growing</a>)
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