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The Crisis of Christmas
Ship Of Fools magazine ^ | Dec 1999 | Andrew Walker

Posted on 12/14/2004 1:24:05 PM PST by Alex Murphy

Christmas comes in many different wrappings. There's pagan Christmas, with holly and mistletoe and the other reminders of our Druidic past. There's sentimental Christian Christmas, with gold, frankincense and fluffy sheep. And there's commercialized Christmas for the feelgood generation. Andrew Walker gets through the wrapping paper to discover the true meaning of it all – the crisis of God entering the world to win it back to himself.

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MOST OF US KNOW that in significant ways Christmas is a pagan invention. European "Father Christmas" can perhaps claim a longer life than the American "Santa Claus", but both these jolly creatures are a bastardization of 4th-century St Nicholas, Bishop of Myra, whom legend has it gave gifts to children and also contended for the full divinity of Christ at the Council of Nicea in AD325. Christmas trees are a 19th-century recreation of German pagan tradition, and mistletoe and holly harp back to the folk fertility of Druidic religion.

We tend to accept such pagan importations into the Christmas story because they all seem to be part of the "spirit of Christmas" – a time of giving, family, merriment and mulled wine, carols, decorations and snowflakes. This is "quality time" for us that is conjured up by residual images of a Victorian Christmas strained through repeats and rehashes of Dickens' A Christmas Carol. It is a world of humanitarian decency which allows a sanitized and sentimental baby Jesus to slip-in with barely a rustle of discomfort from either the religiously indifferent masses or the cohorts of interfaith watchdogs.

Indeed, Jesus is welcomed into the festive season not so much because it is his birthday but because he is a symbol of the Christmas spirit. Witness the tableau of the holy family with adoring mother fawning over adorable child while an elderly Joseph looks on, pleased as punch. See the gift-bearing kings from exotic lands. Watch rough hewn shepherds with their fleecy baby sheep. Add cows and donkeys for good measure, perhaps a hovering angel or two, and together it all adds colour to the Christmas spirit, which is arguably not even Dickens any more but a hazy warm feeling – an "atmosphere" – created by market forces and unrestrained hedonism.

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IF WE ARE COMMITTED Christians we are quick to blame the corruption of Christmas on pagan innovations – not to mention commercial interests – but we are slow to concede that we too have corroded the Christmas story through the sugary acids of sentimentality. And sad to say it may have begun in the 14th century with Francis of Assisi.

A great preacher and popularizer, as well as self-elected pauper, St Francis embellished the Gospel stories in order to make them fresh and vivid to ordinary people: the dark cave of the outcast God-child, for example, took on the glow of a rural idyll as sweet hay and wooden manger turned the landlord's outhouse into country stable. Franciscan spirituality was also expressed through homely iconography so that the stories were imaged in frescoes and church windows. By the time of the Renaissance, 100 years later, Christmas scenes were skilfully animated by artists who increasingly saw religious art as a triumph of technical flair and imaginative creation over dogmatic content.

Lest Protestants lay all blame at the pierced feet of St Francis, or the decadence of Italian art, we should perhaps recall Martin Luther's carol, "Away in a manger", where lowing cattle and the laid-down oh so sweet head of Jesus almost switches off the true light which has come into the world.

All of this is perhaps the more sobering when we realize that we don't even know if the early Church celebrated Christmas at all. We do know that by the 3rd century the Eastern Churches had added Epiphany to the great liturgical feasts of Easter and Pentecost. This great theophany – this public announcement of God's intentions – remains to this day in the Orthodox Church as an event as important as Christmas. Epiphany is not understood as the celebration of the Magi, as it has become in the West, but a celebration of the baptism of Jesus, some 30 years after his birth. The Eastern Epiphany is seen as a trinitarian declaration on the banks of the river Jordan that in Jesus what you see is none other than the revelation of God to the world.

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THE CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION ITSELF emerges from the shadow of Easter in Western Christianity sometime after the imperial edict of toleration in AD311, when the of December 25th was chosen as the official birthday of Jesus. In itself this date is quite arbitrary, as the Bible gives no hint as to what time of year Jesus was born. The scholarly consensus is that December was chosen to celebrate the birth of the "sun of righteousness" as an evangelistic marker against the pagan celebration of the winter solstice.

For those of us living in colder climes, the solstice is now so intertwined with Christmas that the festive season is a veritable Yuletide with all the gloss of chocolate logs, snowmen, chestnuts roasting on an open fire, reindeer, frosted window panes, Santa and elves in Lapland, and even shepherds wrapped up against the cold on a billion Xmas cards. In the United States, you can even visit Christmas shops in the Deep South at the height of summer, and as you walk in you stumble on a winter wonderland like Lucy pushing through the coats of the wardrobe only to find her feet scrunching in the snows of Narnia.

The pagan accoutrements of the Christmas story – of Santa, trees, red berries, and winter pleasures – are not evil in themselves and are, in their own way, delightful. The problem lies elsewhere. The true meaning of Christmas has been buried beneath an avalanche of nostalgia for a "feel good" experience – remembrances of a childhood past, of magic, of reconstituted joy.

Christmas should be the season when the Church calls us to remember the inauguration of God's rescue mission for humankind. Jesus the Word of God, Son of the Father, in obedience to the divine love, divested himself of his power and glory, and in the power of the Spirit joined himself irrevocably to human flesh. The at-one-ment of God with the world may have culminated at Calvary, but it began in Nazareth with God's wooing of Mary through the angelic messenger, and her voluntary acceptance of the divine proposal. The birth of Jesus in Bethlehem was God's initiative, but one that was in full co-operation with the chosen maiden of Israel.

Christmas, in other words, is the recollection and retelling of salvation history: it is the crisis event in the story of the world that changes it for ever. Time itself, as C.S. Lewis reminded us, turned a corner with the incarnation. Let us, by all means, buy our family presents, eat our mince pies, wallow in sentiment if we must, and even sail close to the pagan winter wind. But let us, by no means, fail to announce to the world that Jesus the son of Mary is none other than Immanuel – God with us.


TOPICS: Activism; Apologetics; Current Events; Evangelical Christian; General Discusssion; History; Mainline Protestant; Moral Issues; Other Christian; Religion & Culture; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: christmas
Andrew Walker is Professor of Theology and Education at King's College London and Consultant Editor of Ship of Fools. Formerly the Director of the C.S. Lewis Centre, he is the author of several books, including Restoring the Kingdom (revised 1998), and Telling the Story (1996).
1 posted on 12/14/2004 1:24:05 PM PST by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy; kosta50; sionnsar; Agrarian; MarMema; monkfan; Tantumergo; Cronos; NYer; Vicomte13; ...
Thanks for the article, but lest there be any misunderstanding of the Orthodox Icon which is used here, readers should understand that what the author is talking about as a 14th century innovation from the Franciscans is NOT what the far older, Orthodox Icon is representing. The following is a standard Orthodox explanation of the theology taught by the Icon of the Birth of Christ.

"The icon of the Nativity expresses the presence of the Trinity in the economy of salvation (the unique light that is parted into three rays at the top of the icon) in particular the presence of the Holy Spirit. Second, the continuity of the Old and the New Testaments (the presence of the Isaiah who represents all the prophets of the Old). Third, the organic unity of Jesus redemptive acts: birth, death, descent into hell and resurrection. Fourth the messianic dignity of the Child (the presence of the ox, the ass and the shepherds because the Church teaches that ALL of creation was saved by Christ). Fifth, the perpetual virginity of the Theotokos (the three stars on her head and shoulders). Sixth, the cosmic dimension of the incarnation, so that from then onward, philosophers and scientists, learn from the Paraclete to sing their song of thanksgiving. The Nativity contains three important dogmatic facts: first, the descending movement of God; second the miracle of virginal maternity, the divine answer to the 'fiat' of the Virgin Mary; and third, the aim of divine philanthropy, namely the theosis of man."

For Orthodox Christianity, notwithstanding what may have happened in the West, the Feast of the Birth of Christ has no Santa Claus or commercial or touchy/feely meaning. It is profoundly intertwined with and expressive of the theosis of the entire creation.
2 posted on 12/14/2004 5:48:27 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Kolokotronis
For Orthodox Christianity, notwithstanding what may have happened in the West, the Feast of the Birth of Christ has no Santa Claus or commercial or touchy/feely meaning. It is profoundly intertwined with and expressive of the theosis of the entire creation.

Always appreciate my Orthodox brothers' perspective on things. Even though I am not Orthodox, your understanding of this coincides with mine. Regrettably, there are many Christians on FR who appear to insist that sort of thing must be observed alongside of the Incarnation...

3 posted on 12/14/2004 5:58:50 PM PST by Alex Murphy (Psalm 73)
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To: Alex Murphy

"Regrettably, there are many Christians on FR who appear to insist that sort of thing must be observed alongside of the Incarnation..."

Well, you know, the secular Christmas traditions are fun, even for old curmudgeons like me. The important thing is to remember what we are celebrating and why. It is a failing of the churches that the faithful are not better educated in this and thus are prone to confuse the fun secular holiday with the very important, indeed second only to Pascha, holyday.


4 posted on 12/14/2004 6:08:24 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Kolokotronis
There are a few other comments about the Orthodox icon and the theology that it represents that I think are worth mentioning.

The icon always has an ox and an ass, as Kolo mentions. These are not randomly chosen animals, but rather represent a direct reference to the words of Isaiah 1:3, where the Prophet writes -- "The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib..."

Unlike Western artistic portrayals of the Nativity, traditional Orthodox iconography has the Virgin and Christ at the very center of the icon, whereas St. Joseph the Betrothed is off in the lower left hand corner of the icon. It is thereby made clear that he is not the father of the child. In addition, he looks troubled, and there is the figure of an old man standing in front of him, representing Satan, who tempted Joseph to doubt the words of the angel that had told him that the child was of God.

The characters at the lower right of the icon are usually of women midwives, who are washing Jesus, adding yet another layer of emphasis to the reality that Jesus was born physically -- and that his arrival on earth wasn't something merely mystical and symbolic.

There is usually a tree beneath Christ, which both signifies that He is the one prophesied to arise from the root of Jesse, and also is a prefiguring of the Cross.

The wise men, who arrived later, are off in the distance, while the simple shepherds, to whom the birth was first announced, are closer -- as well as being a reflection of the Gospel account, it also shows that the "common and simple folk" often have an easier and more direct route to being close to God than do the "wealthy and wise."

This is truly one of the richest icons in all of Orthodox iconography. And there is truly nothing sentimental about it...

The cosmic implications of the Nativity are also reflected in the hymnology of the Feast. The Troparion/Apolytikion of the Feast goes:

Thy Nativity, O Christ our God, hath shown to the world the light of wisdom. For by it, those who worshipped the stars were taught by a star to adore Thee, the Son of Righteousness, and to know Thee, the Orient from on high. O Lord, glory be to Thee."

The Kontakion of the Feast:

Today the Virgin gives birth to the Transcendent One, and the earth offers a cave to the Unapproachable One. Angels and shepherds glorify Him, and the magi journey with the star. For our sake, the pre-eternal God is born as a little Child."

The Exapostilarion sung at the Vigil:

From on high our Savior, the Dayspring of the East, hath visited us, and we who are in darkness and shadow have truly found Him: for the Lord hath been born of the Virgin."

And finally, a beautiful sticheron from the Praises of the Vigil:

Today Christ is born of the Virgin in Bethlehem. Today He who knows no beginning now begins to be, and the Word is made flesh. The powers of heaven greatly rejoice, and the earth with mankind makes glad. The Magi offer gifts, the shepherds proclaim the marvel, and we cry aloud without ceasing: Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will among men.

Of course, all of it is even more beautiful when sung.

Wishing all a blessed preparation for the Nativity...

5 posted on 12/14/2004 6:36:31 PM PST by Agrarian
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To: Agrarian

Thanks! Kala Christougenna!


6 posted on 12/14/2004 6:48:22 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Alex Murphy
Always appreciate my Orthodox brothers' perspective on things.

I always appreciate you too, Alex, here on the religion forum. Thank you for this thread.

7 posted on 12/14/2004 7:21:46 PM PST by MarMema
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To: katnip

Great learning stuff here for us. Thought you might like to come read.


8 posted on 12/14/2004 7:23:01 PM PST by MarMema
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To: Agrarian; Kolokotronis
In between baking Christmas cookies today I was working with my two youngest children, who are singing Silent Night at church on Sunday.

Ok they're not going to bring down the house. :-)

While I was singing to them and with them, I kept having to fight choking up on the line "Glories stream from heaven afar".

Thank you so much for reminding me about the symbolism of the ass and ox, so I can make sure to bring that into the lesson tomorrow with my children.

it also shows that the "common and simple folk" often have an easier and more direct route to being close to God than do the "wealthy and wise."

Thanks for pointing this out as well.

9 posted on 12/14/2004 7:35:06 PM PST by MarMema
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To: FormerLib; ezfindit; Truth'sBabyGirl; monkfan; Southside_Chicago_Republican; The_Reader_David

ping


10 posted on 12/14/2004 7:41:21 PM PST by MarMema
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To: MarMema; Agrarian; FormerLib; ezfindit; Truth'sBabyGirl; monkfan; Southside_Chicago_Republican; ...

"it also shows that the "common and simple folk" often have an easier and more direct route to being close to God than do the "wealthy and wise."

This is one of the most important lessons to learn and one which many of us, myself as the chief, should be regularly reminded of.


11 posted on 12/14/2004 8:02:31 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Kolokotronis; MarMema
It is a failing of the churches that the faithful are not better educated in this and thus are prone to confuse the fun secular holiday with the very important, indeed second only to Pascha, holyday.

Your post dovetails nicely with the comments I made on the companion thread to this one. Quoting from that post, "If own nation can't keep the story straight, why should we expect others to do any better?"

Some of the other comments on that thread are pretty noteworthy, too, for other reasons....

12 posted on 12/14/2004 8:42:30 PM PST by Alex Murphy (Psalm 73)
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To: Kolokotronis; Agrarian
Along the lines of the simple folk, I wonder if you know anything about a man named Howard Finster.

Finsterisms

""It's very simple," says Finster, "When Christ called his disciples, he called fishermen, he didn't call nobody from a qualified university."

Forgive me if you find him to be a hoosier. I think he is delightful. We raise goats and listen to country music after church, so I cannot call anyone a hoosier. :-)

13 posted on 12/14/2004 9:06:40 PM PST by MarMema
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To: Alex Murphy

Oops, meant to ping you to the above post as well. It didn't work for whatever reason.


14 posted on 12/14/2004 9:07:15 PM PST by MarMema
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To: Kolokotronis; Alex Murphy; sionnsar; Agrarian; MarMema; monkfan; Tantumergo; Cronos; NYer; ...
About customs...the "Christmas tree"

About the continuity of the Old and the New Testaments

Here Jesus directly invalidates the OT verses Exodus 21:24; Lev. 24:20; Deut. 19:21 and reinterprets them as something we should not follow:

Kolokotronis is absolutely on the mark when he says that Orthodox Christmas is not commercialized, always staying focused on Christ.

Thus, rather than wishing someone "Merry Christmas" we greet each other with "Christ is born!" and instead of "Marry Christmas to you too" we respond "Indeed, He is born!" This is not our personal holiday of merrymaking, but a celebration of the birth of our Saviour. It's not about us, Santa or sales.

Thus Christmas to the Orthodox has a different name and a different meaning: it is simply and always "The Birth of Christ."

Likewise, Orthodox Easter is not even called that, but "Resurrection." It is the central feast of the Church, eclipsing even His Birth. And, consistent with the focus on our Saviour, we do not wish each other "Happy Easter" (the word Easter is pagan), but rather exclaim "Christ is risen!" to which we reply "Indeed, He is risen!"

15 posted on 12/15/2004 12:35:16 AM PST by kosta50 (Eastern Orthodoxy is pure Christianity)
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To: kosta50

Nice post. Thanks Kosta. I am going to ping you to the other thread I am on in case you are up for awhile.


16 posted on 12/15/2004 12:41:07 AM PST by MarMema
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To: MarMema

I like goats. :)


17 posted on 12/15/2004 3:06:13 AM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Kolokotronis
LOL, we went to a dinner for a mission church out here, Greek. It was great! Crab and spaghetti.

And terrific entertainment.

Anyway, they had these bowls of pretzels on all the tables and after it was all over, we just naturally started helping to clean up. Like you do in Orthodox church halls.

I asked if I could have the pretzels that were leftover after I had dumped a few bowls, for our goats. And suddenly I was surrounded by everyone there.
"You have goats?" They were all brimming with huge smiles.

Now usually, you have to understand, people think we are hoosiers with a goat on top of the car or something. But always in Greek churches, we get lots of smiles on that one.

18 posted on 12/15/2004 3:38:28 AM PST by MarMema
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To: MarMema

"... we went to a dinner for a mission church out here, Greek. It was great! Crab and spaghetti."

Crab and spaghetti?! What kind of Greeks do they have out West?

As for goats, they are among the most noble of beasts; brave and affectionate at the same time. They give us milk and wool and are real good to eat in a stew, nice and lean!


19 posted on 12/15/2004 3:50:28 AM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Kolokotronis

I have a neutered buck who is very big and also sweet, named Panteleimon, whom I am training to pack for our Boy Scout troop. We call him Leemon for short.


20 posted on 12/15/2004 3:59:09 AM PST by MarMema
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To: Kolokotronis; MarMema
They give us milk and wool and are real good to eat in a stew, nice and lean!

That milk makes good cheese too.

On a different note, I learned a few things about goats on my uncle's ranch many years ago. First, don't let that billygoat get more than a couple feet from you. keep him close or he'll charge and knock you into next week. Second, don't wear your favorite bluejeans. He's gonna lean into you and make you stinky. Real stinky. Like you stepped on a skunk kind of stinky. And third, in order to get the milk to make the cheese, somebody is gonna have to deal with the billygoat, despite the consequences. Rookie nephews, for example. hehe.

21 posted on 12/15/2004 8:47:18 AM PST by monkfan (Mercy triumphs over judgement)
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To: monkfan

"Rookie nephews, for example. hehe."

I played that role!


22 posted on 12/15/2004 9:14:46 AM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Kolokotronis

Thanks for this wonderful ping!


23 posted on 12/16/2004 10:17:19 AM PST by ezfindit (OrthodoxNet.com - Shining the Light of Wisdom and Truth)
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To: ezfindit

You are very welcome!


24 posted on 12/16/2004 10:36:53 AM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: Alex Murphy
The pagan accoutrements of the Christmas story – of Santa, trees, red berries, and winter pleasures – are not evil in themselves and are, in their own way, delightful. The problem lies elsewhere. The true meaning of Christmas has been buried beneath an avalanche of nostalgia for a "feel good" experience – remembrances of a childhood past, of magic, of reconstituted joy

And this is what so many are really fighting for in defense of Christmas

The feel good memories and the innate "goodness' of men worshipped in the Christmas holiday is an affront to God

As currently constituted the holiday is little more than an attempt to keep the crèche because it was always there . To sing"We Three kings" at the school "winter concert" because WE always sang it . Christmas like so many things is all about men.

Most of us can look at the holiday and know it is not Christ's birthday and that it was designated for pagan conversions to replace a winter holiday . We can know it was never commanded or even approved of by Christ or scripture and still find it worthy to contemplate the incarnation . That is as long as we realize what we look at is only the first step of the plan ordained from the foundation of the world ...the first step to Calvary .

Now next time someone wants to hear a carol because it was that way when I was a kid and I want my kid to have the same experience... they need to listen to those early carols and see how our forefathers saw the day before nativity sets, Santas, trees and school concerts ..

Looking to the cross , the grave, the Resurrection

We three kings of Orient are;
Bearing gifts we traverse afar,
Field and fountain, moor and mountain,
Following yonder star.
Refrain
O star of wonder, star of light,
Star with royal beauty bright,
Westward leading, still proceeding,
Guide us to thy perfect light.

Born a King on Bethlehem’s plain
Gold I bring to crown Him again,
King forever, ceasing never,
Over us all to reign.

Frankincense to offer have I;
Incense owns a Deity nigh;
Prayer and praising, voices raising,
Worshipping God on high.

Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume
Breathes a life of gathering gloom;
Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying,
Sealed in the stone cold tomb.

Glorious now behold Him arise;
King and God and sacrifice;

Alleluia, Alleluia,
Sounds through the earth and skies.

This is a time for soul searching... why do I desire to preserve Christmas ? Do I need a special day or the trapping to celebrate the incarnation ? Or Do I celebrate it daily in my heart ?

Does the nativity set or the carols or the special ceremonies define the day for me? Could Christmas be Christmas in the silence of my home and in my heart without any of the trappings .

Why do we assume that the world needs to see or recognize it at all ? After all after the angels sang Herod wanted to kill Christ. .

The world celebrates fallen men , self centered men, why would we expect any different . Its all about me Lord ..all about me

25 posted on 12/16/2004 11:33:40 AM PST by RnMomof7 (because I'm good enough , and smart enough and darn it I deserve it ")
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To: Kolokotronis
For Orthodox Christianity, notwithstanding what may have happened in the West, the Feast of the Birth of Christ has no Santa Claus or commercial or touchy/feely meaning. It is profoundly intertwined with and expressive of the theosis of the entire creation.

And God in His wisdom has assisted in the preservation of that by keeping the calendars separate

Many blessings

26 posted on 12/16/2004 11:36:17 AM PST by RnMomof7 (because I'm good enough , and smart enough and darn it I deserve it ")
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To: Kolokotronis

I have been told that much that is served and sold as "Lamb" in this country is actually goat because most Americans would not like to think about eating goats.. as a lover of "lamb" I really do not care where it comes from ...

I am OLD as children we drank goats milk , it is wonderful especially for those that have milk allergies. It is still sometimes available in the markets here .


27 posted on 12/16/2004 11:41:38 AM PST by RnMomof7 (because I'm good enough , and smart enough and darn it I deserve it ")
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To: RnMomof7
"I have been told that much that is served and sold as "Lamb" in this country is actually goat because most Americans would not like to think about eating goats.. as a lover of "lamb" I really do not care where it comes from ..."

Who would be fooled by kid being substituted for lamb? To me it would make little difference, but my oldest son and wife would most assuredly disagree. The younger one is like me!

When I was a child goat's milk was given to sick children and the old folks sometimes. It is still available around here from farmers. Years ago there was a large Russian/Czarist emigre community not too far away and that's where we went for the kid, the milk and some good cheese.
28 posted on 12/16/2004 1:11:08 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Nuke the Cube!)
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To: RnMomof7; Kolokotronis
I am OLD as children we drank goats milk...

I was quite fond of the goat's milk yogurt they served us in Israel.

29 posted on 12/16/2004 1:14:44 PM PST by Corin Stormhands (CHRISTmas: One season. One reason.)
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To: RnMomof7; Kolokotronis

We have goats milk every year that we give away by the gallon. Mom, you have only to ask me (and freepmail me your exact location, I know sort of where you are, but a tad more detail) and I will locate for you some goats milk.
Name your breed preference.


30 posted on 12/16/2004 1:43:49 PM PST by MarMema
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