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Benedict XVI: The Pope and His Agenda
La Chiesa ^ | April 20, 2005 | Sandro Magister

Posted on 04/20/2005 9:54:13 AM PDT by NYer

ROMA, April 20, 2005 – They called him a conservative. But Joseph Ratzinger revolutionized even the conclave which, on April 19, made him pope, Benedict XVI, “a humble laborer in the vineyard of the Lord.”

Never in the past century has the choice of a pontiff been spoken in a language so clear and sharp. And it came with a buildup which become more impressive as the hour of truth drew near. Until his last conference on the state of the world, which Ratzinger gave on the last day of the deceased pope’s life. Until, even more importantly, the last homily he proclaimed in Saint Peter’s at the mass “pro eligendo romano pontifice,” a few hours before the closing of the doors of the Sistine Chapel.

As a cardinal, Ratzinger put nothing “on sale” in order to be elected pope. The votes and consensus landed on him one after the other, month after month, scrutiny after scrutiny, attracted only by his agenda, hard as a diamond. At the last mass in Saint Peter’s he reproposed this with the words of the apostle Paul: the goal is that of “being adults in the faith,” and not “children in a state of guardianship, tossed about by the waves and carried here and there by every wind of doctrine.”

Because modern times are leading precisely toward this, he warned: to “a dictatorship of relativism which recognizes nothing as definitive and leaves as the ultimate standard one’s own personality and desires.”

Against this “deceit of men,” Ratzinger opposed the principle that “we have, instead, a different standard: the Son of God, the true man,” who is also “the standard of true humanism” and “the criterion for discerning between the true and the false, between deception and truth.”

The plain conclusion: “We must foster the maturity of this adult faith; we must guide the flock of Christ to this faith.” And it doesn’t matter if “having a clear faith according to the Church’s creed is frequently labeled fundamentalism.”

Over the years, accusations of fundamentalism have been scattered against this German theologian who today is the new head of the Catholic Church.

During the 1960’s, the young Ratzinger followed the second Vatican Council as an expert consultant for the cardinal of Cologne, Joseph Frings. He launched his first darts against the Holy Office, “out of step with the times and a cause of harm and scandal,” which he would direct many years later. But very soon after the end of the council, he began to denounce its effects, which were “crudely divergent” from what was to be expected.

The path he took was parallel to that of two other first-rate theologians of the time, his friends and instructors Henri De Lubac and Hans Urs von Balthasar, both of whom also became cardinals, both of whom were also accused of having turned aside from progressivism to conservatism. Ratzinger never paid any attention to the label that was applied to him: “I have not changed; they are the ones who have changed.”

His was a strange conservatism, in any case. It was apt to disturb, rather than pacify, the Church. One of his favorite models is Saint Charles Borromeo, the archbishop of Milan who, after the Council of Trent, did nothing less than “reconstruct the Catholic Church, which was almost destroyed in the area around Milan as well, without returning to the Middle Ages to do so; on the contrary, he created a modern form of the Church.”

Today the transformations in civilization are no less epochal, in his eyes. The culture that has established itself in Europe “constitutes the most radical possible contradiction, not only of Christianity, but also of the religious traditions of humanity,” he argued on April 1 at Subiaco, at his last conference during the reign of John Paul II. And therefore the Church must react with all the courage it can muster, not conforming itself to the times, not falling to its knees before the world, but “bringing, with holy consternation, the gift of faith to all, the gift of friendship with Christ.”

Benedict XVI does not dream of the mass conversion of whole peoples for the Church of tomorrow. For many regions, he foresees a minority Christianity, but he wants this to be “creative.” He prefers the missionary impulse to timid dialogue with nonbelievers and men of other faiths.

Pessimism and angst have no place with him, and here also he breaks with the labels currently applied to him. He ended his homily-manifesto on April 18 at Saint Peter’s by invoking a world “changed from a vale of tears to the garden of God.”

He has been this way since he was a child: “The Catholicism of the Bavaria in which I grew up was joyful, colorful, human. I miss a sense of purism. This must be because, since my childhood, I have breathed the air of the Baroque.” He is distrustful of theologians who “do not love art, poetry, music, nature: they can be dangerous.” He loves taking walks in the mountains. He plays the piano, and favors Mozart. His brother Georg, a priest, is the choirmaster at Ratisbonne, one of the last pockets of resistance for the great tradition of sacred polyphony and Gregorian chant.

And this has been for years one of the points on which he has collided with novelties in the postconciliar Church. He has had harsh words for the transformation of the mass and liturgies “into spectacles that require directors of genius and talented actors.” He has said similar things about the dismantling of sacred music. “How often we celebrate only ourselves, without even taking Him into account,” he commented in his meditations for the Stations of the Cross last Good Friday. Here, “Him” refers to Jesus Christ, the one forgotten by liturgies changed into convivial gatherings.

Benedict XVI has never hidden his reservations even about the mass liturgies celebrated by his predecessor. No one in the curia of John Paul II was more free, or more critical, than he was. And Karol Wojtyla had the greatest respect for him for this reason, too. “My trusted friend”: this is how he defined Ratzinger in his autobiographical book “Arise, Let Us Be Going,” praise he never bestowed on any of his other close collaborators.

As prefect for the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Ratzinger criticized John Paul II on many points, even the ones that most distinguished his pontificate.

He didn’t even go to the first interreligious meeting in Assisi in 1986. He saw in this an obfuscation of the identity of Christianity, which cannot be reduced to other faiths. Years later, in 2000, a document came to dissolve any sort of equivocation, the declaration “Dominus Jesus,” published with his signature. It unleashed a storm of controversy. But the pope defended it completely. And in 2002, Ratzinger attended the meeting at Assisi in its modified form.

Another point on which the new pope did not agree with John Paul II was the “mea culpas.” Many other cardinals disagreed with these, but said nothing in public, with the sole exception of the archbishop of Bologna, Giacomo Biffi, who set down his objections in black and white, in a pastoral letter to the faithful of his diocese. Ratzinger voiced his criticism in a different way: in a theological document that responded, point by point, to the objections that had been raised, but in which the objections were all elaborately developed, while the replies appeared tenuous and shaky.

As a cardinal, Benedict XVI also criticized the endless succession of saints and blesseds that pope Wojtyla raised to the honors of the altar: in many cases, these were “persons who might perhaps say something to a certain group, but do not say much to the great multitude of believers.” As an alternative, he proposed “bringing to the attention of Christianity only those figures who, more than all others, make visible to us the holy Church, amid so many doubts about its holiness.”

He has always ignored politically correct language. In 1984, in a document against the Marxist roots of liberation theology, he delivered a deadly series of blows to the communist empire, labeling it “the shame of our time” and “a disgraceful enslavement of man.” During that same period, American president Ronald Reagan was speaking out against the “evil empire.” The news was spread that Cardinal Agostino Casaroli, the Vatican secretary of state and the architect of a policy of good relations with Moscow, had threatened to resign in order to distance himself from the prefect for doctrine. It wasn’t true. In any case, five years later the Berlin Wall came down.

Ratzinger has always distinguished himself as a man of great vision, not as a manager. He would love to see a Church that is simpler in terms of bureaucracy. He doesn’t want its central and peripheral institutions – the Vatican curia, the diocesan chanceries, the episcopal conferences – to become “like the armor of Saul, which prevented the young David from walking.”

Partly for this reason, he reacted strongly in 2000 when another talented archbishop and theologian, his friend and fellow German Walter Kasper, charged him with wanting to identify the universal Church with the pope and the curia, with wanting in effect to restore Roman centralism. Ratzinger replied, confuting Kasper’s thesis. The latter spoke again, provoking another public reply.

At the center of the dispute, which was fought on the terrain of advanced theology, was the relationship between the universal Church and the particular local Churches. This was the same question that the progressivist wing was discussing in more institutional and political terms during those same years, promoting a democratization of the Church, a balance of papal primacy with greater power for the college of bishops.

The controversy over the balance of power in the Church was also involved in the conclave that elected Benedict XVI, and a rejection of a greater role for collegiality was attributed to him, a rejection that would also create an obstacle to dialogue with the Orthodox and Protestant Churches.

But the reality is different. It was Kasper himself, whose motives are not suspect, who gave the name “the Ratzinger formula” to the thesis maintained by the present pope on relations with separated Christians, and called this “fundamental for ecumenical dialogue.” One written form of this thesis maintains that “in regard to papal primacy, Rome must demand from the Orthodox Churches nothing more than was established and practiced during the first millennium.”

During the first millennium, the college of bishops carried much greater weight. It will be, perhaps, a conservative pope like Benedict XVI who will clear the way for this reform.


TOPICS: Activism; Apologetics; Catholic; Current Events; Ecumenism; General Discusssion; History; Ministry/Outreach; Moral Issues; Religion & Culture; Religion & Politics; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: benedictxvi; cardinals; conclave; jpii; pope; ratzinger
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1 posted on 04/20/2005 9:54:25 AM PDT by NYer
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To: american colleen; Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; ...

Interesting just how many differences there are between JPII and Benedict XVI.


2 posted on 04/20/2005 9:58:02 AM PDT by NYer ("Love without truth is blind; Truth without love is empty." - Pope Benedict XVI)
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To: NYer
"He is distrustful of theologians who “do not love art, poetry, music, nature: they can be dangerous.” He loves taking walks in the mountains. He plays the piano, and favors Mozart. His brother Georg, a priest, is the choirmaster at Ratisbonne, one of the last pockets of resistance for the great tradition of sacred polyphony and Gregorian chant."

A man after my own heart :-)

3 posted on 04/20/2005 10:02:34 AM PDT by Aristotle721 (The Recovering Choir Director - www.cantemusdomino.net/blog)
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To: NYer
He has always ignored politically correct language.

Of all the differences, that's the one I most look forward to.

4 posted on 04/20/2005 10:03:55 AM PDT by old and tired
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To: NYer
Never in the past century has the choice of a pontiff been spoken in a language so clear and sharp.

The election of Pius XII sent a signal nobody missed.

5 posted on 04/20/2005 10:12:18 AM PDT by Romulus ("Andiamo avanti. Il Signore ci aiuter e Maria sua Santissima Madre star dalla nostra parte.")
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To: NYer

I'm not a catholic... but if I were I'd know that Benedict XVI was my kind of pope.


6 posted on 04/20/2005 10:16:23 AM PDT by Luke (CPO, USCG (Ret))
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To: NYer

Interesting also how they were able to be great friends and still work together, both seemingly with God's blessing. John Paul was the man for his day, and now Benedict will have his, each to the glory of God.


7 posted on 04/20/2005 10:16:56 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: NYer

It is interesting, the differences, and how evident the Hand of God is in these two successors to Peter. I am praying that Ben XVI appoints someone as the prefect of the doctrine of faith whom he admires and trusts, as much as JP II trusted him in that post.

With all the "Prophecies" running rampant out there, descernment is paramount, but one would have to be pretty foggy in the head not to see them being realized before our eyes.


8 posted on 04/20/2005 10:17:10 AM PDT by Integrityrocks
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To: NYer

"Benedict XVI has never hidden his reservations even about the mass liturgies celebrated by his predecessor. No one in the curia of John Paul II was more free, or more critical, than he was. And Karol Wojtyla had the greatest respect for him for this reason, too."

Interesting!


9 posted on 04/20/2005 10:37:14 AM PDT by Tantumergo
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To: NYer; Romulus; ninenot; Desdemona
He is distrustful of theologians who "do not love art, poetry, music, nature: they can be dangerous." He loves taking walks in the mountains. He plays the piano, and favors Mozart. His brother Georg, a priest, is the choirmaster at Ratisbonne, one of the last pockets of resistance for the great tradition of sacred polyphony and Gregorian chant.

And this has been for years one of the points on which he has collided with novelties in the postconciliar Church. He has had harsh words for the transformation of the mass and liturgies "into spectacles that require directors of genius and talented actors." He has said similar things about the dismantling of sacred music. "How often we celebrate only ourselves, without even taking Him into account," he commented in his meditations for the Stations of the Cross last Good Friday. Here, "Him" refers to Jesus Christ, the one forgotten by liturgies changed into convivial gatherings.

Benedict XVI has never hidden his reservations even about the mass liturgies celebrated by his predecessor. No one in the curia of John Paul II was more free, or more critical, than he was.

This reinforces my opinion that Piero Marini will not be the pontifical MC for much longer.

10 posted on 04/20/2005 10:56:33 AM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: Aristotle721; NYer
""He is distrustful of theologians who “do not love art, poetry, music, nature: they can be dangerous.”

A man after my own heart as well. I can hear him saying the words my pastor used a few weeks ago. My pastor, in a homily, flat out said "those nincompoop theologians that undermine people's faith"! I nearly went into down-home mode and almost did a Rebel Yell and a classic Amen Corner "Amen" right out loud! I managed to contain it until I got in my car! I can see Benedict XVI saying the same thing in German!
11 posted on 04/20/2005 11:29:24 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of all the shucking and jiving)
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To: old and tired; NYer
He has always ignored politically correct language.

Wonderful to hear. In America, political correctness is the club used by the ACLU Secular Taliban and their acolytes, to beat back believers----to oust religionists of every faith from claiming their rightful place in the public square.

PC needs to be quashed every place it raises it ugly head. We pray that Pope Benedict XVI will deliver the message far and wide-----political correctness is dead, its demise hastened by a devastated culture corrupted by secularism.

12 posted on 04/20/2005 11:38:30 AM PDT by Liz (One of it's most compelling tenets is Catholicism's acknowledgement of individual free will.)
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To: NYer
At the last mass in Saint Peter’s he reproposed this with the words of the apostle Paul: the goal is that of “being adults in the faith,” and not “children in a state of guardianship, tossed about by the waves and carried here and there by every wind of doctrine.”

He is a superb thinker, an intellectual of the highest order. It will be difficult for some to grasp the huge ideas he wraps his mind around. We must forgive those who criticize this Pope---they simply cannot aspire as high as he does.

13 posted on 04/20/2005 11:46:44 AM PDT by Liz (One of it's most compelling tenets is Catholicism's acknowledgement of individual free will.)
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To: Tantumergo

When you are as powerful as the Pope is, you end up surrounded by syncophants. You become desperately in need of someone who believes in the same objectives that you do, but are not afraid to tell you when they think you are wrong.


14 posted on 04/20/2005 11:57:23 AM PDT by RonF
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To: NYer

With the new Pope we have now taken off our gloves to fight evil. It will develop into an all out war. All one has to do is to look at the "Catholics" who want changes.

As one liberal said she was glad to see the Pope leave his position of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. I laugh as Cardinal Arinze will slide right over to that position.


15 posted on 04/20/2005 12:02:45 PM PDT by franky (Pray for the souls of the faithful departed.)
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To: NYer

Does anyone know why Kathleen Keating seems to detest Pope Benedict-XVI? I've always found her to be at least interesting to listen to (whether or not I agree with her) but lately she's sounding like a total wingnut. She talks in riddles - although I think I know what she means but I still can't be sure. Like many, I tend to like our new pope so I'd like to know what her problem is, if anyone can shed any light?


16 posted on 04/20/2005 12:25:09 PM PDT by Fudd Fan (CARPE TUNNEL - seize the mouse)
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To: ELS

"into spectacles that require directors of genius and talented actors."

Heck, the American translation of the Scriptures is so flat that it take a trained actor to project their meaning with any clarity at all. We lectors have a devil of a time, and when you get someone who deons't have the faintest idea of how to read aloud, it can be prerty awful. But why is i t that modernists hate beauty? I guess because they are Purtians at heart, On the other hand, that it is to do injustice to the Puritans, most of whom were earthy men.


17 posted on 04/20/2005 12:40:21 PM PDT by RobbyS (JMJ)
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To: Romulus

Hitler certainly didn't. Ironically, Pius has been tarred by people who haven't bothered to learn that Pius was the last man that the Nazis wanted to be pope.


18 posted on 04/20/2005 12:45:12 PM PDT by RobbyS (JMJ)
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To: RobbyS

Pius was elected on the third ballot, the fastest election in the last century. The cardinals knew he was their man and with war looming there was no time to fool around.

B16 was elected on the 4th ballot.


19 posted on 04/20/2005 1:27:36 PM PDT by Romulus ("Andiamo avanti. Il Signore ci aiuter e Maria sua Santissima Madre star dalla nostra parte.")
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To: NYer

>> During the first millennium, the college of bishops carried much greater weight. It will be, perhaps, a conservative pope like Benedict XVI who will clear the way for this reform. <<

It is an important point to make that the re-establishment of Orthodoxy is the means by which collegiality can be established.


20 posted on 04/20/2005 1:39:13 PM PDT by dangus
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To: NYer
Swooning... it's just not right to be this happy! :-) I keep thinking something bad is about to happen... :-(

Wish I had bought on of those coffee mugs from 'the ratzinger fan club' when I saw them a couple of years ago --- 'putting the smackdown on heresy since 1981' - now they are all out of them!

21 posted on 04/20/2005 3:58:27 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: NYer
How cool is this pic?

Bunch of seminarians in St. Peter's as the new pope, Benedict XVI was announced.


22 posted on 04/20/2005 4:03:29 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: american colleen
That IS one cool pic.

The "JPII" seminarians appear to approve.

23 posted on 04/20/2005 4:14:29 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of ye Chace (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
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To: Fudd Fan

I think I heard her say in an interview that Ratzinger (this is before his election) does not truly believe in the prophecies of Fatima. This may be the reason why she doesn't seem to be happy about the situation.


24 posted on 04/20/2005 4:43:02 PM PDT by TrishaSC
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To: AnAmericanMother

Nice to see lots of young and clean cut priests! There have been a few Legionaires interviewed on the various news stations... they are happy and articulate and faithful, very uplifting!


25 posted on 04/20/2005 4:56:36 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: RobbyS
But why is i t that modernists hate beauty?

For some it's not that they hate beauty, it's that they hate beauty in the Church. When you have an agenda that is contrary to that of any institution, you can't further the agenda until you weaken or deconstruct the existing institution.

Some are innocent, but many realize exactly what they are doing. They know full well that our sacred music, which has its roots in times before Christ walked the earth is extremely powerful. It can convert on its own accord. They know it is essential to puvlerize the mass that converted the world and changed human history. They realize how beautuful our women look in veils and how mysterious our brothers and sisters look in the clothing of their vocation. Most of all they know the power of the Gospel, which comes from the Anglo Old-English word "Godspell".

They're not dumb. Which is why they've gotten away with as much as they have.

I'm not presenting anything new here. The Nazi's, Chicoms, Bolsheviks and any other tools of the enemy realized that they had to wipe out the existing traditions and history in order to flourish.

26 posted on 04/20/2005 5:15:49 PM PDT by AAABEST (Kyrie eleison - Christe eleison †)
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To: NYer
I am absolutely loving Pope Benedict more each time I read what he has written or said. And I really like this writer too.

During the 1960’s, the young Ratzinger followed the second Vatican Council as an expert consultant for the cardinal of Cologne, Joseph Frings. He launched his first darts against the Holy Office, “out of step with the times and a cause of harm and scandal,” which he would direct many years later. But very soon after the end of the council, he began to denounce its effects, which were “crudely divergent” from what was to be expected.

"Crudely divergent", so exact, so perfectly stated. I went to the library today to begin reading some of his works, and everything was gone. There was a mad rush earlier, evidently. The only book I could get my hands on, via another branch, was Salt of The Earth. I should have that in a few days, and can't wait to begin reading it.

His was a strange conservatism, in any case. It was apt to disturb, rather than pacify, the Church. One of his favorite models is Saint Charles Borromeo, the archbishop of Milan who, after the Council of Trent, did nothing less than “reconstruct the Catholic Church, which was almost destroyed in the area around Milan as well, without returning to the Middle Ages to do so; on the contrary, he created a modern form of the Church.”

Interesting. So much reading, so little time.

..not conforming itself to the times, not falling to its knees before the world, but “bringing, with holy consternation, the gift of faith to all, the gift of friendship with Christ.”

Again, wonderful imagery. What a beautiful phrase holy consternation is!

He prefers the missionary impulse to timid dialogue with nonbelievers and men of other faiths.

Smart. Very smart. The missionary impusle acutally lives, dialogue is alive in the sense a plant is alive. Beautiful, necessary but not suffient unto itself; inferior nutrients.

“How often we celebrate only ourselves, without even taking Him into account,” he commented in his meditations for the Stations of the Cross last Good Friday. Here, “Him” refers to Jesus Christ, the one forgotten by liturgies changed into convivial gatherings.

Heartbreaking, but true.

As a cardinal, Benedict XVI also criticized the endless succession of saints and blesseds that pope Wojtyla raised to the honors of the altar: in many cases, these were “persons who might perhaps say something to a certain group, but do not say much to the great multitude of believers.” As an alternative, he proposed “bringing to the attention of Christianity only those figures who, more than all others, make visible to us the holy Church, amid so many doubts about its holiness.”

I agree wholeheartedly. It's no good devaluing Sainthood.

27 posted on 04/20/2005 5:19:17 PM PDT by AlbionGirl (May the Lord guide your steps, Pope Benedict, and may he grant you loyal and honest advisors.)
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To: TrishaSC
think I heard her say in an interview that Ratzinger (this is before his election) does not truly believe in the prophecies of Fatima.

For whatever reason Ratzinger had for suppressing the Fatima secret, he may reap the consequences as the prophecied bishop in white who flees Rome and dies a cruel death. It would be a strange, sad twist of fate.

28 posted on 04/20/2005 6:05:41 PM PDT by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: All
For those interested:

Dominus Jesus - On the Unicity and Salvific Universality of Jesus Christ and the Church

29 posted on 04/20/2005 6:47:44 PM PDT by DBeers (†)
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To: american colleen
I find the comparison of these two photos amusing. First the young, joyful exuberant faces of the priests, may God Bless them, after the announcement:

Now take a look at some the cardinals faces after the announcement:


30 posted on 04/20/2005 7:09:17 PM PDT by murphE (Never miss an opportunity to kiss the hand of a holy priest.)
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To: murphE
LOL! Thanks so much, I can't stop laughing at this.

Four things I heard about our holy father today: he likes a beer 'after work' he walked to his apartment to 'pick up his stuff' he gave the homily in latin and he was wearing some sort of t-shirt instead of an expensive french shirt and cufflinks under the traditional pope garb when he was announced on the balcony (guess you can see it in some of the pics around).

I think he's a pretty fun guy. I think we are in for a ride here. I wanna get on it.

31 posted on 04/20/2005 7:19:13 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: american colleen

That second one from the left just kills me. =D


32 posted on 04/20/2005 7:28:41 PM PDT by murphE (Never miss an opportunity to kiss the hand of a holy priest.)
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To: murphE

That picture of the young guys is just perfect!

I can't tell if the Cardinals are just tired or this bunch just didn't agree...difference between being 20something and 70+ after a long hard two weeks?


33 posted on 04/20/2005 7:33:54 PM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Knitting A Conundrum

Hmmm, I only get the red x for a broken image. A shame.


34 posted on 04/20/2005 7:39:07 PM PDT by Romish_Papist (The times are out of step with the Catholic Church. God Bless Pope Benedict XVI!!!!)
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To: TattooedUSAFConservative

Copy and paste from properties works wonders. Those are my kind of priests! Seeing priests like that makes me incredibly jealous! :) God Bless 'em!


35 posted on 04/20/2005 7:41:26 PM PDT by Romish_Papist (The times are out of step with the Catholic Church. God Bless Pope Benedict XVI!!!!)
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To: american colleen
Four things I heard about our holy father today: he likes a beer 'after work'

Gee, I bet the pope and I have lots in common!

36 posted on 04/20/2005 7:50:39 PM PDT by old and tired
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To: NYer

I have been so busy the last couple of days -- not really had any time to post on these threads. My loss!


37 posted on 04/20/2005 7:53:57 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: murphE

Oh, LOL! I missed that picture before!


38 posted on 04/20/2005 7:56:48 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: murphE
Nah, looks like he's just got badly fitting dentures. I like the guy next to him - kind of in the background - hiding while clenching his teeth in a most painful way.

None of them look too thrilled but the last guy on the right at least looks like he's trying to put up a stiff upper lip.

Maybe it was the rising stench of the great unwashed masses below that set them off?

Thanks again for that pic... I still laugh when I look at it. Talk about joyful countenances raised to the Lord!

39 posted on 04/20/2005 8:11:37 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: old and tired

Don't get too excited or above yourself... my atheist/agnostic/lapsed Lutheran husband likes to have a beer after work too. ;-)


40 posted on 04/20/2005 8:12:41 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: american colleen
my atheist/agnostic/lapsed Lutheran husband likes to have a beer after work too.

Hey, my atheist/agnostic/baptized but not raised Catholic husband likes to have a beer after work too. Wow, small world. ; )

41 posted on 04/20/2005 8:16:47 PM PDT by murphE (Never miss an opportunity to kiss the hand of a holy priest.)
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To: american colleen

I love it!!!! I absolutely love it!!!!!


42 posted on 04/20/2005 8:18:31 PM PDT by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has already been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: american colleen

LOL -- I'm glad I got my Cardinal Ratzinger Fan Club tee shirt last year. I never would have guessed he'd be the new pope!


43 posted on 04/20/2005 8:33:10 PM PDT by Unam Sanctam
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To: murphE
Those pictures are great!
The joy seen in those young priests really shows the reason for hope in our future.
BTW, maybe those Cardinals are actually happy, they just don't know how to smile after the last 30+ years...
44 posted on 04/20/2005 8:39:54 PM PDT by vox_freedom (Fear no evil)
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To: vox_freedom

45 posted on 04/20/2005 8:56:48 PM PDT by murphE (Never miss an opportunity to kiss the hand of a holy priest.)
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To: murphE; NYer
Hey, all this time I thought you were a guy!

Here's another pic I haven't seen before.

In this photo released by the German Catholic News Agency KNA and dated from July, 8, 1951 Joseph Ratzinger, standing right, is seen with his family, father Josef, mother Maria and sister Maria, seated from right, and brother Georg following their ordination to the priesthood.

46 posted on 04/20/2005 9:10:45 PM PDT by american colleen (Long live Benedict XVI!)
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To: NYer

He would love to see a Church that is simpler in terms of bureaucracy. He doesn’t want its central and peripheral institutions – the Vatican curia, the diocesan chanceries, the episcopal conferences – to become “like the armor of Saul, which prevented the young David from walking.”

That must be why Ratzinger did nothing to simplify the bureaucracy in the 24 years he served in it. Instead, he made the Curia to be the gatekeeper of every single decision that came out of episcopal conferences, and made his CDF to resemble the Holy Office of Ottaviani, which he purported to despise as a periti at Vatican II.

I've read so much of what Ratzinger has said the past two days, little of which is reflected in what he did.

Watch what BXVI does, not what he says.

47 posted on 04/20/2005 9:11:32 PM PDT by sinkspur (If you want unconditional love with skin, and hair and a warm nose, get a shelter dog.)
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To: american colleen
my atheist/agnostic/lapsed Lutheran husband likes to have a beer after work too. ;-)

Well, in that case I'll put down the Beck's and go back to the Budweiser. :(

48 posted on 04/21/2005 4:19:19 AM PDT by old and tired
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To: All; american colleen

Here's a picture of his ordination in 1951. George Ratzinger is on the left left, Pope Benedict XVI is on the right. Check out those lace albs.

49 posted on 04/21/2005 4:46:54 AM PDT by murphE (Never miss an opportunity to kiss the hand of a holy priest.)
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To: american colleen

That picture is a definite keeper.


50 posted on 04/22/2005 6:29:01 AM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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