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HOMILY OF INAUGURATION MASS OF BENEDICT XVI
EWTN.com ^ | 04-24-05 | Pope Benedict XVI

Posted on 04/24/2005 5:55:52 AM PDT by Salvation


 

 

HOMILY OF INAUGURATION MASS OF BENEDICT XVI

Homily of Pope Benedict XVI of the Mass for the Imposition of the Pallium, the Conferral of the Fisherman's Ring, and the Inauguration of the Pontificate, given in St. Peter's Square, Sunday 24 April 2005.

Your Eminences,
My dear Brother Bishops and Priests,
Distinguished Authorities and Members of the Diplomatic Corps,
Dear Brothers and Sisters,
 

During these days of great intensity, we have chanted the litany of the saints on three different occasions: at the funeral of our Holy Father John Paul II; as the Cardinals entered the Conclave; and again today, when we sang it with the response: Tu illum adiuva – sustain the new Successor of Saint Peter.  On each occasion, in a particular way, I found great consolation in listening to this prayerful chant.  How alone we all felt after the passing of John Paul II – the Pope who for over twenty-six years had been our shepherd and guide on our journey through life!  He crossed the threshold of the next life, entering into the mystery of God.  But he did not take this step alone.  Those who believe are never alone – neither in life nor in death.  At that moment, we could call upon the Saints from every age – his friends, his brothers and sisters in the faith – knowing that they would form a living procession to accompany him into the next world, into the glory of God.  We knew that his arrival was awaited.  Now we know that he is among his own and is truly at home.  We were also consoled as we made our solemn entrance into Conclave, to elect the one whom the Lord had chosen.  How would we be able to discern his name?  How could 115 Bishops, from every culture and every country, discover the one on whom the Lord wished to confer the mission of binding and loosing?  Once again, we knew that we were not alone, we knew that we were surrounded, led and guided by the friends of God.  And now, at this moment, weak servant of God that I am, I must assume this enormous task, which truly exceeds all human capacity.  How can I do this?  How will I be able to do it?  All of you, my dear friends, have just invoked the entire host of Saints, represented by some of the great names in the history of God’s dealings with mankind.  In this way, I too can say with renewed conviction: I am not alone.  I do not have to carry alone what in truth I could never carry alone.  All the Saints of God are there to protect me, to sustain me and to carry me.  And your prayers, my dear friends, your indulgence, your love, your faith and your hope accompany me.  Indeed, the communion of Saints consists not only of the great men and women who went before us and whose names we know.  All of us belong to the communion of Saints, we who have been baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, we who draw life from the gift of Christ’s Body and Blood, through which he transforms us and makes us like himself.  Yes, the Church is alive – this is the wonderful experience of these days.  During those sad days of the Pope’s illness and death, it became wonderfully evident to us that the Church is alive.  And the Church is young.  She holds within herself the future of the world and therefore shows each of us the way towards the future.  The Church is alive and we are seeing it: we are experiencing the joy that the Risen Lord promised his followers.  The Church is alive – she is alive because Christ is alive, because he is truly risen.  In the suffering that we saw on the Holy Father’s face in those days of Easter, we contemplated the mystery of Christ’s Passion and we touched his wounds.  But throughout these days we have also been able, in a profound sense, to touch the Risen One.  We have been able to experience the joy that he promised, after a brief period of darkness, as the fruit of his resurrection.

The Church is alive – with these words, I greet with great joy and gratitude all of you gathered here, my venerable brother Cardinals and Bishops, my dear priests, deacons, Church workers, catechists.  I greet you, men and women Religious, witnesses of the transfiguring presence of God.  I greet you, members of the lay faithful, immersed in the great task of building up the Kingdom of God which spreads throughout the world, in every area of life.  With great affection I also greet all those who have been reborn in the sacrament of Baptism but are not yet in full communion with us; and you, my brothers and sisters of the Jewish people, to whom we are joined by a great shared spiritual heritage, one rooted in God’s irrevocable promises.  Finally, like a wave gathering force, my thoughts go out to all men and women of today, to believers and non-believers alike.

Dear friends!  At this moment there is no need for me to present a programme of governance.  I was able to give an indication of what I see as my task in my Message of Wednesday 20 April, and there will be other opportunities to do so.  My real programme of governance is not to do my own will, not to pursue my own ideas, but to listen, together with the whole Church, to the word and the will of the Lord, to be guided by Him, so that He himself will lead the Church at this hour of our history.  Instead of putting forward a programme, I should simply like to comment on the two liturgical symbols which represent the inauguration of the Petrine Ministry; both these symbols, moreover, reflect clearly what we heard proclaimed in today’s readings.

The first symbol is the Pallium, woven in pure wool, which will be placed on my shoulders.  This ancient sign, which the Bishops of Rome have worn since the fourth century, may be considered an image of the yoke of Christ, which the Bishop of this City, the Servant of the Servants of God, takes upon his shoulders.  God’s yoke is God’s will, which we accept.  And this will does not weigh down on us, oppressing us and taking away our freedom.  To know what God wants, to know where the path of life is found – this was Israel’s joy, this was her great privilege.  It is also our joy: God’s will does not alienate us, it purifies us – even if this can be painful – and so it leads us to ourselves.  In this way, we serve not only him, but the salvation of the whole world, of all history.  The symbolism of the Pallium is even more concrete: the lamb’s wool is meant to represent the lost, sick or weak sheep which the shepherd places on his shoulders and carries to the waters of life.  For the Fathers of the Church, the parable of the lost sheep, which the shepherd seeks in the desert, was an image of the mystery of Christ and the Church.  The human race – every one of us – is the sheep lost in the desert which no longer knows the way.  The Son of God will not let this happen; he cannot abandon humanity in so wretched a condition.  He leaps to his feet and abandons the glory of heaven, in order to go in search of the sheep and pursue it, all the way to the Cross.  He takes it upon his shoulders and carries our humanity; he carries us all – he is the good shepherd who lays down his life for the sheep.  What the Pallium indicates first and foremost is that we are all carried by Christ.  But at the same time it invites us to carry one another.  Hence the Pallium becomes a symbol of the shepherd’s mission, of which the Second Reading and the Gospel speak.  The pastor must be inspired by Christ’s holy zeal: for him it is not a matter of indifference that so many people are living in the desert.  And there are so many kinds of desert.  There is the desert of poverty, the desert of hunger and thirst, the desert of abandonment, of loneliness, of destroyed love.  There is the desert of God’s darkness, the emptiness of souls no longer aware of their dignity or the goal of human life.  The external deserts in the world are growing, because the internal deserts have become so vast.  Therefore the earth’s treasures no longer serve to build God’s garden for all to live in, but they have been made to serve the powers of exploitation and destruction.  The Church as a whole and all her Pastors, like Christ, must set out to lead people out of the desert, towards the place of life, towards friendship with the Son of God, towards the One who gives us life, and life in abundance.  The symbol of the lamb also has a deeper meaning.  In the Ancient Near East, it was customary for kings to style themselves shepherds of their people.  This was an image of their power, a cynical image: to them their subjects were like sheep, which the shepherd could dispose of as he wished.  When the shepherd of all humanity, the living God, himself became a lamb, he stood on the side of the lambs, with those who are downtrodden and killed.  This is how he reveals himself to be the true shepherd:  “I am the Good Shepherd . . . I lay down my life for the sheep”, Jesus says of himself (Jn 10:14f).  It is not power, but love that redeems us!  This is God’s sign: he himself is love.  How often we wish that God would make show himself stronger, that he would strike decisively, defeating evil and creating a better world.  All ideologies of power justify themselves in exactly this way, they justify the destruction of whatever would stand in the way of progress and the liberation of humanity.  We suffer on account of God’s patience.  And yet, we need his patience.  God, who became a lamb, tells us that the world is saved by the Crucified One, not by those who crucified him.  The world is redeemed by the patience of God.  It is destroyed by the impatience of man.

One of the basic characteristics of a shepherd must be to love the people entrusted to him, even as he loves Christ whom he serves.  “Feed my sheep”, says Christ to Peter, and now, at this moment, he says it to me as well.  Feeding means loving, and loving also means being ready to suffer.  Loving means giving the sheep what is truly good, the nourishment of God’s truth, of God’s word, the nourishment of his presence, which he gives us in the Blessed Sacrament.  My dear friends – at this moment I can only say:  pray for me, that I may learn to love the Lord more and more.  Pray for me, that I may learn to love his flock more and more – in other words, you, the holy Church, each one of you and all of you together.  Pray for me, that I may not flee for fear of the wolves.  Let us pray for one another, that the Lord will carry us and that we will learn to carry one another.

The second symbol used in today’s liturgy to express the inauguration of the Petrine Ministry is the presentation of the fisherman’s ring.  Peter’s call to be a shepherd, which we heard in the Gospel, comes after the account of a miraculous catch of fish: after a night in which the disciples had let down their nets without success, they see the Risen Lord on the shore.  He tells them to let down their nets once more, and the nets become so full that they can hardly pull them in; 153 large fish: “and although there were so many, the net was not torn” (Jn 21:11).  This account, coming at the end of Jesus’s earthly journey with his disciples, corresponds to an account found at the beginning: there too, the disciples had caught nothing the entire night; there too, Jesus had invited Simon once more to put out into the deep.  And Simon, who was not yet called Peter, gave the wonderful reply: “Master, at your word I will let down the nets.”  And then came the conferral of his mission: “Do not be afraid.  Henceforth you will be catching men” (Lk 5:1-11).  Today too the Church and the successors of the Apostles are told to put out into the deep sea of history and to let down the nets, so as to win men and women over to the Gospel – to God, to Christ, to true life.  The Fathers made a very significant commentary on this singular task.  This is what they say: for a fish, created for water, it is fatal to be taken out of the sea, to be removed from its vital element to serve as human food.  But in the mission of a fisher of men, the reverse is true.  We are living in alienation, in the salt waters of suffering and death; in a sea of darkness without light.  The net of the Gospel pulls us out of the waters of death and brings us into the splendour of God’s light, into true life.  It is really true: as we follow Christ in this mission to be fishers of men, we must bring men and women out of the sea that is salted with so many forms of alienation and onto the land of life, into the light of God.  It is really so:  the purpose of our lives is to reveal God to men.  And only where God is seen does life truly begin.  Only when we meet the living God in Christ do we know what life is.  We are not some casual and meaningless product of evolution.  Each of us is the result of a thought of God.  Each of us is willed, each of us is loved, each of us is necessary.  There is nothing more beautiful than to be surprised by the Gospel, by the encounter with Christ.  There is nothing more beautiful than to know Him and to speak to others of our friendship with Him.  The task of the shepherd, the task of the fisher of men, can often seem wearisome.  But it is beautiful and wonderful, because it is truly a service to joy, to God’s joy which longs to break into the world.

Here I want to add something: both the image of the shepherd and that of the fisherman issue an explicit call to unity.  “I have other sheep that are not of this fold; I must lead them too, and they will heed my voice.  So there shall be one flock, one shepherd” (Jn 10:16); these are the words of Jesus at the end of his discourse on the Good Shepherd.  And the account of the 153 large fish ends with the joyful statement: “although there were so many, the net was not torn” (Jn 21:11).  Alas, beloved Lord, with sorrow we must now acknowledge that it has been torn!  But no – we must not be sad!  Let us rejoice because of your promise, which does not disappoint, and let us do all we can to pursue the path towards the unity you have promised.  Let us remember it in our prayer to the Lord, as we plead with him: yes, Lord, remember your promise.  Grant that we may be one flock and one shepherd!  Do not allow your net to be torn, help us to be servants of unity!

At this point, my mind goes back to 22 October 1978, when Pope John Paul II began his ministry here in Saint Peter’s Square.  His words on that occasion constantly echo in my ears:  “Do not be afraid!  Open wide the doors for Christ!”  The Pope was addressing the mighty, the powerful of this world, who feared that Christ might take away something of their power if they were to let him in, if they were to allow the faith to be free.  Yes, he would certainly have taken something away from them: the dominion of corruption, the manipulation of law and the freedom to do as they pleased.  But he would not have taken away anything that pertains to human freedom or dignity, or to the building of a just society.  The Pope was also speaking to everyone, especially the young.  Are we not perhaps all afraid in some way?  If we let Christ enter fully into our lives, if we open ourselves totally to him, are we not afraid that He might take something away from us?  Are we not perhaps afraid to give up something significant, something unique, something that makes life so beautiful?  Do we not then risk ending up diminished and deprived of our freedom?  And once again the Pope said:  No!  If we let Christ into our lives, we lose nothing, nothing, absolutely nothing of what makes life free, beautiful and great.  No!  Only in this friendship are the doors of life opened wide.  Only in this friendship is the great potential of human existence truly revealed.  Only in this friendship do we experience beauty and liberation.  And so, today, with great strength and great conviction, on the basis of long personal experience of life, I say to you, dear young people: Do not be afraid of Christ!  He takes nothing away, and he gives you everything.  When we give ourselves to him, we receive a hundredfold in return.  Yes, open, open wide the doors to Christ – and you will find true life.  Amen.
 
[Vatican Original text: English]

POPE BENEDICT XVI: MAY THE CHURCH BECOME ‘A SACRAMENT OF UNITY’ FOR HUMAN RACE

PAPAL PROGRAM FOR YESTERDAY AND COMING DAYS

BENEDICT XVI, A POPE OF CHRIST, COMMUNION, COLLEGIALITY

TEXT OF THE FIRST HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI

HABEMUS PAPAM, CARDINAL JOSEPH RATZINGER, POPE BENEDICT XV

WELCOME BENEDICT XVI!



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for your continued discussion.

We thank you, Lord, for Pope Benedict XVI!

1 posted on 04/24/2005 5:55:53 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; SMEDLEYBUTLER; Siobhan; Lady In Blue; attagirl; goldenstategirl; Starmaker; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

2 posted on 04/24/2005 5:56:56 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Bumped, bookmarked and thanks.


3 posted on 04/24/2005 6:00:24 AM PDT by AlbionGirl (May the Lord guide your steps, Pope Benedict, and may he grant you loyal and honest advisors.)
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To: AlbionGirl

Thank you -- and my pleasure.


4 posted on 04/24/2005 6:04:33 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Good-morning, everyone.

Lots of pictures here:

(Live Thread)The Solemn Mass of Inauguration of Pope Benedict XVI

5 posted on 04/24/2005 6:06:07 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
I was struck by the invocation of the theme from Exodus - the imagery of people searching for union with God. The Pope was aware its the first day of Passover and this invocation is not an accident. And the rest of his message built on it by arguing that freedom without God is not really freedom - its a different form of slavery. We will really be free only when we extend thanks to the One who implanted the very idea of freedom in our souls. We need God to complete us - by experiencing freedom that can be found only in the joy and strength of faith in Him.

(Denny Crane: "Sometimes you can only look for answers from God and failing that... and Fox News".)
6 posted on 04/24/2005 6:11:23 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: goldstategop

Good analysis! That was an excellent connection with Passover.


7 posted on 04/24/2005 6:13:33 AM PDT by livius
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To: Salvation

Pope Benedict's homily is well worth a read and re-read. Just like his homily for the Funeral Mass of John Paul the Great, this one is very full.
Thank you.


8 posted on 04/24/2005 6:18:47 AM PDT by pieces of time
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To: livius; goldstategop

**That was an excellent connection with Passover.**

Which is today!

(But you already know that.)


9 posted on 04/24/2005 6:22:14 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

bump!


10 posted on 04/24/2005 6:24:53 AM PDT by tiredoflaundry (If you think pushing 40 is hard, try dragging it!)
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To: Salvation

Yes. I heard that the reason there were fewer Jewish representatives than usual at the Mass this morning was because of the fact that it was Passover, so naturally they were otherwise occupied.


11 posted on 04/24/2005 6:40:44 AM PDT by livius
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To: livius
The Pope invited the Chief Rabbi Of Rome to attend his investiture. Due to the holiday it was impossible for the Chief Rabbi to come and pay his respects but in this case, it was the thought behind the invitation that counted for a great deal more than the invitation itself.

(Denny Crane: "Sometimes you can only look for answers from God and failing that... and Fox News".)
12 posted on 04/24/2005 6:43:49 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: Salvation

Thanks for posting this and thanks for the ping Salvation! I didn't get a chance to watch. Hoping to catch the installation later today on EWTN.


13 posted on 04/24/2005 6:44:05 AM PDT by sneakers
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To: Salvation; goldstategop

Incidentally, one thing I would really like to see is for the Catholic Church (Latin Rite) to adopt the Orthodox Paschal calendar, which is much more closely connected to Passover.


14 posted on 04/24/2005 6:45:44 AM PDT by livius
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To: Salvation

Thanks for the ping, one for the bookmark!


15 posted on 04/24/2005 6:53:06 AM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: livius
That would be a good idea and would emphasize the shared religious heritage of Christians and Jews. No one is calling for religious syncretism or the idea every religion must become alike or one religion ought to be subordinate to another - rather the idea of true ecumenism is to honor the differences between different faiths in a respectful manner while at the same time defending the common values all faiths share in a world in which the place of religion is under siege and very much in doubt.

(Denny Crane: "Sometimes you can only look for answers from God and failing that... and Fox News".)
16 posted on 04/24/2005 6:54:19 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: Salvation
My real programme of governance is not to do my own will, not to pursue my own ideas, but to listen, together with the whole Church, to the word and the will of the Lord, to be guided by Him, so that He himself will lead the Church at this hour of our history.

Thank you, God, for giving us such a holy, intelligent and brave Supreme Pontiff.

17 posted on 04/24/2005 7:04:22 AM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictum XVI!)
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To: Salvation

I'm very concerned that Pope Benedict XVI continues to carry that grotesque crucifix carried for many years by his predecessor. He needs our prayers.


18 posted on 04/24/2005 7:08:49 AM PDT by Judica me
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To: Salvation

Thank you Salvation for posting. I watched this morning but didn't get past the Pallium as I fell asleep. Also, I find Pope Benedict easier to read than to listen to as I can digest his words better that way.


19 posted on 04/24/2005 7:12:58 AM PDT by Diva
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To: livius
Council of Nicea A.D. 325

We also send you the good news of the settlement concerning the holy pasch, namely that in answer to your prayers this question also has been resolved. All the brethren in the East who have hitherto followed the Jewish practice will henceforth observe the custom of the Romans and of yourselves and of all of us who from ancient times have kept Easter together with you. Rejoicing then in these successes and in the common peace and harmony and in the cutting off of all heresy, welcome our fellow minister, your bishop Alexander, with all the greater honour and love. He has made us happy by his presence, and despite his advanced age has undertaken such great labour in order that you too may enjoy peace.

Pray for us all that our decisions may remain secure through almighty God and our lord Jesus Christ in the holy Spirit, to whom is the glory for ever and ever. Amen.

20 posted on 04/24/2005 8:34:51 AM PDT by bornacatholic ("Christian is my name and Catholic my surname." Pope Benedict XV)
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To: Salvation

Thanks for this! I am listening to it again on TV, but there is SO much to digest in it, it must be read. The Holy Father's homily was humble, pastoral, instructive, encouraging -- so many things at once.


21 posted on 04/24/2005 8:37:27 AM PDT by padfoot_lover
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To: Judica me
Around my neck I wear the Miraculous Medal and the Crucifix John Paul the Great chose for his Pontificate.

I think the Crucifix is inspirational and truly depicts what my sins did to Jesus. The Crucifix depicts the God-Man as He truly was - emptied totally out for me; exhausted, tortured, dead, having suffered unimaginable agony.

Any "grotesqueness" is my sin.

22 posted on 04/24/2005 8:41:20 AM PDT by bornacatholic ("Christian is my name and Catholic my surname." Pope Benedict XV)
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To: bornacatholic
Hmmm.... "custom of the Romans?" It smacks of an expedient concession to the pagans. Its one that could be taken back without violating the Nicene Creed.

(Denny Crane: "Sometimes you can only look for answers from God and failing that... and Fox News".)
23 posted on 04/24/2005 8:50:48 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: Salvation

What wonderful words! If only the world would harden on their hearts and listen.


24 posted on 04/24/2005 9:01:26 AM PDT by big'ol_freeper ("Freedom consists not in doing what we like, but in having the right to do what we ought." Pope JPII)
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To: goldstategop; Tantumergo; ninenot; american colleen; sandyeggo
It smacks of an expedient concession to the pagans

*ROTFLMAO An Ecumenical Council "conceeding to the pagans."

I'll guarantee you John Stewart can't top this one.

25 posted on 04/24/2005 9:05:43 AM PDT by bornacatholic ("Christian is my name and Catholic my surname." Pope Benedict XV)
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To: Salvation
Masterful, beautiful!

Yes, he would certainly have taken something away from them: the dominion of corruption, the manipulation of law and the freedom to do as they pleased. But he would not have taken away anything that pertains to human freedom or dignity, or to the building of a just society. The Pope was also speaking to everyone, especially the young. Are we not perhaps all afraid in some way? If we let Christ enter fully into our lives, if we open ourselves totally to him, are we not afraid that He might take something away from us? Are we not perhaps afraid to give up something significant, something unique, something that makes life so beautiful? Do we not then risk ending up diminished and deprived of our freedom? And once again the Pope said: No! If we let Christ into our lives, we lose nothing, nothing, absolutely nothing of what makes life free, beautiful and great. No! Only in this friendship are the doors of life opened wide. Only in this friendship is the great potential of human existence truly revealed. Only in this friendship do we experience beauty and liberation. And so, today, with great strength and great conviction, on the basis of long personal experience of life, I say to you, dear young people: Do not be afraid of Christ! He takes nothing away, and he gives you everything. When we give ourselves to him, we receive a hundredfold in return. Yes, open, open wide the doors to Christ – and you will find true life. Amen.

What an honest man Pope Benedict is!!! He does know his Flock already, he knows them very well, as evidenced by the italicized text.

My affection for our Good Pope is growing greater and greater by the syllable.

26 posted on 04/24/2005 9:16:30 AM PDT by AlbionGirl (May the Lord guide your steps, Pope Benedict, and may he grant you loyal and honest advisors.)
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To: bornacatholic
A decade after toleration was granted the Christians, the Church's position was not completely secure. And the Emperor Constantine still resided in Rome, very much the locus of pagan antiquity. Constantinople would not be founded until five years after the events at Nicaea. We have to bear in mind the circumstances in the early fourth century did not yet mark the eventual triumph of Christianity. Indeed almost half a century later, a pagan counter-reaction occured under Julian. The context of some decisions in the history of early Christianity makes sense in view of the era and no - its not a John Stewart punch line.

(Denny Crane: "Sometimes you can only look for answers from God and failing that... and Fox News".)
27 posted on 04/24/2005 9:20:47 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: bornacatholic
I think the Crucifix is inspirational and truly depicts what my sins did to Jesus.

That's a strange way to depict Christ.

How do you like the following depiction of Christ at World Youth Day 2000?


28 posted on 04/24/2005 9:58:08 AM PDT by Judica me
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To: ELS

--My real programme of governance is not to do my own will, not to pursue my own ideas, but to listen, together with the whole Church, to the word and the will of the Lord, to be guided by Him, so that He himself will lead the Church at this hour of our history---

O Lord,
Guide his hand,
Enlighten his mind,
Keep him safe and hale and whole
as long as you have need of him
to be the fisher of men,
your vicar,
our papa.

O Lord,
thank you for sharing him,
and may we,
who hear him speak your words of love,
hasten to respond.

Amen.


29 posted on 04/24/2005 10:09:46 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: livius

---Incidentally, one thing I would really like to see is for the Catholic Church (Latin Rite) to adopt the Orthodox Paschal calendar, which is much more closely connected to Passover.---

The historian in me smiled at this, when I remember how much angst, anger and ink have been spilled on this one issue! It has an interesting history....


30 posted on 04/24/2005 10:13:09 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Judica me
AAAAHK! They've made Our Lord look like a demon in that depiction! Stop scaring me.
31 posted on 04/24/2005 10:18:18 AM PDT by murphE (Never miss an opportunity to kiss the hand of a holy priest.)
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To: Judica me

That's horrible. Why would anyone depict Christ that way? His face looks evil and his hands look like grasping claws.


32 posted on 04/24/2005 10:24:33 AM PDT by SilentServiceCPOWife (Welcome to the Hotel Free Republic-You can check out any time you like but you can never leave)
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife

My hubby, who just looked at it, says it looks mean, not like Jesus. He asked me, you sure that wasn't the unpenitant thief?


33 posted on 04/24/2005 10:29:58 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Judica me; murphE; bornacatholic

In time, he will get his own staff. It's too soon. They have to commission someone to make a fitting staff for the new Pope. According to a colleague of mine, JP2's staff isn't Benedict XVI's style.


34 posted on 04/24/2005 10:32:57 AM PDT by Pyro7480 ("All my own perception of beauty both in majesty and simplicity is founded upon Our Lady." - Tolkien)
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To: Knitting A Conundrum

My husband just said, "Ugh, what is that supposed to be?"

The hands really bother me.


35 posted on 04/24/2005 10:35:15 AM PDT by SilentServiceCPOWife (Welcome to the Hotel Free Republic-You can check out any time you like but you can never leave)
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife

Some of it might be the photograph and the lighting, but compare that to the crucifix they had at the installation mass...or at JP2's funeral mass...


36 posted on 04/24/2005 10:43:10 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Knitting A Conundrum

Unfortunately, I missed the installation mass. I saw the funeral mass for JPII, but I don't remember what the crucifix looked like. Could you tell me where I could find a picture of it?


37 posted on 04/24/2005 10:55:04 AM PDT by SilentServiceCPOWife (Welcome to the Hotel Free Republic-You can check out any time you like but you can never leave)
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife

I haven't found a large pic of it, but there is one on this photo montage:

http://www.ewtn.com/JohnPaul2/_mourning/multimedia/Papal_Funeral_4_01.jpg


38 posted on 04/24/2005 11:10:58 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Salvation

Thanks for posting this outstanding homily.


39 posted on 04/24/2005 11:18:34 AM PDT by Thorin ("I won't be reconstructed, and I do not give a damn.")
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To: Knitting A Conundrum

Thanks. What do you think about that crucifix?


40 posted on 04/24/2005 11:26:18 AM PDT by SilentServiceCPOWife (Welcome to the Hotel Free Republic-You can check out any time you like but you can never leave)
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife

I am much happier with the one they used at the funeral and the one they used at the installation mass...Crucifixes should communicate the suffering and sacrifice Jesus made...


41 posted on 04/24/2005 11:30:00 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Salvation; Dr. Eckleburg
Only when we meet the living God in Christ do we know what life is. We are not some casual and meaningless product of evolution. Each of us is the result of a thought of God. Each of us is willed, each of us is loved, each of us is necessary.

This caused some of the usual suspects some apoplexy, I'll wager.

42 posted on 04/24/2005 11:58:53 AM PDT by wideawake (God bless our brave soldiers and their Commander in Chief)
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To: Salvation

This is going to be a barn-burner of a Papacy!


43 posted on 04/24/2005 12:00:47 PM PDT by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
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To: wideawake
This caused some of the usual suspects some apoplexy, I'll wager.

LOL. It always has.

God's grace through Trinitarian faith in Jesus Christ.

Amen to all who proclaim it.

44 posted on 04/24/2005 12:06:51 PM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg (There are very few shades of gray.)
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife; murphE

Frankly, I think that's a very good representation of the corpus. The head is slightly raised, thus the eyes engage us--in the same fashion as the Madonna's gaze at the end of the Gibson Passion.

The fingers are curling because of the natural physical forces in effect--it's a more "real" representation in that regard.


45 posted on 04/24/2005 12:08:04 PM PDT by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
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To: ninenot

LOL!


46 posted on 04/24/2005 12:30:00 PM PDT by AlbionGirl (May the Lord guide your steps, Pope Benedict, and may he grant you loyal and honest advisors.)
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To: wideawake; Dr. Eckleburg

You beat me with pointing out that line. I was listening to the tape I made of the instillation Mass, while I was compiling my daily thread, and I rejoiced when I heard that line!


47 posted on 04/24/2005 12:35:27 PM PDT by Pyro7480 ("All my own perception of beauty both in majesty and simplicity is founded upon Our Lady." - Tolkien)
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To: Judica me
that grotesque crucifix carried for many years by his predecessor.

Crucifixion is a grotesque and horrible and shameful death. C.S. Lewis points out somewhere that the crucifixion did not show up as a theme in Christian art until the generations that had seen actual crucifixions had died.

48 posted on 04/24/2005 1:00:13 PM PDT by maryz
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife

49 posted on 04/24/2005 1:00:25 PM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: Pyro7480
According to a colleague of mine, JP2's staff isn't Benedict XVI's style.

That's great news. I'll keep praying.

50 posted on 04/24/2005 1:27:57 PM PDT by Judica me
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