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Are Jesus and Buddha Brothers?
Catholic Culture ^ | June 2005 | Carl E. Olson

Posted on 10/30/2005 11:05:55 PM PST by Coleus

Are Jesus and Buddha Brothers?

"When you are a truly happy Christian, you are also a Buddhist. And vice versa." So concludes best-selling author and Buddhist monk Thich Hhat Hanh near the end of his popular book Living Buddha, Living Christ.

Some Catholics agree. For example, Jesuit Father Robert E. Kennedy, a Roshi (Zen master), holds Zen retreats at Morning Star Zendo in Jersey City. He states on his web site: "I ask students to trust themselves and to develop their own self-reliance through the practice of Zen." The St. Francis Chapel at Santa Clara University hosts the weekly practice of "mindfulness and Zen meditation." Indeed, the number of Buddhist retreats and workshops being held at Catholic monasteries and parishes is growing.

Similarly, controversial New Testament scholar Marcus J. Borg writes in Jesus and Buddha: The Parallel Sayings, "Jesus and the Buddha were teachers of wisdom," contending that "wisdom is not just about moral behavior, but about the 'center,' the place from which moral perception and moral behavior flow." Jesus and Buddha proclaimed a "world-subverting wisdom," Borg writes, "that undermined and challenged conventional ways of seeing and being in their time and in every time." He notes that both men spoke about "the way" and concludes, "Thus both were teachers of the way less traveled. 'Way' or 'path' imagery is central to both bodies of teaching."

But are these two "ways" really as compatible as Hanh, Kennedy, Borg, and others believe? What similarities and differences are there between the historical persons and teachings of Jesus and Buddha? Can we agree with Hanh that people should be able to have "both the Buddha and Jesus within their life"?

Buddhism Boom

Buddhism is the fourth largest religion in the world, with about 370 million adherents. Although less than 1 percent of Americans identify themselves as Buddhist, interest in this ancient belief system is growing. There are more Buddhist texts in major bookstores than works dedicated to Islam or Hinduism, and there has been a steady stream of articles and books by and about the Dalai Lama in recent years.

Since the 1960s, the influence of Buddhist thought in some Catholic circles has become increasingly evident. After the Second Vatican Council's call for respectful inter-religious dialogue, many Catholics — including some priests and religious — fully embraced the study of Buddhism. Much was made of the "common characteristics" of Catholicism and Buddhism, particularly in the realm of ethics. External similarities (including monks, meditation, and prayer beads) seemed to indicate newly discovered commonalties between the followers of Christ and Buddha. While some edifying dialogue took place, some Catholics mistakenly concluded that Buddhism was just as true as Christianity and that any criticism of Buddhism was merely "triumphalistic."

Today it is not uncommon for Catholic retreat centers to offer classes and lectures on Zen Buddhism, Christ and Buddha, and even "Zen Catholicism." Their bookstores feature titles such as Zen Spirit, Christian Spirit: The Place of Zen in Christian Life; Jesus and Buddha: The Parallel Sayings; and Going Home: Jesus and Buddha As Brothers, wherein comparisons are made between Christian and Buddhist mysticism, at times suggesting that the two are essentially identical in character and intent.

As one self-proclaimed "Christian Buddhist," John Malcomson, explains, "People often ask me how I could think of myself as a Christian Buddhist. The simple answer is that I don't see God as separate from me." Rather, he states, "God is within me as God is within all things."

Open-Minded Alternative?

Malcomson is just one of a growing number of Christians drawn to Buddhism. In Crossing the Threshold of Hope, John Paul II notes, "Today we are seeing a certain diffusion of Buddhism in the West." What makes this diffusion possible, and why is Buddhism attractive to so many?

Buddhism offers spiritual vitality in the midst of the emptiness of secular life, gives the promise of inner peace, and meets the desire for an explicit moral code. In his classic study Buddhism: Its Essence and Development, Edward Conze writes, "To a person who is thoroughly disillusioned with the contemporary world, and with himself, Buddhism may offer many points of attraction, in the transcending sublimity of the fairy land of its subtle thoughts, in the splendor of its works of art, in the magnificence of its hold over vast populations, and in the determined heroism and quiet refinement of those who are steeped in it."

Another appeal is the non-dogmatic and ostensibly open-minded character of Buddhism. For those who reject the dogmatic, objective claims of Christianity or hold that Christianity should avoid an "exclusive" approach to truth, Buddhism offers an easier alternative. Buddhists teach that they do not practice a religion, a philosophy, or a type of science but rather a way of life that cannot be explained by or contained within any categories used in traditional Western thought. What makes Buddhism so "open-minded," though, is that its teachings are deliberately ambiguous.

Put another way, Buddhism transcends notions of "religion" or "belief" and so can appear compatible with Christianity. In an interview with Beliefnet.com, the Dalai Lama stated, "According to different religious traditions, there are different methods . . . For example, a Christian practitioner may meditate on God's grace, God's infinite love. This is a very powerful concept in order to achieve peace of mind. A Buddhist practitioner may be thinking about relative nature and also Buddha-nature. This is also very useful."

In other words, Christianity and Buddhism are two ways to the same end; Jesus and Buddha are two enlightened teachers who help man to that end. Or, as a reader on a Christian discussion forum stated, "Buddha was just a philosopher who urged men to be selfless. Jesus was just a philosopher who urged men to be selfless. Love is just another word for selfless." Such easy parallels between Christ and Buddha, unfortunately, are misleading and distort the teachings of Christ.

Buddha Basics

Buddha (c. 563-c. 483 B.C.), born Siddhartha Gautama, was the son of an Indian king. Around the age of thirty, he left his privileged life in court to become an ascetic and spent several years traveling and meditating on the human condition, considering especially the reality of suffering. One day, meditating beneath a bodhi tree, he became enlightened (buddha means "enlightened one") and afterward began to teach his dharma, or doctrine, of the Four Noble Truths.


The Four Noble Truths are these:

1. Life is suffering.
2. The cause of suffering is desire.
3. To be free from suffering, we must detach from desire.
4. The "eight-fold path" is the way to alleviate desire.

The eight-fold path consists of right views, right intentions, right speech, and right actions along with livelihood, effort, mindfulness, and concentration.

The final goal of Buddhism is not merely to eradicate desire but to be free of suffering.


Buddha also taught the "three characteristics of being":

1. All things are transitory.
2. There is no self or personality.
3. This world brings only pain and suffering.

Based on these characteristics, Buddhism asserts that to accept the existence of anything is to give birth to its opposite (e.g., love and hate, joy and fear, etc.), which results in the duality of "good" and "bad." Nirvana — literally, "extinguishing a flame" — is the extinction of self and the escape from the cycle of reincarnation.

While Buddhism allows belief in an afterlife, such an allowance is called upaya, an expedient means to a real end. Upaya allows belief to exist as a means to an end; all belief, including that of Buddhism, is merely a construction. According to the logic of upaya, Christianity is allowable as a stage toward spiritual progression, leading eventually to the extinction of self, or nirvana.

The term dharma is difficult to define. One meaning implies the teachings of Buddha or doctrine / law. Ultimately, though, all dharma is provisional; it is simply a means that is without real meaning. Peter Harvey, in his Introduction to Buddhism, says that "one dharma cannot ultimately be distinguished from another: the notion of the 'sameness' of dharmas. Their shared 'nature' is 'emptiness' (sangata). As the Heart Sutra says, 'Whatever is material shape, that is emptiness, and whatever is emptiness, that is material shape.'" In other words, dharma is itself illusory.

Sometimes it is said that Buddhism is atheistic, yet Buddhism is not interested in the question of God, so it is more accurate to describe it as practically atheistic or simply agnostic. Buddhism "works" whether or not there is a God. A Buddhist allows others to believe in God or gods, but such beliefs are merely convenient means to the final end, which has nothing to do with God or gods.

"God is neither affirmed nor denied by Buddhism," wrote the Trappist monk Thomas Merton in Mystics and Zen Masters, "insofar as Buddhists consider such affirmations and denials to be dualistic, therefore irrelevant to the main purpose of Buddhism, which is emancipation from all forms of dualistic thought." This is captured well in the sutras (scriptures), which state that to escape desire one must "not become attached to existence nor to non-existence, to anything inside or outside, neither to good things nor to bad things, neither to right nor wrong." In Buddhism, all distinctions must be extinguished; even enlightenment has no definite nature.

What's the Purpose?

Despite many external similarities, Buddhist meditation and contemplation is quite different from orthodox Christianity. Buddhist meditation strives to "wake" a person from his existential delusions. "Therefore, despite similar aspects, there is a fundamental difference" between Christian and Buddhist mysticism, writes Pope John Paul II. "Christian mysticism . . . is not born of a purely negative 'enlightenment.' It is not born of an awareness of the evil that exists in man's attachment to the world through the senses, the intellect, and the spirit. Instead, Christian mysticism is born of the revelation of the living God" (Crossing the Threshold of Hope).

The Buddhist mystic seeks absorption into an impersonal whole, looking to rid himself of desire and suffering. The Christian mystic, on the other hand, desires neither the loss of personality nor an impersonal oneness with all but a deep and abiding communion with the Triune and personal God.

Jean Cardinal Danielou, known for his study of Eastern religions, explains in God and the Ways of Knowing that "mystical knowledge partakes in the life of the Trinity. It is the realization by man of his deepest being, of what God meant to achieve in creating him."

For the Christian mystic, there is an object (the loving and merciful God) and a growth in the salvific life of grace, leading to everlasting life. On the other hand, the Buddhist sutras state that the "categories of everlasting life and death, and existence and non-existence, do not apply to the essential nature of things but only to their appearances as they are observed by defiled human eyes." Buddhism resists existential possibility; Christianity affirms it.

Catholics believe that the Church is the Bride of Christ, the seed of the kingdom of God, and the conduit of God's grace and mercy in the world. Buddhists believe that church, or sangha, is in the end upaya — nothing more than the expedient means to final extinction.

Rather than the Beatific Vision, Buddhist teaching holds that non-existence is the only hope for escaping the pains of life.

The Catholic Church teaches that although suffering is not part of God's perfect plan, it can bring us closer to Christ and unite us more intimately with our suffering Lord. Buddhism teaches that suffering must be escaped from; indeed, this is a central concern of Buddhism. Christianity is focused on worshiping God, holiness, and the restoration of right relationships between God and man through the work of Jesus. The Buddhist, on the other hand, is not concerned with whether or not God exists, nor does he offer worship. Instead, he seeks his own nirvana.

Catholicism believes that truth, and the Author of truth, can be known rationally (to a significant yet limited extent) and through divine revelation. In contrast, Buddhism denies existential reality; nothing, including the self, can be proven to exist. As the dharma states: "Things are like illusion; they can be said neither to be existent nor non-existent."

Attracting Hungry Souls

Fr. Romano Guardini, in his classic work The Lord, stated his belief that Buddha would be the greatest challenge to Christ in the modern age. Such an assertion may appear somewhat exaggerated in our age, but Buddhist teachings seriously threaten Christianity's central doctrines. Because it appears to be peaceful, non judgmental, and inclusive, its appeal undoubtedly will continue to grow. Buddhism's refusal to articulate dharma in logical ways and its comfortable insistence on a relativistic approach to knowledge and truth makes dialogue quite difficult. Because it offers a spirituality that is ostensibly free of doctrine and authority, it will attract hungry souls looking for fulfillment and meaning. "For this reason," the Holy Father states, "it is not inappropriate to caution those Christians who enthusiastically welcome certain ideas originating in the religious traditions of the Far East."

Vatican II's Nostra Aetate (Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions) says, "Buddhism, in its various forms, realizes the radical insufficiency of this changeable world; it teaches a way by which men, in a devout and confident spirit, may be able either to acquire the state of perfect liberation or attain, by their own efforts or through higher help, supreme illumination." It continues, noting that "the Catholic Church rejects nothing that is true and holy in these religions" and believes that other religions, in certain ways, "often reflect a ray of that Truth that enlightens all men."

But the document also insists that the Church "proclaims, and ever must proclaim Christ 'the way, the truth, and the life' (John 14:6), in whom men may find the fullness of religious life, in whom God has reconciled all things to himself" (NA 2). While the Council noted that Buddhism may contain a "ray of Truth," it did not endorse appropriation of Buddhist beliefs into Christian practice. Rather, the Council insisted that non-Catholic religions can be fulfilled only through the truths held exclusively by the Catholic faith.

The perennial teachings of the Catholic Church and the Buddhist sangha are inherently incompatible. Whereas God remains completely other, distinct from his creation, higher Buddhist discourse rejects the possibility of any such duality. There can be no Creator / creature distinction in Buddhism.

From an apologetic perspective, dialogue with a Buddhist is hindered almost from the start, as the two great philosophical tools of Christianity — ontology and epistemology — are discarded in Buddhist discourse. That is, if existence itself is untenable, how can creation be proven? If creation is untenable, how can God be proven to exist? So it is vital when entering into dialogue with a Buddhist to understand Buddhist objections to Christian beliefs. In the end, we should remember that the Council of Nicaea taught that men must have one thing before truly becoming a member of the body of Christ: faith.

Shortly before the Holy Father's visit to St. Patrick's Cathedral in 1979, the Dalai Lama was greeted there. A monsignor in the receiving line recalls his encounter with the Buddhist patriarch: The Dalai Lama approached him, gazed into his eyes, and queried, "Father, do you know the difference between you and me?"

"No, Your Holiness," replied the monsignor.

"You believe in a personal God," the Dalai Lama observed, "and I do not."

This, above all, marks the difference between Christians and Buddhists. Beyond the rhetoric of "peace," "compatibility," and "the way," there remains one profound difference between Buddha and Jesus: Jesus is God; Buddha is not.

Christ versus Buddha

In his Fundamentals of the Faith, Peter Kreeft writes that "there have been only two people in history who so astonished people that they asked not 'Who are you?' but 'What are you? A man or a god?' They were Jesus and Buddha." He then contrasts the striking differences between the two: "Buddha's clear answer to this question was: 'I am a man, not a god'; Christ's clear answer was: 'I am both Son of Man and Son of God.' Buddha said, 'Look not to me, look to my dharma'; Christ said, 'Come unto me.' Buddha said, 'Be ye lamps unto yourselves"; Christ said, 'I am the light of the world.'"

Yet as we've seen, it is quite common to find Christ reduced to the level of "philosopher" or "great teacher," just as Buddha sometimes is elevated to a state of divinity. Certainly, there are some laudable ethical teachings of Buddha: Resist greed and anger, be compassionate, and so forth. But there remain profound differences between the two men:

Christ claimed to be the one and only true God who came to suffer, die, and rise again, establishing a unique and everlasting covenant with man.

Buddha is believed to be one of many thatagata (thus-come-one). The historical Buddha is just one of several thatagata who come in various ages to teach that life is an illusion and to remove human desires and attachments.

Christ taught that he is "the way, and the truth, and the life." The way to what? "No one comes to the Father," Jesus continues, "but by me" (John 14:6). Jesus comes to reveal the Father, the Creator of all things, so man could have fullness of life.

Buddha taught how man could escape suffering through loss of desire and personality. He held that every person must find his own path to nirvana, or the extinction of self.

Christ preached the reality of sin, the nature of God the Father, and the need for repentance and salvation.

Buddha preached the untenable nature of existence and the means to escape suffering. Buddhism denies the ultimate existence of sin and the necessity of grace.

Christ taught that God is completely other, but he also taught that God wishes to share his divine life, given through the Son by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Buddha taught individuality must perish and that everything is one.

Christ established a Church, with a structure of authority, based on his words and example. He said, "Follow me!"

Buddha left a teaching in which each person must find his own path. He stated, "After my death, the dharma shall be your teacher. Follow the dharma and you will be true to me."

Christ rose from the dead only once and will return as the King of Kings. He revealed his own divinity, saying, "Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am" (John 8:58).

Buddha is a "model," regardless of whether he was a historical person or not. Buddha suggests that "there is no 'I'; there is no 'self.'" At his death, when he experienced pari-nirvana ("final extinction"), he stated that the question of the afterlife was "not conducive to edification."


Carl E. Olson is editor of www.IgnatiusInsight.com , author of Will Catholics Be "Left Behind"? and co-author of The Da Vinci Hoax. He holds a master's in theological studies from the University of Dallas.

Anthony E. Clark is a professor of Asian history at the University of Alabama. His more recent research has centered on East / West religious dialogue.


TOPICS: Catholic
KEYWORDS: buddha; buddhism; catholic; catholicism; catholiclist; jesuit; jesus; robertekennedy; roshi; stpeterscollege; zen; zenbuddhism; zenmaster
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1 posted on 10/30/2005 11:05:56 PM PST by Coleus
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To: Coleus

Only in the very loosest sense could one say that if you are a happy Christian, then you are also a Buddhist, and vice versa. It is possible to be both, since Christianity is a revealed religion, and Buddhism is, at its source, a philosophy, not a religion. (When someone asked Gautama Buddha to discuss his view of gods, cosmology, etc., he declined to do so, saying that it did not have anything to do with what he was trying to teach: his philosophy.) Many people now identify as both Christians and Buddhists. They worship Christ and follow the Middle Way as well. But to say that Christianity and Buddhism are the same thing is, in my humble layperson's opinion, rather misleading and not correct.


2 posted on 10/30/2005 11:16:38 PM PST by Hetty_Fauxvert (Kelo must GO!! ..... http://sonoma-moderate.blogspot.com/)
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To: Coleus

Here's an excellent little book: "The Lotus and the Cross: Jesus Talks with Buddha" by Ravi Zacharias


3 posted on 10/30/2005 11:25:41 PM PST by Rocky (Air America: Robbing the poor to feed the Left)
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To: Coleus
How can any Christian compare Buddha to Christ? Christ is God Incarnate, Who created all things, (including Buddha if he actually lived).

No person or thing can be compared to God, and to do so is pure sacrilege. (In Catholic tradition it was St. Michael the Archangel who challenged Lucifer when he compared himself to God, by saying: "Who is like unto God"?)

But these are pagan times we live in, and God and truth are merely what people happen to believe in today, not something that is eternal and unchangeable.

4 posted on 10/30/2005 11:45:06 PM PST by TheCrusader ("The frenzy of the Mohammedans has devastated the churches of God" -Pope Urban II, 1097AD)
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert
They worship Christ and follow the Middle Way as well. But to say that Christianity and Buddhism are the same thing is, in my humble layperson's opinion, rather misleading and not correct.

You're right of course. However, think of the books it'll sell!

5 posted on 10/30/2005 11:45:17 PM PST by newzjunkey (CA: YES on Prop 73-77! Unions outspending Arnold 3:1, HELP: http://www.joinarnold.com)
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert
The answer:

NO.
6 posted on 10/30/2005 11:54:54 PM PST by Dallas59 (“You love life, while we love death.” - Al-Qaeda / Democratic Party)
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To: Coleus; Lijahsbubbe; bahblahbah; Terriergal; My2Cents; Recovering Ex-hippie

Buddah?

7 posted on 10/30/2005 11:59:39 PM PST by Thinkin' Gal (As it was in the days of NO...)
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To: Coleus

Next thing you know they will be pushing St Germaine and all the so called Ascended Masters nonsense upon an unsuspecting public!


8 posted on 10/31/2005 12:07:28 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (When someone burns a cross on your lawn, the best firehose is an AK-47.)
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To: Thinkin' Gal

Buddah?

That is what my old SGT. ROCK comic books say. Pull the trigger on a Thompson and it goes BUDDA-BUDDA-BUDDA!


9 posted on 10/31/2005 12:11:02 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (When someone burns a cross on your lawn, the best firehose is an AK-47.)
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To: Coleus

Nopeski.


10 posted on 10/31/2005 12:11:25 AM PST by msf92497 (The most dangerous place to be is in a "mothers" womb.)
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To: Coleus

Not a lot of family resemblance. I say ixnay on the brother thing.

11 posted on 10/31/2005 12:28:36 AM PST by JennysCool (Non-Y2K-Compliant)
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To: Coleus
Life is suffering.

On coming back and reading this article more closely, and realizing that many people who are not familiar with Buddhism will take it literally word for word, I wanted to correct at least one of the misinterpretations in this article.

One of the principal foundations of Buddhism is indeed the tenet that "Life is suffering" ... except that "suffering" in English and the original word that is being interpreted as "suffering" do not have the same meaning, and it really skews the meaning of the whole concept. I have forgotten the original word (not being a Sanskrit speaker myself) but the word being interpreted in English as "suffering" is a word that means, literally, a wagon wheel that is not working properly, that is a little bumpy and not giving a smooth ride. It should probably be interpreted more closely as "unsatisfactory." And I think that there are few people in this world who would disagree that our life in this world is often unsatisfactory. Whereas to say that life is *suffering* implies a very self-defeating and nihilistic point of view, to say the least.

Also, to say that Buddhists seek "extinction" is really an extreme interpretation. As a matter of fact, in the prayer of the Three Refuges, Buddhists ask to become a Buddha themselves, solely "in order to benefit all sentient beings." This implies continued existence in some form, as well as a selfless wish to be of use to all self-knowing beings.

I just wanted to comment on that a little. Buddhism has a bad rap as a nihilistic religion, and it is neither nihilistic nor, really, a religion.

12 posted on 10/31/2005 12:32:25 AM PST by Hetty_Fauxvert (Kelo must GO!! ..... http://sonoma-moderate.blogspot.com/)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

Sorry, typo. Make that a purpose-driven Buddha.


13 posted on 10/31/2005 12:47:20 AM PST by Thinkin' Gal (As it was in the days of NO...)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
"That is what my old SGT. ROCK comic books say. Pull the trigger on a Thompson and it goes BUDDA-BUDDA-BUDDA!"

Ruy - LOL...I remember that well.
Also, I think German schmisers went taka-taka-taka and I think another MG went rata-rata-rata. Maybe that was a Jap subgun...lol

14 posted on 10/31/2005 2:39:58 AM PST by Khurkris (Ain't life funny?)
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To: Coleus

Jesus is the Son of God and Savior of the world by His death on the cross (John 3:16). Buddha isn't.


15 posted on 10/31/2005 2:46:27 AM PST by kittymyrib
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To: Coleus

Well, yes, in the most expansive sense. All human beings are one family by descent, including Jesus Christ as a human person, and the human philosopher called "the Buddha".


16 posted on 10/31/2005 3:40:17 AM PST by Tax-chick (I'm not being paid enough to worry about all this stuff ... so I don't.)
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To: Coleus
"The perennial teachings of the Catholic Church and the Buddhist sangha are inherently incompatible. Whereas God remains completely other, distinct from his creation, higher Buddhist discourse rejects the possibility of any such duality. There can be no Creator / creature distinction in Buddhism."

What I was thinking before I got to this paragraph. Buddhism is a fine religion as religions go, but it doesn't conatin all the Truth.

17 posted on 10/31/2005 4:06:26 AM PST by jjm2111 (99.7 FM Radio Kuwait)
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To: TheCrusader

Well, that's why he is named Michael.

Or rather: mikha'el (abbreviation of mi khamokha eloheinu). Meaning "who is as G-d?"

Though for the record, I am fairly sure Michael is a seraph, not an archangel.


18 posted on 10/31/2005 4:10:07 AM PST by Alexander Rubin (Octavius - You make my heart glad building thus, as if Rome is to be eternal.)
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To: Coleus; All
Nothing about Buddhism is from Jesus Christ,Christ has no association whatsoever with Buddha.
Buddha is the work of Satan and another tool to mislead people.

Mark 13:33
Be constantly on watch!Stay awake!
You do not know when the appointed time will come.


Christianity does no allow for Paganism to be practiced!
19 posted on 10/31/2005 4:26:25 AM PST by pro610 (Faith the size of a mustard seed can move mountains.Praise Jesus Christ!)
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To: Coleus

"1. Life is suffering."
Wrong. The Lord created life and saw that it was good.

2. The cause of suffering is desire.
Wrong. The cause of suffering is rejection of the Lord.

3. To be free from suffering, we must detach from desire.
Wrong. Only through Christ's one oblation on the Cross may we be saved.

4. The "eight-fold path" is the way to alleviate desire.
Wrong. We must take up our cross and follow Christ.


20 posted on 10/31/2005 4:33:18 AM PST by bobjam
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To: Coleus
This is one particular example of where ecumenism goes wrong. Sure, we can all appreciate the Buddha. Wise man, teacher. Had a lot of good things to say. But eventually, you start hearing Christians talking about how Buddha and Jesus were pretty similar. A couple of hippies asking you to let the love (or zen) into your heart.

First off, Buddhism and Christianity are totally unrelated in terms of their history or foundations. Second, Buddhism is a lot more than wearing an orange robe and being nice to animals, or to the other extreme, acting comatose and naive like Richard Gere. Buddhsim is what one might call a negative philosophy. Negative, as in life is a painful thing, and the goal is to get away from it all through enlightenment. Christianity is quite the opposite. It's a very positivistic "philosophy".

And that's not mentioning all the other things that go into each religion. They aren't as simplistic as people make them out to be.
21 posted on 10/31/2005 5:08:19 AM PST by Conservative til I die
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert

I hear what you're saying about being a Christian Buddhist. The former is a revealed religion, the latter a philosophy. However, I think there is a danger in trying to incorporate both, as it can obscure one's own Christianity, which is where the salvation is found.


22 posted on 10/31/2005 5:09:56 AM PST by Conservative til I die
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To: Coleus

Budda had an eating disorder.


23 posted on 10/31/2005 5:12:42 AM PST by wolfcreek
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To: Coleus; EveningStar
Are Jesus and Buddha Brothers?

No, but they're Super Best Friends!

24 posted on 10/31/2005 5:30:57 AM PST by solitas (So what if I support an OS that has fewer flaws than yours? 'Mystic' dual 500 G4's, OSX.4.2)
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To: Coleus

I needed a laugh this morning.....


25 posted on 10/31/2005 5:32:32 AM PST by Loud Mime (Hatred is the foundation of socialist movements, conceit is the motivator)
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To: Coleus
Dalai Lama: "Father, do you know the difference between you and me?"

Monsignor: "No, Your Holiness,"

Dalai Lama: "You believe in a personal God, and I do not."

Why would the Monsignor even address him as "Your Holiness"? Wouldn't "Mr. Lama" be more appropriate?

26 posted on 10/31/2005 5:43:55 AM PST by HarleyD (1 John 5:1 - "everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God")
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To: Coleus

Divine Grace is the key to Christianity. Buddism is too childish and simplistic to be called a sibling.


27 posted on 10/31/2005 5:45:38 AM PST by Porterville (Pray for War- Spanish by birth, American by the Grace of God!!!)
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To: Coleus

Why do Catholics feel the need to turn to Buddhism to understand contemplating God? We have so many saints who show us the way. Trouble is that these saints are often too real, too earthy, too human for some. I think those who look to Buddhism believe wrongly that any sensual experience is to deny the spiritual. Therefore meditation and contemplation must have as its aim not only union with God but total separation from our earthly selves. This is not what Christianity teaches. We are not complete despite being flesh and spirit but because of it. Christ elevated our bodies through His incarnation.
I also feel confident in stating that probably most Catholics who turn to Buddhist practices do not believe or outright reject the doctrine of the Real Presence in the Eucharist.


28 posted on 10/31/2005 8:27:40 AM PST by lastchance (Hug your babies.)
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To: TheCrusader

Their motive is their love for the pagan practice of contempative prayer.


29 posted on 10/31/2005 9:26:21 AM PST by The Ghost of FReepers Past (Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a disgrace to any people. Ps. 14:34)
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To: Thinkin' Gal

Appropriate picture of Rick Warren. You could call him a "Christian" Buddhist since he's a contemplative. Or call him Mr. Shirley MacLaine.


30 posted on 10/31/2005 9:28:06 AM PST by The Ghost of FReepers Past (Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a disgrace to any people. Ps. 14:34)
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To: JennysCool

LOL!


31 posted on 10/31/2005 9:28:06 AM PST by murphE (These are days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed but his own. --G.K. Chesterton)
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To: Coleus

Always look on the bright side of life.


32 posted on 10/31/2005 9:31:26 AM PST by N. Theknow (Kennedys - Can't drive, can't fly, can't ski, can't skipper a boat - But they know what's best.)
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To: 2ndMostConservativeBrdMember; afraidfortherepublic; Alas; al_c; american colleen; annalex; ...
Some Catholics agree. For example, Jesuit Father Robert E. Kennedy, a Roshi (Zen master), holds Zen retreats at Morning Star Zendo in Jersey City. He states on his web site:
 
"I ask students to trust themselves and to develop their own self-reliance through the practice of Zen." The St. Francis Chapel at Santa Clara University hosts the weekly practice of "mindfulness and Zen meditation." Indeed, the number of Buddhist retreats and workshops being held at Catholic monasteries and parishes is growing.
 
Catholic Zen Retreats, Jersey City, NJ, conducted by a Jesuit Priest
 
The Perspective of a Zen Pagan
 
Fr. Kevin Hunt Installed as Zen Teacher
The installation was led by Fr. Robert Kennedy, S.J., who is the only North American Jesuit who is also a Zen Master (Roshi) and who served as Fr. Kevin’s teacher.
 
Second Annual Northern California Chan.Zen-(un)Catholic "Dialogue" Held in Burlingame, CA
 
what ever happened to the first commandment?

33 posted on 10/31/2005 10:04:01 AM PST by Coleus (Roe v. Wade and Endangered Species Act both passed in 1973, Murder Babies/save trees, birds, algae)
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To: JennysCool

***Not a lot of family resemblance. I say ixnay on the brother thing.***

Especially since the Jesus character is a German artist's model. Gives new meaning to the Lost Tribes in Europe nonsense.


34 posted on 10/31/2005 10:17:19 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (When someone burns a cross on your lawn, the best firehose is an AK-47.)
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To: wolfcreek

Looks to me like Buddah never detached from his desire for food.


35 posted on 10/31/2005 10:20:27 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: wolfcreek

yea, I know, I'm starting to look like him.


36 posted on 10/31/2005 10:30:48 AM PST by Coleus (Roe v. Wade and Endangered Species Act both passed in 1973, Murder Babies/save trees, birds, algae)
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert; Coleus

How can a Christian be a Buddhist? Among other things, how can a Christian believe the universe does not exist?


37 posted on 10/31/2005 10:31:42 AM PST by nickcarraway (I'm Only Alive, Because a Judge Hasn't Ruled I Should Die...)
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To: Coleus

It's very easy to draw parallels between Christ and Buddha.
Its also very easy to draw parallels between Bill Clinton and GWB, that doesn't mean Bill Clinton is a Conservative.


38 posted on 10/31/2005 11:00:33 AM PST by NormB (Yes, but watch your cookies!!)
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To: lastchance; Coleus
Did anybody catch Peter Leithart's article When East is West?

He claims that the Buddhism we've imported from the East was influenced by a liberal Protestant colonial who converted to Buddhism and started Buddhist instruction along Protestant lines, "Sunday Schools" for young buddhists and so forth. Thus one could argue that flakier Catholics are attracted to Buddhism like they are to mushy Episcopalianism--they're more similar than they look.

39 posted on 10/31/2005 11:09:29 AM PST by Dumb_Ox
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To: Coleus
Some of the teachings of Buddhism are similar to the Letter of James, an often neglected part of the NT. When James says, "Have not respect of persons," he is uttering that timeless truth that the trappings of the world don't matter, including physical appearance, status, wealth, usefulness . . . a very Zen concept. Most religions at their holiest approach the same point, which is love.

That is not to say that Christianity is not the messianic truth that will lead us individually and as a planet to salvation. It is. Once you see it, the game is over, as far as other religions. No reason to trash them, but truth is truth.

40 posted on 10/31/2005 12:02:33 PM PST by firebrand
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To: Coleus

Your Jesuit link is yet another piece of evidence that, once and for all, the Jesuits should be suppressed as an order.

There ARE precedents! ;-)


41 posted on 10/31/2005 12:15:32 PM PST by magisterium
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To: Coleus

Can McDonalds and Buddha coexist?


42 posted on 10/31/2005 12:40:53 PM PST by RightWhale (Repeal the law of the excluded middle)
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To: firebrand

but truth is truth. >>

Amen, and only through Jesus, who is the thruth, is the way for Christians to be saved.

and for non-Christians the CCC says this:

847 This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation. 337 LG 16; cf. DS 3866-3872.


43 posted on 10/31/2005 1:57:51 PM PST by Coleus (Roe v. Wade and Endangered Species Act both passed in 1973, Murder Babies/save trees, birds, algae)
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To: Coleus

So, if Jesus and Buddha were brothers, and Jesus is the Son of God, wouldn't that make Buddha also the Son of God worthy of equal worship? That is heresy.


44 posted on 10/31/2005 2:05:01 PM PST by DocRock
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To: Coleus
through the dictates of their conscience

The operative phrase. And he's a tough master, that Jiminy Cricket. He's jumping around trying to get some people to even read the Gospel.

45 posted on 10/31/2005 2:09:28 PM PST by firebrand
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To: DocRock
Buddah is not the only begotten son of G_D.

LK,12:51_"Suppose ye that I am come to give peace on earth? I tell you, Nay; but rather division: For from henceforth there shall be five in one house divided, three against two, and two against three. The father shall be divided against the son, and the son against the father; the mother against the daughter, and the daughter against the mother; the mother in law against her daughter in law, and the daughter in law against her mother in law."

It's pretty plain that Christianity is some kind of a warrior religion where the adherents are called to fight and take up the sword for Christ.

Christ brought the war in heaven to earth. The fight between Satan and his half of heaven and God the father and his half of heaven is now the affair of all mankind.

MT,10:34__Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword."

Too many confuse the peace of Christ and the peace of surrender and abnegation.

46 posted on 10/31/2005 2:30:29 PM PST by i.l.e. (Tagline - this space for sale....)
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To: Coleus

Maybe we should think twice before listening to a Jesuit whose name is Robert Kennedy . . . .


47 posted on 10/31/2005 2:40:12 PM PST by AuH2ORepublican (http://auh2orepublican.blogspot.com/)
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To: TheCrusader

No Buddhist worships Buddha. Buddha didn't call himself G-d and would have been repelled by such a comparison. He founded a school of philosophy, not a religion. The religion came afterwards but it doesn't resemble any other religion. There is no worship, it is only a struggle with the self and it's existence on earth


48 posted on 10/31/2005 2:45:37 PM PST by muir_redwoods (Free Sirhan Sirhan, after all, the bastard who killed Mary Jo Kopechne is walking around free)
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To: i.l.e.
I agree. Jesus said in Luke 22:35, "And he said unto them, When I sent you without purse, and scrip, and shoes, lacked ye any thing? And they said, Nothing." This is Jesus talking to his disciples. "Then he said unto them, But now,..." This is a big "But now", because Jesus is getting His disciples ready to minister on this earth without Him. These are final instructions before He heads to the cross for our sins. "But now, He that hath a purse, let him take it,..." Keep your money with you. "...And likewise his scrip:..." That is your Bible. "...And he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." (Luke 22:36) That's right, your weapon is more important than the clothes on your back. "For I say unto you, that this that is written must yet be accomplished in me,..." Jesus is speaking of his own death. He said, "Now look, I have to die, but you don't". "... And he was reckoned among the transgressors: for the things concerning me have an end." (Luke 22:37) That's his earthly ministry.
49 posted on 10/31/2005 2:49:09 PM PST by DocRock
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To: Coleus

Umm...lemme think about this....NO!!


50 posted on 10/31/2005 2:50:23 PM PST by Uriah_lost (We aren't pro-war, we're PRO-VICTORY!)
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