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Catholic Church in India ordains its first married deacons
Asia News ^ | January 24, 2006 | Nirmala Carvalho

Posted on 01/24/2006 11:32:14 AM PST by NYer

INDIA

Indian Church ordains its first married deacons
by Nirmala Carvalho
Ordination ceremony takes place in the Archdiocese of Mumbai. Diocesan spokesman says the event was very important, enriching the mission of the Church.

Mumbai (AsiaNews) – The Catholic Church of India ordained its first married deacons. Last Sunday, Card Ivan Dias, archbishop of Mumbai, presided over the ceremony that saw Lyod Dias and Elwyn D’Souza, both 60, acquire the right to celebrate religious functions such as marriages, funerals, baptisms and administer the sacraments, except for mass and confession.

In an interview with AsiaNews Fr Anthony Charangat, spokesman for the Archdiocese of Mumbai, explained that “this is first time a married person has been ordained deacon. No other diocese in India is known to have ordained a permanent deacon.”

For the clergyman, this is a “very important” event for “this ordination shows how the laity has its rightful place in the life of the Church.”

“The ordination of permanent married deacons brings back into use an old sacrament that had fallen into disuse. Today, however, it is something we need in these areas,” he said.

Deacons will be ordinary ministers of the Word of God. After the Second Vatican Council, the Latin Church restored the deaconate “as a proper and permanent order in the hierarchy [. . .] enriching the mission of the Church,” he said.

The ordination of married deacons has been practiced for decades in Europe and Latin America. The Indian Church was authorised to do the same in 1983, but it was never implemented till now.

This, Father Charangat explained, was largely due to the need “to prepare people to accept the novelty and set up programmes to train candidates.”
Fr Babu Joseph, spokesman for the Bishops’ Conference of India, expressed similar views. “Married deacons have always been part of the Church's tradition, though at some points in its history their visibility declined.”



TOPICS: Activism; Catholic; Current Events; General Discusssion; Ministry/Outreach; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: catholic; deacons; india

1 posted on 01/24/2006 11:32:19 AM PST by NYer
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To: NYer

Married deacons will be the spiritual providers for the vast underserved regions of the world.


2 posted on 01/24/2006 11:35:10 AM PST by FormerACLUmember
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To: american colleen; Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; ...

We'll wait for SOLDIEROFJESUSCHRIST to fill us in on the details here and how this is being received by the laypeople.


3 posted on 01/24/2006 11:36:16 AM PST by NYer (Discover the beauty of the Eastern Catholic Churches - freepmail me for more information.)
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To: NYer

My twin Daughters where christened this month by a married deacon in our church.


4 posted on 01/24/2006 11:39:47 AM PST by TXBSAFH ("I would rather be a free man in my grave then living as a puppet or a slave." - Jimmy Cliff)
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To: NYer

From what I have read, if you are married first, you can become a deacon. If you are single and are ordained a deacon, you take a vow of celibacy. Is that correct?


5 posted on 01/24/2006 11:45:18 AM PST by voiceinthewind
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To: voiceinthewind

Yes, that is correct.


6 posted on 01/24/2006 11:55:44 AM PST by NYer (Discover the beauty of the Eastern Catholic Churches - freepmail me for more information.)
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To: NYer; SOLDIEROFJESUSCHRIST

I got a question for SOLDIER (and NYer if you know too, since this is connected with the Antiochene Church)...what Rite do Indian Catholics use? The Syro-Malabar or Malankara Rite or the Latin Rite, or both?

I know the former rites were suppressed in the 1600s or whenever, but what is their status now?


7 posted on 01/24/2006 12:28:45 PM PST by Claud
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To: NYer

and if your wife passes on you may not remarry.


8 posted on 01/24/2006 12:37:28 PM PST by wordsofearnest (Bring Back Torre)
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To: wordsofearnest
and if your wife passes on you may not remarry.

Also correct.

9 posted on 01/24/2006 3:54:08 PM PST by NYer (Discover the beauty of the Eastern Catholic Churches - freepmail me for more information.)
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To: voiceinthewind; NYer

<< From what I have read, if you are married first, you can become a deacon. If you are single and are ordained a deacon, you take a vow of celibacy. Is that correct? >>

Around the world there are also lots of married former Anglican priests who've converted and who've been ordained as Catholic Priests.


10 posted on 01/24/2006 3:56:00 PM PST by Brian Allen (How arrogant are we to believe our career political-power-lusting lumpen somehow superior to theirs?)
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To: Claud; x5452; Kolokotronis
what Rite do Indian Catholics use? The Syro-Malabar or Malankara Rite or the Latin Rite, or both?

While I have never attended a Syro-Malabar Catholic Church, the following seems to give a very detailed description of the rite used in their churches. It is written by a priest and was published in the Catholic Herald.

Syro-Malabar Rite


Holy Mass

OFFICIAL WEB SITE - Syro Malabar Catholic Church

Attention x5452 - here is another Eastern Catholic Church where the bishop wears a Roman mitre.

11 posted on 01/24/2006 4:08:26 PM PST by NYer (Discover the beauty of the Eastern Catholic Churches - freepmail me for more information.)
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To: NYer; Claud; x5452

Here's a link to the sad history, until the past two years, of this Church with the Latin Church.

http://www.thesyromalabarchurch.org/history.htm

It does seem, thank God, that times are changing for this very ancient Church and the way that Rome treats it. Perhaps in the near future the Latin mitre on an Indian bishop of a sui juris Church will go the way of Latin domination of this Church.


12 posted on 01/24/2006 4:23:23 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: NYer
"For the clergyman, this is a “very important” event for “this ordination shows how the laity has its rightful place in the life of the Church.”

This is misinformed. A deacon IS a clergyman, not a layman. He has received the sacrament of Holy Orders.

The laity's proper place in the life of the Church is the sanctification of the WORLD, principally through participation in family, work or profession, political responsibility, culture, the arts.

The sanctification of the WORLD. No minor role, that.

13 posted on 01/24/2006 5:04:31 PM PST by Mrs. Don-o (Urbi et Orbi.)
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To: NYer
We'll wait for SOLDIEROFJESUSCHRIST to fill us in on the details here and how this is being received by the laypeople.

He already has filled in.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1560810/posts

14 posted on 01/24/2006 5:27:42 PM PST by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: Brian Allen
lots

< 700 hardly qualifies as "lots".

15 posted on 01/24/2006 5:48:00 PM PST by A.A. Cunningham
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To: Claud
what Rite do Indian Catholics use? The Syro-Malabar or Malankara Rite or the Latin Rite, or both?

Actually they use all 3 -- Christianity arrived in india with St. Thomas the Apostle in Kerala. Then, the were under the Syriac rite. When the Portuguese came in, vast numbers became Catholic -- and these (mostly from Goa or Maharashtra) are Latin Rite. The Keralites are primarily Syriac rites.
16 posted on 01/25/2006 2:15:32 AM PST by Cronos (Never forget 9/11. Restore Hagia Sophia!)
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To: NYer; Kolokotronis

His head clothing I should hope are the last of his concerns.


17 posted on 01/25/2006 5:37:17 AM PST by x5452
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To: NYer; american colleen; Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; ..
Dear All,

I am sorry I was not able to make any comments on this article much earlier than I usually tend to make. I have been having some problems with my P.C. and a certain email address has disappeared with hundreds of emails in it.

In any case, I trust in the Lord that this is nothing serious.

With regard to the article, concerning the ordination of two deacons in the Catholic Church in Mumbai, I will first post two recent articles -- one is from The "Examiner" and the other is from the "Mumbai Mirror".

The Article from the Mumbai Mirror is an article which talks about exactly what I have been harping about that Catholic Youth and Young Adults are possibly leaving the Catholic Church in cities in large numbers and joining Pentecostal Churches or House Churches as they are called in certain Asian countries.

The Article has been aptly titled "A Crisis of Faith".

The Second Article is with regard to the ordination of two deacons both of whom who are 60 years old. I wish they were younger as the Catholic Youth, Young Catholic Adults, and Young Catholic Married Couples and Families sorely need individuals who can relate to them.


For Example, I was watching E.W.T.N. on Sunday Night where there was this Program on a young catholic married couple "Jason Evert and Crystalina Padilla Evert" who are famous in the United States for their Chastity talks at a number of Schools throughout the United States.

In India, We do not have individuals such as these specially given the fact that PreMarital Sex, Live-In-Relationships, Abortion, etc have been on the increase for the past 5 years or more.

What I consider as quite disappointing is the fact that these two Deacons will be under the exclusive control of the Archbishop of Mumbai and that means they will not be able to tackle a problem area among the faithful unless the Cardinal gives the nod.


What to me is unacceptable is the fact that a large number of Catholic Priests in Mumbai(Bombay) are in denial with regard to the exodus of Catholics from all the ethnic groups that exist in Bombay and from all age groups to a variety of Pentecostal Churches.

By the way, I am a Latin Rite Catholic from the Former Portuguese Territory of Goa.

In Jesus and Mary,

P.S.- More Comments later tomorrow. I will be posting more information tomorrow about the different kinds of Ethnic Communities that Catholics in Mumbai come from specially for the attention of Claud.

Claud, I have something in common with you. I lived in Philly for a couple of years, before moving down South to Atlanta. I notice you are from Bucks County-- I am quite familiar with that place.





A CRISIS OF FAITH ? (1/03/2006)



A study conducted by the Don Bosco order of priests finds that Catholic youth are in danger of moving from the community to groups that offer a greater sense of belonging



Manoj R Nair



A study of Catholic youth in India has warned that young people in the community could be heading towards a ‘crisis of faith’ and that they might move away from the Church to join groups that offer a more vibrant sense of community and belonging.

The study conducted by priests of Don Bosco’s Salesian order as part of the centennial celebrations of their presence in India says that the views of Catholic youth on birth control, sexuality and violence seem to be drawn from the general society they live in rather than from the Catholic faith, which has strong views on these issues.

However, the three-year long all-India study, makes a distinction between faith and belief and added that there is no ‘crisis of belief’. The study said that while the Church was successful in ‘transmitting its religious dogma’, it had not been effective in helping to conveying an appropriate faith.

“Hence, the danger could be that in a crisis situation, these young Catholics may easily fall away from the religion and join other groups that offer them better prospects of internalisation and a more vibrant sense of community,” the study said.

Therefore, the study concludes that the challenge the Catholic Church has to face is to convert its “believing and belonging youth” into “faith-ful youth”. They have to be helped to move from an inherited religion to a personally appropriated ‘living out’ of their Catholic religion, the study suggested.

“This means that while the youth think that faith is important, when it comes to practising the faith, there are difficulties,” said father Darryl D’Souza, director of Tej Prasarini, the communications wing of Don Bosco.

Bandra resident Richard D’Souza, father of a 20-year-old said that while most churches had plenty of youth groups, the young “have a tough schedule with jobs, academics and sports like my daughter had,” he said.

The Don Bosco order, founded in Italy in AD 1859 by St John Bosco, is known for its work among the young.

The study was initiated by father Adolph Furtado in July 2002 and then continued by father Cyril de Souza and social activists Josanthony Joseph and Johny Joseph. The study proposed to draw up the religious profile of contemporary Catholic youth in India to find out what they think and know about their religion, and whether they feel they live it out in practice.

The study targeted boys and girls between 12 and 25 years. Questionnaires were sent to 5,000 people across India, in 10 languages; only 3,609 responded.

The findings, compiled in a book “Lord I believe. Increase my Faith” - The Response of Catholic Youth to Religion will be released later this week in Bangalore.


THE YOUTH SAY

In my parish in Orlem, there are a lot of activities for the youth. A lot of young people are also active in the programmes. However, I do feel that many of them do not necessarily practice what is taught in the church.
— Lyndon Rodriques, 13
Orlem, Malad

In my parish, the youth is very involved in church activities. I am part of the choir and I feel that there is a sense of belonging.
— Caroline Santos, 21
Vakola, Santacruz

I do not mind missing the weekly mass as long as I pray at home or elsewhere. But I do not think that the youth lack a sense of belonging. It varies from person to person. I believe that as long you are a good human being, attending prayer meetings does not really matter.
— Alison D’Souza, 20
Bandra

THE STATISTICS SAY

* Only 29.2 per cent of the youth claim to go to church everyday, while 82.8 per cent claim to pray every day.

* 15.5 per cent feel that religion is hardly important or not important.

* However, 99.5 per cent pray, implying that they make a distinction between religion and their relationship with God.

* 5.3 per cent have questions about the existence of god, while 8.7 doubt whether God cares for them.

* 68 per cent said that they would choose to be a Catholic given a choice, 24 per cent a Christian (not necessarily Catholic) and 6 per cent choose to be free of any religion.



2)A Landmark in Bombay Church History

Bishop Bosco Penha

The Archdiocese of Bombay takes a historic step in restoring the diaconate to the permanent rank of the hierarchy by the ordination of Lloyd Dias and Elwyn de Souza.

We will have arrived at a landmark in Bombay Church History when, on the morning of Sunday, January 22, 2006, Cardinal Ivan Dias ordains the first two permanent deacons in the presence of the other bishops, the deans and the families, relatives and friends of the two deacons. It will also be a landmark in Indian Church history because, as far as we know, no other diocese in the country has initiated the Permanent Diaconate although the permission from Rome to establish the Permanent Diaconate in the Church of India was received by the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of India as far back as 1983.

The Permanent Diaconate – A Great Gift of God to the Church

Already in the Dogmatic Constitution on The Church, the Second Vatican Council had recommended the revival of the Permanent Diaconate when it said :

“Since these duties” (of the Permanent Deacons) “so very necessary to the life of the Church, can be fulfilled only with difficulty in many regions in accordance with the discipline of the Latin Church as it exists today, the diaconate can in the future be restored as a proper and permanent rank of the hierarchy. It pertains to the competent territorial bodies of bishops, of one kind or another, with the approval of the Supreme Pontiff, to decide whether and where it is opportune for such deacons to be established for the care of souls. With the consent of the Roman Pontiff, this diaconate can, in the future be conferred upon men of more mature age, even upon those living in the married state. It may also be conferred upon suitable young men, for whom the law of celibacy must remain intact.” (No.29)

In his address on December 30, 1995, to the Plenary Assembly of the Congregation for the Clergy, which had met to discuss the training, ministry and life of the Permanent Deacons, Pope John Paul II expressed his view that the vocation of the Permanent Deacon is a great gift of God to the Church and for this reason is an important enrichment for the Church’s mission. A similar view has been expressed by the Congregation for the Clergy and the Congregation for Catholic Education in their joint declaration on the Permanent Diaconate:

“One of the fruits of the Second Vatican Council was the desire to restore the diaconate as a proper and stable rank of the hierarchy”. On the basis of the “historical circumstances and pastoral purposes noted by the Council Fathers, the Holy Spirit, protagonist of the Church’s life, worked mysteriously to bring about a new and more complete actualisation of the hierarchy which traditionally consists of bishops, priests and deacons. In this manner the Christian community was revitalised, configured more closely to that of the Apostles which, under the influence of the Paraclete, flourished as the Acts of the Apostles testifies.
18 posted on 01/25/2006 11:24:45 AM PST by MILESJESU
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To: NYer

**acquire the right to celebrate religious functions such as marriages, funerals, baptisms and administer the sacraments, except for mass and confession.**

Permanent deacons can not administer the Sacrament of the Annointing of the Sick also.


19 posted on 01/25/2006 12:56:52 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

You are so right, Mrs. Don-o!!

There are three steps to the Sacrament of Holy Orders:
Diaconate -- Being ordained as a permanent deacon
Presbyteral -- Being ordained as a priest
Episcopal -- Being ordained as a bishop


20 posted on 01/25/2006 1:00:23 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; NYer; BearWash; murphE

Dear All,

I guess y'all know that today is the 250th Birth Anniversary of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart is one of my favorite composers along with Beethoven, Chopin, Bach, Gounod, and Liszt to mention a few.

I have a deep rooted interest in Classical Music and Sacred Choral Music. In Fact, both the genres of Music have been my first love from a young age.

Today, In Mumbai at the N.C.P.A. The Newman Choir performed a number of compositions of Mozart specially his sacred choral works and a couple of Masses. I did not attend the Peformance at the N.C.P.A. but there were two good writeups in the Times of India over the past two days.

I have discovered an excellent Sacred Choral Music Site on the Web, it is from a Parish website in minneapolis. It is http://www.stagnes.net/music-recordings.html.

If anyone is interested in the Life and works of Mozart they can also check out the following web page at www.mozartproject.org. I just love the Orchestral Masses composed by all these eminent Musicians.

In Jesus and Mary,



When Mozart Stunned Rome.

Wolfgang's Memory Caught a Pope's Attention

By Elizabeth Lev

ROME, JAN. 26, 2006 (Zenit.org).- As any good music aficionado knows, 2006 marks the 350th anniversary of the birth of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Opera houses worldwide are featuring "Don Giovanni" and "Figaro," while Mozart biographies and boxed sets of concertos and sonatas proliferate in music stores.

Even Rome was enchanted by this great composer and, indeed, the child prodigy from Salzburg was warmly received in the Eternal City during his brief sojourn here in 1770.

Mozart is often associated with the Freemasons -- he joined the Masons of Vienna in 1784 -- and "The Magic Flute" is held by many scholars to be a Masonic opera. The most important moments of his life, however, took place in the Catholic Church.

Mozart was born on Jan. 26, 1756, and baptized Catholic with the name Johann Chrysostom Wolfgang Theophilus. "Theophilus," which means "lover of God," was soon transformed into the more celebrated moniker "Amadeus." He married Costanza Weber in the Cathedral of Vienna, his children were baptized Catholic and he was given last rites by a Catholic priest.

In this light, the visit to Rome must have held great meaning for the 14-year-old Catholic Mozart. Immediately upon entering the city through the splendid Piazza del Popolo, the young Mozart and his father Leopold made their way to St. Peter's Basilica. Thanks to Wolfgang's fine clothes and Leopold's clever strategies, the two were allowed through the Vatican gates.

It was Holy Week in Rome -- Holy Tuesday to be exact. Pope Clement XIV was busy serving meals to the poor gathered in the Vatican, shortly before celebrating Mass in the Sistine Chapel. The two Austrian musicians managed to find their way into the papal presence and then accompanied the court into the chapel.

It was custom during Holy Week in the Sistine Chapel to sing the exceptionally beautiful piece of music known as the "Miserere," written a century earlier by Giorgio Allegri. The work, performed by two choirs of nine voices, was exclusive to the Sistine Chapel and could not be published, but was handed down from choirmaster to choirmaster.

The remarkable prodigy Wolfgang stunned everyone by returning to his lodgings and transcribing the music he had memorized during the liturgy. His proud father wrote to Wolfgang's mother Anna, "Perhaps you have heard of the famous 'Miserere,' whose publication is prohibited under pain of excommunication. Well, we have it. Wolfgang wrote it from memory."

Word spread fast throughout Rome of the child who could memorize music after hearing it once. The news eventually reached the ears of the Pope. Far from excommunicating the boy, Pope Clement received Wolfgang several times in audience, conferring medals and titles on him.

The Mozarts visited Santa Maria Maggiore and the Quirinal Palace in the Pope's company. Like good pilgrims, they acquired relics, including a piece of the Holy Cross. And, although perhaps not as salubrious for the soul, during that July in Rome, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart learned how to play bocce ball.







21 posted on 01/27/2006 1:45:16 PM PST by MILESJESU
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To: SOLDIEROFJESUSCHRIST

Nice story. Liz Lev is great. God bless.


22 posted on 01/27/2006 1:49:18 PM PST by Nihil Obstat
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