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Catholic Caucus: Holy Days of Obligation
CatholicCulture.org ^ | not available | Brother John M. Samaha, S.M.,

Posted on 02/01/2006 8:59:17 PM PST by Salvation

Holy Days of Obligation, Or Holy Days of Opportunity

Holy days are usually regarded in terms of obligation and imposition. But should they not be considered even more as graced times of opportunity to mark a special mystery of our faith? In recent years, holy days have come in for a good deal of discussion, evaluation and renewal.

As early as the fourth century, St. John Chrysostom was concerned about the celebration of holy days in Constantinople. This Father and Doctor of the Church commented in a homily that "many people celebrate the holy days and know their names: but of their history, meaning and origin they know nothing."

Today, this challenge persists, and needs to be addressed anew. We might respond to the Bishop of Constantinople in the words of our earliest forebears in the faith: How can I know the meaning or history of the holy days and other feasts "unless someone explains it to me" (Acts 8:31).

The comment of St. John Chrysostom and the words of the Acts of the Apostles invite us to do some home-work, and to draw a historical perspective on holy days of obligation, which are really opportunities to celebrate, to renew and to enrich our faith.

What is a holy day of obligation? A simple answer is that a holy day is an important feast of Our Lord, Our Lady or other saints that Catholics are morally obliged to observe by participating in the celebration of the Eucharist and by abstaining from unnecessary servile work. These days are made solemnities, like a Sunday in terms of festivity and observance, because of their special importance and meaning for the universal and/or local Church. In the United States, we observe six holy days each liturgical year. Holy days do vary from one country to another.

Our American Catholic history tells us why these six holy days of obligation have special significance. Why do we observe six of the 10 prescribed by Church law, and why do other countries observe different feasts?

The Code of Canon Law, most recently revised and promulgated in 1983, requires the observance of 10 holy days. However, exceptions can be made by the Holy See in special agreements with the bishops' conferences of various countries. When the 1918 Code became effective, the Church in the United States was permitted to continue observing the six holy days designated by the U.S. bishops at the Third Plenary Council of Baltimore in 1884.

Sunday is the focus of the entire liturgical year, the day on which we celebrate our salvation in Christ's death and resurrection. We are asked to celebrate a holy day of obligation with the same solemnity as the Lord's Day.

By honoring another mystery of Christ, or by honoring Mary or a saint of local significance, we are celebrating the same as we do on a Sunday, but with a special orientation. In coming together as a community of faith for the celebration of the Eucharist, we declare the importance of the feast in the life of the particular Church. For this reason, parishes are urged to celebrate holy days with all their resources as they do on Sundays. A deeper understanding by pastors and the faithful of the nature and meaning of each holy day helps to elicit a more appreciative celebration and a commitment to excellence for these special occasions.

The history of holy days of obligation in the United States follows the complex origins of Catholicism in our country. The faith was planted in American soil by waves of Catholic immigrants from all corners of the world. The wide variety of ethnic groups brought together different languages and customs. Each lived an expression of Catholicism with its own distinctive cultural impress. The first three countries to bring the Church to America, in the 16th and 17th centuries — England, France and Spain — had a definite impact on the liturgical calendar of the United States. The six holy days we now observe are a distillation of the liturgical calendars followed by the English, French and Spanish colonists.

The first diocese of the new United States of America was established in Baltimore in 1789, the very year that George Washington was inaugurated as the country's first president. Prior to 1783, the American colonies were under the jurisdiction of London and followed the practices of the Catholic Church in England, which then was weakly organized and frequently persecuted by the British government. American Catholics of English origin were observing the same holy days celebrated in Great Britian.

Before 1777, England included 34 holy days of obligation in its liturgical calendar. That year, Pope Pius VI reduced that number to 11.

Considering that Catholics were persecuted in all 13 colonies (even in Maryland, which had been founded by and for English Catholics), how could they celebrate 34 holy days of obligation? Catholics were often dispensed from the obligation, not only because of persecution but also because they were widely scattered and lived far from the churches that existed at that time.

There is yet another aspect of the history of our holy days— the influence of the French and Spanish colonies. With the insertion of parts of New France (Canada) and Mexico into the new republic, the number of American Catholics increased, and with them came customs and feasts different from those of the Anglo-American Catholics. French America and Spanish America gave us the observance of Mary's Immaculate Conception as a holy day of obligation.

This diversity of origins resulted in almost every U.S. diocese following its own calendar of holy days until 1884, even though the Archbishop of Baltimore had repeatedly attempted some measure of uniformity. In 1791, 10 holy days of obligation were specified for the United States. By 1839, that number dropped to eight. However, dioceses of non-English origin — San Francisco (Spanish), Santa Fe (Spanish), New Orleans (French and Spanish), Chicago (French), Detroit (French) and others— continued to observe their own particular holy days before 1884. When the Third Plenary Council met in Baltimore, the bishops approved the uniform calendar of six holy days now observed: Mary, Mother of God; Ascension: Assumption of Mary; All Saints; Immaculate Conception; Christmas. The decision of the bishops was approved by the Holy See in 1885.

American Catholics, and indeed all Christians, are called to demonstrate the overriding importance of God's unconditional love in our lives. How do we line up our priorities regarding God and Mammon?

Christianity is countercultural. The Church invites us in the observance of holy days to make a personal sacrifice that will witness to the centrality of Christ in our lives. Our response to the celebration of holy days in our country will determine whether we bring the message of Christ to the marketplace, or allow the marketplace to stifle Christ. Will we consider holy days as burdensome obligations, or as dynamic opportunities?

About The Author

Brother John M. Samaha, S.M., a Marianist for 50 years, taught high school and adult education in the United States and Lebanon. Now retired at Villa St. Joseph in Cupertino, Calif., he volunteers at the Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute of the University of Dayton, his alma mater. He is an active member and past officer of the Mariological Society of America.

 

Holy Days Of Obligation

After their general annual meeting in 1991, the National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) of the United States issued the following decree on Dec. 13.

In addition to Sunday, the days to be observed as holy days of obligation in the Latin-rite dioceses of the United States, in conformity with Canon 1246, are as follows:

Jan. 1, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God.

Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter, the Solemnity of the Ascension.

Aug. 15, the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Nov. 1, the Solemnity of All Saints.

Dec. 8, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception.

Dec. 25, the Solemnity of the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Whenever Jan. 1, Aug. 15 or Nov. 1 falls on a Saturday or on a Monday, the precept to attend Mass is abrogated.

This decree of the NCCB was approved and confirmed by the Holy See and became effective Jan. 1, 1993.

The Catholic Answer, Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division, Our Sunday Visitor, Inc, 200 Noll Plaza, Huntington, In 46750, 1-800-348-2440.

This item 1371 digitally provided courtesy of CatholicCulture.org

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Should the United States have more holy days?
1 posted on 02/01/2006 8:59:19 PM PST by Salvation
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To: Salvation
I found this on another chat site, but the link to Creighton University in Nebraska doesn't work.

http://www.creighton.edu/~alackamp/holydays/answer.html

The 1983 Code of Canon Law identifies Sunday as "the primordial
holy day of obligation" in the universal Church.

In addition to Sunday there are 10 other days of obligation:

1. The Nativity of the Lord Jesus Christ (Christmas)
2. The Epiphany (Jan. 6.)
3. The Ascension (40 days after Easter)
4. The Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi) not observed in the United States
5. Holy Mary, the Mother of God (octave day of Christmas, Jan. 1)
6. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8)
7. The Assumption (Aug. 15)
8. St. Joseph (March 19) not observed in the United States
9. Ss. Peter and Paul (June 29) not observed in the United States
10. All Saints (Nov. 1)
The 1983 Code of Canon Law also states that the conference of Bishops
(usually the bishops of a particular country of a region) can suppress or
transfer the observance of these days, after approval from the Apostolic See (i.e. the Vatican)

Several years ago the National Conference of Catholic Bishops determined that the holy days of Mary, the Mother of God (Jan. 1), the Assumption (Aug. 15) and All Saints (Nov. 1) would not be observed with the obligation of participating in Mass whenever they would be a Saturday or Monday. Whenever these holy days are a Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday then they would be observed with the obligation of participation in Mass. This decision was approved by the Vatican.
In the past year the conference of Bishops received approval to transfer the holy days of Ascension Thursday to Sunday. The bishops of each province had to agree to this transfer before it was permissible. In Nebraska, which is the Metropolitan Province of Omaha or the the dioceses of Omaha, Lincoln, Grand Island, the bishops determined that Ascension Thursday should be observed on the 40th day after Easter rather than moving it to a Sunday.

2 posted on 02/01/2006 9:01:34 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Siobhan; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

3 posted on 02/01/2006 9:03:05 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

YES!!! Absolutely.


4 posted on 02/01/2006 9:06:19 PM PST by Heartofsong83
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To: Heartofsong83

I think so, too. At least get it back up to the ten listed by the (not working) Creighton link.


5 posted on 02/01/2006 9:10:15 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Agreed, plus several well-observed days such as the other days of the Christmas and Easter seasons (some of which should be federal, legal holidays as well).


6 posted on 02/01/2006 9:14:04 PM PST by Heartofsong83
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To: Salvation

Not only should we get it back up to ten, I think we should REALLY observe the bit about servile work and take the day off.


7 posted on 02/02/2006 5:58:15 AM PST by Desdemona (Music Librarian and provider of cucumber sandwiches, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary. Hats required.)
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To: Salvation
Should the United States have more holy days?

Absolutely!

The U.S. Church needs to stop watering down the importance of these days, and making it's own rules up in these Feasts of Our Lord....and get with the rest of The Church.

*In* my own humble opinion, of course. :o)

8 posted on 02/02/2006 9:50:57 AM PST by kstewskis ("There you go again..." R.R.)
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To: Salvation

So I've got some time before the next one. Great. :)

Seriesly, I think I need a revival about every 90 days, and it seems like the HDOs are spread out just perfectly to provide that... though I don't know that Catholics take advantage of the opportunity presented.

Also, I've always wondered why people don't eat a feast on a feast day.


9 posted on 02/02/2006 12:08:21 PM PST by Flavius Josephus (Enemy Idealogies: Pacifism, Liberalism, and Feminism, Islamic Supremacism)
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To: Salvation

Yes, absolutely.

For starters, I have always lamented the fact that the Epiphany (celebrated on its correct day - Jan. 6th.) is not a day of obligation in the US, but is in Canada, and nearly most other countries of sizeable Catholic populations.

Besides this, we definitely need to reverse course and start restoring the observances of some of these feasts on their correct days in ADDITION to and not in place of Sundays.


10 posted on 02/02/2006 12:27:22 PM PST by jrny (Oremus pro Pontifice nostro Benedicto Decimo Sexto.)
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To: Desdemona

Can't disagree with you at all.

I went to the funeral of a parishioner who died suddenly this morning and the church was packed. Amazing -- how many people took the day off!


11 posted on 02/02/2006 5:51:52 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: kstewskis

Maybe we should all start sending messages to the usscb.org?


12 posted on 02/02/2006 5:52:52 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: jrny

**the Epiphany (celebrated on its correct day - Jan. 6th.) is not a day of obligation in the US, but is in Canada**

Agree with you all the way. It's too easy when they put it to the next Sunday!


13 posted on 02/02/2006 5:54:43 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Wouldn't hurt!


14 posted on 02/02/2006 6:34:24 PM PST by kstewskis ("There you go again..." R.R.)
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To: Salvation
The Feast of the Annunciation used to be a universally honored Holy Day of Obligation in both the Eastern and Western Churches from the early Middle Ages until the 1800s, when first France and then the United States opted out.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01542a.htm
This feast was always a holy day of obligation in the Universal Church. As such it was abrogated first for France and the French dependencies, 9 April, 1802; and for the United States, by the Third Council of Baltimore, in 1884.

Exactly nine months before Christmas, it also makes a strong pro-life statement.

The Greek Church in the Trullan Synod even suspended Lenten fasting in order to celebrate March 25th. I would be in favor of that, too.

15 posted on 02/03/2006 3:38:49 PM PST by Dajjal
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To: jrny

There's one that should be added, another is Good Friday...


16 posted on 02/05/2006 12:57:48 PM PST by Heartofsong83
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To: Salvation

EXACTLY! (BTW, it also makes a great time to end the secular Christmas season as well)


17 posted on 02/05/2006 12:58:35 PM PST by Heartofsong83
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BTTT!


18 posted on 04/24/2006 8:10:43 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

1. The Nativity of the Lord Jesus Christ (Christmas)
2. The Epiphany (Jan. 6.)
3. The Ascension (40 days after Easter)
4. The Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi) not observed in the United States
5. Holy Mary, the Mother of God (octave day of Christmas, Jan. 1)
6. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8)
7. The Assumption (Aug. 15)
8. St. Joseph (March 19) not observed in the United States
9. Ss. Peter and Paul (June 29) not observed in the United States
10. All Saints (Nov. 1)

It would be great if all these days and Good Friday were Holy Days of Obligation in the US......... and everyone attended.

But also it is great to go to mass because you want to go and not because people think they have to go.

I like going to daily mass - it's beautiful because the people want to be there and they are attentive and involved with the mass. I prefer that to Sunday mass when it is ovious a lot of the people don't want to be there, don't know why they are there, are thinking about other things, are dressed for a picnic, chewing gum, etc. Priests I think know this too and so the homilies tend to be a lot better at daily mass.

Thank God we are free to go to daily mass.


19 posted on 04/24/2006 8:28:58 AM PDT by Nihil Obstat (“Dios no muere!”)
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To: Nihil Obstat

**It would be great if all these days and Good Friday were Holy Days of Obligation in the US......... and everyone attended. **

I think we ALL need to pray fervently for this to happen!


20 posted on 04/24/2006 8:31:52 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Nihil Obstat

**Thank God we are free to go to daily mass.**

Going to Daily Mass became a priority in my life this year and I have succeeded in working my work schedule around it! Hooray!


21 posted on 04/24/2006 8:32:44 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

BTTT on the Solemnity of the Ascension — May 17, 2007!


22 posted on 05/17/2007 7:44:16 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
ASCENSION THURSDAY - Holy Day of Obligation in certain dioceses

Catholic Caucus: Holy Days of Obligation

Holy Days of Obligation -Attendance at Mass of the Feast of the BVM no longer required

23 posted on 05/17/2007 7:46:23 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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