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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 03-01-06, Ash Wednesday
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | 03-01-06 | New American Bible

Posted on 03/01/2006 9:34:46 AM PST by Salvation

March 1, 2006

Ash Wednesday

Psalm: Wednesday 12

Reading I
Jl 2:12-18

Even now, says the LORD,
return to me with your whole heart,
with fasting, and weeping, and mourning;
Rend your hearts, not your garments,
and return to the LORD, your God.
For gracious and merciful is he,
slow to anger, rich in kindness,
and relenting in punishment.
Perhaps he will again relent
and leave behind him a blessing,
Offerings and libations
for the LORD, your God.

Blow the trumpet in Zion!
proclaim a fast,
call an assembly;
Gather the people,
notify the congregation;
Assemble the elders,
gather the children
and the infants at the breast;
Let the bridegroom quit his room
and the bride her chamber.
Between the porch and the altar
let the priests, the ministers of the LORD, weep,
And say, “Spare, O LORD, your people,
and make not your heritage a reproach,
with the nations ruling over them!
Why should they say among the peoples,
‘Where is their God?’”

Then the LORD was stirred to concern for his land
and took pity on his people.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 51:3-4, 5-6ab, 12-13, 14 and 17

R. (see 3a) Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
Have mercy on me, O God, in your goodness;
in the greatness of your compassion wipe out my offense.
Thoroughly wash me from my guilt
and of my sin cleanse me.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
For I acknowledge my offense,
and my sin is before me always:
“Against you only have I sinned,
and done what is evil in your sight.”
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
A clean heart create for me, O God,
and a steadfast spirit renew within me.
Cast me not out from your presence,
and your Holy Spirit take not from me.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.
Give me back the joy of your salvation,
and a willing spirit sustain in me.
O Lord, open my lips,
and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
R. Be merciful, O Lord, for we have sinned.

Reading II
2 Cor 5:20 -- 6:2

Brothers and sisters:
We are ambassadors for Christ,
as if God were appealing through us.
We implore you on behalf of Christ,
be reconciled to God.
For our sake he made him to be sin who did not know sin,
so that we might become the righteousness of God in him.

Working together, then,
we appeal to you not to receive the grace of God in vain.
For he says:

In an acceptable time I heard you,
and on the day of salvation I helped you.

Behold, now is a very acceptable time;
behold, now is the day of salvation.

Gospel
Mt 6:1-6, 16-18

Jesus said to his disciples:
“Take care not to perform righteous deeds
in order that people may see them;
otherwise, you will have no recompense from your heavenly Father.
When you give alms,
do not blow a trumpet before you,
as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets
to win the praise of others.
Amen, I say to you,
they have received their reward.
But when you give alms,
do not let your left hand know what your right is doing,
so that your almsgiving may be secret.
And your Father who sees in secret will repay you.

“When you pray,
do not be like the hypocrites,
who love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on street corners
so that others may see them.
Amen, I say to you,
they have received their reward.
But when you pray, go to your inner room,
close the door, and pray to your Father in secret.
And your Father who sees in secret will repay you.

“When you fast,
do not look gloomy like the hypocrites.
They neglect their appearance,
so that they may appear to others to be fasting.
Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward.
But when you fast,
anoint your head and wash your face,
so that you may not appear to be fasting,
except to your Father who is hidden.
And your Father who sees what is hidden will repay you.”




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KEYWORDS: ashwednesday; catholiccaucus; catholiclist; dailymassreadings; lent; purple
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 03/01/2006 9:34:50 AM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Siobhan; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; Pyro7480; livius; ...
No "Alleluias" during Lent so.............

King of Endless Glory Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the King of Endless Glory Ping List.

2 posted on 03/01/2006 9:36:48 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Ash Wednesday
3 posted on 03/01/2006 9:37:36 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Here are some other links about Lent:

The History of Lent

The Holy Season of Lent -- Fast and Abstinence

The Holy Season of Lent -- The Stations of the Cross

Lent and Fasting

Mardi Gras' Catholic Roots [Shrove Tuesday]

Ash Wednesday

All About Lent

Kids and Holiness: Making Lent Meaningful to Children

Why We Need Lent

MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI FOR LENT 2006

Lent a Time for Renewal, Says Benedict XVI

4 posted on 03/01/2006 9:39:25 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Joel 2:12-18


An Urgent Call to Repentance



[12] ”Yet even now,” says the LORD, “return to me with all your heart,
with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning; [13] and rend your
hearts and not your garments.” Return to the LORD, your God, for he is
gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love,
and repents of evil. [14] Who knows whether he will not turn and
repent, and leave a blessing behind him, a cereal offering and.a drink
offering for the LORD, your God?


[15] Blow the trumpet in Zion; sanctify a fast; call a solemn
assembly; [16] gather the people. Sanctify the congregation; assemble
the elders; gather the children, even nursing infants. Let the
bridegroom leave his room, and the bride her chamber.


The Priests Entreat the Lord


[17] Between the vestibule and the altar let the priests, the
ministers of the LORD, weep and say, “Spare thy people, O LORD, and
make not thy heritage a reproach, a byword among the nations. Why
should they say among the peoples, ‘Where is their God?'"


[18] Then the LORD became jealous for his land, and had pity on his people.




Commentary:


2:12-17. The first part of the book ends with a general exhortation to
conversion: there is an oracle of the Lord (“says the Lord”: v. 12),
where the prophet makes an appeal on behalf of God; and then he
specifically mentions the priests’ duty to do penance and offer
prayers. Central to these words of warning is v. 13, which spells out
what makes conversion last--God’s compassion and man’s sincere
determination. St Jerome comments: "'Return to me with. all your
heart': show your repentance and inner conversion through fasting,
mourning and tears. By fasting now, your hunger will be satisfied
later; mourning now, one day you will laugh; weeping now, you shall be
consoled. The custom of rending one’s garments at times of sorrow or
adversity is well-established: the high priest tore his robes to show
the gravity of the Savior’s crime; and, according to the Acts of the
Apostles, Paul and Barnabas ripped their tunics when they heard
blasphemous words being spoken. But I tell you to rend not your
garments, but your hearts that are filled with sin. The heart, like
wineskins, does not tear of its own accord: it must be deliberately
torn. When you have rent your heart in this way, return to the Lord,
your God, from whom you have strayed by your sins. Never doubt his
forgiveness, for no matter how many and grave your past sins have
been, he will pardon you from the abundance of his mercy”
("Commentarii in Ioelem", 2, 12ff).


2:17. This verse (which the liturgy of the Church uses as a call to
penance on Ash Wednesday) acts as a conclusion to the first part of
the book: a change of heart, backed up by sincere acts of penance, can
cause God to stay his hand and spare his people any more
affliction. The words that open the second part of the book (v. 18)
tell us of the Lord’s response; from then on, hope is on the horizon:
“God does not let himself be outdone in generosity. Be sure that he
grants faithfulness to those who give themselves to him” (St Josemaria
Escrivá, "The Forge", 623).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


5 posted on 03/01/2006 9:43:41 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: 2 Corinthians 5:20-6:2


The Ministry of Reconciliation (Continuation)



[20] So we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through
us. We beseech you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. [21] For
our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might
become the righteousness of God.


St Paul, a True Servant of Christ


[1] Working together with him, then, we entreat you not to accept the
grace of God in vain. [2] For he says, "At the acceptable time I have
listened to you, and helped you on the day of salvation." Behold, now
is the acceptable time; behold, now is the day of salvation.




Commentary:


18-21. The reconciliation of mankind with God--whose friendship we lost
through original sin--has been brought about by Christ's death on the
cross. Jesus, who is like men in all things "yet without sinning" (Heb
4:14), bore the sins of men (cf. Is 53:4-12) and offered himself on the
cross as an atoning sacrifice for all those sins (cf. 1 Pet 2:22-25),
thereby reconciling men to God; through this sacrifice we became the
righteousness of God, that is, we are justified, made just in God's
sight (cf. Rom 1:17; 3:24-26 and notes). The Church reminds us of this
in the rite of sacramental absolution: "God, the Father of mercies,
through the death and resurrection of his son has reconciled the world
to himself [...]."


Our Lord entrusted the Apostles with this ministry of reconciliation
(v. 18), this "message of reconciliation" (v. 19), to pass it on to all
men: elsewhere in the New Testament it is described as the "message of
salvation" (Acts 13:26), the "word of grace" (Acts 14:3; 20:32), the
"word of life" ( 1 Jn 1: 1). Thus, the Apostles were our Lord's
ambassadors to men, to whom St Paul addresses a pressing call: "be
reconciled to God", that is, apply to yourselves the reconciliation
obtained by Jesus Christ--which is done mainly through the sacraments
of Baptism and Penance. "The Lord Jesus instituted in his Church the
sacrament of Penance, so that those who have committed sins after
Baptism might be reconciled with God, whom they have offended, and with
the Church itself whom they have injured" (John Paul II, "Aperite
Portas", 5).


21. "He made him to be sin": obviously St Paul does not mean that
Christ was guilty of sin; he does not say "to be a sinner" but "to be
sin". "Christ had no sin," St Augustine says; "he bore sins, but he did
not commit them" ("Enarrationes in Psalmos", 68, 1, 10).


According to the rite of atoning sacrifices (cf. Lev 4:24; 5:9; Num
19:9; Mic 6:7; Ps 40:7) the word "sin", corresponding to the Hebrew
"asam", refers to the actual act of sacrifice or to the victim being
offered. Therefore, this phrase means "he made him a victim for sin" or
"a sacrifice for sin". it should be remembered that in the Old
Testament nothing unclean or blemished could be offered to God; the
offering of an unblemished animal obtained God's pardon for the
transgression which one wanted to expiate. Since Jesus was the most
perfect of victims offered for us, he made full atonement for all sins.
In the Letter to the Hebrews, when comparing Christ's sacrifice with
that of the priests of the Old Testament, it is expressly stated that
"every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same
sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when Christ had offered
for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand
of God, then to wait until his enemies should be made a stool for his
feet. For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who
are sanctified" (Heb 10:11-14).


This concentrated sentence also echoes the Isaiah prophecy about the
sacrifice of the Servant of Yahweh; Christ, the head of the human race,
makes men sharers in the grace and glory he achieved through his
sufferings: "upon him was the chastisement that made us whole, and with
his stripes we are healed" (Is 53:5).


Jesus Christ, burdened with our sins and offering himself on the cross
as a sacrifice for them, brought about the Redemption: the Redemption
is the supreme example both of God's justice--which requires atonement
befitting the offense--and of his mercy, that mercy which makes him
love the world so much that "he gave his only Son" (Jn 3:16). "In the
Passion and Death of Christ--in the fact that the Father did not spare
his own Son, but 'for our sake made him sin'--absolute justice is
expressed, for Christ undergoes the Passion and Cross because of the
sins of humanity. This constitutes even a 'superabundance' of justice,
for the sins of man are 'compensated for' by the sacrifice of the
Man-God. Nevertheless, this justice, which is properly justice 'to
God's measure', springs completely from love, from the love of the
Father and of the Son, and completely bears fruit in love. Precisely
for this reason the divine justice revealed in the Cross of Christ is
'to God's measure', because it springs from love and is accomplished in
love, producing fruits of salvation. The divine dimension of redemption
is put into effect not only by bringing justice to bear upon sin, but
also by restoring to love that creative power in man thanks to which he
once more has access to the fullness of life and holiness that come
from God. In this way, redemption involves the revelation of mercy in
its fullness" (John Paul II, "Dives In Misericordia", 7).


1-10. St Paul concludes his long defense of his apostolic ministry (cf.
3:1-6:10) by saying that he has always tried to act as a worthy servant
of God. First he calls on the Corinthians to have a sense of
responsibility so that the grace of God be not ineffective in them (vv.
1-2), and then he briefly describes the afflictions this ministry has
meant for him. Earlier, he touched on this subject (cf. 4:7-12), and he
will deal with it again in 11:23-33.


1-2. St Paul exhorts the faithful not to accept the grace of God in
vain-which would happen if they did not cultivate the faith and initial
grace they received in Baptism and if they neglected the graces which
God continues to send them. This exhortation is valid for all
Christians: "We receive the grace of God in vain", St Francis de Sales
points out, "when we receive it at the gate of our heart, without
allowing it to enter: we receive it without receiving it; we receive it
without fruit, since there is no use in feeling the inspiration if one
does not consent unto it. And just as the sick man who has the medicine
in his hands, if he takes only part of it, will only partially benefit
from it, so too, when God sends a great and mighty inspiration to move
us to embrace his love, if we do not avail of it in its entirety, we
shall benefit from it only partially" ("Treatise on the Love of God",
book 2, chap. 11).


The Apostle urges them to cultivate the grace they have been given,
using a quotation from Isaiah (49:8): the right time has come, the day
of salvation. His words recall our Lord's preaching in the synagogue of
Nazareth (cf. Lk 4:16-21).


The "acceptable time" will last until Christ comes in glory at the end
of the world (in the life of the individual, it will last until the
hour of his death); until then, every day is "the day of salvation":
"'Ecce none dies salutis', the day of salvation is here before us. The
call of the good shepherd has reached us: '"ego vocavi te nomine too",
I have called you by name' (Is 43:1). Since love repays love, we must
reply: '"ecce ego quia vocasti me", Here I am, for you called me'
(1 Sam 3:5) [...]. I will be converted, I will turn again to the Lord
and love him as he wants to be loved" ([St] J. Escriva, "Christ Is Passing
By", 59).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


6 posted on 03/01/2006 9:44:41 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18


An Upright Intention in Almsgiving, Prayer and Fasting



(Jesus said to His disciples,) [1] "Beware of practising your piety
before men in order to be seen by them; for then you will have no
reward from your Father who is in Heaven.


[2] "Thus, when you give alms, sound no trumpet before you, as the
hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be
praised by men. Truly, I say to you, they have their reward. [3] But
when you give alms, do not let your left hand know what your right hand
is doing, [4] so that your alms may be in secret; and your Father who
sees in secret will reward you.


[5] "And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites; for they
love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners,
that they may be seen by men. Truly, I say to you, they have their
reward. [6] But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and
pray to your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in
secret will reward you.


[16] "And when you fast, do not look dismal, like the hypocrites, for
they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by men.
Truly, I say to you, they have their reward. [17] But when you fast,
anoint your head and wash your face, [18] that your fasting may not be
seen by men but by your Father who is in secret; and your Father who
sees in secret will reward you."




Commentary:


1-18. "Piety", here, means good works (cf. note on Matthew 5:6). Our
Lord is indicating the kind of spirit in which we should do acts of
personal piety. Almsgiving, fasting and prayer were the basic forms
taken by personal piety among the chosen people--which is why Jesus
refers to these three subjects. With complete authority He teaches
that true piety must be practised with an upright intention, in the
presence of God and without any ostentation. Piety practised in this
way implies exercising our faith in God who sees us--and also in the
safe knowledge that He will reward those who are sincerely devout.


5-6. Following the teaching of Jesus, the Church has always taught us
to pray even when we were infants. By saying "you" (singular) our Lord
is stating quite unequivocally the need for personal prayer--relating
as child to Father, alone with God.


Public prayer, for which Christ's faithful assemble together, is
something necessary and holy; but it should never displace obedience to
this clear commandment of our Lord: "When you pray, go into your room
and shut the door and pray to your Father".


The Second Vatican Council reminds us of the teaching and practice of
the Church in its liturgy, which is "the summit toward which the
activity of the Church is directed; it is also the fount from which all
her power flows [...]. The spiritual life, however, is not limited
solely to participation in the liturgy. The Christian is indeed called
to pray with others, but he must also enter into his bedroom to pray to
his Father in secret; furthermore, according to the teaching of the
Apostle, he must pray without ceasing (1 Thessalonians 5:17)"
("Sacrosanctum Concilium", 10 and 12).


A soul who really puts his Christian faith into practice realizes that
he needs frequently to get away and pray alone to his Father, God.
Jesus, who gives us this teaching about prayer, practised it during His
own life on earth: the holy Gospel reports that He often went apart to
pray on His own: "At times He spent the whole night in an intimate
conversation with His Father. The Apostles were filled with love when
they saw Christ pray" ([St] J. Escriva, "Christ Is Passing By", 119; cf.
Matthew 14:23; Mark 1:35; Luke 5:16; etc.). The Apostles followed the
Master's example, and so we see Peter going up to the rooftop of the house
to pray in private, and receiving a revelation (cf. Acts 10:9-16). "Our
life of prayer should also be based on some moments that are dedicated
exclusively to our conversation with God, moments of silent dialogue"
("ibid", 119).


16-18. Starting from the traditional practice of fasting, our Lord
tells us the spirit in which we should exercise mortification of our
senses: we should do so without ostentation, avoiding praise,
discreetly; that way Jesus' words will not apply to us: "they have
their reward"; it would have been a very bad deal. "The world admires
only spectacular sacrifice, because it does not realize the value of
sacrifice that is hidden and silent" ([St] J. Escriva, "The Way", 185).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


7 posted on 03/01/2006 9:45:51 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy
8 posted on 03/01/2006 9:51:17 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Awakening Prayer

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 102 (103)
Praise of the compassionate Lord
My soul, bless the Lord!
 All that is in me, bless his holy name.
My soul, bless the Lord!
 Never forget all he has done for you.

The Lord, who forgives your wrongdoing,
 who heals all your weaknesses.
The Lord, who redeems your life from destruction,
 who crowns you with kindness and compassion.
The Lord, who fills your age with good things,
 who renews your youth like an eagle’s.
The Lord, who gives fair judgements,
 who gives judgement in favour of the oppressed.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 102 (103)
The Lord is compassion and kindness,
 full of patience, full of mercy.
He will not fight against you for ever:
 he will not always be angry.
He does not treat us as our sins deserve;
 he does not pay us back for our wrongdoing.

As high as the sky above the earth,
 so great is his kindness to those who fear him.
As far as east is from west,
 so far he has put our wrongdoing from us.
As a father cares for his children,
 so the Lord cares for those who fear him.

For he knows how we are made,
 he remembers we are nothing but dust.
Man – his life is like grass,
 he blossoms and withers like flowers of the field.
The wind blows and carries him away:
 no trace of him remains.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 102 (103)
The Lord has been kind from the beginning;
 to those who fear him his kindness lasts for ever.
His justice is for their children’s children,
 for those who keep his covenant,
 for those who remember his commandments
 and try to perform them.
The Lord’s throne is high in the heavens
 and his rule shall extend over all.

Bless the Lord, all his angels,
 strong in your strength, doers of his command,
 bless him as you hear his words.
Bless the Lord, all his powers,
 his servants who do his will.
Bless the Lord, all he has created,
 in every place that he rules.
My soul, bless the Lord!

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Reading Isaiah 58:1 - 12 ©
Shout for all you are worth,
raise your voice like a trumpet.
Proclaim their faults to my people,
their sins to the House of Jacob.

They seek me day after day,
they long to know my ways,
like a nation that wants to act with integrity
and not ignore the law of its God.

They ask me for laws that are just,
they long for God to draw near:
‘Why should we fast if you never see it,
why do penance if you never notice?’

Look, you do business on your fast-days,
you oppress all your workmen;
look, you quarrel and squabble when you fast
and strike the poor man with your fist.

Fasting like yours today
will never make your voice heard on high.
Is that the sort of fast that pleases me,
a truly penitential day for men?

Hanging your head like a reed,
lying down on sackcloth and ashes?
Is that what you call fasting,
a day acceptable to the Lord?

Is not this the sort of fast that pleases me
– it is the Lord who speaks –
to break unjust fetters and
undo the thongs of the yoke,

to let the oppressed go free,
and break every yoke,
to share your bread with the hungry,
and shelter the homeless poor,

to clothe the man you see to be naked
and not turn from your own kin?
Then will your light shine like the dawn
and your wound be quickly healed over.

Your integrity will go before you
and the glory of the Lord behind you.
Cry, and the Lord will answer;
call, and he will say, ‘I am here’.

If you do away with the yoke,
the clenched fist, the wicked word,
if you give your bread to the hungry,
and relief to the oppressed,

your light will rise in the darkness,
and your shadows become like noon.
The Lord will always guide you,
giving you relief in desert places.

He will give strength to your bones
and you shall be like a watered garden,
like a spring of water
whose waters never run dry.

You will rebuild the ancient ruins,
build up on the old foundations.
You will be called ‘Breach-mender’,
‘Restorer of ruined houses’.

Reading From a letter to the Corinthians by Saint Clement, pope
Repent
Let us fix our attention on the blood of Christ and recognise how precious it is to God his Father, since it was shed for our salvation and brought the grace of repentance to all the world.
If we review the various ages of history, we will see that in every generation the Lord has offered the opportunity of repentance to any who were willing to turn to him. When Noah preached God’s message of repentance, all who listened to him were saved. Jonah told the Ninevites they were going to be destroyed, but when they repented, their prayers gained God’s forgiveness for their sins, and they were saved, even though they were not of God’s people.
Under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, the ministers of God’s grace have spoken of repentance; indeed, the Master of the whole universe himself spoke of repentance with an oath: As I live, says the Lord, I do not wish the death of the sinner but his repentance. He added this evidence of his goodness: House of Israel, repent of your wickedness. Tell the sons of my people: If their sins should reach from earth to heaven, if they are brighter than scarlet and blacker than sackcloth, you need only turn to me with your whole heart and say, “Father”, and I will listen to you as a holy people.
In other words, God wanted all his beloved ones to have the opportunity to repent and he confirmed this desire by his own almighty will. That is why we should obey his sovereign and glorious will and prayerfully entreat his mercy and kindness. We should be suppliant before him and turn to his compassion, rejecting empty works and quarrelling and jealousy which only lead to death.
Brothers, we should be humble in mind, putting aside all arrogance, pride and foolish anger. Rather, we should act in accordance with the Scriptures, as the Holy Spirit says: The wise man must not glory in his wisdom nor the strong man in his strength nor the rich man in his riches. Rather, let him who glories glory in the Lord by seeking him and doing what is right and just. Recall especially what the Lord Jesus said when he taught gentleness and forbearance. Be merciful, he said, so that you may have mercy shown to you. Forgive, so that you may be forgiven. As you treat others, so you will be treated. As you give, so you will receive. As you judge, so you will be judged. As you are kind to others, so you will be treated kindly. The measure of your giving will be the measure of your receiving.
Let these commandments and precepts strengthen us to live in humble obedience to his sacred words. As Scripture asks: Whom shall I look upon with favour except the humble, peaceful man who trembles at my words?
Sharing then in the heritage of so many vast and glorious achievements, let us hasten toward the goal of peace, set before us from the beginning. Let us keep our eyes firmly fixed on the Father and Creator of the whole universe, and hold fast to his splendid and transcendent gifts of peace and all his blessings.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

9 posted on 03/01/2006 9:54:16 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Reflections, Prayers, Actions, Questions and Answers for Lent 2006
10 posted on 03/01/2006 10:23:58 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Wednesday, March 1, 2006
Ash Wednesday
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Joel 2:12-18
Psalm 51:3-6, 12-14, 17
2 Corinthians 5:20 -- 6:2
Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18

You ask me a method of attaining perfection. I know of love - and only love. Love can do all things.

-- St Therese of Lisieux


11 posted on 03/01/2006 10:30:02 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Getting the Most Out of Lent

Colleen Smith by Colleen Smith

Other Articles by Colleen Smith
Getting the Most Out of Lent
3/01/06


OK, OK, I admit it: I like Lent. There’s something about self-deprivation and deferred gratification that brings out the best in me. And even though I sometimes slide reluctantly into the traditional Lenten practices of prayer, fasting and alms-giving, I know they result in deepened devotion and discipline and, ultimately, joy.

Year after year, it’s happened for me and confirmed my belief that everyone might benefit from observing Lent in a deeper fashion.

Plus, I actually like tuna-noodle casserole. I really do. It’s a Catholic comfort food, I’m certain. I also like the ashes as a sort of literal “in your face” sign of our Catholicism. I like our rich rituals of the season, our purple liturgical environment, the Gospel readings culminating with Passion Sunday, the arid holy water founts and all the strong reminders of who we are and where we have been as a faith community. I’m always especially horrified and humbled to know that many of us would have stood among the crowd of people shrieking “Crucify Him!”

I also like Lent for the same reason I like New Year’s Day — both seem to me appropriate times to begin again, to redouble my efforts, improve myself and thereby my life and my own world and, with grace, that of my neighbor.

Still, more and more, I approach Lent with seemingly less and less creativity. “What will I give up this Lent?” I ask myself. “What should I do this year?”

I don’t feel I have to don a hair shirt, necessarily. But I want to push the envelope, so to speak, and not lose sight of the nature of Lent, knowing that I’ll get out of it precisely what I put into it.

So I decided to do what I often do: I made a list. To promote a more prayerful and penitential Lent, I’m offering the following suggestions compiled as ways to keep a holy Lent. By no means is this list all inclusive. Heavens! I just think of these as 40 deeds for 40 days:

Memorize a prayer + Bear a wrong patiently + Look up your Baptismal date if you don’t know it, and note it for future celebration + Contribute money to a charitable cause + Volunteer at a shelter, soup kitchen, hospital or other social service ministry that could use a hand + Clean a closet; donate the goods + Visit patients in a hospice or hospital + Pray for missionaries + Participate in Operation Rice Bowl + Counsel the doubtful + Receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation + Take your back issues of magazines to a nursing home + Pray the Way of the Cross. And be present while your pray. + Help a young person + Meditate on the Sorrowful Mysteries of the Rosary + Enroll in a faith formation class, and show up! + Pray for priests, seminarians, Religious women and men + Make a contemplative retreat + Study the life of your patron saint + Forgive someone who has trespassed against you + Resist temptation + Resist again + Respect life + Pray for the dead + Visit a prison + Hold your tongue + Fast an extra day + Practice politeness + Decry war and injustice + Join the parish choir + Or sing at liturgy + Remember an old friend + Forget a grudge + Appreciate creation + Read a Catholic writer + Read another Catholic writer + Welcome the stranger + Pray for the well-being of families + Reflect on Scriptures + Listen to your conscience. Really listen.

Mind you, I share this list of possibilities only to offer options, not to overwhelm you.

I was interviewing a priest working in the inner-city amidst the indignities of poverty and the oppression of crime. He ticked off the hardships with which he wrestles. Eventually I threw up my hands and asked him how he continues when the odds stacked against him loom so large and the problems seem so systemic.

The priest said, “Just because we can’t do everything doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to do something.”

So that’s what I’m doing this Lent: I have a lot of work to do, but I’m trying to do something, mindful that I’m human and highly fallible, aware that I won’t find perfection in this Lent or this life. But after 40 days and 40 nights of practicing my resolve, after the Triduum unfolds, on Easter morning I’ll smile when I sing: ALLELUIA!

© Copyright 2001 Catholic Exchange


12 posted on 03/01/2006 10:38:31 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Lauds -- Morning Prayer

Morning Prayer (Lauds)

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 50 (51)
God, have mercy on me
Take pity on me, Lord, in your mercy; in your abundance of mercy wipe out my guilt.
Wash me ever more from my guilt and cleanse me from my sin.

For I know how guilty I am: my sin is always before me.

Against you, you alone have I sinned, and I have done evil in your sight.
Know this, so that you may give just sentence and an unbiased judgement.

See, I was conceived in guilt, in sin my mother conceived me;
but you love truth in the heart, and deep within me you have shown me your wisdom.

You will sprinkle me with hyssop, and I will be made clean; you will wash me, and I will be whiter than snow.
You will make me hear the sound of joy and gladness; the bones you have crushed will rejoice.

Turn your face away from my sins and wipe out all my transgressions;
create a pure heart in me, God, put a steadfast spirit into me.

Do not send me away from your presence, or withdraw your holy spirit from me;
give me again the joy of your salvation, and be ready to strengthen me with your spirit.

I will teach the unjust your ways, and the impious will return to you.
Free me from the guilt of bloodshed, God, God my saviour, and my voice will glory in your justice.

Open my lips, Lord, and my mouth will proclaim your praise;
for you do not delight in sacrifices: if I offered you a burnt offering, it would not please you.
The true sacrifice is a broken spirit: a contrite and humble heart, O God, you will not refuse.

Be pleased, Lord, to look kindly on Sion, so that the walls of Jerusalem can be rebuilt,
Then indeed you will accept the proper sacrifices, gifts and burnt offerings; then indeed will bullocks be laid upon your altar.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Jeremiah 14
Lamentation of the people in the time of famine and war
Let my eyes shed tears, night and day, let them never cease,
 for the daughter of my people is afflicted with a great affliction,
 with the worst of all wounds.

If I go out into the fields – behold, those slain by the sword;
 if I go into the city – behold, those wasted by famine.
Prophet and priest go through the land, they know nothing.

Surely you have not rejected Judah, thrust him from you?
Surely Sion has not become hateful to your heart?

Why have you struck us down beyond all hope of healing?
We have looked for peace, but no good came;
 we have looked for the time of healing, but trouble came instead.

We acknowledge, O Lord, our wickedness, and the evil done by our fathers:
 we acknowledge that we have sinned.
Do not make us a reproach, for your name’s sake,
 and do not make us a disgrace before the throne of your glory.
Remember the covenant you made with us: do not bring it to an end.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 99 (100)
Enter the Temple with joy
Rejoice in the Lord, all the earth. Exult in his presence and serve him with joy.

Know that the Lord is God. He made us and we are his – his people, the sheep of his flock.

Cry out his praises as you enter his gates, fill his courtyards with songs. Proclaim him and bless his name;
for the Lord is our delight. His mercy lasts for ever, his faithfulness through all the ages.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Benedictus
The Messiah and his forerunner
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, for he has come to his people and brought about their redemption.
He has raised up the sign of salvation in the house of his servant David,
as he promised through the mouth of the holy ones, his prophets through the ages:
to rescue us from our enemies and all who hate us, to take pity on our fathers,
to remember his holy covenant and the oath he swore to Abraham our father,
that he would give himself to us, that we could serve him without fear – freed from the hands of our enemies –
in uprightness and holiness before him, for all of our days.

And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High: for you will go before the face of the Lord to prepare his path,
to let his people know their salvation, so that their sins may be forgiven.
Through the bottomless mercy of our God, one born on high will visit us
to give light to those who walk in darkness, who live in the shadow of death;
to lead our feet in the path of peace.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

13 posted on 03/01/2006 10:42:26 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

 
Collect:
Lord, protect us in our struggle against evil. As we begin the discipline of Lent, make this day holy by our self-denial. Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Activities:
moreless

March 01, 2006 Month Year Season

Ash Wednesday

The time has now come in the Church year for the solemn observance of the great central act of history, the redemption of the human race by our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. In the Roman Rite, the beginning of the forty days of penance is marked with the austere symbol of ashes which are used in today's liturgy. The use of ashes is a survival from an ancient rite according to which converted sinners submitted themselves to canonical penance. The Alleluia and the Gloria are suppressed until Easter.

Abstinence from eating meat is to be observed on all Fridays during Lent. This applies to all persons 14 and older. The law of fasting on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday applies to all persons 18 or older and younger than 59.

Stational churches are the churches that are appointed for special morning and evening services during Lent, Easter and some other important days. The tradition started in order to strengthen the sense of community within the Church in Rome, as this system meant that the Holy Father would visit each part of the city and celebrate Mass with the congregation.

The first stational church during Lent is St. Sabina at the Aventine. It was built in the 5th century, presumably at the site of the original Titulus Sabinae, a church in the home of Sabina who had been martyred c. 114. The tituli were the first parish churches in Rome. St Dominic lived in the adjacent monastery for a period soon before his death in 1221. Among other residents of the monastery were St Thomas Aquinas.

Visit Churches of Rome and "Station Churches", a Lenten Journey by Fr. Bill for more information about stational churches.


Ash Wednesday
At the beginning of Lent, on Ash Wednesday, ashes are blessed during Mass, after the homily. The blessed ashes are then "imposed" on the faithful as a sign of conversion, penance, fasting and human mortality. The ashes are blessed at least during the first Mass of the day, but they may also be imposed during all the Masses of the day, after the homily, and even outside the time of Mass to meet the needs of the faithful. Priests or deacons normally impart this sacramental, but instituted acolytes, other extraordinary ministers or designated lay people may be delegated to impart ashes, if the bishop judges that this is necessary. The ashes are made from the palms used at the previous Passion Sunday ceremonies. — Ceremonies of the Liturgical Year, Msgr. Peter J. Elliott

The act of putting on ashes symbolizes fragility and mortality, and the need to be redeemed by the mercy of God. Far from being a merely external act, the Church has retained the use of ashes to symbolize that attitude of internal penance to which all the baptized are called during Lent. — Directory on Popular Piety and the Liturgy

From the very early times the commemoration of the approach of Christ's passion and death was observed by a period of self-denial. St. Athanasius in the year 339 enjoined upon the people of Alexandria the 40 days' fast he saw practiced in Rome and elsewhere, "to the end that while all the world is fasting, we who are in Egypt should not become a laughing stock as the only people who do not fast but take our pleasure in those days." On Ash Wednesday in the early days, the Pope went barefoot to St. Sabina's in Rome "to begin with holy fasts the exercises of Christian warfare, that as we do battle with the spirits of evil, we may be protected by the help of self-denial." — Daily Missal of the Mystical Body

Things to Do:

  • Go with your family to receive ashes at Mass today. Leave them on your forehead as a witness to your faith. Here is a Lenten reflection on the meaning of the ashes on Ash Wednesday. If you have children, you may want to share this with them in terms that they can understand.

  • Today parents should encourage their children to reflect upon what regular penances they will perform throughout this season of Lent. Ideally, each member of the family should choose his own personal penance as well as some good act that he will perform (daily spiritual reading, daily Mass, extra prayers, almsgiving, volunteer work, housecleaning, etc.), and the whole family may wish to give up one thing together (TV, movies, desserts) or do something extra (family rosary, Holy Hour, Lenten Alms Jar).

  • The use of Sacrifice Beans may help children to keep track of their Lenten penances. Some families begin this activity (with undyed beans!) on Ash Wednesday and then use the collected beans to cook a penitential bean dish for Good Friday at the end of Lent.

  • Here is a Lenten prayer that the family may pray every night from Ash Wednesday to the first Saturday in Lent, to turn the family's spiritual focus towards this holy season.

  • Read the Holy Father's 2001 Ash Wednesday homily.

14 posted on 03/01/2006 10:45:54 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

 

Purity of Intention
March 1, 2006


I must be convinced that God sees everything

Ash Wednesday
Father Daniel Polzer, LC

Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18
Jesus said to his disciples: "Take care not to perform righteous deeds in order that people may see them; otherwise, you will have no recompense from your heavenly Father. When you give alms, do not blow a trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets to win the praise of others. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you give alms, do not let your left hand know what your right is doing, so that your almsgiving may be secret. And your Father who sees in secret will repay you. When you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, who love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on street corners so that others may see them. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go to your inner room, close the door, and pray to your Father in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will repay you. When you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites. They neglect their appearance, so that they may appear to others to be fasting. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, so that you may not appear to be fasting, except to your Father who is hidden. And your Father who sees what is hidden will repay you."

Introductory Prayer: Lord, as I begin my Lenten fast I come to you in prayer. I believe that you are very present in my life, and I hope – with your grace to help me – to be faithful to your friendship. You know what a sinner I am and how weak I am. Help me in this time of prayer to strengthen my convictions. Purify me of impure intentions. I want to begin this Lenten season well, firmly united to you and your will.

Petition: Lord, grant me a pure intention in all my Lenten resolutions.

1. It Is the Intention That Counts.  God does not judge our actions from the outside, but from the inside. What makes most of our actions good or bad is the intention we have in doing them. In many cases the same external act could be either good or bad depending on what intention I do it with. Jesus understands that the Pharisees do things to be seen and warns us against this egoistical way. It is egoistical, not because the act itself or the words themselves are bad, but because the Pharisees do and say these things seeking men’s praise instead of God’s.

2. God Sees All.  I must be convinced that God sees everything. He knows my every intention, my every desire, my every sin. God knows with perfect clarity all of the good and all of the bad in my soul. I cannot fool God. If I try to fool him I am only fooling myself. This truth should give me great confidence because I do not need to worry about proving anything to God or justifying myself before him. I do not need to worry about what other people think. I can trust in God that I will receive my just reward for having pure intentions – nothing more, nothing less.

3. Seeing from a Human Point of View.  Where is it that the Pharisees make a mistake? They are caught up in seeing things from a human point of view. For the person of little faith it is difficult to understand the supernatural value of human actions. When faith is weak, what God thinks holds little weight because there is an unconscious doubt that God really thinks about what human beings do. Such a person looks elsewhere to give value to his good actions. What others think and say becomes the measure of value.

Dialogue with Christ: Lord, as I begin my Lenten fast, help me to live this special season of the year with the purest of intentions. I believe and am convinced that what you think of my life and actions is the only thing that counts. It is the only just standard to determine my life’s value. Do not let me get distracted with what others think or how others see me. I do not want a merely earthly reward. I want the true reward of your love and approval.

Resolution: I will make a hidden sacrifice during the day that no one but God can see.


15 posted on 03/01/2006 10:53:15 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

16 posted on 03/01/2006 10:55:46 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Homily of the Day


Homily of the Day

Title:   God's Love-Power Can Change Hearts
Author:   Monsignor Dennis Clark, Ph.D.
Date:   Wednesday, March 1, 2006
 


Joel 2:12-18 / 2 Cor 5:20-6:2 / Mt 6:1-6,16-18

The human heart is more complex than any computer, and none of us ever fully understands its reasons and its choices. But we have to try, with God's help, lest we let our hearts lead us, all unawares, to places whose dangers are invisible to us. That testing of the heart and reorienting of the heart is what Lent is about.

In today's gospel, Matthew reminds us of one of the hazards that every religious person faces: Practicing our faith and doing good for others just to be seen and admired. It's a trap that's so easy to fall into, and it's such a waste of time and joy. The alternative is ever so much more satisfying because our hearts know that it is true.

Only a heart that sees that it is loved by God will have in it the astonished gratitude that impels it to thank God in word and deed. True thankfulness will blossom into prayer, into sharing with others what God has shared with us, and into striving to reshape our hearts into God's likeness. The good deeds will come naturally from deep inside, and what others see or don't see won't matter.

This Lent, concentrate on God's goodness and generosity to you, so totally unearned and unmerited. Gratitude will tell your heart where you need to go, and what needs to change. God's love-power has changed many hearts. Why not let His love-power change yours?

 


17 posted on 03/01/2006 10:57:51 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
By far my most favorite passage in the New Testament. To have a wonderful secret between you and God? I can think of nothing more enjoyable.
_____

I do wish I was better at all the forgiving and forgetting though.


Jesus said to his disciples:
“Take care not to perform righteous deeds
in order that people may see them;
otherwise, you will have no recompense from your heavenly Father.
When you give alms,
do not blow a trumpet before you,
as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets
to win the praise of others.
Amen, I say to you,
they have received their reward.
But when you give alms,
do not let your left hand know what your right is doing,
so that your almsgiving may be secret.
And your Father who sees in secret will repay you."
18 posted on 03/01/2006 10:57:53 AM PST by warsaw44
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To: warsaw44

Do something secretly today for someone you love!


19 posted on 03/01/2006 12:43:40 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: warsaw44
 
 
 
A Voice in the Dessert

Wednesday March 1, 2006   Ash Wednesday

 Reading I (Joel 2:12-18)   Reading II (2 Corinthians 5:20-6:2)

Gospel (St. Mark 6:1-6, 16-18)

 In the second reading today, Saint Paul says to the Corinthians that he is an ambassador on behalf of Christ who is calling out to be reconciled with God, and he tells us that this is the day of salvation, that this is the acceptable time. The Church today gives us this holy season as the acceptable time, as the time when we are called to make changes in our lives. And it is made clear by Our Lord how that is to be done. It is to be done secretly.  

There are a couple of things we can look at. First of all, today is a day of fasting and sometimes when people fast they get a little on the cranky side. So Our Lord is telling us, “Make sure that you don’t do that. Make sure that the way you fast is in a way that no one else would recognize that you are fasting.” If we are going to be fasting, we need to make sure that we are trying even harder to be charitable. Not being phony about anything, but making sure that we are not allowing the hunger in our stomachs to turn into anger in our hearts and to become mean or nasty in any way. We need to make sure that what we are doing is taking our physical hunger and changing it into a spiritual hunger so that the heart becomes more longing for what is right and good.  

That is precisely why we are told in the prophet Joel that we are to rend our hearts and not our garments. And while we prayed in the responsorial psalm, Create for me, O God, a clean heart, that is what Our Lord is looking for. He is looking for a heart that is open to Him. He is looking for a heart that is pure and wants to be purified even more. That is what this season is all about. If this is the day of salvation and this is the acceptable time, as Saint Paul tells us, then we need to make sure that we are calling ourselves to true holiness and seeking to be reconciled with God. 

In this holy time, what we need to do, first of all, is to look at our sinfulness, to confess our sins, and to strive to overcome them. But if this is a time of holiness, then it is not just a time of a small, perfunctory kind of penance that we might do, but it is a call to truly be holy. So we need to look at our prayer life and we need to look at our relationship with God. If Saint Paul is telling us in his Letter to the Corinthians that we are to be united with Christ, then it is also to be united with Him in His suffering. When we look at the fact that this is a day of salvation, what was necessary for our salvation? It was necessary that Jesus Christ would take on our human nature and that He would suffer and die and rise again. We are asked now, because we are partakers in the divine nature, to unite with Him, to elevate ourselves above an earthly level, so that the penances we choose during this holy season are going to be truly holy penances, so that they are going to be something spiritual. If Jesus came to us and took on our nature so that He could suffer and die and give us His nature, it is so that we could be lifted up, so that we could be truly holy as He is holy.  

The only way we are going to achieve that kind of holiness is through prayer and self-denial. If we can strive in this holy season to overcome sin and to increase and improve and perfect our prayer life, then this truly becomes a holy season. If, on the other hand, we are running around making sure that people know what penances we have chosen to do (as Jesus tells us not to do), then He tells us we have already received our reward. It is not a holy season for us then because it is selfish. He tells us to make sure that the things we do are done in secret. On a day like today when we are called to fast, if we become angry, impatient, or mean, then it is not a holy day. Then our fasting becomes an occasion of sin rather than a means to holiness. Again, we need to make sure that we are augmenting our fasting with prayer. The saints tell us that if we want our prayer to be heard, it is fasting that gives power to the prayer. But it is also the prayer that obtains for us the grace to be able to fast, and so we need both. These are the things we can think about, to make sure we are not doing things in order that other people would see them, to do things that are truly going to help us grow in holiness, to make sure we are doing the things that are going to help us reconcile with God and live a more perfect life.  

That is what this holy season is all about, to look into our hearts and tear them open, to rend the heart. What that literally means is to rip it in half, because we know that we are sinners and we need to come before the Lord with a broken heart. Not with pride and arrogance, but with humility, with sorrow, and with a broken heart. When we come before Him in that kind of state, then we are going to be willing to deny ourselves, then we are going to be willing to do what we need to do to change so that we can stop offending Him. If, on the other hand, we want to come before Him and try to present ourselves as all put together and not really in need of anything, then it is with arrogance that we come to Him and we are not going to seek any kind of reconciliation because we do not think we need it.  

So as we begin this time of Lent, the first thing we have to do is to reflect within ourselves, and the hunger that we feel from the fasting today will help us to be able to do that. Do not think about your stomach – think about your heart. Just think about how much your soul has been starving for prayer, for the Word of God, for true holiness. Look beyond the physical hunger to the spiritual hunger. Look beyond the external things to the internal things and ask yourself: What am I doing and why am I doing it? And make sure that what we are doing are the things that will help to bring a reconciliation and a growth in holiness, that what we are doing is done for the right reason: so we can get rid of sin, so we can grow in holiness and be more perfectly united with Jesus Christ. 

*  This text was transcribed from the audio recording with minimal editing.       


20 posted on 03/01/2006 12:46:35 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Sadly,
today I have to do something rotten to someone I love...
I made plans with my kid brother for Saturday but I forgot thats the all day Boston Catholic Mens Conference '. I realized this late last night so need to call him today.
I will make up for it though!


21 posted on 03/01/2006 12:53:09 PM PST by warsaw44
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To: warsaw44

I hope he understands. Have a great conference!


22 posted on 03/01/2006 1:00:27 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

May this Ash Wednesday bring blessings to all.


23 posted on 03/01/2006 1:06:37 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: Salvation

Faith-sharing bump.


24 posted on 03/01/2006 1:09:10 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: warsaw44

That is indeed a lovely passage, and most instructional.


25 posted on 03/01/2006 1:14:06 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: Salvation

Wow you got this post just in time for me.Sister said to tell you you are doing a wonderful job:)


26 posted on 03/01/2006 7:12:36 PM PST by fatima (Just say it if it is for love-have no regrets.)
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To: fatima

Guess I was a little late this morning, huh?


27 posted on 03/01/2006 9:02:04 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Vespers -- Evening Prayer

Vespers (Evening Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 138 (139)
The Lord knows all things
Lord, you have examined me, you know me:
 you know when I sit down and when I rise.
From far away you know my thoughts:
 you know every step I take,
 when I walk, when I lie down:
 you have seen all that I do.
Before a word even reaches my lips,
 you know, Lord, all that I will say.

You are close in front of me and close behind me:
 you have laid your hand upon me.
Your knowledge is beyond my understanding:
 it is too high, I cannot reach it.

Where shall I go, to escape your spirit?
 Where shall I go, to flee your face?
If I rise to the heavens, you are there.
 If I sink to the depths, you are there.
If I put on the wings of the dawn itself –
 if I make my abode beyond the farthest sea –
 it is still your hand that will lead me there,
 it is still your right hand that will hold me.
If I say “May the shadows cover me:
 let there be no light around me” –
the shadows will not hide me from you,
 and the night will shine like the day:
for shadows and light are the same to you.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 138 (139)
For you created my innermost being
 as you knit me together in my mother’s womb.
I will praise you, for you made me so wonderfully:
 so wonderful are your works,
 so perfect your knowledge.

Even my bones were not hidden from you
 as I was being created in secret,
 put together in the depths of the earth.
Your eyes saw me before ever I was completed.
 All my days were written in your book
 before any of them came into being.
Your thoughts, O God, are precious to me:
 precious above all things and too many to count.
If I try to count them, they are more than the sand:
 if I come to an end, still I am with you.

Look into me, God, and know my heart:
 examine me and know my paths.
See if I am wandering on ways that lead nowhere,
 and set my feet on the path to eternity.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Colossians 1
Christ, firstborn of all creatures and firstborn from the dead
Let us give thanks to God the Father, who has made us worthy to share in the light that is the saints’ inheritance.
He has rescued us from the power of the shadows and brought us to the kingdom of his beloved Son,
in whom we have redemption and the forgiveness of sins.

He is the image of the invisible God, the first-born of all creation,
for in him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible,
thrones and dominations, principalities and powers.

All things were created through him and for him: he is before all things, and in him all things hold together.

And he is the head of the body, the Church. He is the beginning, the first-born from the dead, and so he is pre-eminent above all.
For it was the Father’s will that the fullness of God should dwell in him, and that through him all things should be reconciled to himself.
Through the blood of the Cross he brought peace to all things, both on Earth and in the heavens.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Magnificat
My soul rejoices in the Lord
My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
 and my spirit rejoices in God, my salvation.
For he has shown me such favour –
 me, his lowly handmaiden.
Now all generations will call me blessed,
 because the mighty one has done great things for me.
His name is holy,
 his mercy lasts for generation after generation
 for those who revere him.

He has put forth his strength:
 he has scattered the proud and conceited,
 torn princes from their thrones;
 but lifted up the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things;
 the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel,
 he has remembered his mercy as he promised to our fathers,
 to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Prayers and Intercessions ?
Glory and honour to God, who made a new and eternal covenant with his people, sealed with the blood of Christ and renewed today in the sacrament of the altar. We beg him now:
Bless your people, Lord.
Teach rulers and people to follow your will
and work together for the good of all.
For those who gave up everything to follow Christ: make them faithful servants;
may they be a shining example to men of the holiness of your Church.
You made all men in your image:
give them a horror of unjust discrimination.
For those who have strayed: lead them back to your love and truth:
teach us how to be of help to them.
Let the dead enter into your glory,
let them praise you together, for all eternity.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

28 posted on 03/01/2006 9:09:46 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
I was a little worried but backtracked in the posts from yesterday and saw car trouble-you are never late beautiful.It just's means Fatima is lazy:)
29 posted on 03/01/2006 9:11:44 PM PST by fatima (Just say it if it is for love-have no regrets.)
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To: All
From Women for Faith and Family

Farewell to Alleluia and Gloria
During the penitential seasons of the Church, the Gloria and the Alleluia are not said or sung. The Gloria is sung only at the Mass on Holy Thursday, usually with great ceremony, organ and sometimes trumpets, and often with the ringing of bells. After the singing of the Gloria, musical instruments are to be silent until the Alleluia at the Easter Vigil. (Catholic families might imitate this solemn silence by not playing instrumental music in their homes at this time.)

In the Middle Ages and throughout the 16th century, the "burying" of the Alleluia was a solemn ritual on Septuagesima Sunday. A procession of children carrying a wooden plaque bearing the word "Alleluia" laid it at the feet of the statue of the Blessed Virgin, covering it with a purple cloth. It remained there until Easter at the Gospel procession, when the plaque was carried as the priest intoned the three Alleluias before the Easter Gospel. In Paris, a straw figure inscribed with the word was carried out of the choir at the end of the service and burned in the church yard.

Although the practice of literally removing the Alleluia from the Church may have disappeared, even today in some parish celebrations of the Easter Vigil an Alleluia card is carried in procession and placed in front of the altar during the singing of the first Alleluias before the Gospel for Easter.

The hymn Alleluia, Song of Gladness and the one that follows date from the early 9th and 10th centuries; both refer to the farewell to the Alleluia in the liturgy.


30 posted on 03/01/2006 9:58:42 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
The Word Among Us


Wednesday, March 01, 2006

Meditation
Joel 2:12-18



Blow the trumpet in Zion! (Joel 2:15)

So sounds the ancient call to repentance. Get ready! The day of the resurrection is approaching, so fast! Pray! Give alms!

When the people in Joel’s time heard the Lord’s call, they responded by “rending” their hearts and not just their garments. They called a fast, gathered at the Temple to pray, and begged the Lord to have mercy on them. And, as Joel tells us, he did. Not only did God lift the locust plague that was besieging them; he promised even greater blessings to come. He promised to pour out his Spirit upon them (Joel 2:28).

The time has come for us to heed the trumpet call as well. It is time to learn how to love Jesus more deeply and to pray that more people will come to believe in him. But this is also a time when God promises to pour out his Spirit upon us. It is a time when grace flows from his throne, drawing us close to his heart and delivering us from the sin that can so easily cling to us.

This combination of our dedication and God’s grace and power can make this Lent a time of real transformation for us. Every day this season, God will give us countless opportunities to come and receive from him. Every day, he will give us countless invitations to turn from sin and to turn to Christ. And every time we respond to his invitation, God will shower us with love. He will take the “little death” in every act of self-denial and turn it into a shining testimony to his resurrection.

What do you intend to do this Lent? How can you best respond to the trumpet call of the Lord? Take some time today to write down your commitment. Then come up with a plan for how you will carry it out. Remember: Our actions combined with God’s grace can produce miracles!

“Lord, the trumpet has sounded, and I want to respond. Help me to rend my heart this Lent, so that it can be filled anew with your love and your Spirit.”

Psalm 51:3-6,12-14,17; 2 Corinthians 5:20–6:2; Matthew 6:1-6,16-18


31 posted on 03/01/2006 10:14:18 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 

<< Wednesday, March 1, 2006 >> Ash Wednesday
 
Joel 2:12-18
2 Corinthians 5:20—6:2
Psalm 51
Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18
View Readings  Similar Reflections  Search OBOB
 
UP FROM THE ASHES
 
"Rend your hearts." —Joel 2:13
 

Today, the Catholic Church marks our heads with an ashen cross. Ashes connote humility and death. Ashes are what is left over after something is burned. They are commonly associated with the residue of destruction and death. Something has died today. We die to ourselves in the self-denial of Lent. The ashes of our desires are what remains after this death.

After a forest fire, the forest floor is covered with ashes. The ashes are the residue of death and destruction. However, the ashes also are the beginning of new life for the forest. The fire clears away the accumulated litter on the forest floor which had been smothering seedlings which tried to grow every year. Now that the fire has burned away this litter, the ashes serve as a sort of mulch which protects and actually nourishes the new seedlings. Thus, the ashes enable the cycle of new life to begin.

We are like that. The Lenten ashes of our repentance and dying to self smother our selfish pleasures, enabling and nourishing new life to blossom within us.

What new life does the Lord want to spring up as a result of your dying to self this Lent? Will it be a call to a new vocation, the conception of a new child, a new holiness, the courage to witness publicly for Jesus, or joining a small Christian community? Repent! Die to yourself (Lk 9:23). Let Jesus create His new, abundant life (Jn 10:10) in you.

 
Prayer: Father, may I crucify my flesh with its passions and desires (Gal 5:24). May I always be fertile and fruitful for You.
Promise: "Keep your deeds of mercy secret, and your Father Who sees in secret will repay you." —Mt 6:4
Praise: John receives his ashes early in the day and makes a silent witness for Christ by wearing them throughout the day at his downtown job.
 

32 posted on 03/01/2006 10:20:24 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Compline -- Night Prayer

Compline (Night Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.


This is an excellent moment for an examination of conscience. In a communal celebration of Compline, one of the penitential acts given in the Missal may be recited.

A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.


Psalm 30 (31)
Trustful prayer in time of adversity
O God, protect me; be my refuge.
In you, Lord, I put my trust: may I never be put to shame.
 In your justice, set me free,
Turn your ear to me,
 make haste to rescue me.
Be my rampart, my fortification;
 keep me safe.

For you are my strength and my refuge:
 you will lead me out to the pastures,
 for your own name’s sake.
You will lead me out of the trap that they laid for me –
 for you are my strength.

Into your hands I commend my spirit:
 you have redeemed me, Lord God of truth.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
O God, protect me; be my refuge.

Psalm 129 (130)
Out of the depths
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord.
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord: Lord, hear my voice.
Let your ears listen out for the voice of my pleading.

If you took notice of our transgressions, Lord – Lord, who would be left?
But with you is forgiveness, and for this we revere you.
I rely on you, Lord, my spirit relies on your promise;
my soul hopes in the Lord, more than the watchman for daybreak.

More than the watchman for daybreak, let Israel hope in the Lord:
for with the Lord there is kindness and abundant redemption.
He himself will redeem Israel from all its transgressions.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord.

Reading Ephesians 4:26-27
Be angry if you must, but do not sin: do not let your anger outlast the sunset: do not give the Devil his chance.

Short Responsory ?
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

Canticle Nunc Dimittis
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace.
Now, Master, you let your servant go in peace.
 You have fulfilled your promise.
My own eyes have seen your salvation,
 which you have prepared in the sight of all peoples.
A light to bring the Gentiles from darkness;
 the glory of your people Israel.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace.

Prayer
Let us pray.
Lord Jesus Christ, you lay a gentle yoke upon those who follow you. Meek and humble, you give them a light burden to carry. Receive the work and the prayers we have offered to you today; and give us rest, to make us more eager to serve you, who live and reign for ever and ever, Amen.

May the almighty Lord grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
A M E N
An antiphon to Our Lady should be recited here.

33 posted on 03/01/2006 10:23:18 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Mt 6:1-18
# Douay-Rheims Vulgate
1 Take heed that you do not your justice before men, to be seen by them: otherwise you shall not have a reward of your Father who is in heaven. adtendite ne iustitiam vestram faciatis coram hominibus ut videamini ab eis alioquin mercedem non habebitis apud Patrem vestrum qui in caelis est
2 Therefore when thou dost an alms-deed, sound not a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be honoured by men. Amen I say to you, they have received their reward. cum ergo facies elemosynam noli tuba canere ante te sicut hypocritae faciunt in synagogis et in vicis ut honorificentur ab hominibus amen dico vobis receperunt mercedem suam
3 But when thou dost alms, let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doth. te autem faciente elemosynam nesciat sinistra tua quid faciat dextera tua
4 That thy alms may be in secret, and thy Father who seeth in secret will repay thee. ut sit elemosyna tua in abscondito et Pater tuus qui videt in abscondito reddet tibi
5 And when ye pray, you shall not be as the hypocrites, that love to stand and pray in the synagogues and corners of the streets, that they may be seen by men: Amen I say to you, they have received their reward. et cum oratis non eritis sicut hypocritae qui amant in synagogis et in angulis platearum stantes orare ut videantur ab hominibus amen dico vobis receperunt mercedem suam
6 But thou when thou shalt pray, enter into thy chamber, and having shut the door, pray to thy Father in secret, and thy father who seeth in secret will repay thee. tu autem cum orabis intra in cubiculum tuum et cluso ostio tuo ora Patrem tuum in abscondito et Pater tuus qui videt in abscondito reddet tibi
7 And when you are praying, speak not much, as the heathens. For they think that in their much speaking they may be heard. orantes autem nolite multum loqui sicut ethnici putant enim quia in multiloquio suo exaudiantur
8 Be not you therefore like to them for your Father knoweth what is needful for you, before you ask him. nolite ergo adsimilari eis scit enim Pater vester quibus opus sit vobis antequam petatis eum
9 Thus therefore shall you pray: Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. sic ergo vos orabitis Pater noster qui in caelis es sanctificetur nomen tuum
10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. veniat regnum tuum fiat voluntas tua sicut in caelo et in terra
11 Give us this day our supersubstantial bread. panem nostrum supersubstantialem da nobis hodie
12 And forgive us our debts, as we also forgive our debtors. et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimisimus debitoribus nostris
13 And lead us not into temptation. But deliver us from evil. Amen. et ne inducas nos in temptationem sed libera nos a malo
14 For if you will forgive men their offences, your heavenly Father will forgive you also your offences. si enim dimiseritis hominibus peccata eorum dimittet et vobis Pater vester caelestis delicta vestra
15 But if you will not forgive men, neither will your Father forgive you your offences. si autem non dimiseritis hominibus nec Pater vester dimittet peccata vestra
16 And when you fast, be not as the hypocrites, sad. For they disfigure their faces, that they may appear unto men to fast. Amen I say to you, they have received their reward. cum autem ieiunatis nolite fieri sicut hypocritae tristes demoliuntur enim facies suas ut pareant hominibus ieiunantes amen dico vobis quia receperunt mercedem suam
17 But thou, when thou fastest anoint thy head, and wash thy face; tu autem cum ieiunas ungue caput tuum et faciem tuam lava
18 That thou appear not to men to fast, but to thy Father who is in secret: and thy Father who seeth in secret, will repay thee. ne videaris hominibus ieiunans sed Patri tuo qui est in abscondito et Pater tuus qui videt in abscondito reddet tibi

34 posted on 03/01/2006 10:37:07 PM PST by annalex
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To: annalex


Jesus Christ Extreme Humility
Triptich

Fr. William McNichols, iconographer

Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico

35 posted on 03/01/2006 10:40:22 PM PST by annalex
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To: annalex; Salvation; fatima; Ciexyz; All



Dear Friends in Jesus and Mary,

The Persecution of Father Robert Altier by the Archbishop of Minneapolis. The Site may be pulled down in the near future.

Father has been banned from speaking period. Please pray for him.

My Detailed Message follows below:


This is an Emergency Request for prayers and to storm heaven for Father Robert Altier.

For All of us who love his solid "Orthodox" Homilies which are posted by Salvation on this thread; this will come not only as a nasty shock but this is sheer persecution by Archbishop Flynn of the Archdiocese of Minneapolis.


Please check out http://www.desertvoice.org/Censored.html and you will know what I am talking about. Father Robert Altier has been banned by the Archbishop of Minneapolis from publishing his homilies on "A Voice in the Desert".


He has also been banned from speaking on Relevant Radio. Most parts of the web site have been shut down as a result of this catastrophic and oppressive decision by the Archbsihop of Minneapolis.


Now, one cannot access the Homilies that are posted on a daily basis on the web page that says Audio or listen to them. Nor can one access Homilies that are posted in the Microsoft Word Format or the Highlights Section or just anything at all.

I greatly fear that this awesome web site will be pulled down as soon as possible and made functional, as Father Robert Altier and his Parishioners who post these Homilies are being persecuted by the raving liberal Archbishop of Minneapolis.


Please forward this to all Orthodox Catholic Freepers on this thread or all Freepers who are Catholic and love Father Altier's Homilies. We need to storm heaven for him like nobody's business.

Imagine an Archbishop persecuting him. For some time now, i have been in touch with Parishioners from his Parish who have been constantly asking me to pray for Father Altier's Ministry.

Looks like they suspected something like this would happen to him. Poor Father Altier is being persecuted.


36 posted on 03/02/2006 7:23:56 AM PST by MILESJESU
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To: SOLDIEROFJESUSCHRIST

I enjoy reading "A Voice in the Desert" and certainly hope that it continues to appear.


37 posted on 03/02/2006 6:44:49 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: Salvation

Homily of the Day bump.


38 posted on 03/02/2006 6:46:50 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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