Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

To: Juana la Loca

I am a Catholic deacon and led the RCIA program at our Church for years and this is what I would highly recommend:
1. The Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church
2. Supplement the above with any number of the on-line courses in scripture that can be downloaded for free from Scott Hahn's website.
3. Make sure that your place proper emphasis on preparing them for Evangelization (a faith you're not prepared to give away will be a faith that will begin to unravel).

Other hints: You can download Hahn's Scripture Courses, keep them as files on your computer and then on a weekly basis, e-mail the Scripture reading assignment to each member of the class for upcoming discussion. The other thing I would highly recommend is that at least monthly you plan for a community meal where each RCIA person brings a dish they have prepared. Many in RCIA come from Protestant churches where sharing a meal is the way they "do church." This also helps build community and a sense of belonging. Don't underestimate the power of a shared meal (remember the Eucharist was instituted at the Passover meal).


17 posted on 05/31/2006 11:17:42 AM PDT by veritas2002
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]


To: veritas2002; Juana la Loca
Juana, The Deacon is correct, esp. on the following:

3. Make sure that your place proper emphasis on preparing them for Evangelization (a faith you're not prepared to give away will be a faith that will begin to unravel).

It is ABSOLUTELY CRUCIAL that people realize, from the very first day, that yours is not a "CLASS" where people graduate upon receiving the sacraments on Easter Vigil. Many RCIA courses stress this, sometimes involuntarily, and it leads to a large drop-out rate after the classes are done. You MUST stress, in EVERY class, the concept that Karl Rahner said (I'll paraphrase) "The Christian of the modern day will either learn to experience Christ, or he will fail by falling into mediocrity or legalism". People MUST see, in every class, that they can experience Christ in their own daily lives, and that the doctrines help to define their experiences to the objective reality of Revelation - since experiences are subjective, we need a firm basis - thus, the doctrines of the Church.

I just finished Mystagogy, where we concentrate on experiencing Christ. However, the whole course must touch on it so that people "are prepared to give away their faith", as the deacon says. During my research, I came across a study that showed that up to 70% of RCIA neophytes fall away from active participation after the first two years...Incredible. The main reason is that people are not experiencing Christ in their lives - especially through some sort of ministry - a use of the gifts God has given them for the sake of the Body, the Church.

Thus, I strongly advice that a person in RCIA learns to begin to experience Christ through sacrament, prayer, the Scriptures, everyday life, and ministry. Making the faith real (rather than a bunch of esoteric philosophical question/answers) is instrumental in making the neophytes (new Catholics) active in their faith. When people experience Christ, they will share their faith.

Regards

20 posted on 05/31/2006 11:44:17 AM PDT by jo kus (There is nothing colder than a Christian who doesn't care for the salvation of others - St.Crysostom)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies ]

To: veritas2002

Excellent recommendations with the Scripture lessons from Scott Hahn.


30 posted on 05/31/2006 1:22:06 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson