Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 06-05-06, Memorial, St. Boniface, bishop & martyr
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | 06-05-06 | New American Bible

Posted on 06/05/2006 7:53:36 AM PDT by Salvation

June 5, 2006

Memorial of Saint Boniface, bishop and martyr

Psalm: Monday 24

Reading 1
2 Pt 1:2-7

Beloved:
May grace and peace be yours in abundance
through knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.

His divine power has bestowed on us
everything that makes for life and devotion,
through the knowledge of him
who called us by his own glory and power.
Through these, he has bestowed on us
the precious and very great promises,
so that through them you may come to share in the divine nature,
after escaping from the corruption that is in the world
because of evil desire.
For this very reason,
make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue,
virtue with knowledge, knowledge with self-control,
self-control with endurance, endurance with devotion,
devotion with mutual affection, mutual affection with love.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 91:1-2, 14-15b, 15c-16

R. (see 2b) In you, my God, I place my trust.
You who dwell in the shelter of the Most High,
who abide in the shadow of the Almighty,
Say to the LORD, “My refuge and my fortress,
my God, in whom I trust.”
R. In you, my God, I place my trust.
Because he clings to me, I will deliver him;
I will set him on high because he acknowledges my name.
He shall call upon me, and I will answer him;
I will be with him in distress.
R. In you, my God, I place my trust.
I will deliver him and glorify him;
with length of days I will gratify him
and will show him my salvation.
R. In you, my God, I place my trust.

Gospel
Mk 12:1-12

Jesus began to speak to the chief priests, the scribes,
and the elders in parables.
“A man planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it,
dug a wine press, and built a tower.
Then he leased it to tenant farmers and left on a journey.
At the proper time he sent a servant to the tenants
to obtain from them some of the produce of the vineyard.
But they seized him, beat him,
and sent him away empty-handed.
Again he sent them another servant.
And that one they beat over the head and treated shamefully.
He sent yet another whom they killed.
So, too, many others; some they beat, others they killed.
He had one other to send, a beloved son.
He sent him to them last of all, thinking, ‘They will respect my son.’
But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir.
Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’
So they seized him and killed him,
and threw him out of the vineyard.
What then will the owner of the vineyard do?
He will come, put the tenants to death,
and give the vineyard to others.
Have you not read this Scripture passage:

The stone that the builders rejected
has become the cornerstone;
by the Lord has this been done,
and it is wonderful in our eyes?”

They were seeking to arrest him, but they feared the crowd,
for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them.
So they left him and went away.




TOPICS: Activism; Apologetics; Catholic; Charismatic Christian; Current Events; Eastern Religions; Ecumenism; Evangelical Christian; General Discusssion; History; Islam; Judaism; Mainline Protestant; Ministry/Outreach; Moral Issues; Orthodox Christian; Other Christian; Other non-Christian; Prayer; Religion & Culture; Religion & Politics; Religion & Science; Skeptics/Seekers; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: bishop; catholic; catholiccaucus; catholiclist; dailymassreadings; martyr; ordinarytime; stboniface
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 06/05/2006 7:53:38 AM PDT by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Alleluia Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Alleluia Ping List.

2 posted on 06/05/2006 7:55:33 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
So - Who Was St.Boniface?

Saint Boniface, Bishop and Martyr 680-754 AD [Read Only]

3 posted on 06/05/2006 7:56:39 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Saint Boniface, Bishop and Martyr 680-754 AD [Read Only]
4 posted on 06/05/2006 8:00:26 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
June Devotion: The Sacred Heart

Sacred Heart Of Jesus

Efficacious Novena to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Sacred Heart Animated

5 posted on 06/05/2006 8:01:25 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Boniface's crypt in Fulda Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
6 posted on 06/05/2006 8:01:41 AM PDT by rahbert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All

In one week I will be leaving on a pilgrimage to Eastern Europe and will need someone to post the Daily Readings. Could you help out in any way at all.

BTW, here is my schedule -- I'll keep a diary since I don't have a laptop and post a thread when I get back.

Day 1 June 12 -- leave U. S.
Day 2 June 13 -- Prague
Day 3 June 14 -- Prague
Day 4 June 15 -- Prague, Wroclaw, Warsaw
Day 5 June 16 -- Warsaw Fr. Kolbe's Convent
Day 6 June 17 -- Czesochowa
Day 7 June 18 -- Auschwitz, Wadowice, Kalwaria, Krakow
Day 8 June 19 -- Krakow
Day 9 June 20 -- Krakow St. Faustina & Salt Mines
Day 10 June 21 -- Litmanova, Budapest
Day 11 June 22 -- Budapest
Day 12 June 23 -- Puszta, Vienna
Day 13 June 24 -- Vienna
Day 14 June 25 -- Return Flight


7 posted on 06/05/2006 8:04:38 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: rahbert

Thank you!


8 posted on 06/05/2006 8:05:13 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: All

From: 2 Peter 1:2-7

Greeting



[2] May grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God
and of Jesus our Lord.

Divine Largesse


[3] His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life
and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own
glory and excellence, [4] by which he has granted to us his precious
and very great promises, that through these you may escape from the
corruption that is in the world because of passion, and become
partakers of the divine nature.

Christian Virtues


[5] For this very reason make every effort to supplement your faith
with virtue, and virtue with knowledge, [6] and knowledge with
self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness
with godliness, [7] and godliness with brotherly affection, and
brotherly affection with love.



Commentary:

1-2. As in other New Testament writings and in ordinary letters of the
time the opening greeting gives the name of the sender, that of the
addressees and the greeting as such.

"Simon": the original Greek text says "Simeon", using the Hebrew form
of the same name (cf. Acts 15:14). To this he adds that of "Peter",
the name the Lord gave him when he promised to make him the head of
the Apostles (cf. In 1:42).

The original addressees of the letter may have been the faithful of
the communities of Greece or Asia Minor (cf. the Introduction).

The greeting contains two words frequently used in this setting "grace
and peace" (cf. 1 Pet 1:2 and note)--which sum up the benefits the
Christian has received. The true "knowledge of God and of Jesus" is a
frequent point of reference in the letter (cf. 1:1, 8; 2:20; 3:18). It
is not just intellectual knowledge, but rather the knowledge that
comes from familiarity with the Lord and conduct consistent with the
faith (cf. 1:5-7). The author emphasizes this point from the very
start, because he wants to forestall the influence of false teachings
which undermine the faith.

"The righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ": this may be a
reference to God the Father AND Jesus; but, given that the Greek text
uses only one definite article, it is probably a title of Jesus Christ,
whom he calls "God and Savior", in the same way as elsewhere he
describes him as "Lord and Savior" (1:11; 2:20; 3:2, 18). Thus, the
divinity of Jesus Christ, which is often proclaimed in the New
Testament, is openly acknowledged at the very start of the letter.

3-21. The first part of the letter is an appeal for steadfastness in
the faith and for growth in Christian life. Firstly, he encourages his
readers to pursue virtue; the reasoning he uses is both simple and
profound (vv. 3-11): by his power, God has chosen the Apostles and
conferred on them wonderful graces in which all the faithful share
(vv. 3-4); they must respond to this divine initiative by practicing
virtue so as to reach the goal and fullness to which the Christian is
called (vv. 5-11).

He goes on (vv. 12-21) to remind them that hope in our Lord's second
coming is something well founded, something that belongs to the
deposit of faith: the transfiguration of our Lord was a foretaste of
his final coming (vv. 16-18); it was something foretold in many
prophecies and no one has the right to argue against it (vv. 19-21).
Therefore, the final coming of the Lord is something quite certain and
helps to keep our hope alive.

3-4. In these verses the same pronoun is repeated three times:
"granted to US", called US", "granted to US"; although he may mean all
Christians, it is more likely that he is referring only to the
Apostles.

The basis of Christian morality and of the practice of virtue
(vv. 5-9) is God's initiative in calling the Apostles (v. 3) and
endowing them with graces (promises) sufficient to make all Christians
"partakers of the divine nature".

"His divine power": usually in the Bible calling is attributed to God
the Father (cf., e.g., 1 Pet 1:15; 2:9; 5:10); by emphasizing here
that it is Jesus Christ who calls "by his own glory and excellence",
the author is clearly acknowledging Jesus as God.

"His precious and very great promises": the promises made in the Old
Testament, especially those to do with the coming of the Messiah and
Savior. Jesus Christ brought about the Redemption, whereby all men
have access to the supernatural good things of which the prophets
spoke.

"Partakers of the divine nature": this succinct phrase sums up the
fruits that the good things (especially grace) produce in Christians.
This sharing in God's own life is both the beginning and the final goal
of Christian life. It is the beginning insofar as it is incorporation
in Christ through Baptism, and brings with it (through grace and
adoptive divine filiation) a sharing in God's own life. It is the
final goal of the Christian life since this participation attains its
fullness and enduring perfection in heaven with the contemplation of
God "as he is" (1 In 3:2 and note on same).

Of course, already in this life the Blessed Trinity dwells in the soul
in grace (cf., e.g., Jn 14:17-23; 1 Cor 3:16; 6:19; and notes on
same). "Our faith teaches us that man, in the state of grace, is
divinized--filled with God" ([St] J. Escriva, "Christ Is Passing By", 103).

Partaking of the divine nature is a basic feature of the Christian
vocation. Pope Pius XII reminds us of this marvelous fact, which is
closely linked to the mystery of the Incarnation: "If the Word
'emptied himself, taking the form of a servant' (Phil 2:7), he did so
in order that his brethren according to the flesh might be made
partakers of the divine nature (cf. 2 Pet 1:4), both during this
earthly exile by sanctifying grace and in the heavenly home by the
possession of eternal beatitude. For this reason the Only-begotten of
the Father chose to become a son of man, that we might be made
conformable to the image of the Son of God (cf. Rom 8:29) and be
renewed according to the likeness of him who created us (cf. Col
3:10)" ("Mystici Corporis", 20).

On this subject, see also the notes on Rom 8:14-15 and Gal 4:6.

5-9. Lists of Christian virtues are also to be found in other parts of
the New Testament (cf., e.g., Gal 5:22-23; 1 Tim 6:11; Rev 2:19). This
passage provides a list which is well conceived from a pedagogical
point of view--simple to remember, because each virtue is linked with
the one before it; and the emphasis is on faith and charity, which
mark the beginning and end of the list. St Ignatius of Antioch
commented on the value of these two theological virtues: "Given an
unswerving faith and love for Jesus Christ, there is nothing in all
this that will not be obvious to you; for life begins and ends with
those two qualities. Faith is the beginning, and love is the end; and
the two together lead to God. All that makes for a soul's perfection
follows in their train, for nobody who professes faith will commit
sin, and nobody who possesses love can feel hatred" ("Letter to the
Ephesians", 14, 1-2).

For Christians, virtues are not an end in themselves but a means
necessary for attaining knowledge of Christ (cf. note on 1:1); but
union with the Lord calls for works, and if we failed to practice
virtues we could not see Christ (v. 9). St Teresa of Avila constantly
stresses the need to combine contemplation and action: "I repeat that
if you have this in view you must not build upon foundations of prayer
and contemplation alone, for, unless you strive after the virtues and
practice them, you will never grow to be more than dwarfs. God grant
that nothing worse than this may happen--for, as you know, anyone who
fails to go forward begins to go back" ("Interior Castle", VII, 4, 9).




Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


9 posted on 06/05/2006 8:08:17 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: All

Memorial: St. Boniface, Bishop & Martyr


From: Mark 12:1-12


The Parable of the Wicked Tenants



[1] And he began to speak to them in parables. "A man planted a
vineyard, and set a hedge around it, and dug a pit for the wine press,
and built a tower, and let it out to tenants, and went into another
country. [2] When the time came, he sent a servant to the tenants, to
get from them some of the fruit of the vineyard. [3] And they took him
and beat him, and sent him away empty-handed. [4] Again he sent to them
another servant, and they wounded him in the head, and treated him
shamefully. [5]And he sent another, and him they killed; and so with
many others, some they beat and some they killed. [6] He had still one
other, a beloved son; finally he sent him to them, saying, 'They will
respect my son.' [7] But those tenants said to one another, 'This is
the heir; come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.'
[8] And they took him and killed him, and cast him out of the vineyard.
[9] What will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come and destroy
the tenants, and give the vineyard to others. [10] Have you not read
the scripture: 'The very stone which the builders rejected has become
the head of the corner; [11] this was the Lord's doing, and it is
marvelous in our eyes'?" [12] And they tried to arrest him but feared
the multitude, for they perceived that he had told the parable against
them; so they left him and went away.




Commentary:


1-12. This parable is a masterly summary of history of salvation. To
explain the mystery of his redemptive death, Jesus makes use of one of
the most beautiful allegories of the Old Testament the so-called "song
of the vineyard," in which Isaiah (5:1-7) prophesied Israel's
ingratitude for God's favors. On the basis of this Isaiah text, Jesus
reveals the patience of God, who sends one messenger after another--the
prophets of the Old Testament--until at last, as the text says, he
sends "his beloved son", Jesus, whom the tenants will kill. This
_expression, as also that which God himself uses to describe Christ at
Baptism (1:11) and the Transfiguration (9:7), points to the divinity of
Jesus, who is the cornerstone of salvation, rejected by the builders in
their selfishness and pride. To the Jews listening to Jesus telling
this parable, his meaning must have been crystal clear. The rulers
"perceived that he had told the parable against them" (v. 12) and that
it was about the fulfillment of the Isaiah prophecy (cf. note on Mt
21:33-46).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


10 posted on 06/05/2006 8:09:24 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

God Bless You on your pilgrimage. What a wonderful itinerary. Travel safely and commune with God and His Son!


11 posted on 06/05/2006 8:15:08 AM PDT by karnage
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Mass Readings

First reading 2 Peter 1:2 - 7 ©
May you have more and more grace and peace as you come to know our Lord more and more.
By his divine power, he has given us all the things that we need for life and for true devotion, bringing us to know God himself, who has called us by his own glory and goodness. In making these gifts, he has given us the guarantee of something very great and wonderful to come: through them you will be able to share the divine nature and to escape corruption in a world that is sunk in vice. But to attain this, you will have to do your utmost yourselves, adding goodness to the faith that you have, understanding to your goodness, self-control to your understanding, patience to your self-control, true devotion to your patience, kindness towards your fellow men to your devotion, and, to this kindness, love.
Psalm or canticle: Psalm 90
Gospel Mark 12:1 - 12 ©
Jesus went on to speak to them in parables, ‘A man planted a vineyard; he fenced it round, dug out a trough for the winepress and built a tower; then he leased it to tenants and went abroad. When the time came, he sent a servant to the tenants to collect from them his share of the produce from the vineyard. But they seized the man, thrashed him and sent him away empty-handed. Next he sent another servant to them; him they beat about the head and treated shamefully. And he sent another and him they killed; then a number of others, and they thrashed some and killed the rest. He had still someone left: his beloved son. He sent him to them last of all. “They will respect my son” he said. But those tenants said to each other, “This is the heir. Come on, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.” So they seized him and killed him and threw him out of the vineyard. Now what will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come and make an end of the tenants and give the vineyard to others. Have you not read this text of scripture:
It was the stone rejected by the builders
that became the keystone.
This was the Lord’s doing
and it is wonderful to see?

And they would have liked to arrest him, because they realised that the parable was aimed at them, but they were afraid of the crowds. So they left him alone and went away.

12 posted on 06/05/2006 8:15:40 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: All
Office of Readings -- Awakening Prayer

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 6
A prayer for relief from affliction
Lord, do not condemn me in your fury: do not destroy me in your anger.

Take pity on me, Lord, for I am sick; heal me, Lord, for my bones are in disarray.
My spirit is deeply disturbed, and you, Lord – how long?

Turn to me, Lord, rescue my spirit: in your pity, save me.
If I die, how can I praise you? Can anyone in the underworld proclaim your name?

I struggle and groan, soak my bed with weeping night after night;
my eyes are troubled with sadness: I grow older as my enemies watch.

Leave me, all who do evil, for the Lord has heard my voice as I wept.
The Lord listened to my prayer, granted me what I asked.

Let my enemies be ashamed and confounded:
let shame and confusion overtake them soon.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 9A (9)
Thanksgiving for victory
I will thank you, Lord, with all my heart; I will tell of your wonders.
I will rejoice in you and triumph, make music to your name, O Most High.

Because my enemies are in full retreat; they stumble and perish at your presence.
For you have given judgement in my favour, upheld my case, taken your seat on the throne of judgement.

You have rebuked the nations, condemned the wicked, wiped out their name for ever and for ever.

My enemies are no more; their land is a desert for ever. You have demolished their cities, their very memory is wiped away.

But the Lord will reign for ever: he has made his throne his judgement-seat.
He himself will judge the whole world in justice, judge the peoples impartially.

The Lord will be a refuge for the oppressed, a refuge in good times and in bad.
Let them put their hope in you, those who know your name; for you, Lord, have never abandoned those who seek you.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 9A (9)
Sing to the Lord who dwells in Sion, proclaim to the nations his loving care.
For he has remembered the poor and avenged them with blood: he has not forgotten the cry of the weak.

Take pity on me, Lord: see how my enemies torment me.
You raise me up from the gates of death, and I will proclaim your praise at the gates of the daughter of Sion; I will rejoice in your salvation.

The nations have fallen into the pit that they made, into the very trap that they set: their feet are caught fast.
The Lord’s justice shines forth: the sinner is trapped by his very own action.

Sinners will go down to the underworld, and all nations that forget God.
For the weak will not always be forgotten: the hope of the weak will never perish.

Rise up, Lord, let men not be complacent: let the nations come before you to be judged.
Put fear into them, Lord: let them know that they are only men.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Reading Job 29:1 - 30:23 ©
And Job continued his solemn discourse. He said:
Who will bring back to me the months that have gone,
 and the days when God was my guardian,
when his lamp shone over my head,
 and his light was my guide in the darkness?
Shall I ever see my autumn days again
 when God hedged round my tent;
when Shaddai dwelt with me,
 and my children were around me;
when my feet were plunged in cream,
 and streams of oil poured from the rocks?

When I went out to the gate of the city,
 when I took my seat in the square,
as soon as I appeared, the young men stepped aside,
 while the older men rose to their feet.
Men of note interrupted their speeches,
 and put their fingers on their lips;
The voices of rulers were silenced,
 and their tongues stayed still in their mouths.

And now I am the laughing-stock
 of my juniors, the young people,
whose fathers I did not consider fit
 to put with the dogs that looked after my flock.

And these are the ones that now sing ballads about me,
 and make me the talk of the town!
To them I am loathsome, they stand aloof from me,
 do not scruple to spit in my face.
Because he has unbent my bow and chastened me
 they cast the bridle from their mouth.
That brood of theirs rises to right of me,
 stones are their weapons,
 and they take threatening strides towards me.
They have cut me off from all escape,
 there is no one to check their attack.
They move in, as though through a wide breach,
 and I am crushed beneath the rubble.
Terrors turn to meet me,
 my confidence is blown away as if by the wind;
 my hope of safety passes like a cloud.

And now the life in me trickles away,
 days of grief have gripped me.
At night-time, sickness saps my bones,
 I am gnawed by wounds that never sleep.
With immense power it has caught me by the clothes,
 clutching at the collar of my coat.
It has thrown me into the mud
 where I am no better than dust and ashes.

I cry to you, and you give me no answer;
 I stand before you, but you take no notice.
You have grown cruel in your dealings with me,
 your hand lies on me, heavy and hostile.
You carry me up to ride the wind,
 tossing me about in a tempest.
I know it is to death that you are taking me,
 the common meeting place of all that lives.

Reading A letter by St Boniface
The careful shepherd watches over Christ's flock
In her voyage across the ocean of this world, the Church is like a great ship being pounded by the waves of life’s different stresses. Our duty is not to abandon ship but to keep her on her course.
The ancient fathers showed us how we should carry out this duty: Clement, Cornelius and many others in the city of Rome, Cyprian at Carthage, Athanasius at Alexandria. They all lived under emperors who were pagans; they all steered Christ’s ship – or rather his most dear spouse, the Church. This they did by teaching and defending her, by their labours and sufferings, even to the shedding of blood.
I am terrified when I think of all this. Fear and trembling came upon me and the darkness of my sins almost covered me. I would gladly give up the task of guiding the Church which I have accepted if I could find such an action warranted by the example of the fathers or by holy Scripture.
Since this is the case, and since the truth can be assaulted but never defeated or falsified, with our tired mind let us turn to the words of Solomon: Trust in the Lord with all your heart and do not rely on your own prudence. Think on him in all your ways, and he will guide your steps. In another place he says: The name of the Lord is an impregnable tower. The just man seeks refuge in it and he will be saved.
Let us stand fast in what is right and prepare our souls for trial. Let us wait upon God’s strengthening aid and say to him: O Lord, you have been our refuge in all generations.
Let us trust in him who has placed this burden upon us. What we ourselves cannot bear let us bear with the help of Christ. For he is all-powerful and he tells us: My yoke is easy and my burden is light.
Let us continue the fight on the day of the Lord. The days of anguish and of tribulation have overtaken us; if God so wills, let us die for the holy laws of our fathers, so that we may deserve to obtain an eternal inheritance with them.
Let us be neither dogs that do not bark nor silent onlookers nor paid servants who run away before the wolf. Instead let us be careful shepherds watching over Christ’s flock. Let us preach the whole of God’s plan to the powerful and to the humble, to rich and to poor, to men of every rank and age, as far as God gives us the strength, in season and out of season, as Saint Gregory writes in his book of Pastoral Instruction.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

13 posted on 06/05/2006 8:17:11 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: All
American Catholic’s Saint of the Day


June 5, 2006
St. Boniface
(672?-754)

Boniface, known as the apostle of the Germans, was an English Benedictine monk who gave up being elected abbot to devote his life to the conversion of the Germanic tribes. Two characteristics stand out: his Christian orthodoxy and his fidelity to the pope of Rome.

How absolutely necessary this orthodoxy and fidelity were is borne out by the conditions he found on his first missionary journey in 719 at the request of Pope Gregory II. Paganism was a way of life. What Christianity he did find had either lapsed into paganism or was mixed with error. The clergy were mainly responsible for these latter conditions since they were in many instances uneducated, lax and questionably obedient to their bishops. In particular instances their very ordination was questionable.

These are the conditions that Boniface was to report in 722 on his first return visit to Rome. The Holy Father instructed him to reform the German Church. The pope sent letters of recommendation to religious and civil leaders. Boniface later admitted that his work would have been unsuccessful, from a human viewpoint, without a letter of safe-conduct from Charles Martel, the powerful Frankish ruler, grandfather of Charlemagne. Boniface was finally made a regional bishop and authorized to organize the whole German Church. He was eminently successful.

In the Frankish kingdom, he met great problems because of lay interference in bishops’ elections, the worldliness of the clergy and lack of papal control.

During a final mission to the Frisians, he and 53 companions were massacred while he was preparing converts for Confirmation.

In order to restore the Germanic Church to its fidelity to Rome and to convert the pagans, he had been guided by two principles. The first was to restore the obedience of the clergy to their bishops in union with the pope of Rome. The second was the establishment of many houses of prayer which took the form of Benedictine monasteries. A great number of Anglo-Saxon monks and nuns followed him to the continent. He introduced Benedictine nuns to the active apostolate of education.

Comment:

Boniface bears out the Christian rule: To follow Christ is to follow the way of the cross. For Boniface, it was not only physical suffering or death, but the painful, thankless, bewildering task of Church reform. Missionary glory is often thought of in terms of bringing new persons to Christ. It seems—but is not—less glorious to heal the household of the faith.



14 posted on 06/05/2006 8:24:46 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: All
Monday, June 5, 2006
St. Boniface, Bishop, Martyr (Memorial)
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
2 Peter 1:2-7
Psalm 91:1-2, 14-16
Mark 12:1-12

If God causes you to suffer much, it is a sign that He has great designs for you, and that He certainly intends to make you a Saint.

-- St Ignatius Loyola


15 posted on 06/05/2006 8:33:17 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: All
Catholic Culture

Collect:
Lord, your martyr Boniface spread the faith by his teaching and witnessed to it with his blood. By the help of his prayers keep us loyal to our faith and give us courage to profess it in our lives. Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

June 05, 2006 Month Year Season

Memorial of St. Boniface, bishop and martyr

Old Calendar: St. Boniface

St. Boniface, a monk of Exeter in England, is one of the great figures of the Benedictine Order and of the monastic apostolate in the Middle Ages. Gregory II sent him to preach the Gospel in Germany. He evangelized Hesse, Saxony and Thuringia and became Archbishop of Mainz. He well earned the title of Apostle of Germany, and Catholic Germany in our own times still venerates him as its father in the faith. He was put to death by the Frisians at Dokkum in 754 during the last of his missionary journeys. The famous abbey of Fulda, where his body lies, has remained the national shrine of Catholic Germany.


St. Boniface
A Benedictine monk was chosen by divine Providence to become Germany's great apostle and patron. Boniface's first missionary endeavor proved unsuccessful (716). Before attempting a second he went to Rome and received papal authorization (718). Under the holy bishop Willibrord he converted Frisia within a period of three years. On November 30, 722, Boniface was consecrated bishop by Pope Gregory II.

In 724 he turned his attention to the Hessian people, among whom he continued his missionary activity with renewed zeal. On an eminence near the village of Geismar on the Eder, he felled a giant oak that the people honored as the national sanctuary of the god Thor. Boniface used the wood to build a chapel in honor of St. Peter. This courageous act assured the eventual triumph of the Gospel in Germany.

The resident clergy and the priests dwelling at the court, whose unworthy lives needed censure, were constantly creating difficulties. Nevertheless Boniface continued to labor quietly, discreetly. He prayed unceasingly, put his trust in God alone, recommended his work to the prayers of his spiritual brothers and sisters in England. And God did not abandon him. Conversions were amazingly numerous. In 732 Gregory III sent him the pallium, the insignia of the archiepiscopal dignity. Boniface now devoted his time and talent to the ecclesiastical organization of the Church in Germany. He installed worthy bishops, set diocesan boundaries, promoted the spiritual life of the clergy and laity, held national synods (between 742 and 747), and in 744 founded the monastery of Fulda, which became a center of religious life in central Germany. In 745 he chose Mayence for his archiepiscopal see, and affiliated to it thirteen suffragan dioceses. This completed the ecclesiastical organization of Germany.

The final years of his busy life were spent, as were his earlier ones, in missionary activity. Word came to him in 754 that a part of Frisia had lapsed from the faith. He took leave of his priests and, sensing the approach of death, carried along a shroud. He was 74 years of age when with youthful enthusiasm he began the work of restoration, a mission he was not to complete. A band of semi-barbarous pagans overpowered and put him to death when he was about to administer confirmation to a group of neophytes at Dockum.

Patron: Brewers; Tailors; Germany; Prussia.

Symbols: Axe; book; raven; scourge; sword; sword piercing heart; Bible transfixed by sword; fallen oak; book and pen; scourge; club; fox; axe and fallen oak of Thor.

Things to Do:

  • One tradition about Saint Boniface says that he used the customs of the locals to help convert them. There was a game in which they threw sticks called kegels at smaller sticks called heides. Boniface bought religion to the game, having the heides represent demons, and knocking them down showing purity of spirit. You might use your ingenuity to imitate this game for your children and tell them the story of St. Boniface.

  • When reading more about St. Boniface, you will discover that his baptized name was Winfrid. He took the name Boniface either when he took religious profession as a Benedictine, or when Pope Gregory II consecrated him as a regional bishop. More details can be found at Catholic Encyclopedia's entry.

  • St. Boniface was the uncle of St. Walburga. St. Boniface worked with many other canonized saints in his evangelization of Germany. Find out which saints these were.

  • Patron Saints Index provides several letters to and from Saint Boniface.

  • St. Boniface, although an Englishman, planted the seeds of the Catholic Faith in Germany (at that time "Germany" included the domains of the Frankish monarchs, present-day Belgium and the Netherlands), and now Germany calls St. Boniface her patron. Bake some special German cookies or treat and learn some of the religious customs that come from this country.

16 posted on 06/05/2006 8:35:44 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: All
Lauds -- Morning Prayer

Morning Prayer (Lauds)

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 5
A morning prayer for help
Let my words come to your ears, O Lord: hear my sighs.
Listen to the voice of my crying, my King and my God.

As I pray to you in the morning, Lord, listen to my voice; in the morning I will stand before you and await you.
You are not a God who loves evil. The wicked cannot stay near you, the unjust cannot remain in your presence.

You hate all who do evil – you destroy all who speak falsehood – the Lord abominates the bloody and deceitful man.
But in the abundance of your mercy you will admit me to your house: I will worship you in your holy temple, with fear and reverence.

Lord, guide me in your justice, protect me from my enemies: let me see the path I must follow.
For there is no truth in their mouth – their heart is a bottomless pit – their throat is a wide open grave – their tongue seduces.
Punish them, Lord, and let their own plans destroy them. On account of their crimes, thrust them from your presence; for they are rebels against you.

Let all who hope in you rejoice, triumph for ever.
You will shelter them and they will glory in you.
For you bless the just, O Lord, and your good will surrounds them like a shield.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle 1 Chronicles 29
To God alone be honour and glory
Blessed are you, Lord, God of our father Israel, through all the ages.
All power and greatness are yours, O God; glory, splendour, and majesty.
All things are yours, in the heavens and on the earth; you rule over them, Lord, you are high above them all.
All riches and glory come from you, you rule over all things.

In your hand lie strength and power, your hand raises all things and sets them firm.
So now, our God, we give you thanks, and praise your glorious name.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 28 (29)
Praise the word of the Lord
Give to the Lord, all his children, his glory and power, give to the Lord the glory of his name.
Worship the Lord in holy splendour.

The voice of the Lord is heard over the waters: the God of majesty thunders, God above all the waters.
The voice of the Lord in his power, the voice of the Lord in his greatness.

The voice of the Lord breaks the cedars, the Lord breaks down the cedars of Lebanon.
The Lord makes Lebanon leap like a calf, Sirion like a wild ox.

The voice of the Lord cuts flames in two; the voice of the Lord beats on the desert, the Lord stuns the desert of Kadesh.
The voice of the Lord puts the deer to flight, it empties the thickets; in his sanctuary, all praise his glory.

The Lord dwells above the raging flood, he is enthroned as king for ever.
The Lord will give strength to his people, the Lord will bless his people with peace.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Benedictus
The Messiah and his forerunner
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, for he has come to his people and brought about their redemption.
He has raised up the sign of salvation in the house of his servant David,
as he promised through the mouth of the holy ones, his prophets through the ages:
to rescue us from our enemies and all who hate us, to take pity on our fathers,
to remember his holy covenant and the oath he swore to Abraham our father,
that he would give himself to us, that we could serve him without fear – freed from the hands of our enemies –
in uprightness and holiness before him, for all of our days.

And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High: for you will go before the face of the Lord to prepare his path,
to let his people know their salvation, so that their sins may be forgiven.
Through the bottomless mercy of our God, one born on high will visit us
to give light to those who walk in darkness, who live in the shadow of death;
to lead our feet in the path of peace.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

17 posted on 06/05/2006 8:37:18 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: All
REgnum Christi

 

Payback Time
June 5, 2006


God doesn´t give up on us after one try. He often sends a number of messengers into our lives to draw us closer to him.

Boniface, bishop and martyr
Father Edward McIlmail, LC 

Mark 12:1-12
Jesus began to speak to the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders in parables. "A man planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it, dug a wine press, and built a tower. Then he leased it to tenant farmers and left on a journey. At the proper time he sent a servant to the tenants to obtain from them some of the produce of the vineyard. But they seized him, beat him, and sent him away empty-handed. Again he sent them another servant. And that one they beat over the head and treated shamefully. He sent yet another whom they killed. So, too, many others; some they beat, others they killed. He had one other to send, a beloved son. He sent him to them last of all, thinking, ´They will respect my son.´ But those tenants said to one another, ´This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.´ So they seized him and killed him, and threw him out of the vineyard. What then will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come, put the tenants to death, and give the vineyard to others. Have you not read this scripture passage: The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; by the Lord has this been done, and it is wonderful in our eyes?" They were seeking to arrest him, but they feared the crowd, for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them. So they left him and went away.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I come before you humbly. As one who has frequently fallen into sin, I am aware of my weakness. Your great love, though, assures me that your grace can keep me on the path to holiness.

Petition: Let me see more clearly, Lord, what you are asking of me. Let me know what you want me to give back to you and to others.

1. Stand Corrected. Being corrected hurts. Being corrected in public hurts even more. And having one´s whole way of life corrected -- well, that really stings. And so it must have been for the group of leaders who approached Jesus. Our Lord, in a not-so-subtle way, tells them that they are wrong. Wrong about their self-righteousness, wrong about their narrow reading of Scripture, and wrong about how they think God works in the world. This blinded them to the Son of God when he came among them. We like to think we would have been different ― we would not have rejected Jesus, we tell ourselves. Are we so sure? Aren´t we really like the leaders of Jesus´ time when we fail to listen to his agents ― a bishop, a parish priest, a legitimate superior? Have I said no to him lately?

2. "Another Servant." God doesn´t give up on us after one try. He often sends a number of messengers into our lives to draw us closer to him. Such is the illogic of a Father´s love. Where do we miss the clues that God sends us? It could be in something a child says, a line from a homily, an e-mail from a friend in crisis ― these are the ordinary means God uses to reach out to us. Old Testament prophets faced rejection by the people of God. Have things changed much? Could I be turning a deaf ear to a prophet?

3. "This Is the Heir."  The tenant farmers don´t seem very bright. They murder the son in order to get his inheritance. What father would give an inheritance to someone who killed his son? It doesn´t make sense. Then again, sin doesn´t make sense either. Many times we reject Christ in our life and then wonder why our prayers to God the Father go (seemingly) unanswered. What could we be thinking? How often do I offer up a sacrifice or an act of charity for a prayer intention?

Dialogue with Christ: Let me live up to the demands of my faith, Lord. Let me realize that my dignity as a Christian demands that I try to live a life worthy of my baptism ― that I not be satisfied living like everyone else.

Resolution: I will offer up a decade of the Rosary for a family member who is far from the faith.


18 posted on 06/05/2006 8:41:40 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: All
Homily of the Day


Homily of the Day

Title:   You Already Have What You Need
Author:   Monsignor Dennis Clark, Ph.D.
Date:   Monday, June 5, 2006
 


2 Peter 1:2-7 / Mk 12:1-12

Life is a wonderful gift - no doubt about it! And most of us regularly thank the good Lord for giving us this gift which we could never earn or merit. But sometimes life can get very complicated and our calm confidence can get rattled or even shaken to the core.

It may be a crisis of certifiably major proportions, but more often it's just a convergence of lots of little things, a scraped fender, a sick child, a checkbook that won't balance, a water heater that burst at the worst possible moment. By themselves none of them is life threatening, to say the least. But when they come together, they can push us over the edge and leave us feeling not just weary but truly overwhelmed.

When those moments come, as they do to us all, we need to look past our feelings of inadequacy and desperation, and remember what St. Peter tells us in today's epistle. The Lord has already bestowed upon us everything we need in order to face whatever challenges life serves up. The essence of the Lord's gift is the Holy Spirit who dwells silently within the heart of every one of us.

The Spirit can give us both the wisdom and the strength we need to make the best of each day, no matter what that day brings. Trust the Holy Spirit within you, and you will live in peace, even when storms rage all around you. Trust the Spirit, follow the Spirit's lead, and you will never lose your way.

 


19 posted on 06/05/2006 8:47:14 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: karnage

Thanks for dropping by on the thread and for the kind wishes. Being in the place where St. Maximillian Kolbe, St. Faustina, Pope John Paul II, lived and grew up and prayed will be so inspirational. Let alone all the wonderful architechture and churches.


20 posted on 06/05/2006 5:45:41 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: All
Carmelite Coat of Arms Pray for

A Voice in the Desert

  Please Sign the Petition

Lord, send forth Your Spirit,
and renew the face of the earth.

                           ~ Psalm 104:30

To receive updates, email us.


Where Heresy and Dissent Abound
Safe isn't Safe Anymore
 Petition by Concerned Roman Catholics of America
Father Altier Assigned to Nursing Home
Shut Up, Good Priest - in defense of Fr. Altier

 The Archbishop Responds to Us
The Archbishop's Message to the Public - March 20

Response of Fr. Altier and Fr. Welzbacher, pastor
A Statement from the Webmaster at Desert Voice


Archbishop Flynn's Double Standard

The Vicar General's Two-by-Four

There's More than Meets the Eye

Letters from the Desert - your response
Is this the reason Father Altier was silenced?  Father Altier innocent of any impropriety
About Father Altier and Desert Voice
Fidelity Green Light Award and Site Review 

  

email@desertvoice.org



In obedient compliance with the expressed written request of

Most Reverend Harry J. Flynn

Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Father Altier’s homilies and spiritual presentations
can no longer be published on www.desertvoice.org

or broadcast on Relevant Radio.

This action of the Archbishop is not related to any scandal
or sexual misconduct on the part of Father Robert Altier.

We regret any inconvenience and humbly ask for your prayers.

All concerns should be directed in a spirit of charity to:

Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis

 Most Reverend Harry J. Flynn
226 Summit Avenue
Saint Paul, MN, USA 55102
(651) 291-4400

communications@archspm.org


21 posted on 06/05/2006 5:47:19 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Mk 12:1-12
# Douay-Rheims Vulgate
1 And he began to speak to them in parables: A certain man planted a vineyard and made a hedge about it and dug a place for the winefat and built a tower and let it to husbandmen: and went into a far country. et coepit illis in parabolis loqui vineam pastinavit homo et circumdedit sepem et fodit lacum et aedificavit turrem et locavit eam agricolis et peregre profectus est
2 And at the season he sent to the husbandmen a servant to receive of the husbandmen of the fruit of the vineyard. et misit ad agricolas in tempore servum ut ab agricolis acciperet de fructu vineae
3 Who, having laid hands on him, beat and sent him away empty. qui adprehensum eum ceciderunt et dimiserunt vacuum
4 And again he sent to them another servant: and him they wounded in the head and used him reproachfully. et iterum misit ad illos alium servum et illum capite vulneraverunt et contumeliis adfecerunt
5 And again he sent another, and him they killed: and many others, of whom some they beat, and others they killed. et rursum alium misit et illum occiderunt et plures alios quosdam caedentes alios vero occidentes
6 Therefore, having yet one son, most dear to him, he also sent him unto them last of all, saying: They will reverence my son. adhuc ergo unum habens filium carissimum et illum misit ad eos novissimum dicens quia reverebuntur filium meum
7 But the husbandmen said one to another: This is the heir. Come let us kill him and the inheritance shall be ours. coloni autem dixerunt ad invicem hic est heres venite occidamus eum et nostra erit hereditas
8 And laying hold on him, they killed him and cast him out of the vineyard. et adprehendentes eum occiderunt et eiecerunt extra vineam
9 What therefore will the lord of the vineyard do? He will come and destroy those husbandmen and will give the vineyard to others. quid ergo faciet dominus vineae veniet et perdet colonos et dabit vineam aliis
10 And have you not read this scripture, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is made the head of the corner: nec scripturam hanc legistis lapidem quem reprobaverunt aedificantes hic factus est in caput anguli
11 By the Lord has this been done, and it is wonderful in our eyes. a Domino factum est istud et est mirabile in oculis nostris
12 And they sought to lay hands on him: but they feared the people. For they knew that he spoke this parable to them. And leaving him, they went their way. et quaerebant eum tenere et timuerunt turbam cognoverunt enim quoniam ad eos parabolam hanc dixerit et relicto eo abierunt

22 posted on 06/05/2006 9:37:43 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Parable of the vineyard

Speculum humanae salvationis.
Cologne, frater Nycolaus (scribe);
c. 1450
National Library of the Netherlands

23 posted on 06/05/2006 9:42:03 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: annalex

BTTT


24 posted on 06/05/2006 9:44:32 PM PDT by Pyro7480 ("If you wish to go to extremes, let it be in... patience, humility, & charity." -St. Philip Neri)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480

Appreciate the bump. It's always great to read the Latin, isn't it?


25 posted on 06/05/2006 10:33:06 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: All
The Word Among Us

Monday, June 05, 2006

Meditation
2 Peter 1:2-7



His divine power has granted us all things . . . through the knowledge of him who called us.(2 Peter 1:3)

Do you know Jesus? The question may make us feel uncomfortable, either because it seems very personal in nature or because we really don’t know how to answer it. After all, how can anyone “know” the eternal Son of God? Immediately, we sense that knowing Jesus involves more than an intellectual grasp of his teachings or a familiarity with the story of his life, death, and resurrection. To say, “I know Jesus” is more like saying, “I know Emily. She’s my neighbor,” or “I know my husband very well.”

As daunting a question as this may seem, in reality it’s probably one of the most encouraging, hope-filled questions anyone could ever ask us. Why? Because knowing Jesus is not very hard at all. In fact, it’s very easy—not because Jesus is so compatible with us but because he wants us to know him. Jesus longs to have a personal relationship with us.

So how do we get to know Jesus? One of the best ways is through his word in Scripture. Scripture does far more than convey information or tell a good, stirring story. It has the power to change us from the inside out. Every time we read the Bible, it is Jesus himself speaking to us—if we let him. He comes to fill our minds with his truth and his promises. He comes to free our hearts from hurtful desires, sinful enticements, and painful memories.

This is why Peter said that God’s divine power has given us everything we need “through the knowledge” of Jesus (2 Peter 1:3). Knowing Jesus doesn’t just make us friends with God—amazing as this is. Knowing Jesus changes our lives forever. So what can possibly hold us back? We can, if we hold on to fears, sins, or frustrations. Spend time with Jesus. Let his word soften your heart and strengthen your mind. As you do, you too will become a “partaker of the divine nature” (1:4).

“Lord Jesus, let me hear your voice. I want to know the power of your divine nature working in me, drawing me closer and closer to you. I want us to become best friends, even as I learn to submit to your authority and lordship.”

Psalm 91:1-2,14-16; Mark 12:1-12



26 posted on 06/05/2006 10:36:36 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: All
Vespers -- Evening Prayer

Vespers (Evening Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 10 (11)
The Lord, support of the just
I trust in the Lord, so why do you say to me:
“Fly up to the mountain like a sparrow”?

“For the wicked have drawn their bows, fitted the arrow to the string, to shoot in darkness at the upright of heart.
When the foundations are being overthrown, what are the just to do?”

The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord’s throne is in heaven.
His eyes look down on the poor, he examines the children of men.
The Lord scrutinises the just and the unjust, and his heart hates those who do evil.
He rains down coals upon the wicked, fire and brimstone and a scorching wind: this is what he gives them to drink.

For the Lord is just and loves just deeds, and the upright shall see his face.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 14 (15)
Who is worthy to face the Lord?
Lord, who will live in your tent? Who will dwell on your holy mountain?

Whoever comes there without stain, acts rightly, speaks truth in his heart.
Whoever does not speak deceitfully, – or do harm to his neighbour, – or slander him.

Whoever despises the evil-doer, but he reveres those who fear the Lord.
Whoever swears and keeps his word, come what may – lends his money without usury – takes no bribe to condemn the innocent.

Whoever lives like this will stand firm for ever.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Ephesians 1
God the Saviour
Blessed be God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who has blessed us, in Christ, with every spiritual blessing in heaven.

In love, he chose us before the creation of the world,
to be holy and spotless in his sight.

He predestined us to be his adopted children through Jesus Christ,
simply because it pleased him to do so.

This he did for the praise of the glory of his grace,
of his free gift of us to his Beloved,

in whose blood we have gained redemption,
and the forgiveness of our sins.

This he did according to the riches of his grace,
which he gave us in abundance,

with all wisdom and discernment,
revealing to us the mysteries of his will,
because it pleased him to do so.

In this action he has planned, in the fulfilment of time,
to bring all things together in Christ,
from the heavens and from the earth.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Magnificat
My soul rejoices in the Lord
My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
 and my spirit rejoices in God, my salvation.
For he has shown me such favour –
 me, his lowly handmaiden.
Now all generations will call me blessed,
 because the mighty one has done great things for me.
His name is holy,
 his mercy lasts for generation after generation
 for those who revere him.

He has put forth his strength:
 he has scattered the proud and conceited,
 torn princes from their thrones;
 but lifted up the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things;
 the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel,
 he has remembered his mercy as he promised to our fathers,
 to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

27 posted on 06/05/2006 11:01:11 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body


<< Monday, June 5, 2006 >> St. Boniface
 
2 Peter 1:2-7 Psalm 91 Mark 12:1-12
View Readings  
 
COLLECT CALL
 
"In due time He dispatched a man in His service to the tenants to obtain from them His share of produce from the vineyard." —Mark 12:2
 

Our heavenly Father is the Owner of the vineyard, this world. It all belongs to Him. He created it and therefore owns it (Mk 12:1ff; Is 5:1ff). The Father sends servants to pick up what rightfully belongs to Him. These servants are our spouses, families, co-workers, the poor, the rich, the depressed, and even strangers.

We as tenant farmers can refuse God His rights and beat up His servants (Mk 12:1ff), or we can acknowledge His ownership. Our time and money, bodies and souls, strength and energy, hands and feet, homes and jobs must be given to God through the people He sends into our lives (cf Mk 12:29-31).

Someone's knocking on the door. He or she is from God. God is taking it back. Will you let it go? Or will you beat up the servant through apathy and selfishness? Whatever we do to the least of the brethren, that is what we do to Him (Mt 25:40).

 
Prayer: Jesus, You gave Your life for me and thereby gave it all back to the Father. May I do the same.
Promise: "He has bestowed on us the great and precious things He promised, so that through these you who have fled a world corrupted by lust might become sharers of the divine nature." —2 Pt 1:4
Praise: St. Boniface gave nearly eighty years of his life in tireless service to the Lord, and was then honored with a martyr's death.
 

28 posted on 06/05/2006 11:05:28 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: All
Compline -- Night Prayer

Compline (Night Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


This is an excellent moment for an examination of conscience. In a communal celebration of Compline, one of the penitential acts given in the Missal may be recited.

A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.


Psalm 85 (86)
A poor man's prayer in time of trouble
Lord God, you are full of mercies, patient and true. Alleluia.
Turn your ear to me, Lord, and hear me,
 for I am poor and destitute.
Keep my life safe, for I am faithful;
 O God, save your servant, who trusts in you.

Take pity upon me, O Lord,
 for I call to you all the day long.
Make your servant’s heart glad,
 for to you, O Lord, I have raised it.
For you, Lord, are gentle and mild:
 you are kind to all those who call on you.

Let your ears hear my prayer, O Lord!
 Turn to the voice of my pleading!
In my time of trouble I call on you,
 for you, O Lord, will hear me.

No other god is like you, O Lord,
 and nothing compares with your works.
All people – all nations you made –
 will come and worship before you;
 they will give glory to your name.
For you are great, you work wonders:
 you alone are God.

O Lord, teach me your paths,
 and I will come to your truth.
Make my heart simple and guileless,
 so that it honours your name.
I will proclaim you, Lord my God,
 and give you praise with all my heart.
I will give glory to your name for ever,
 for your great kindness is upon me:
 you have rescued me from the deepest depths.

O God, the proud rise against me,
 in the meetings of the powerful they seek my life:
 they do not keep you in their sight.
And you, Lord, are a God of compassion,
 full of mercies, patient and true.
Look upon me, have mercy upon me,
 give your strength and protection to your servant
 your servant, the child of your handmaid.

Give me a sign of your goodness,
 let my enemies see it and be confounded;
because you, O Lord, have helped me and given me comfort.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Lord God, you are full of mercies, patient and true. Alleluia.

Reading 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10
God chose that we should receive salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us; so that, asleep or awake, we should still live with him.

Short Responsory ?
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

Canticle Nunc Dimittis
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.
Now, Master, you let your servant go in peace.
 You have fulfilled your promise.
My own eyes have seen your salvation,
 which you have prepared in the sight of all peoples.
A light to bring the Gentiles from darkness;
 the glory of your people Israel.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.

Prayer
Let us pray.
Give our bodies rest, Lord, to restore them; and let the seeds sown by our labours today grow and yield an eternal harvest.
Through Christ our Lord, Amen.

May the almighty Lord grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
A M E N
An antiphon to Our Lady should be recited here.

29 posted on 06/05/2006 11:07:38 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson