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Meditations for this Feast Day of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Crossroads Initiative ^ | 8th Century | St. John Damascene

Posted on 08/15/2006 4:23:45 AM PDT by Carolina

This reading on the Assumption of Mary is taken from the first homily of St. John Damascene on the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

“But even though, according to nature, your most holy and happy soul is separated from your most blessed and stainless body and the body as usual is delivered to the tomb, it will not remain in the power of death and is not subject to decay. For just as her virginity remained inviolate while giving birth, when she departed her body was preserved from destruction and only taken to a better and more divine tabernacle, which is not subject to any death . . . Hence I will call her holy passing not death, but falling asleep or departure, or better still, arrival. . . .

"Your stainless and wholly immaculate body has not been left on earth; the Queen, the Mistress, the Mother of God who has truly given birth to God has been translated to the royal palaces of heaven. .

"Angels and archangels have borne you upwards, the impure spirits of the air have trembled at your ascension. The air is purified, the ether sanctified by your passing through them. . . the powers meet you with sacred hymns and much solemnity, saying something like this: Who is she that comes forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, elect like the sun? [cf. Cant 6:9] How you have blossomed forth, how sweet you have become! You are the flower of the field, a lily among the thorns [Cant 2.1] . . . Not like Elijah have you entered heaven, not like Paul have you been rapt to the third heaven; no, you have penetrated even to the royal throne of your Son himself . . . a blessing for the world, a sanctification of the universe, refreshment for those who are tired, comfort for the sorrowing, healing for the sick, a port for those in danger, pardon for sinners, soothing balm for the oppressed, quick help for all who pray to you. . .

“Good Mistress, graciously look down on us; direct and guide our destinies wheresoever you will. Pacify the storm of our wicked passions, guide us into the quiet port of the divine will and grant us the blessedness to come.”

St. John Damascene was one of the last of the Early Church Fathers. He died in 749AD and was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII in the 19th century.


TOPICS: Catholic; Prayer; Theology
KEYWORDS: assumption; catholic; earlyfathers; johnhenrynewman; meditations

1 posted on 08/15/2006 4:23:46 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Coleus; Salvation

Catholic ping on this blessed Feast Day of Our Lady.


2 posted on 08/15/2006 4:24:26 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Carolina
From John Henry Cardinal Newman

I say, it would be a greater miracle if, her life being what it was, her death was like that of other men, than if it were such as to correspond to her life. Who can conceive, my brethren, that God should so repay the debt, which He condescended to owe to His Mother, for the elements of His human body, as to allow the flesh and blood from which it was taken to moulder in the grave? Do the sons of men thus deal with their mothers? do they not nourish and sustain them in their feebleness, and keep them in life while they are able? Or who can conceive that that virginal frame, which never sinned, was to undergo the death of a sinner? Why should she share the curse of Adam, who had no share in his fall? "Dust thou art, and into dust thou shalt return," was the sentence upon sin; she then, who was not a sinner, fitly never saw corruption. She died, then, as we hold, because even our Lord and Saviour died; she died, as she suffered, because she was in this world, because she was in a state of things in which suffering and death are the rule. She lived under their external sway; and, as she obeyed Caesar by coming for enrollment to Bethlehem, so did she, when God willed it, yield to the tyranny of death, and was dissolved into soul and body, as well as others. But though she died as well as others, she died not as others die; for, through the merits of her Son, by whom she was what she was, by the grace of Christ which in her had anticipated sin, which had filled her with light, which had purified her flesh from all defilement, she was also saved from disease and malady, and all that weakens and decays the bodily frame. Original sin had not been found in her, by the wear of her senses, and the waste of her frame, and the decrepitude of years, propagating death. She died, but her death was a mere fact, not an effect; and, when it was over, it ceased to be. She died that she might live, she died as a matter of form or (as I may call it) an observance, in order to fulfill, what is called, the debt of nature,—not primarily for herself or because of sin, but to submit herself to her condition, to glorify God, to do what her Son did; not however as her Son and Saviour, with any suffering for any special end; not with a martyr's death, for her martyrdom had been in living; not as an atonement, for man could not make it, and One had made it, and made it for all; but in order to finish her course, and to receive her crown.

And therefore she died in private. It became Him, who died for the world, to die in the world's sight; it became the Great Sacrifice to be lifted up on high, as a light that could not be hid. But she, the lily of Eden, who had always dwelt out of the sight of man, fittingly did she die in the garden's shade, and amid the sweet flowers in which she had lived. Her departure made no noise in the world. The Church went about her common duties, preaching, converting, suffering; there were persecutions, there was fleeing from place to place, there were martyrs, there were triumphs; at length the rumour spread abroad that the Mother of God was no longer upon earth. Pilgrims went to and fro; they sought for her relics, but they found them not; did she die at Ephesus? or did she die at Jerusalem? reports varied; but her tomb could not be pointed out, or if it was found, it was open; and instead of her pure and fragrant body, there was a growth of lilies from the earth which she had touched. So inquirers went home marvelling, and waiting for further light. And then it was said, how that when her dissolution was at hand, and her soul was to pass in triumph before the judgment-seat of her Son, the apostles were suddenly gathered together in the place, even in the Holy City, to bear part in the joyful ceremonial; how that they buried her with fitting rites; how that the third day, when they came to the tomb, they found it empty, and angelic choirs with their glad voices were heard singing day and night the glories of their risen Queen. But, however we feel towards the details of this history (nor is there anything in it which will be unwelcome or difficult to piety), so much cannot be doubted, from the consent of the whole Catholic world and the revelations made to holy souls, that, as is befitting, she is, soul and body, with her Son and God in heaven, and that we are enabled to celebrate, not only her death, but her Assumption.

3 posted on 08/15/2006 4:26:42 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Carolina


Its flowers are too stainless to remain
Concealed in the dark caverns of the earth,
But must be lifted up by God again
To know a second spring - a glad rebirth!
How could Christ leave her body in the tomb
Who was above all other women blest,
Who gave Him refuge in her virgin womb,
And fed Him on the lilies of her breast?
Is she not fairer far than any flower?
What bloom could ever boast her loveliness?
What fragrance rose in its sequestered bower
Has ever vied with her in spotlessness?
Truly the Lord, her God, the Holy One,
Has placed His tabernacle in the sun.

~Thomas E. Burke
4 posted on 08/15/2006 4:28:04 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: NYer; Pyro7480; Nihil Obstat; bornacatholic; Convert from ECUSA; AnAmericanMother; Maeve; ...

Please add your favorite meditations for this day.


5 posted on 08/15/2006 4:30:20 AM PDT by Carolina
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Comment #6 Removed by Moderator

To: Carolina

The Assumption of the BVM is a reminder of the promise Christ her son keeps for all the Christian Believers on being resurected on the last day.


7 posted on 08/15/2006 5:39:34 AM PDT by Biggirl (A biggirl with a big heart for God's animal creation.)
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To: Carolina
The Blessed Virgin compared to the Air we Breathe

WILD air, world-mothering air,
Nestling me everywhere,
That each eyelash or hair
Girdles; goes home betwixt
The fleeciest, frailest-flixed
Snowflake; that ’s fairly mixed
With, riddles, and is rife
In every least thing’s life;
This needful, never spent,
And nursing element;
My more than meat and drink,
My meal at every wink;
This air, which, by life’s law,
My lung must draw and draw
Now but to breathe its praise,
Minds me in many ways
Of her who not only
Gave God’s infinity
Dwindled to infancy
Welcome in womb and breast,
Birth, milk, and all the rest
But mothers each new grace
That does now reach our race—

Mary Immaculate,
Merely a woman, yet
Whose presence, power is
Great as no goddess’s
Was deemèd, dreamèd; who
This one work has to do—
Let all God’s glory through,
God’s glory which would go
Through her and from her flow
Off, and no way but so.

I say that we are wound
With mercy round and round
As if with air: the same
Is Mary, more by name.
She, wild web, wondrous robe,
Mantles the guilty globe,
Since God has let dispense
Her prayers his providence:
Nay, more than almoner,
The sweet alms’ self is her
And men are meant to share
Her life as life does air.

If I have understood,
She holds high motherhood
Towards all our ghostly good
And plays in grace her part
About man’s beating heart,
Laying, like air’s fine flood,
The deathdance in his blood;
Yet no part but what will
Be Christ our Saviour still.
Of her flesh he took flesh:
He does take fresh and fresh,
Though much the mystery how,
Not flesh but spirit now
And makes, O marvellous!
New Nazareths in us,
Where she shall yet conceive
Him, morning, noon, and eve;
New Bethlems, and he born
There, evening, noon, and morn—
Bethlem or Nazareth,
Men here may draw like breath
More Christ and baffle death;
Who, born so, comes to be
New self and nobler me
In each one and each one
More makes, when all is done,
Both God’s and Mary’s Son.

Again, look overhead
How air is azurèd;
O how! nay do but stand
Where you can lift your hand
Skywards: rich, rich it laps
Round the four fingergaps.
Yet such a sapphire-shot,
Charged, steepèd sky will not
Stain light. Yea, mark you this:
It does no prejudice.
The glass-blue days are those
When every colour glows,
Each shape and shadow shows.
Blue be it: this blue heaven
The seven or seven times seven
Hued sunbeam will transmit
Perfect, not alter it.
Or if there does some soft,
On things aloof, aloft,
Bloom breathe, that one breath more
Earth is the fairer for.
Whereas did air not make
This bath of blue and slake
His fire, the sun would shake,
A blear and blinding ball
With blackness bound, and all
The thick stars round him roll
Flashing like flecks of coal,
Quartz-fret, or sparks of salt,
In grimy vasty vault.

So God was god of old:
A mother came to mould
Those limbs like ours which are
What must make our daystar
Much dearer to mankind;
Whose glory bare would blind
Or less would win man’s mind.
Through her we may see him
Made sweeter, not made dim,
And her hand leaves his light
Sifted to suit our sight.

Be thou then, O thou dear
Mother, my atmosphere;
My happier world, wherein
To wend and meet no sin;
Above me, round me lie
Fronting my froward eye
With sweet and scarless sky;
Stir in my ears, speak there
Of God’s love, O live air,
Of patience, penance, prayer:
World-mothering air, air wild,
Wound with thee, in thee isled,
Fold home, fast fold thy child.

-- Gerard Manley Hopkins

8 posted on 08/15/2006 5:50:51 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: thiscouldbemoreconfusing

Friend, this is a meditation thread. If you wish to debate this is not the place for it. I ask that you respect the nature of this thread.


9 posted on 08/15/2006 6:10:44 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: thiscouldbemoreconfusing

Luke 1:46-55


10 posted on 08/15/2006 6:13:27 AM PDT by Mercat (Luke 1:46-55)
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To: AnAmericanMother
The glass-blue days are those
When every colour glows,
Each shape and shadow shows.
Blue be it: this blue heaven
The seven or seven times seven
Hued sunbeam will transmit
Perfect, not alter it.

The Assumption of Mary
Michel Sittow, c. 1500

11 posted on 08/15/2006 6:18:20 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Biggirl

The Assumption by Botticini c. 1475-6

~by St. Alphonsus Liguori from the Seventh Discourse, The Assumption of Mary

"And now death came; not indeed clothed in mourning and grief, as it does to others, but adorned with light and gladness. But what do we say? Why speak of death? Let us rather say that divine love came, and cut the thread of that noble life. And as a light, before going out, gives a last and brighter flash than ever, so did this beautiful creature, on hearing her Son's invitation to follow him, wrapped in the flames of love, and in the midst of her loving sighs, give a last sigh of still more ardent love, and breathing forth her soul, expired. Thus was that great soul, that beautiful dove of the Lord, loosened from the bands of this life; thus did she enter into the glory of the blessed, where she is now seated, and will be seated, Queen of Paradise, for all eternity."

"Let us now consider how our Savior went forth from heaven to meet his Mother. On first meeting her, and to console her, he said: Arise, make haste, my love, my dove, my beautiful one, and come, for winter is now past and gone. Come, my own dear Mother, my pure and beautiful dove; leave that valley of tears, in which, for my love, you have suffered so much. Come from Lebanon, my spouse, come from Lebanon, come: You shall be crowned. Come in, soul and body, to enjoy the reward of your holy life. If your sufferings have been great on earth, far greater is the glory which I have prepared for you in heaven. Enter, then, that kingdom, and take your seat near me; come to receive that crown which I will bestow on you as Queen of the universe."

12 posted on 08/15/2006 6:28:13 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Carolina

THE ASSUMPTION OF MARY: A BELIEF SINCE APOSTOLIC TIMES

Father Clifford Stevens
The Assumption is the oldest feast day of Our Lady, but we don't know how it first came to be celebrated. Its origin is lost in those days when Jerusalem was restored as a sacred city, at the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine (c. 285-337). By then it had been a pagan city for two centuries, ever since Emperor Hadrian (76-138) had leveled it around the year 135 and rebuilt it as in honor of Jupiter.

For 200 years, every memory of Jesus was obliterated from the city, and the sites made holy by His life, death and Resurrection became pagan temples.

After the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 336, the sacred sites began to be restored and memories of the life of Our Lord began to be celebrated by the people of Jerusalem. One of the memories about his mother centered around the "Tomb of Mary," close to Mount Zion, where the early Christian community had lived.

On the hill itself was the "Place of Dormition," the spot of Mary's "falling asleep," where she had died. The "Tomb of Mary" was where she was buried.

At this time, the "Memory of Mary" was being celebrated. Later it was to become our feast of the Assumption.

For a time, the "Memory of Mary" was marked only in Palestine, but then it was extended by the emperor to all the churches of the East. In the seventh century, it began to be celebrated in Rome under the title of the "Falling Asleep" ("Dormitio") of the Mother of God.

Soon the name was changed to the "Assumption of Mary," since there was more to the feast than her dying. It also proclaimed that she had been taken up, body and soul, into heaven.

That belief was ancient, dating back to the apostles themselves. What was clear from the beginning was that there were no relics of Mary to be venerated, and that an empty tomb stood on the edge of Jerusalem near the site of her death. That location also soon became a place of pilgrimage. (Today, the Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition of Mary stands on the spot.)

At the Council of Chalcedon in 451, when bishops from throughout the Mediterranean world gathered in Constantinople, Emperor Marcian asked the Patriarch of Jerusalem to bring the relics of Mary to Constantinople to be enshrined in the capitol. The patriarch explained to the emperor that there were no relics of Mary in Jerusalem, that "Mary had died in the presence of the apostles; but her tomb, when opened later . . . was found empty and so the apostles concluded that the body was taken up into heaven."

In the eighth century, St. John Damascene was known for giving sermons at the holy places in Jerusalem. At the Tomb of Mary, he expressed the belief of the Church on the meaning of the feast: "Although the body was duly buried, it did not remain in the state of death, neither was it dissolved by decay. . . . You were transferred to your heavenly home, O Lady, Queen and Mother of God in truth."

All the feast days of Mary mark the great mysteries of her life and her part in the work of redemption. The central mystery of her life and person is her divine motherhood, celebrated both at Christmas and a week later (Jan. 1) on the feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8) marks the preparation for that motherhood, so that she had the fullness of grace from the first moment of her existence, completely untouched by sin. Her whole being throbbed with divine life from the very beginning, readying her for the exalted role of mother of the Savior.

The Assumption completes God's work in her since it was not fitting that the flesh that had given life to God himself should ever undergo corruption. The Assumption is God's crowning of His work as Mary ends her earthly life and enters eternity. The feast turns our eyes in that direction, where we will follow when our earthly life is over.

The feast days of the Church are not just the commemoration of historical events; they do not look only to the past. They look to the present and to the future and give us an insight into our own relationship with God. The Assumption looks to eternity and gives us hope that we, too, will follow Our Lady when our life is ended.

The prayer for the feast reads: "All-powerful and ever-living God: You raised the sinless Virgin Mary, mother of your Son, body and soul, to the glory of heaven. May we see heaven as our final goal and come to share her glory."

In 1950, in the Apostolic Constitution , Pope Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption of Mary a dogma of the Catholic Church in these words: "The Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heaven."

With that, an ancient belief became Catholic doctrine and the Assumption was declared a truth revealed by God.

Father Clifford Stevens writes from Tintern Monastery in Oakdale, Neb.


This article was taken from the July-August 1996 issue of "Catholic Heritage". To subscribe write Our Sunday Visitor, Inc., 200 Noll Plaza, Huntington, IN 46750-9957 or call 1-800-348-2440. Published bimonthly at a charge of $18.00 per year.
Provided Courtesy of: Eternal Word Television Network 5817 Old Leeds Road Irondale, AL 35210 www.ewtn.com
Today is a Holy Day of Obligation for all Catholics. For information on a Mass in your area, consult: www.masstimes.org
13 posted on 08/15/2006 6:35:33 AM PDT by COBOL2Java (Freedom isn't free, but the men and women of the military will pay most of your share)
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To: COBOL2Java

Thank you. Blessings to you on this feast day. Mass this morning was wonderful. It was great to be able to chant and sing traditional hymns. I was amazed at how many families with young children were there this morning so early.


14 posted on 08/15/2006 6:53:13 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: All


We'll hew a highway through the skies
And pave it white with sheen
For pure must be the pathway
Where walks a stainless Queen.

We'll fuse the fairest rainbows
In one symphonic hue
And gaily tint the fabric
Of our Lady's avenue.

If heaven's brightest beauties
Should dare her pathway bar
We'll cleave the sun in splinters
And shatter every star.

We'll drain the fresh new dawning
Of all its dew drop spray
And with it soothe the roughness
That mars the maiden's way.

Then all the angel choirs
With anthems swelling sweet
Shall lead the lovely Lady
Along her spangled street.

A destiny of glory
This roadway shall complete
When at its end the Mother
And the Son of God shall meet.

~Thomas H. Cosgrove
15 posted on 08/15/2006 7:26:46 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Carolina
"Please add your favorite meditations for this day.

Salve Regina!
16 posted on 08/15/2006 7:29:50 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (The Arab League jihad continues on like a fart in an elevator - FR American in Israel)
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To: Convert from ECUSA

17 posted on 08/15/2006 7:38:46 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Carolina

Beautiful thread!


18 posted on 08/15/2006 7:59:38 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina; nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Prayer Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Prayer Ping List.

19 posted on 08/15/2006 8:00:50 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Salvation, I'm afraid that Carolina beat you to the thread...
20 posted on 08/15/2006 8:06:37 AM PDT by COBOL2Java (Freedom isn't free, but the men and women of the military will pay most of your share)
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To: Salvation

Ooops! This is it! Nevermind... hehe


21 posted on 08/15/2006 8:07:31 AM PDT by COBOL2Java (Freedom isn't free, but the men and women of the military will pay most of your share)
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To: COBOL2Java

You have FReepmail.


22 posted on 08/15/2006 8:13:36 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina
Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 08-15-06, Solemnity, Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
23 posted on 08/15/2006 8:18:52 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina
The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary IS
a Holy Day of Obligation!
 
See you in Church!
 
Carracci's Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary 

24 posted on 08/15/2006 9:02:08 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Lovely. Mass was wonderful this morning. Chant, traditional hymns, and another great homily from Father.


25 posted on 08/15/2006 9:10:42 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: All

~by St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Today the glorious Virgin has ascended into heaven, surely filling up the measure of joy of those who dwell there. But it might seem more fitting for us to weep than to clap our hands. If heaven rejoices in Mary’s presence, does it not follow that our world below should bemoan her absence? Nevertheless, let us make an end of our repining, for here we have no abiding city: we seek the very city to which blessed Mary has gone today. If we are enrolled as citizens of heaven, it is surely right for us to remember her and to share her joy even in our exile, even here beside the waters of Babylon. Our Queen has gone before us, and so glorious has been her entry into paradise that we, her servants, confidently follow our mistress, crying: Draw us after you and we shall run toward the fragrance of your perfumes. We in our exile have sent on ahead of us our advocate who, as mother of our judge and mother of mercy, will humbly and effectively look after everything that concerns our salvation.

Today earth has sent a priceless gift up to heaven, so that by giving and receiving within the blessed bond of friendship, the human is wedded to the divine, earth to heaven, the depths to the heights. A sublime fruit of the earth has gone up to heaven, from whence the best gifts, the perfect gifts descend. The blessed Virgin has ascended on high and therefore she too will give gifts to us. And why not? Surely she lacks neither the ability to do so, nor the will. She is the queen of heaven; she is compassionate; she is the mother of the only-begotten Son of God. This more than anything proves the greatness of her power and love—unless, perhaps, we do not believe that the Son of God honors his mother, or unless we doubt that Love itself, which is born of God and rested nine months in her womb, evoked a response of love in her heart.

But quite apart form the benefits that will accrue to us through her glorification, if we love her we shall rejoice because she goes to her Son. We shall certainly congratulate her without reserve, unless—which God forbid—we are wholly without gratitude toward her who has found for us the way of grace. The Lord, who she first received when he entered the village of this world, today receives her into the holy city. But can you imagine with how much joy, with how much glory? On earth there was no worthier place for Mary to receive the son of God than the temple of her virginal womb. Nor in heaven is there a worthier place for her than that royal throne to which her Son has today exalted her.

Who can describe either how Christ was begotten or how Mary was taken up into heaven? Just as Mary surpassed in grace all others on earth, so also in heaven is her glory unique. If eye has not seen or ear heard or the human heart conceived what God has prepared for those who love him, who can express what he has prepared for the woman who gave him birth and who loved him, as everyone knows, more than anyone else? Blessed indeed is Mary, blessed in many ways, both in receiving the Savior, and in being received by the Savior.

26 posted on 08/15/2006 10:02:55 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Carolina
Beautiful!


27 posted on 08/15/2006 10:26:43 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: Carolina
Standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother and his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary of Magdala.

When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple there whom he loved, he said to his mother, "Woman, behold, your son."

Then he said to the disciple, "Behold, your mother." And from that hour the disciple took her into his home.

After this, aware that everything was now finished, in order that the scripture might be fulfilled, Jesus said, "I thirst."

Thank you Jesus! Blessed Virgin Mary pray for us. Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on us.

28 posted on 08/15/2006 4:10:20 PM PDT by Nihil Obstat
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To: Carolina
Sorry, I was simply responding to your invitation in post six "Please add your favorite meditations for this day"

And that is all I did, I was not looking for a debate, nor chastisement, just posting one of my fovorite verses of Scripture, one I have thought long and hard over.

29 posted on 08/15/2006 4:11:10 PM PDT by thiscouldbemoreconfusing
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To: thiscouldbemoreconfusing
Yes, I understand. But to us Catholics, that verse is like a cudgel used to beat us for our supposed idolatry of Mary. No matter how much we explain, non-Catholics know better than we what our interior motivations are.

Today is the day we honor the Mother of Our Lord, who through her humility opened the gate of Salvation for us, and her utter dependence and trust in God showed us the way of perfect obedience. We are not confused as to whom we worship. Worship belongs to God alone. With regards to the Virgin Mary, God loved her and honored her. Out of all the human race, he chose her to give His Beloved Son His human frame. So we venerate her and show her honor. It grieves us when she is dishonored. So on this day of the remembrance of her triumph we invite everyone to meditate on Mary, the woman whom every generation should call Blessed.

30 posted on 08/15/2006 4:52:37 PM PDT by Carolina
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