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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 08-15-06, Solemnity, Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | 08-15-06 | New American Bible

Posted on 08/15/2006 8:08:09 AM PDT by Salvation

August 15, 2006

Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Mass during the Day

Psalm: Monday 34

Reading 1
Rv 11:19a; 12:1-6a, 10ab

God’s temple in heaven was opened,
and the ark of his covenant could be seen in the temple.

A great sign appeared in the sky, a woman clothed with the sun,
with the moon under her feet,
and on her head a crown of twelve stars.
She was with child and wailed aloud in pain as she labored to give birth.
Then another sign appeared in the sky;
it was a huge red dragon, with seven heads and ten horns,
and on its heads were seven diadems.
Its tail swept away a third of the stars in the sky
and hurled them down to the earth.
Then the dragon stood before the woman about to give birth,
to devour her child when she gave birth.
She gave birth to a son, a male child,
destined to rule all the nations with an iron rod.
Her child was caught up to God and his throne.
The woman herself fled into the desert
where she had a place prepared by God.

Then I heard a loud voice in heaven say:
“Now have salvation and power come,
and the Kingdom of our God
and the authority of his Anointed One.”

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 45:10, 11, 12, 16

R. (10bc) The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.
The queen takes her place at your right hand in gold of Ophir.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.
Hear, O daughter, and see; turn your ear,
forget your people and your father’s house.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.
So shall the king desire your beauty;
for he is your lord.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.
They are borne in with gladness and joy;
they enter the palace of the king.
R. The queen stands at your right hand, arrayed in gold.

Reading II
1 Cor 15:20-27

Brothers and sisters:
Christ has been raised from the dead,
the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.
For since death came through man,
the resurrection of the dead came also through man.
For just as in Adam all die,
so too in Christ shall all be brought to life,
but each one in proper order:
Christ the firstfruits;
then, at his coming, those who belong to Christ;
then comes the end,
when he hands over the Kingdom to his God and Father,
when he has destroyed every sovereignty
and every authority and power.
For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet.
The last enemy to be destroyed is death,
for “he subjected everything under his feet.”

Gospel
Lk 1:39-56

Mary set out
and traveled to the hill country in haste
to a town of Judah,
where she entered the house of Zechariah
and greeted Elizabeth.
When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting,
the infant leaped in her womb,
and Elizabeth, filled with the Holy Spirit,
cried out in a loud voice and said,
“Blessed are you among women,
and blessed is the fruit of your womb.
And how does this happen to me,
that the mother of my Lord should come to me?
For at the moment the sound of your greeting reached my ears,
the infant in my womb leaped for joy.
Blessed are you who believed
that what was spoken to you by the Lord
would be fulfilled.”

And Mary said:

“My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord;
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me
and holy is his Name.
He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.
He has shown the strength of his arm,
and has scattered the proud in their conceit.
He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.
He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children forever.”

Mary remained with her about three months
and then returned to her home.




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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 08/15/2006 8:08:11 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Alleluia Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Alleluia Ping List.

2 posted on 08/15/2006 8:09:34 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Meditations for this Feast Day of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

HOMILIES PREACHED BY FATHER ALTIER ON THE FEAST OF THE ASSUMPTION

Why Catholics Believe in the Assumption of Mary

St. John Damascene: Homily 3 on the Assumption/Dormition

St. John Damascene: Homily II on the Assumption/Dormition

St. John Damascene: Homily I on the Assumption/Dormition

Catholic Caucus: The Assumption of Mary - Marcellino D'Ambrosio, PhD

Today's the Feast of the Assumption of Mary into Heaven

Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, August 15th.

Maronite Catholic: Qolo (Hymn) of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

St. Gregory Palamas: On the Dormition of Our Supremely Pure Lady Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary

Maronite Catholic: Qolo (Hymn) of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Catholic Caucus: A NOVENA OF FASTING AND PRAYERS/ASSUMPTION/DORMITION

The Fourth Glorious Mystery

Archbishop Sheen Today! -- The glorious assumption

The Assumption Of The Blessed Virgin Mary Reflections For The Feast 2003

The Assumption Of Mary

3 posted on 08/15/2006 8:14:59 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Revelation 11:19a; 12:1-6a, 10ab


The Sounding of the Seventh Trumpet



[19] Then God's temple in heaven was opened, and the ark of his
covenant was seen within his temple.


The Woman Fleeing from the Dragon


[1] And a great portent appeared in heaven, a woman clothed with the
sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve
stars; [2] she was with child and she cried out in her pangs of birth,
in anguish for delivery [3] And another portent appeared in heaven;
behold, a great red dragon, with seven heads and ten horns, and seven
diadems upon his heads. [4] His tail swept down a third of the stars of
heaven, and cast them to the earth. And the dragon stood before the
woman who was about to bear a child, that he might devour her child
when she brought it forth; [5] she brought forth a male child, one who
is to rule all the nations with a rod of iron, but her child was caught
up to God and to his throne, [6] and the woman fled into the
wilderness, where she has a place prepared by God.


[10] And I heard a loud voice in heaven, saying, "Now the salvation and
the power and the kingdom of our God and the authority of his Christ
have come.




Commentary:


19. The seer introduces the heavenly temple (the location par
excellence of God's presence), paralleling the earlier mention of the
temple of Jerusalem (cf. 11:1-2). The opening of the temple and the
sight of the Ark of the Covenant show that the messianic era has come
to an end and God's work of salvation has been completed. The ark was
the symbol of Israel's election and salvation and of God's presence in
the midst of his people. According to a Jewish tradition, reported in 2
Maccabees 2:4-8, Jeremiah placed the ark in a secret hiding place prior
to the destruction of Jerusalem, and it would be seen again when the
Messiah carne. The author of the Apocalypse uses this to assure us that
God has not forgotten his covenant: he has sealed it definitively in
heaven, where the ark is located.


Many early commentators interpreted the ark as a reference to Christ's
sacred humanity, and St Bede explains that just as the manna was kept
in the original ark, so Christ's divinity lies hidden in his sacred
body (cf. "Explanatio Apocalypsis", 11, 19).


The heavenly covenant is the new and eternal one made by Jesus Christ
(cf. Mt 26:26-29 and par.) which will be revealed to all at his second
coming when the Church will triumph, as the Apocalypse goes on to
describe. The presence of the ark in the heavenly temple symbolizes the
sublimity of the messianic kingdom, which exceeds anything man could
create. "The vigilant and active expectation of the coming of the
Kingdom is also the expectation of a finally perfect justice for the
living and the dead, for people of all times and places, a justice
which Jesus Christ, installed as supreme Judge, will establish (cf. Mt
24:29-44, 46; Acts 10:42; 2 Cor 5: 10). This promise, which surpasses
all human possibilities, directly concerns our life in this world. For
true justice must include everyone; it must explain the immense load of
suffering borne by all generations. In fact, without the resurrection
of the dead and the Lord's judgment, there is no justice in the full
sense of the term. The promise of the resurrection is freely made to
meet the desire for true justice dwelling in the human heart" (SCDF,
"Libertatis Conscientia", 60).


The thunder and lightning which accompany the appearance of the ark are
reminiscent of the way God made his presence felt on Sinai; they reveal
God's mighty intervention (cf. Rev 4:5; 8:5) which is now accompanied
by the chastisement of the wicked, symbolized by the earthquake and
hailstones (cf. Ex 9: 13-35).


1-17. We are now introduced to the contenders in the eschatological
battles which mark the final confrontation between God and his
adversary, the devil. The author uses three portents to describe the
leading figures involved, and the war itself. The first is the woman
and her offspring, including the Messiah (12:1-2); the second is the
dragon, who will later transfer his power to the beasts (12:3); the
third, the seven angels with the seven bowls (15:1).


Three successive confrontations with the dragon are described--1) that
of the Messiah to whom the woman gives birth (12:1-6); 2) that of St
Michael and his angels (12:7-12); and 3) that of the woman and the rest
of her offspring (12:13-17) These confrontations should not be seen as
being in chronological order. They are more like three distinct
pictures placed side by side because they are closely connected: in
each the same enemy, the devil, does battle with God's plans and with
those whom God uses to carry them out.


1-2. The mysterious figure of the woman has been interpreted ever since
the time of the Fathers of the Church as referring to the ancient
people of Israel, or the Church of Jesus Christ, or the Blessed Virgin.
The text supports all of these interpretations but in none do all the
details fit. The woman can stand for the people of Israel, for it is
from that people that the Messiah comes, and Isaiah compares Israel to
"a woman with child, who writhes and cries out in her pangs when she is
near her time" (Is 26:17).


She can also stand for the Church, whose children strive to overcome
evil and to bear witness to Jesus Christ (cf. v. 17). Following this
interpretation St Gregory wrote: "The sun stands for the light of
truth, and the moon for the transitoriness of temporal things; the holy
Church is clothed like the sun because she is protected by the splendor
of supernatural truth, and she has the moon under her feet because she
is above all earthly things" ("Moralia", 34, 12).


The passage can also refer to the Virgin Mary because it was she who
truly and historically gave birth to the Messiah, Jesus Christ our Lord
(cf. v. 5). St Bernard comments: "The sun contains permanent color and
splendor; whereas the moon's brightness is unpredictable and
changeable, for it never stays the same. It is quite right, then, for
Mary to be depicted as clothed with the sun, for she entered the
profundity of divine wisdom much further than one can possibly
conceive" ("De B. Virgine", 2).


In his account of the Annunciation, St Luke sees Mary as representing
the faithful remnant of Israel; the angel greets her with the greeting
given in Zephaniah 3:15 to the daughter of Zion (cf. notes on Lk 1:26-
31). St Paul in Galatians 4:4 sees a woman as the symbol of the Church,
our mother; and non-canonical Jewish literature contemporary with the
Book of Revelation quite often personifies the community as a woman.
So, the inspired text of the Apocalypse is open to interpreting this
woman as a direct reference to the Blessed Virgin who, as mother,
shares in the pain of Calvary (cf. Lk 2:35) and who was earlier
prophesied in Isaiah 7:14 as a "sign" (cf. Mt 1:22-23). At the same
time the woman can be interpreted as standing for the people of God,
the Church, whom the figure of Mary represents.


The Second Vatican Council has solemnly taught that Mary is a "type" or
symbol of the Church, for "in the mystery of the Church, which is
itself rightly called mother and virgin, the Blessed Virgin stands out
in eminent and singular fashion as exemplar both of virgin and mother.
Through her faith and obedience she gave birth on earth to the very Son
of the Father, not through the knowledge of man but by the
overshadowing of the Holy Spirit, in the manner of a new Eve who placed
her faith, not in the serpent of old but in God's messenger, without
wavering in doubt. The Son whom she brought forth is he whom God placed
as the first-born among many brethren (cf. Rom 8:29), that is, the
faithful, in whose generation and formation she cooperates with a
mother's love" (Vatican II, "Lumen Gentium", 63).


The description of the woman indicates her heavenly glory, and the
twelve stars of her victorious crown symbolize the people of God--the
twelve patriarchs (cf. Gen 37:9) and the twelve apostles. And so,
independently of the chronological aspects of the text, the Church sees
in this heavenly woman the Blessed Virgin, "taken up body and soul into
heavenly glory, when her earthly life was over, and exalted by the Lord
as Queen over all things, that she might be the more fully conformed to
her Son, the Lord of lords (cf. Rev 19:16) and conqueror of sin and
death" ("Lumen Gentium", 59). The Blessed Virgin is indeed the great
sign, for, as St Bonaventure says, "God could have made none greater.
He could have made a greater world and a greater heaven; but not a
woman greater than his own mother" ("Speculum", 8).


3-4. In his description of the devil (cf. v. 9), St John uses symbols
taken from the Old Testament. The dragon or serpent comes from Genesis
3:1-24, a passage which underlies all the latter half of this book. Its
red color and seven heads with seven diadems show that it is bringing
its full force to bear to wage this war. The ten horns in Daniel 7:7
stand for the kings who are Israel's enemies; in Daniel a horn is also
mentioned to refer to Antiochus IV Epiphanes, of whom Daniel also says
(to emphasize the greatness of Antiochus' victories) that it cast stars
down from heaven onto the earth (cf. Dan 8:10). Satan drags other
angels along with him, as the text later recounts (Rev 12:9). All these
symbols, then, are designed to convey the enormous power of Satan. "The
devil is described as a serpent", St Cyprian writes, "because he moves
silently and seems peaceable and comes by easy ways and is so astute
and so deceptive [...] that he tries to have night taken for day,
poison taken for medicine. So, by deceptions of this kind, he tries to
destroy truth by cunning. That is why he passes himself off as an angel
of light" ("De Unitate Ecclesiae", I-III).


After the fall of our first parents war broke out between the serpent
and his seed and the woman and hers: "I will put enmity between you and
the woman, between your seed and her seed; he shall bruise your head,
and you shall bruise his heel" (Gen 3:15). Jesus Christ is the woman's
descendant who will obtain victory over the devil (cf. Mk 1:23-26; Lk
4:31-37; etc.). That is why the power of evil concentrates all his
energy on destroying Christ (cf. Mt 2:13-18) or to deflecting him from
his mission (cf. Mt 4:1-11 and par.). By relating this enmity to the
beginnings of the human race St. John paints a very vivid picture.


5. The birth of Jesus Christ brings into operation the divine plan
announced by the prophets (cf. Is 66:7) and by the Psalms (cf. Ps 2:9),
and marks the first step in ultimate victory over the devil. Jesus'
life on earth, culminating in his passion, resurrection and ascension
into heaven, was the key factor in achieving this victory. St John
emphasizes the triumph of Christ as victor, who, as the Church
confesses, "sits at the right hand of the Father" ("Nicene-
Constantinopolitan Creed").


6. The figure of the woman reminds us of the Church, the people of God.
Israel took refuge in the wilderness to escape from Pharaoh, and the
Church does the same after the victory of Christ. The wilderness stands
for solitude and intimate union with God. In the wilderness God took
personal care of his people, setting them free from their enemies (cf.
Ex 17:8-16) and nourishing them with quail and manna (cf. Ex 16:1-36).
The Church is given similar protection against the powers of hell (cf.
Mt 16:18) and Christ nourishes it with his body and his word all the
while it makes its pilgrimage through the ages; it has a hard time
(like Israel in the wilderness) but there will be an end to it: it will
take one thousand two hundred and sixty days (cf. notes on 11:3).


Although the woman, in this verse, seems to refer directly to the
Church, she also in some way stands for the particular woman who gave
birth to the Messiah, the Blessed Virgin. As no other creature has
done, Mary has enjoyed a very unique type of union with God and very
special protection from the powers of evil, death included. Thus, as
the Second Vatican Council teaches, "in the meantime [while the Church
makes its pilgrim way on earth], the Mother of Jesus in the glory which
she possesses in body and soul in heaven is the image and beginning of
the Church as it is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise she
shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come (cf. 2 Pet
3:10), a sign of certain hope and comfort to the pilgrim people of God"
("Lumen Gentium", 68).


10-12. With the ascension of Christ into heaven the Kingdom of God is
established and so all those who dwell in heaven break out into a song
of joy. The devil has been deprived of his power over man in the sense
that the redemptive action of Christ and man's faith enable man to
escape from the world of sin. The text expresses this joyful truth by
saying that there is now no place for the accuser, Satan whose name
means and whom the Old Testament teaches to be the accuser of men
before God: cf. Job 1:6-12; 2:1-10). Given what God meant creation to
be, Satan could claim as his victory anyone who, through sinning,
disfigured the image and likeness of God that was in him. However, once
the Redemption has taken place, Satan no longer has power to do this,
for, as St John writes, "if any one does sin, we have an advocate with
the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous; and he is the expiation for our
sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world"
(Jn 2:1-2). Also, on ascending into heaven, Christ sent us the Holy
Spirit as "Intercessor and Advocate, especially when man, that is,
mankind, find themselves before the judgment of condemnation by that
'accuser' about whom the Book of Revelation says that 'he accuses them
day and night before our God"' (John Paul II, "Dominum Et
Vivificantem", 67).


Although Satan has lost this power to act in the world, he still has
time left, between the resurrection of our Lord and the end of history,
to put obstacles in man's way and frustrate Christ's action. And so he
works ever more frenetically, as he sees time run out, in his effort to
distance everyone and society itself from the plans and commandments of
God.


The author of the Book of Revelation uses this celestial chant to warn
the Church of the onset of danger as the End approaches.



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


4 posted on 08/15/2006 8:17:22 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: 1 Corinthians 15:20-27


The Basis of Our Faith (Continuation)



[20] But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits
of those who have fallen asleep. [21] For as by a man came death, by a
man has come also the resurrection of the dead. [22] For as in Adam all
die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive. [23] But each in his
own order: Christ the first fruits, then at his coming those who belong
to Christ. [24] Then comes the end, when he delivers the kingdom to God
the Father after destroying every rule and every authority and power. [25]
For he must reign until he has put all his enemies under his feet.
[26] The last enemy to be destroyed is death. [27] "For God has put all
things in subjection under his feet." But when it says, "All things
are put in subjection under him," it is plain that he is excepted who
put all things under him.




Commentary:


20-28. The Apostle insists on the solidarity that exists between Christ
and Christians: as members of one single body, of which Christ is the
head, they form as it were one organism (cf. Rom 6:3-11; Gal 3:28).
Therefore, once the resurrection of Christ is affirmed, the
resurrection of the just necessarily follows. Adam's disobedience
brought death for all; Jesus, the new Adam, has merited that all should
rise (cf. Rom 5:12-21). "Again, the resurrection of Christ effects for
us the resurrection of our bodies not only because it was the efficient
cause of this mystery, but also because we all ought to arise after the
example of the Lord. For with regard to the resurrection of the body we
have this testimony of the Apostle: 'As by a man came death, by a man
has come also the resurrection of the dead' (1 Cor 15:21). In all that
God did to accomplish the mystery of our redemption he made use of the
humanity of Christ as an effective instrument, and hence his
resurrection was, as it were, an instrument for the accomplishment of
our resurrection" ("St Pius V Catechism", I, 6, 13).


Although St Paul here is referring only to the resurrection of the just
(v. 23), he does speak elsewhere of the resurrection of all mankind
(cf. Acts 24:15). The doctrine of the resurrection of the bodies of all
at the end of time, when Jesus will come in glory to judge everyone,
has always been part of the faith of the Church; "he [Christ] will come
at the end of the world, he will judge the living and the dead; and he
will reward all, both the lost and the elect, according to their works.
And all those will rise with their own bodies which they now have so
that they may receive according to their works, whether good or bad;
the wicked, a perpetual punishment with the devil; the good, eternal
glory with 'Christ" (Fourth Lateran Council, "De Fide Catholica", chap.
1).


23-28. St Paul outlines very succinctly the entire messianic and
redemptive work of Christ: by decree of the Father, Christ has been
made Lord of the universe (cf. Mt 28:18), in fulfillment of Ps 110:1
and Ps 8:7. When it says here that "the Son himself will also be
subjected to him who put all things under him", this must be understood
as referring to Christ in his capacity of Messiah and head of the
Church; not Christ as God, because the Son is "begotten, not created,
consubstantial with the Father" ("Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed").


Christ's sovereignty over all creation comes about in history, but it
will achieve its final, complete, form after the Last Judgment. The
Apostle presents that last event--a mystery to us--as a solemn act of
homage to the Father. Christ will offer all creation to his Father as
a kind of trophy, offering him the Kingdom which up to then had been
confided to his care. From that moment on, the sovereignty of God and
Christ will be absolute, they will have no enemies, no rivals; the
stage of combat will have given way to that of contemplation, as St
Augustine puts it (cf. "De Trinitate", 1, 8).


The Parousia or second coming of Christ in glory at the end of time,
when he establishes the new heaven and the new earth (cf. Rev 21:1-2),
will mean definitive victory over the devil, over sin, suffering and
death. A Christian's hope in this victory is not something passive:
rather, it is something that spurs him on to ensure that even in this
present life Christ's teaching and spirit imbue all human activities.
"Far from diminishing our concern to develop this earth," Vatican II
teaches, "the expectancy of a new earth should spur us on, for it is
here that the body of a new human family grows, foreshadowing in some
way the age which is to come. That is why, although we must be careful
to distinguish earthly progress clearly from the increase of the
Kingdom of Christ, such progress is of vital concern to the Kingdom of
God, insofar as it can contribute to the better ordering of human
society.


"When we have spread on earth the fruits of our nature and our
enterprise--human dignity, brotherly communion, and freedom--according
to the command of the Lord and in his Spirit, we will find them once
again, cleansed this time from the stain of sin, illuminated and
transfigured, when Christ presents to his Father an eternal and
universal kingdom of truth and life, a kingdom of holiness and grace, a
kingdom of justice, love and peace ("Roman Missal", preface for the
solemnity of Christ the King). Here on earth the Kingdom is
mysteriously present; when the Lord comes it will enter into its
perfection" ("Gaudium Et Spes", 39).


24. "When he delivers the kingdom to God the Father": this does not
quite catch the beauty of the Greek which literally means "when he
delivers the kingdom to the God and Father". In New Testament Greek,
when the word "Theos" (God) is preceded by the definite article ("ho
Theos") the first person of the Blessed Trinity is being referred to.


25. "He must reign": every year, on the last Sunday of ordinary time,
the Church celebrates the solemnity of Christ the King, to acknowledge
his absolute sovereignty over all created things. On instituting this
feast, Pius XI pointed out that "He must reign in our minds, which
should assent with perfect submission and firm belief to revealed
truths and to the teachings of Christ. He must reign in our wills,
which should obey the laws and precepts of God. He must reign in our
hearts, which should spurn natural desires and love God above all
things, and cleave to him alone. He must reign in our bodies and in
our members, which should serve as instruments for the interior
sanctification of our souls, or, to use the words of the Apostle Paul,
as instruments of righteousness unto God (Rom 6:13)" ("Quas Primas").


27. By "all things" the Apostle clearly means all created beings. In
pagan mythology, rivalry and strife occurred among the gods and
sometimes led to the son of a god supplanting his father. St Paul wants to
make it quite clear that Sacred Scripture suggests nothing of
that kind. No subjection is possible among the three persons of the
Blessed Trinity, because they are one God.



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


5 posted on 08/15/2006 8:20:42 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Luke 1:39-56


The Visitation



[39] In those days Mary arose and went with haste into the hill
country, to a city of Judah, [40] and she entered the house of
Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. [41] And when Elizabeth heard the
greeting of Mary, the babe leaped in her womb; and Elizabeth was filled
with the Holy Spirit [42] and she exclaimed with a loud cry, "Blessed
are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb! [43] And
why is this granted me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?
[44] For behold, when the voice of your greeting came to my ears, the
babe in my womb leaped for joy. [45] And blessed is she who believed
that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her from the
Lord."


The Magnificat


[46] And Mary said, "My soul magnifies the Lord, [47] and my spirit
rejoices in God my Savior, [48] for He has regarded the low estate of
His handmaiden. For behold, henceforth all generations will call me
blessed; [49] for He who is mighty has done great things for me, and
holy is His name. [50] And His mercy is on those who fear Him from
generation to generation. [51] He has shown strength with His arm, He
has scattered the proud in the imagination of their hearts, [52] He has
put down the mighty from their thrones, and exalted those of low
degree; [53] He has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich He
has sent empty away. [54] He has helped His servant Israel, in
remembrance of His mercy, [55] as He spoke to our fathers, to Abraham
and to his posterity for ever."


[56] And Mary remained with her about three months, and returned to her
home.




Commentary:


39-56. We contemplate this episode of our Lady's visit to her cousin
St. Elizabeth in the Second Joyful Mystery of the Rosary: "Joyfully
keep Joseph and Mary company...and you will hear the traditions of the
House of David.... We walk in haste towards the mountains, to a town
of the tribe of Judah (Luke 1:39).


"We arrive. It is the house where John the Baptist is to be born.
Elizabeth gratefully hails the Mother of her Redeemer: Blessed are you
among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. Why should I be
honored with a visit from the mother of my Lord? (Luke 1:42-43).


"The unborn Baptist quivers...(Luke 1:41). Mary's humility pours forth
in the "Magnificat".... And you and I, who are proud--who were
proud--promise to be humble" ([St] J. Escriva, "Holy Rosary").


39. On learning from the angel that her cousin St. Elizabeth is soon to
give birth and is in need of support, our Lady in her charity hastens
to her aid. She has no regard for the difficulties this involves.
Although we do not know where exactly Elizabeth was living (it is now
thought to be Ain Karim), it certainly meant a journey into the hill
country which at that time would have taken four days.


From Mary's visit to Elizabeth Christians should learn to be caring
people. "If we have this filial contact with Mary, we won't be able to
think just about ourselves and our problems. Selfish personal problems
will find no place in our mind" ([St] J. Escriva, "Christ Is Passing By," 145).


42. St. Bede comments that Elizabeth blesses Mary using the same words
as the archangel "to show that she should be honored by angels and by
men and why she should indeed be revered above all other women" ("In
Lucae Evangelium Expositio, in loc.").


When we say the "Hail Mary" we repeat these divine greetings,
"rejoicing with Mary at her dignity as Mother of God and praising the
Lord, thanking Him for having given us Jesus Christ through Mary" ("St.
Pius X Catechism", 333).


43. Elizabeth is moved by the Holy Spirit to call Mary "the mother of
my Lord", thereby showing that Mary is the Mother of God.


44. Although he was conceived in sin--original sin--like other men, St.
John the Baptist was born sinless because he was sanctified in his
mother's womb by the presence of Jesus Christ (then in Mary's womb) and
of the Blessed Virgin. On receiving this grace of God St. John
rejoices by leaping with joy in his mother's womb--thereby fulfilling
the archangel's prophecy (cf. Luke 1:15).


St. John Chrysostom comments on this scene of the Gospel: "See how new
and how wonderful this mystery is. He has not yet left the womb but he
speaks by leaping; he is not yet allowed to cry out but he makes
himself heard by his actions [...]; he has not yet seen the light but
he points out the Sun; he has not yet been born and he is keen to act
as Precursor. The Lord is present, so he cannot contain himself or
wait for nature to run its course: he wants to break out of the prison
of his mother's womb and he makes sure he witnesses to the fact that
the Savior is about to come" ("Sermo Apud Metaphr., Mense Julio").


45. Joining the chorus of all future generations, Elizabeth, moved by
the Holy Spirit, declares the Lord's Mother to be blessed and praises
her faith. No one ever had faith to compare with Mary's; she is the
model of the attitude a creature should have towards its
Creator--complete submission, total attachment. Through her faith,
Mary is the instrument chosen by God to bring about the Redemption; as
Mediatrix of all graces, she is associated with the redemptive work of
her Son: "This union of the Mother with the Son in the work of
salvation is made manifest from the time of Christ's virginal
conception up to His death; first when Mary, arising in haste to go to
visit Elizabeth, is greeted by her as blessed because of her belief in
the promise of salvation and the Precursor leaps with joy in the womb
of his mother [...]. The Blessed Virgin advanced in her pilgrimage of
faith and faithfully persevered in her union with her Son unto the
cross, where she stood (cf. John 19:25), in keeping with the Divine
Plan, enduring with her only-begotten Son the intensity of His
suffering, associating herself with His sacrifice in her mother's
heart, and lovingly consenting to the immolation of this Victim which
was born of her" (Vatican II, "Lumen Gentium", 57f).


The new Latin text gives a literal rendering of the original Greek when
it says "quae credidit" (RSV "she who has believed") as opposed to the
Vulgate "quae credidisti" ("you who have believed") which gave more of
the sense than a literal rendering.


46-55. Mary's "Magnificat" canticle is a poem of singular beauty. It
evokes certain passages of the Old Testament with which she would have
been very familiar (especially 1 Samuel 2:1-10).


Three stanzas may be distinguished in the canticle: in the first
(verses 46-50) Mary glorifies God for making her the Mother of the
Savior, which is why future generations will call her blessed; she
shows that the Incarnation is a mysterious _expression of God's power
and holiness and mercy. In the second (verses 51-53) she teaches us
that the Lord has always had a preference for the humble, resisting the
proud and boastful. In the third (verses 54-55) she proclaims that
God, in keeping with His promise, has always taken care of His chosen
people--and now does them the greatest honor of all by becoming a Jew
(cf. Romans 1:3).


"Our prayer can accompany and imitate this prayer of Mary. Like her,
we feel the desire to sing, to acclaim the wonders of God, so that all
mankind and all creation may share our joy" ([St] J. Escriva, "Christ Is
Passing By", 144).


46-47. "The first fruits of the Holy Spirit are peace and joy. And the
Blessed Virgin had received within herself all the grace of the Holy
Spirit" (St. Basil, "In Psalmos Homilae", on Psalm 32). Mary's soul
overflows in the words of the "Magnificat". God's favors cause every
humble soul to feel joy and gratitude. In the case of the Blessed
Virgin, God has bestowed more on her than on any other creature.
"Virgin Mother of God, He whom the heavens cannot contain, on becoming
man, enclosed Himself within your womb" ("Roman Missal", Antiphon of
the Common of the Mass for Feasts of Our Lady). The humble Virgin of
Nazareth is going to be the Mother of God; the Creator's omnipotence
has never before manifested itself in as complete a way as this.


48-49. Mary's _expression of humility causes St. Bede to exclaim: "It
was fitting, then, that just as death entered the world through the
pride of our first parents, the entry of Life should be manifested by
the humility of Mary" ("In Lucae Evangelium Expositio, in loc.").


"How great the value of humility!--"Quia respexit humilitatem.... It
is not of her faith, nor of her charity, nor of her immaculate purity
that our Mother speaks in the house of Zachary. Her joyful hymn sings:
`Since He has looked on my humility, all generations will call me
blessed'" ([St] J. Escriva, "The Way", 598).


God rewards our Lady's humility by mankind's recognition of her
greatness: "All generations will call me blessed." This prophecy is
fulfilled every time someone says the Hail Mary, and indeed she is
praised on earth continually, without interruption. "From the earliest
times the Blessed Virgin is honored under the title of Mother of God,
under whose protection the faithful take refuge together in prayer in
all their perils and needs. Accordingly, following the Council of
Ephesus, there was a remarkable growth in the cult of the people of God
towards Mary, in veneration and love, in invocation and imitation,
according to her own prophetic words: `all generations will call me
blessed, for He who is mighty has done great things for me'" (Vatican
II, "Lumen Gentium", 66).


50. "And His mercy is on those who fear Him from generation to
generation": "At the very moment of the Incarnation, these words open
up a new perspective of salvation history. After the Resurrection of
Christ, this perspective is new on both the historical and the
eschatological level. From that time onwards there is a succession of
new generations of individuals in the immense human family, in
ever-increasing dimensions; there is also a succession of new
generations of the people of God, marked with the sign of the Cross and
of the Resurrection and `sealed' with the sign of the paschal mystery
of Christ, the absolute revelation of the mercy that Mary proclaimed on
the threshold of her kinswoman's house: "His mercy is [...] from
generation to generation' [...].


"Mary, then, is the one who has the "deepest knowledge of the mystery
of God's mercy". She knows its price, she knows how great it is. In
this sense, we call her the "Mother of Mercy": Our Lady of Mercy, or
Mother of Divine Mercy; in each one of these titles there is a deep
theological meaning, for they express the special preparation of her
soul, of her whole personality, so that she was able to perceive,
through the complex events, first of Israel, then of every individual
and of the whole of humanity, that mercy of which `from generation to
generation' people become sharers according to the eternal design of
the Most Holy Trinity" (John Paul II, "Dives In Misericordia", 9).


51. "The proud": those who want to be regarded as superior to others,
whom they look down on. This also refers to those who, in their
arrogance, seek to organize society without reference to, or in
opposition to, God's law. Even if they seem to do so successfully, the
words of our Lady's canticle will ultimately come true, for God will
scatter them as He did those who tried to build the Tower of Babel,
thinking that they could reach as high as Heaven (cf. Genesis 11:4).


"When pride takes hold of a soul, it is no surprise to find it bringing
along with it a whole string of other vices--greed, self-indulgence,
envy, injustice. The proud man is always vainly striving to dethrone
God, who is merciful to all His creatures, so as to make room for
himself and his ever cruel ways.


"We should beg God not to let us fall into this temptation. Pride is
the worst sin of all, and the most ridiculous.... Pride is unpleasant,
even from a human point of view. The person who rates himself better
than everyone and everything is constantly studying himself and looking
down on other people, who in turn react by ridiculing his foolish
vanity" ([St] J. Escriva, "Friends of God", 100).


53. This form of divine providence has been experienced countless times
over the course of history. For example, God nourished the people of
Israel with manna during their forty years in the wilderness (Exodus
16:4-35); similarly His angel brought food to Elijah (1 Kings 19:5-8),
and to Daniel in the lions' den (Daniel 14:31-40); and the widow of
Sarepta was given a supply of oil which miraculously never ran out (1
Kings 17:8ff). So, too, the Blessed Virgin's yearning for holiness was
fulfilled by the incarnation of the Word.


God nourished the chosen people with His Law and the preaching of His
prophets, but the rest of mankind was left hungry for His word, a
hunger now satisfied by the Incarnation. This gift of God will be
accepted by the humble; the self-sufficient, having no desire for the
good things of God, will not partake of them (cf. St. Basil, "In
Psalmos Homilae", on Psalm 33).


54. God led the people of Israel as He would a child whom He loved
tenderly: "the Lord your God bore you, as a man bears his son, in all
the way that you went" (Deuteronomy 1:31). He did so many times, using
Moses, Joshua, Samuel, David, etc., and now He gives them a definitive
leader by sending the Messiah--moved by His great mercy which takes
pity on the wretchedness of Israel and of all mankind.


55. God promised the patriarchs of old that He would have mercy on
mankind. This promise He made to Adam (Genesis 3:15), Abraham (Genesis
22:18), David (2 Samuel 7:12), etc. From all eternity God had planned
and decreed that the Word should become incarnate for the salvation of
all mankind. As Christ Himself put it, "God so loved the world that He
gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but
have eternal life" (John 3:16).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


6 posted on 08/15/2006 8:22:20 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Mass Readings

First reading Apocalypse 11:19 - 12:10 ©
Then the sanctuary of God in heaven opened and the ark of the covenant could be seen inside it. Then came flashes of lightning, peals of thunder and an earthquake, and violent hail.
Now a great sign appeared in heaven: a woman, adorned with the sun, standing on the moon, and with the twelve stars on her head for a crown. She was pregnant, and in labour, crying aloud in the pangs of childbirth. Then a second sign appeared in the sky, a huge red dragon which had seven heads and ten horns, and each of the seven heads crowned with a coronet. Its tail dragged a third of the stars from the sky and dropped them to the earth, and the dragon stopped in front of the woman as she was having the child, so that he could eat it as soon as it was born from its mother. The woman brought a male child into the world, the son who was to rule all the nations with an iron sceptre, and the child was taken straight up to God and to his throne, while the woman escaped into the desert, where God had made a place of safety ready, for her to be looked after in the twelve hundred and sixty days.
Then I heard a voice shout from heaven, ‘Victory and power and empire for ever have been won by our God, and all authority for his Christ, now that the persecutor, who accused our brothers day and night before our God, has been brought down.’
Psalm or canticle: Psalm 44
Second reading 1 Corinthians 15:20 - 26 ©
Christ has in fact been raised from the dead, the first-fruits of all who have fallen asleep. Death came through one man and in the same way the resurrection of the dead has come through one man. Just as all men die in Adam, so all men will be brought to life in Christ; but all of them in their proper order: Christ as the first-fruits and then, after the coming of Christ, those who belong to him. After that will come the end, when he hands over the kingdom to God the Father, having done away with every sovereignty, authority and power. For he must be king until he has put all his enemies under his feet and the last of the enemies to be destroyed is death, for everything is to be put under his feet.
Gospel Luke 1:39 - 56 ©
Mary set out at that time and went as quickly as she could to a town in the hill country of Judah. She went into Zechariah’s house and greeted Elizabeth. Now as soon as Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leapt in her womb and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit. She gave a loud cry and said, ‘Of all women you are the most blessed, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. Why should I be honoured with a visit from the mother of my Lord? For the moment your greeting reached my ears, the child in my womb leapt for joy. Yes, blessed is she who believed that the promise made her by the Lord would be fulfilled.’
And Mary said:
‘My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord
and my spirit exults in God my saviour;
because he has looked upon his lowly handmaid.
Yes, from this day forward all generations will call me blessed,
for the Almighty has done great things for me.
Holy is his name,
and his mercy reaches from age to age for those who fear him.
He has shown the power of his arm,
he has routed the proud of heart.
He has pulled down princes from their thrones and exalted the lowly.
The hungry he has filled with good things, the rich sent empty away.
He has come to the help of Israel his servant, mindful of his mercy
– according to the promise he made to our ancestors –
of his mercy to Abraham and to his descendants for ever.’

Mary stayed with Elizabeth about three months and then went back home.

7 posted on 08/15/2006 8:24:58 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Office of Readings -- Awakening Prayer

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 23 (24)
The Lord comes to his temple
The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness, the world and all who live in it.
He himself founded it upon the seas and set it firm over the waters.

Who will climb the mountain of the Lord? Who will stand in his holy place?
The one who is innocent of wrongdoing and pure of heart,
who has not given himself to vanities or sworn falsely.
He will receive the blessing of the Lord and be justified by God his saviour.
This is the way of those who seek him, seek the face of the God of Jacob.

Gates, raise your heads. Stand up, eternal doors, and let the king of glory enter.
Who is the king of glory?
The Lord of might and power. The Lord, strong in battle.

Gates, raise your heads. Stand up, eternal doors, and let the king of glory enter.
Who is the king of glory?
The Lord of hosts – he is the king of glory.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 45 (46)
God, our refuge and our strength
The Lord is our refuge and our strength, a true help in our troubles.
Therefore we do not fear, even when the earth is shaken and mountains fall into the depths of the sea,
the waves roar and foam and rise up to shake the mountains.

The streams of the river give joy to the city of God, the holy dwelling-place of the Most High.
God is within it, it will not be shaken; God will give help as the day dawns.
The nations are in turmoil and kingdoms totter: at the sound of his voice, the earth flows like water.

The Lord of strength is with us, the God of Jacob is our refuge.
Come and see the works of the Lord, who has done wonders on the earth.
He puts an end to wars over all the world: he tramples the bow, shatters weapons, and burns the shields with fire.
Stop and see that I am God: I will be exalted among the nations, exalted on the earth.

The Lord of strength is with us, the God of Jacob is our refuge.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 86 (87)
Jerusalem, mother of all nations
Its foundations are set on the sacred mountains –
 the Lord loves the gates of Sion
 more than all the tents of Jacob.
Glorious things are said of you, city of God!

I shall count Rahab and Babylon among those who acknowledge me.
 The Philistines, Tyrians, Ethiopians –
 all have their birthplace here.
Of Sion it will be said “Here is the birthplace of all people:
 the Most High himself has set it firm”.

The Lord shall write in the book of the nations:
 “Here is their birthplace”.
They will sing as in joyful processions:
 “All my being springs from you”.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Reading Ephesians 1:16 - 2:10 ©
I have never failed to remember you in my prayers and to thank God for you. May the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, give you a spirit of wisdom and perception of what is revealed, to bring you to full knowledge of him. May he enlighten the eyes of your mind so that you can see what hope his call holds for you, what rich glories he has promised the saints will inherit and how infinitely great is the power that he has exercised for us believers. This you can tell from the strength of his power at work in Christ, when he used it to raise him from the dead and to make him sit at his right hand, in heaven, far above every Sovereignty, Authority, Power, or Domination, or any other name that can be named not only in this age but also in the age to come. He has put all things under his feet and made him, as the ruler of everything, the head of the Church; which is his body, the fullness of him who fills the whole creation.
And you were dead, through the crimes and the sins in which you used to live when you were following the way of this world, obeying the ruler who governs the air the spirit who is at work in the rebellious. We all were among them too in the past, living sensual lives, ruled entirely by our own physical desires and our own ideas; so that by nature we were as much under God’s anger as the rest of the world. But God loved us with so much love that he was generous with his mercy: when we were dead through our sins, he brought us to life with Christ – it is through grace that you have been saved – and raised us up with him and gave us a place with him in heaven, in Christ Jesus.
This was to show for all ages to come, through his goodness towards us in Christ Jesus, how infinitely rich he is in grace. Because it is by grace that you have been saved, through faith; not by anything of your own, but by a gift from God; not by anything that you have done, so that nobody can claim the credit. We are God’s work of art, created in Christ Jesus to live the good life as from the beginning he had meant us to live it.

Reading The Apostolic Constitution of Pope Pius XII on the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Your body is holy and glorious
In their sermons and speeches on the feast day of the Assumption of the Mother of God, the holy fathers and the great doctors of the church were speaking of something that the faithful already knew and accepted: all they did was to bring it out into the open, to explain its meaning and substance in other terms. Above all, they made it most clear that this feast commemorated not merely the fact that the blessed Virgin Mary did not experience bodily decay, but also her triumph over death and her heavenly glory, following the example of her only Son, Jesus Christ.
Thus St John Damascene, who is the greatest exponent of this tradition, compares the bodily Assumption of the revered Mother of God with her other gifts and privileges: It was right that she who had kept her virginity unimpaired through the process of giving birth should have kept her body without decay through death. It was right that she who had given her Creator, as a child, a place at her breast should be given a place in the dwelling-place of her God. It was right that the bride espoused by the Father should dwell in the heavenly bridal chamber. It was right that she who had gazed on her Son on the cross, her heart pierced at that moment by the sword of sorrow that she had escaped at his birth, should now gaze on him seated with his Father. It was right that the Mother of God should possess what belongs to her on and to be honoured by every creature as the God’s Mother and handmaid.
St Germanus of Constantinople considered that the preservation from decay of the body of the Mother of God, the Virgin Mary, and its elevation to heaven as being not only appropriate to her Motherhood but also to the peculiar sanctity of its virgin state: It is written, that you appear in beauty, and your virginal body is altogether holy, altogether chaste, altogether the dwelling-place of God; from which it follows that it is not in its nature to decay into dust, but that it is transformed, being human, into a glorious and incorruptible life, the same body, living and glorious, unharmed, sharing in perfect life.
Another very ancient author asserts: Being the most glorious Mother of Christ our saviour and our God, the giver of life and immortality, she is given life by him and shares bodily incorruptibility for all eternity with him who raised her from the grave and drew her up to him in a way that only he can understand.
All that the holy fathers say refers ultimately to Scripture as a foundation, which gives us the vivid image of the great Mother of God as being closely attached to her divine Son and always sharing his lot.
It is important to remember that from the second century onwards the holy fathers have been talking of the Virgin Mary as the new Eve for the new Adam: not equal to him, of course, but closely joined with him in the battle against the enemy, which ended in the triumph over sin and death that had been promised even in Paradise. The glorious resurrection of Christ is essential to this victory and its final prize, but the blessed Virgin’s share in that fight must also have ended in the glorification of her body. For as the Apostle says: When this mortal nature has put on immortality, then the scripture will be fulfilled that says “Death is swallowed up in victory”.
So then, the great Mother of God, so mysteriously united to Jesus Christ from all eternity by the same decree of predestination, immaculately conceived, an intact virgin throughout her divine motherhood, a noble associate of our Redeemer as he defeated sin and its consequences, received, as it were, the final crowning privilege of being preserved from the corruption of the grave and, following her Son in his victory over death, was brought, body and soul, to the highest glory of heaven, to shine as Queen at the right hand of that same Son, the immortal King of Ages.

Canticle Te Deum
God, we praise you; Lord, we proclaim you!
You, the Father, the eternal –
all the earth venerates you.
All the angels, all the heavens, every power –
The cherubim, the seraphim –
unceasingly, they cry:
“Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts:
heaven and earth are full of the majesty of your glory!”

The glorious choir of Apostles –
The noble ranks of prophets –
The shining army of martyrs –
all praise you.
Throughout the world your holy Church proclaims you.
– Father of immeasurable majesty,
– True Son, only-begotten, worthy of worship,
– Holy Spirit, our Advocate.

You, Christ:
– You are the king of glory.
– You are the Father’s eternal Son.
– You, to free mankind, did not disdain a Virgin’s womb.
– You defeated the sharp spear of Death, and opened the kingdom of heaven to those who believe in you.
– You sit at God’s right hand, in the glory of the Father.
– You will come, so we believe, as our Judge.

And so we ask of you: give help to your servants, whom you set free at the price of your precious blood.
Number them among your chosen ones in eternal glory.
Bring your people to safety, Lord, and bless those who are your inheritance.
Rule them and lift them high for ever.

Day by day we bless you, Lord: we praise you for ever and for ever.
Of your goodness, Lord, keep us without sin for today.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy on us.
Let your pity, Lord, be upon us, as much as we trust in you.
In you, Lord, I trust: let me never be put to shame.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

8 posted on 08/15/2006 8:27:47 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
American Catholic’s Saint of the Day

God calls each one of us to be a saint.

August 15, 2006
Assumption of Mary

On November 1, 1950, Pius XII defined the Assumption of Mary to be a dogma of faith: “We pronounce, declare and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma that the immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul to heavenly glory.” The pope proclaimed this dogma only after a broad consultation of bishops, theologians and laity. There were few dissenting voices. What the pope solemnly declared was already a common belief in the Catholic Church.

We find homilies on the Assumption going back to the sixth century. In following centuries the Eastern Churches held steadily to the doctrine, but some authors in the West were hesitant. However, by the thirteenth century there was universal agreement. The feast was celebrated under various names (Commemoration, Dormition, Passing, Assumption) from at least the fifth or sixth century.

Scripture does not give an account of Mary’s Assumption into heaven. Nevertheless, Revelation 12 speaks of a woman who is caught up in the battle between good and evil. Many see this woman as God’s people. Since Mary best embodies the people of both Old and New Testament, her Assumption can be seen as an exemplification of the woman’s victory.

Furthermore, in 1 Corinthians 15:20 Paul speaks of Christ’s resurrection as the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.

Since Mary is closely associated with all the mysteries of Jesus’ life, it is not surprising that the Holy Spirit has led the Church to belief in Mary’s share in his glorification. So close was she to Jesus on earth, she must be with him body and soul in heaven.

Comment:

In the light of the Assumption of Mary, it is easy to pray her Magnificat (Luke 1:46–55) with new meaning. In her glory she proclaims the greatness of the Lord and finds joy in God her savior. God has done marvels to her and she leads others to recognize God’s holiness. She is the lowly handmaid who deeply reverenced her God and has been raised to the heights. From her position of strength she will help the lowly and the poor find justice on earth and she will challenge the rich and powerful to distrust wealth and power as a source of happiness.

Quote:

“In the bodily and spiritual glory which she possesses in heaven, the Mother of Jesus continues in this present world as the image and first flowering of the Church as she is to be perfected in the world to come. Likewise, Mary shines forth on earth, until the day of the Lord shall come (cf. 2 Peter 3:10), as a sign of certain hope and comfort for the pilgrim People of God” (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 68).



9 posted on 08/15/2006 8:30:04 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

The Ghent Altarpiece: Virgin Mary by Hubert and Jan van Eyck
1426-29
Oil on wood, 168,7 x 74,9 cm
Cathedral of St Bavo, Ghent
10 posted on 08/15/2006 8:30:52 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: Salvation

I


Like a long, drawn-out breath,
a pausing
was that last moment
of your old life.
You,
who had seen and felt and been so much
to those around you,
a clear lamp
for the light of your beloved son.

And so it came to this moment then,
long years after your darkest day,
and brightest morning,
long days since you last kissed him goodbye,
your perfect son.

Did you not
let that last breath pass
like a goodbye kiss to those gathered around you,
dear faces all.

A moment only of darkness,
and then,
once again,
that beloved voice whispered in your ear.

"Mother, it's time. Let's go home."

II

Oh Blessed Mother,
when I think of your falling asleep
being reunited forever with your Son
assumed into Heaven
where you could become mother of us all,
I long to say,
Thank you, Mother,
for caring for us all,
for covering us with your mantle,
for looking after us when we stray,
for leading us home to your son.

Thank you Mother,
for all the sorrows, toil and care
you were willing to give
during your earthly life,
and thank you for trying so hard to reach
a hardheaded mankind
that too often chooses to go its own way.

Thank you Mother,
for helping to teach us how to be salt, light, and
leaven in this dark and sad world,
may we always be open to further your intentions,
and those of the sacred heart of your divine Son.

Amen

III

Sancta Maria,
Sancta Virgo virginum,
Ora pro nobis.

O Blessed Mother
on this day when we celebrate
your joyful Assumption,
your joyful entry into Heaven,
remember this day
all those left behind
without joy,
thinking there is no hope,
who see only the darkness.

Sancta Maria,
Mater boni Consilii,
Consolatrix afflictorum,
Ora pro nobis.

O Blessed Mother,
be this day
with those attacked for no reason
but that they belong to the wrong group,
the unborn,
the poor,
the persecuted for their color,
their background,
their stance for right,
those caught in the crossfire
of other people's hate,
those who had no idea they were combattants
in another group's war.

Sancta Maria,
Mater Dei,
Speculum iustitiae,
Refugium peccatorum,
Ora pro nobis.

O Blessed Mother
You who comfort us in our sorrows,
Remind us of the truth of your son,
Aid us in our repentence,
Tell us the ways of Jesus' truth,
O keep us always under your mantle
safe in the loving hands
of such a mother!

Sancta Maria
Regina Angelorum,
Regina Martyrum,
Regina pacis,
Regina in caelum assumpta,
Ora pro nobis.

Amen.


11 posted on 08/15/2006 8:31:45 AM PDT by Knitting A Conundrum (Act Justly, Love Mercy, and Walk Humbly With God Micah 6:8)
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To: Knitting A Conundrum

Thank you, this is beautiful.


12 posted on 08/15/2006 8:33:15 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina

What a beautiful painting!


13 posted on 08/15/2006 8:33:56 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Tuesday, August 15, 2006
The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Solemnity)
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Revelation 11:19; 12:1-6, 10
Psalm 45:10-12, 16
1 Corinthians 15:20-27
Luke 1:39-56

Hold firmly that our faith is identical with the ancients. Deny this, and you dissolve the unity of the Church.

-- St. Thomas Aquinas


14 posted on 08/15/2006 8:34:53 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Homily given by His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI
Castel Gandolfo, August 15, 2005

Dear Brothers in the Episcopate and in the Priesthood,
Dear Brothers and Sisters,

First of all, I offer a cordial greeting to you all. It gives me great joy to celebrate Mass in this beautiful parish church on the day of the Assumption.

I greet Cardinal Sodano, the Bishop of Albano, all the priests, the Mayor and all of you. Thank you for your presence.

The Feast of the Assumption is a day of joy. God has won. Love has won. It has won life. Love has shown that it is stronger than death, that God possesses the true strength and that his strength is goodness and love.

Mary was taken up body and soul into Heaven: there is even room in God for the body. Heaven is no longer a very remote sphere unknown to us.

We have a mother in Heaven. And the Mother of God, the Mother of the Son of God, is our Mother. He himself has said so. He made her our Mother when he said to the disciple and to all of us: "Behold, your Mother!". We have a Mother in Heaven. Heaven is open, Heaven has a heart.

In the Gospel we heard the Magnificat, that great poem inspired by the Holy Spirit that came from Mary's lips, indeed, from Mary's heart. This marvellous canticle mirrors the entire soul, the entire personality of Mary. We can say that this hymn of hers is a portrait of Mary, a true icon in which we can see her exactly as she is. I would like to highlight only two points in this great canticle.

It begins with the word "Magnificat": my soul "magnifies" the Lord, that is, "proclaims the greatness" of the Lord. Mary wanted God to be great in the world, great in her life and present among us all. She was not afraid that God might be a "rival" in our life, that with his greatness he might encroach on our freedom, our vital space. She knew that if God is great, we too are great. Our life is not oppressed but raised and expanded: it is precisely then that it becomes great in the splendour of God.

The fact that our first parents thought the contrary was the core of original sin. They feared that if God were too great, he would take something away from their life. They thought that they could set God aside to make room for themselves.

This was also the great temptation of the modern age, of the past three or four centuries. More and more people have thought and said: "But this God does not give us our freedom; with all his commandments, he restricts the space in our lives. So God has to disappear; we want to be autonomous and independent. Without this God we ourselves would be gods and do as we pleased".

This was also the view of the Prodigal Son, who did not realize that he was "free" precisely because he was in his father's house. He left for distant lands and squandered his estate. In the end, he realized that precisely because he had gone so far away from his father, instead of being free he had become a slave; he understood that only by returning home to his father's house would he be truly free, in the full beauty of life.

This is how it is in our modern epoch. Previously, it was thought and believed that by setting God aside and being autonomous, following only our own ideas and inclinations, we would truly be free to do whatever we liked without anyone being able to give us orders. But when God disappears, men and women do not become greater; indeed, they lose the divine dignity, their faces lose God's splendour. In the end, they turn out to be merely products of a blind evolution and, as such, can be used and abused. This is precisely what the experience of our epoch has confirmed for us.

Only if God is great is humankind also great. With Mary, we must begin to understand that this is so. We must not drift away from God but make God present; we must ensure that he is great in our lives. Thus, we too will become divine; all the splendour of the divine dignity will then be ours. Let us apply this to our own lives.

It is important that God be great among us, in public and in private life.

In public life, it is important that God be present, for example, through the cross on public buildings, and that he be present in our community life, for only if God is present do we have an orientation, a common direction; otherwise, disputes become impossible to settle, for our common dignity is no longer recognized.

Let us make God great in public and in private life. This means making room for God in our lives every day, starting in the morning with prayers, and then dedicating time to God, giving Sundays to God. We do not waste our free time if we offer it to God. If God enters into our time, all time becomes greater, roomier, richer.

A second observation: Mary's poem - the Magnificat - is quite original; yet at the same time, it is a "fabric" woven throughout of "threads" from the Old Testament, of words of God.

Thus, we see that Mary was, so to speak, "at home" with God's word, she lived on God's word, she was penetrated by God's word. To the extent that she spoke with God's words, she thought with God's words, her thoughts were God's thoughts, her words, God's words. She was penetrated by divine light and this is why she was so resplendent, so good, so radiant with love and goodness.

Mary lived on the Word of God, she was imbued with the Word of God. And the fact that she was immersed in the Word of God and was totally familiar with the Word also endowed her later with the inner enlightenment of wisdom.

Whoever thinks with God thinks well, and whoever speaks to God speaks well. They have valid criteria to judge all the things of the world. They become prudent, wise, and at the same time good; they also become strong and courageous with the strength of God, who resists evil and fosters good in the world.

Thus, Mary speaks with us, speaks to us, invites us to know the Word of God, to love the Word of God, to live with the Word of God, to think with the Word of God. And we can do so in many different ways: by reading Sacred Scripture, by participating especially in the Liturgy, in which Holy Church throughout the year opens the entire book of Sacred Scripture to us. She opens it to our lives and makes it present in our lives.

But I am also thinking of the Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church that we recently published, in which the Word of God is applied to our lives and the reality of our lives interpreted; it helps us enter into the great "temple" of God's Word, to learn to love it and, like Mary, to be penetrated by this Word.

Thus, life becomes luminous and we have the basic criterion with which to judge; at the same time, we receive goodness and strength.

Mary is taken up body and soul into the glory of Heaven, and with God and in God she is Queen of Heaven and earth. And is she really so remote from us?

The contrary is true. Precisely because she is with God and in God, she is very close to each one of us.

While she lived on this earth she could only be close to a few people. Being in God, who is close to us, actually, "within" all of us, Mary shares in this closeness of God. Being in God and with God, she is close to each one of us, knows our hearts, can hear our prayers, can help us with her motherly kindness and has been given to us, as the Lord said, precisely as a "mother" to whom we can turn at every moment.

She always listens to us, she is always close to us, and being Mother of the Son, participates in the power of the Son and in his goodness. We can always entrust the whole of our lives to this Mother, who is not far from any one of us.

On this feast day, let us thank the Lord for the gift of the Mother, and let us pray to Mary to help us find the right path every day. Amen.

15 posted on 08/15/2006 8:35:40 AM PDT by Carolina
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Collect:
All-powerful and ever-living God, you raised the sinless Virgin Mary, mother of your Son, body and soul to the glory of heaven. May we see heaven as our final goal and come to share her glory. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns wth you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

August 15, 2006 Month Year Season

Solemnity of the Assumption

Old Calendar: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

On November 1, 1950, Pius XII defined the dogma of the Assumption. Thus he solemnly proclaimed that the belief whereby the Blessed Virgin Mary, at the close of her earthly life, was taken up, body and soul, into the glory of heaven, definitively forms part of the deposit of faith, received from the Apostles. To avoid all that is uncertain the Pope did not state either the manner or the circumstances of time and place in which the Assumption took place — only the fact of the Assumption of Mary, body and soul, into the glory of heaven, is the matter of the definition.


The Assumption
Now toward the end of the summer season, at a time when fruits are ripe in the gardens and fields, the Church celegrates the most glorious "harvest festival" in the Communion of Saints. Mary, the supremely blessed one among women, Mary, the most precious fruit which has ripened in the fields of God's kingdom, is today taken into the granary of heaven. — Pius Parsch

The Assumption is the oldest feast day of Our Lady, but we don't know how it first came to be celebrated.

Its origin is lost in those days when Jerusalem was restored as a sacred city, at the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine (c. 285-337). By then it had been a pagan city for two centuries, ever since Emperor Hadrian (76-138) had leveled it around the year 135 and rebuilt it as Aelia Capitolina in honor of Jupiter.

For 200 years, every memory of Jesus was obliterated from the city, and the sites made holy by His life, death and Resurrection became pagan temples.

After the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 336, the sacred sites began to be restored and memories of the life of Our Lord began to be celebrated by the people of Jerusalem. One of the memories about his mother centered around the "Tomb of Mary," close to Mount Zion, where the early Christian community had lived.

On the hill itself was the "Place of Dormition," the spot of Mary's "falling asleep," where she had died. The "Tomb of Mary" was where she was buried.

At this time, the "Memory of Mary" was being celebrated. Later it was to become our feast of the Assumption.

For a time, the "Memory of Mary" was marked only in Palestine, but then it was extended by the emperor to all the churches of the East. In the seventh century, it began to be celebrated in Rome under the title of the "Falling Asleep" ("Dormitio") of the Mother of God.

Soon the name was changed to the "Assumption of Mary," since there was more to the feast than her dying. It also proclaimed that she had been taken up, body and soul, into heaven.

That belief was ancient, dating back to the apostles themselves. What was clear from the beginning was that there were no relics of Mary to be venerated, and that an empty tomb stood on the edge of Jerusalem near the site of her death. That location also soon became a place of pilgrimage. (Today, the Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition of Mary stands on the spot.)

At the Council of Chalcedon in 451, when bishops from throughout the Mediterranean world gathered in Constantinople, Emperor Marcian asked the Patriarch of Jerusalem to bring the relics of Mary to Constantinople to be enshrined in the capitol. The patriarch explained to the emperor that there were no relics of Mary in Jerusalem, that "Mary had died in the presence of the apostles; but her tomb, when opened later . . . was found empty and so the apostles concluded that the body was taken up into heaven."

In the eighth century, St. John Damascene was known for giving sermons at the holy places in Jerusalem. At the Tomb of Mary, he expressed the belief of the Church on the meaning of the feast: "Although the body was duly buried, it did not remain in the state of death, neither was it dissolved by decay. . . . You were transferred to your heavenly home, O Lady, Queen and Mother of God in truth."

All the feast days of Mary mark the great mysteries of her life and her part in the work of redemption. The central mystery of her life and person is her divine motherhood, celebrated both at Christmas and a week later (Jan. 1) on the feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8) marks the preparation for that motherhood, so that she had the fullness of grace from the first moment of her existence, completely untouched by sin. Her whole being throbbed with divine life from the very beginning, readying her for the exalted role of mother of the Savior.

The Assumption completes God's work in her since it was not fitting that the flesh that had given life to God himself should ever undergo corruption. The Assumption is God's crowning of His work as Mary ends her earthly life and enters eternity. The feast turns our eyes in that direction, where we will follow when our earthly life is over.

The feast days of the Church are not just the commemoration of historical events; they do not look only to the past. They look to the present and to the future and give us an insight into our own relationship with God. The Assumption looks to eternity and gives us hope that we, too, will follow Our Lady when our life is ended.

In 1950, in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus, Pope Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption of Mary a dogma of the Catholic Church in these words: "The Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heaven."

With that, an ancient belief became Catholic doctrine and the Assumption was declared a truth revealed by God.

Fr. Clifford Stevens in Catholic Heritage

Things to Do:

  • The Directory on Popular Piety talks about the deep significance of this feast day. It also refers to the custom of blessing herbs:
    In the Germanic countries, the custom of blessing herbs is associated with 15 August. This custom, received into the Rituale Romanum, represents a clear example of the genuine evangelization of pre-Christian rites and beliefs: one must turn to God, through whose word "the earth produced vegetation: plants bearing seeds in their several kinds, and trees bearing fruit with their seed inside in their several kinds" (Gen 1, 12) in order to obtain what was formerly obtained by magic rites; to stem the damages deriving from poisonous herbs, and benefit from the efficacy of curative herbs.

    This ancient use came to be associated with the Blessed Virgin Mary, in part because of the biblical images applied to her such as vine, lavender, cypress and lily, partly from seeing her in terms of a sweet smelling flower because of her virtue, and most of all because of Isaiah 11, 1, and his reference to the "shoot springing from the side of Jesse", which would bear the blessed fruit of Jesus.

    This Blessing of Herbs is included in the prayers library.

  • In an age of senuality and materialism the Assumption points out the dignity and destiny of our human body, extols the dignity of womanhood, and turns our eyes to the true life beyond the grave. At Mass today ask Mary for the grace to keep your mind fixed on things above and to aspire continually to be united with her and to be brought to the glory of the Resurrection

16 posted on 08/15/2006 8:38:15 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Lauds -- Morning Prayer

Morning Prayer (Lauds)

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 62 (63)
Thirsting for God
O God, you are my God, I wait for you from the dawn.
My soul thirsts for you, my body longs for you.
I came to your sanctuary,
 as one in a parched and waterless land,
 so that I could see your might and your glory.
My lips will praise you, for your mercy is better than life itself.

Thus I will bless you throughout my life,
 and raise my hands in prayer to your name;
my soul will be filled as if by rich food,
 and my mouth will sing your praises and rejoice.
I will remember you as I lie in bed,
 I will think of you in the morning,
for you have been my helper,
 and I will take joy in the protection of your wings.

My soul clings to you; your right hand raises me up.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Daniel 3
All creatures, bless the Lord
Bless the Lord, all his works, praise and exalt him for ever.

Bless the Lord, you heavens; all his angels, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, you waters above the heavens; all his powers, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, sun and moon; all stars of the sky, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, rain and dew; all you winds, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, fire and heat; cold and warmth, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, dew and frost; ice and cold, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, ice and snow; day and night, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, light and darkness; lightning and storm-clouds, bless the Lord.

Bless the Lord, all the earth, praise and exalt him for ever.

Bless the Lord, mountains and hills; all growing things, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, seas and rivers; springs and fountains, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, whales and fish; birds of the air, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, wild beasts and tame; sons of men, bless the Lord.

Bless the Lord, O Israel, praise and exalt him for ever.

Bless the Lord, his priests; all his servants, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, spirits of the just; all who are holy and humble, bless the Lord.

Ananias, Azarias, Mishael, bless the Lord, praise and exalt him for ever.

Let us bless Father, Son and Holy Spirit, praise and exalt them for ever.
Bless the Lord in the firmament of heaven, praise and glorify him for ever.

Psalm 149
The saints rejoice
Sing a new song to the Lord, his praise in the assembly of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in its maker, and the sons of Sion delight in their king.
Let them praise his name with dancing, sing to him with timbrel and lyre,
for the Lord’s favour is upon his people, and he will honour the humble with victory.

Let the faithful celebrate his glory, rejoice even in their beds,
the praise of God in their throats; and swords ready in their hands,
to exact vengeance upon the nations, impose punishment on the peoples,
to bind their kings in fetters and their nobles in manacles of iron,
to carry out the sentence that has been passed: this is the glory prepared for all his faithful.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Benedictus
The Messiah and his forerunner
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, for he has come to his people and brought about their redemption.
He has raised up the sign of salvation in the house of his servant David,
as he promised through the mouth of the holy ones, his prophets through the ages:
to rescue us from our enemies and all who hate us, to take pity on our fathers,
to remember his holy covenant and the oath he swore to Abraham our father,
that he would give himself to us, that we could serve him without fear – freed from the hands of our enemies –
in uprightness and holiness before him, for all of our days.

And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High: for you will go before the face of the Lord to prepare his path,
to let his people know their salvation, so that their sins may be forgiven.
Through the bottomless mercy of our God, one born on high will visit us
to give light to those who walk in darkness, who live in the shadow of death;
to lead our feet in the path of peace.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

17 posted on 08/15/2006 8:42:25 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary IS
a Holy Day of Obligation!
 
See you in Church!
 
Carracci's Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary 

18 posted on 08/15/2006 9:01:23 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

 

The First to Be Freed from Death
August 15, 2006


Mary’s Assumption teaches us that one day we will go the way she went.

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Father Richard Gill, LC

Luke 1:39-56
Mary set out and traveled to the hill country in haste to a town of Judah, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary´s greeting, the infant leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth, filled with the Holy Spirit, cried out in a loud voice and said, "Most blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For at the moment the sound of your greeting reached my ears, the infant in my womb leaped for joy. Blessed are you who believed that what was spoken to you by the Lord would be fulfilled." And Mary said: "My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord; my spirit rejoices in God my savior. For he has looked upon his handmaid´s lowliness; behold, from now on will all ages call me blessed. The Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is from age to age to those who fear him. He has shown might with his arm, dispersed the arrogant of mind and heart. He has thrown down the rulers from their thrones but lifted up the lowly. The hungry he has filled with good things; the rich he has sent away empty. He has helped Israel his servant, remembering his mercy, according to his promise to our fathers, to Abraham and to his descendants forever." Mary remained with her about three months and then returned to her home.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, thank you for giving me Mary as my mother. I desire to love her and long to follow in her path. I know that with her I can be united with you in heaven, the fulfillment of my earthly journey toward you.

Petition: Lord, increase my desire for eternal life and to see you face-to-face in your glory.

1. The First of the Disciples.  Mary was the first of the disciples because from the moment she received the invitation from the angel Gabriel, she put herself at the service of God’s plan and Jesus’ mission. She had no other program or agenda for her life from the moment of the Annunciation to the day of her Assumption into heaven. Her life and work, her faith, hope and love, were all focused on Jesus and the fulfillment of the mission to which God had called her. Her life became one of complete and total availability to whatever the mission called for and for anything the Lord would reveal to her.

2. Our Future Revealed to Us.  There has never been a place in the entire Catholic world that has claimed to be Mary’s burial place. The belief that she was assumed into heaven body and soul has been a constant throughout time, even though the Church only formally defined it in the last century. Mary’s Assumption teaches us that one day we will go the way she went, that we will be entirely brought into union with God and Jesus Christ in all we are -- body and soul -- at the end of time. This teaching reminds us of the dignity and the value of the body, which is our physical existence. We will not be in heaven simply as “spirits” but as full persons composed of body and soul.

3. She Heard the Word and She Kept It.  Elizabeth knew instantly she was in the presence of one who had an intimate relationship with God and who had kept her promise to him. Indeed, Mary understood that her whole life would consist in cooperating with God’s plan for her, and she dedicated every moment to the fulfillment of that plan. We too must put Christ first. We must put his plan over our lives first.

Dialogue with Christ: Jesus, give me hope in eternal life and the resurrection of the body so that I may enjoy eternity with you. Make me understand that the life of grace is the beginning of eternal life for me right here and now.

Resolution: I will pray for the grace of a renewed hope in eternal life and the constant grace and help from God to attain it.


19 posted on 08/15/2006 9:05:05 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Homily of the Day


Homily of the Day

Title:   Will You Come the Rest of the Way?
Author:   Monsignor Dennis Clark, Ph.D.
Date:   Tuesday, August 15, 2006
 


Rv 11:19a;12:1-6a,10ab / Cor 15:20-27 / Lk 1:39-56

There was a king whose only son was an angry, rebellious young man. Try as he might, the king could not find a way to his son's heart. And finally one day the boy gathered up his things and rode off into the sunset. The father tracked his journey across many lands, waiting patiently till his son would remember where his real home was. When the time seemed right, the father sent a message, "Come home, my son," he said. "I love you, and I want you at my side."

The son replied with a sad heart, "Dear father, I can't come home. Too much has passed between us. The distance is too far."

The father replied, "Return as far as you can, my son, and I will come to you the rest of the way."

+ + +

As we celebrate this feast of Jesus' mother, our eyes turn where Mary is always pointing, to her Son, who understands us so well. He knows the baggage we're carrying, the fears and angers, hatreds and prejudices, sins, confusions, and all sorts of junk. He knows! And knowing all that, He says to us what the king said to his son, "Return as far as you can, and I will come to you the rest of the way." That's what God did for us, when He made Mary Jesus' mother. He came out to a spot where we could meet Him and not be afraid, and where we could finally open our arms and say, "Father!"

God continues to "come the rest of the way" for us every day. In doing that, He's not just taking care of us, He's showing us what He wants us to become, and that is reconcilers, people who have learned the habit of coming the rest of the way for one another.

Too much of life is frittered away with people getting angry and staying angry at one another. Angry at their parents and spouses, brothers and sisters, angry at their colleagues, their clergy, their contractor, and God knows who else. What a waste, especially when we know that so often the evil is in the eye of the beholder and nowhere else!

So why not pay attention to what the Lord is trying to teach us? Here it is: It makes no difference who's at fault. Take the initiative, the way the Lord does. Seek out the person you dubbed "my enemy." Name your hurt, your shame, your sorrow, your resentment, whatever it is that needs naming, and begin the search for peace ... and leave your calculator at home!

Help the other person break out of the trap built by anger, resentment, or shame. Help the other save face, if that's the issue. Do what needs to be done, and don't hold back. It's hard work, no doubt. But in doing it we become like God, and our hearts will grow large and happy and full — just like God's!

That is God's promise, and He always keeps His word.

 


20 posted on 08/15/2006 9:08:00 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Solemnity of the Assumption

by Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.

Other Articles by Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.
Solemnity of the Assumption
08/15/06


I once asked a college theology class if anyone could explain the doctrine of the Assumption. A student replied, “Yeah, that’s the teaching whereby the Catholic Church ‘assumes’ that Mary is in heaven.”

In This Article...
Greatest of Marian Feasts
Something Unique about Mary
No Decay, No Delay

Greatest of Marian Feasts

There’s a bit more to it than that. The Church does not just “assume” that any canonized saint in is in heaven. Rather, it authoritatively declares that a person is in glory and should therefore be honored in liturgy and imitated in life. Our church calendar is filled with saints’ days.

But why a particular day for each saint? The first evidence for this goes back to 155 AD, to a bishop named Polycarp. The account of his martyrdom notes that after his execution, the faithful collected his bones, more precious than gold, and put them in a place of honor where every year they gathered to celebrate the anniversary of his death as a sort of “birthday” into eternal life. Celebrating Mass in the catacombs over the relics of the martyrs led to the practice of putting relics in the main altar of every church. Eventually saints who did not die a martyr’s death were also commemorated on their heavenly “birthday” and their relics were accorded great honor.

From very early times, August 15 has been observed as the “birthday” of our Blessed Lady. On this greatest of all Marian feasts we celebrate the greatest moment of her life — being permanently reunited with her son and sharing His glory.

Something Unique about Mary

All the saints experience the “beatific vision” upon their entry into heaven, and we celebrate this on every saint’s day. But there is something unique about Mary’s day. The Catholic Church teaches authoritatively that it is not just Mary’s soul that was admitted to God’s glory, but that at the end of her earthly life, Mary’s body as well as her soul was assumed into heaven by the loving power of God.

There is no eyewitness account of this actual event recorded in the Bible. Come to think of it, though, no one witnessed the actual resurrection of Jesus, either. The evidence was an empty tomb and eyewitness reports that the Risen Lord had appeared to them.

Interesting parallel here. There is a tomb at the foot of the Mount of Olives where ancient tradition says that Mary's body was placed. But there is nothing inside. There are no relics, as with other saints. And credible apparitions of Mary, though not recorded in the New Testament, have been recorded from the 3rd century till today.

Mary is not equal to Christ, of course. Jesus, though possessing a complete human nature, is the Eternal Word made flesh. Mary is only a creature.

But she is a unique creature, the highest of all creatures. This is not just because she was born without the handicap of original sin. Eve and Adam were born free of sin as well, but it did not stop them from sinning as soon as they had the chance. Mary instead chose, with the help of God’s grace, to preserve her God-given purity throughout the whole of her life.

No Decay, No Delay

The bodily corruption of death was not God’s original plan. It came into the world through sin, as St. Paul says “the sting of death is sin” (I Cor 15:56). So it is fitting that she who knew no sin should know no decay and no delay in enjoying the full fruits of her son’s work. It is fitting that she who stood by Christ under the Cross should stand by Him bodily at the right hand of the Father. “The Queen stands at your right hand, in gold of Ophir” (Ps 45). Enoch and Elijah, who the Old Testament says were assumed into heaven, were surely great in God’s eyes. But they do not begin to compare with the immaculate mother of His Son.

We too, one day, insofar as we accept God’s grace, will stand at His right hand. But Paul says that “all will come to life again, but each one in proper order” (I Cor 15:23). The Redeemer, of course, blazes the resurrection trail. But who is to be first among His disciples? The one who is last is first: the Lord’s humble handmaid who did no more than say yes, and kept saying yes, and whose soul magnified not herself, but the Lord.


Dr. D'Ambrosio studied under Avery Cardinal Dulles for his Ph.D. in historical theology and taught for many years at the University of Dallas. He now directs
www.crossroadsinitiative.com, which offers Catholic resources for RCIA, adult faith formation, and teens, with a special emphasis on the Year of the Eucharist, the Theology of the Body, the early Church Fathers, and the sacrament of confirmation.


21 posted on 08/15/2006 9:12:01 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; NYer; Nihil Obstat; mileschristi; rrstar96
From the pages of Vivificat!

Today we celebrate the Assumption of Our Lady, the Theotokos, Mary Most Holy

Dormition of Our Lady
Today we remember a deed of power: Our Lord Jesus Christ called his Mother to himself, in body, soul, and spirit.

For Catholic Christians this means something simultaneously simple and grandiose: that the resurrection of the dead has been verified in Mary, the Mother of Jesus and Our Mother. She has received her crown, and she is as close to God as a mere creature can get, closer to Him than the Seraphim and the Cherubim. The Church rightly sings:

You are truly deserving of glory, O Theotokos, the ever-blessed and most pure Mother of our God. More honorable than the Cherubim and beyond compare more glorious than the Seraphim, who as a Virgin gave birth to God the Word, true Birth-giver of God, we magnify you.
The Church also rightly prays:
Under your protection, we hasten, O Virgin Birth-giver of God. Do not turn away from us in our time of need, but pure and blessed Lady, save us!
Redemption has been completed: A Man redeemed Mankind by dying on a cross and restored our life by rising triumphantly from the dead, thus removing the guilt of Adam; by calling Woman upon himself, he then restored Womankind to her rightful place in this New Eve.

Powerful and glorious are the deeds of Our Lord!

The Lord has called his Ark of his Majesty into his Tent!

This is the day the Lord has made! Let us rejoice and be glad in it!

22 posted on 08/15/2006 9:40:27 AM PDT by Teófilo (Visit Vivificat! - http://www.vivificat.org - A Catholic Blog of News, Commentary and Opinion)
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To: Teófilo; Carolina; sandyeggo; Salvation


Hymn of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary


Maronite Catholic Hymn for the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary taken from the Book of Offering, Maronite Catholic Church.


Alleluia! O Mother who gave Life to us, petition on our behalf the Son who appeared from you: may he remove from us the blows of punishment, and keep away divisions and disputes. May he lead us in the path of life in which we journey at all times. On your memorial day, we sing praise to your only Son.

Alleluia! Blessed are you, O Mary, for God, who feeds all creatures, was nourished by you and rested on your breast. O Wonder! The Son of God was nourished by a human creature! He assumed what is ours and gave us what is his. On his mother's memorial let us proclaim: Glory to you, O Lord.

Alleluia! As dew was falling gently over the city of Ephesus Saint John wrote to its people. He instructed them to celebrate the memory of the Blessed Mary, three times each year: In January, during the time of planting of the seeds; in May, during the time of harvest; and in August, during the time of the grapes. For the mysteries of life are prefigured in these months.

Alleluia! On your memorial day, O Blessed Mary, angels and mortals are overwhelmed with joy. The dead rejoice in their tombs because of the glory in creation. God will bless those who celebrate your memory with faith and pour his mercy upon them.

Alleluia! Who is to see a new ship sustaining the One who is mighty; the One who sustains and rules all creation. Mary bore him, yet he bears all creation. He nourishes all living creatures, yet she nourished him with her milk. He is the Maker of all infants, yet he dwelt, as an infant, in her womb. The fiery beings in the heights sing hymns of praise to him! Alleluia!

23 posted on 08/15/2006 10:28:30 AM PDT by NYer
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To: Salvation

Faith-sharing bump.


24 posted on 08/15/2006 1:26:50 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Leaning on the everlasting arms.)
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To: NYer

Prayers offered up for Pittsburgh PA mayor Bob O'Connor, still in the hospital after five weeks of treatment for brain cancer.


25 posted on 08/15/2006 1:31:08 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Leaning on the everlasting arms.)
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To: NYer

Thank you for that hymn!


26 posted on 08/15/2006 4:51:49 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Teófilo

Beautiful painting!


27 posted on 08/15/2006 4:54:51 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina; ELS

Thanks for the Pope's homily!


28 posted on 08/15/2006 4:57:07 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Carmelite Coat of Arms Pray for

A Voice in the Desert

I will raise up for Myself a faithful priest; he will do
what is in My heart and in
My mind, says the Lord.

                  ~ 1 Samuel 2:35

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29 posted on 08/15/2006 4:57:31 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Assumption and the Doctors of the Church
Carlo Maratti
1689 Oil on canvas
S. Maria del Popolo, Rome
30 posted on 08/15/2006 4:58:02 PM PDT by Carolina
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To: All
Vespers -- Evening Prayer

Vespers (Evening Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 121 (122)
Jerusalem, the holy city
They filled me with joy when they said, “We will go to the house of the Lord”.
Now our feet are standing within your gates, Jerusalem.

Jerusalem, built as a city, whole and self-contained:
there the tribes have gone up, the tribes of the Lord –
the witness of Israel, to praise the Lord’s name.
For there are the thrones of justice, the thrones of the house of David.

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: “Safety for those who care for you,
peace inside your walls, security within your ramparts!”

For my brethren and those near to me I will say “Peace be upon you”.
For the sake of the house of the Lord our God, I will call blessings upon you.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 126 (127)
Without the Lord, we labour in vain
If the Lord does not build the house,
 its builders labour in vain.
If the Lord does not watch over a city,
 its workmen guard it in vain.

It is vain for you to rise before the dawn
 and go late to your rest,
 eating the bread of toil –
 to those he loves, the Lord gives sleep.

The Lord bestows sons as an heirloom,
 the fruit of the womb as a reward.
Like arrows in the hand of a warrior –
 so are the sons of one’s youth.
Happy the man who fills his quiver thus:
 when he disputes with his enemies at the gate,
 he will not be the loser.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Ephesians 1
God the Saviour
Blessed be God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who has blessed us, in Christ, with every spiritual blessing in heaven.

In love, he chose us before the creation of the world,
to be holy and spotless in his sight.

He predestined us to be his adopted children through Jesus Christ,
simply because it pleased him to do so.

This he did for the praise of the glory of his grace,
of his free gift of us to his Beloved,

in whose blood we have gained redemption,
and the forgiveness of our sins.

This he did according to the riches of his grace,
which he gave us in abundance,

with all wisdom and discernment,
revealing to us the mysteries of his will,
because it pleased him to do so.

In this action he has planned, in the fulfilment of time,
to bring all things together in Christ,
from the heavens and from the earth.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Magnificat
My soul rejoices in the Lord
My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
 and my spirit rejoices in God, my salvation.
For he has shown me such favour –
 me, his lowly handmaiden.
Now all generations will call me blessed,
 because the mighty one has done great things for me.
His name is holy,
 his mercy lasts for generation after generation
 for those who revere him.

He has put forth his strength:
 he has scattered the proud and conceited,
 torn princes from their thrones;
 but lifted up the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things;
 the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel,
 he has remembered his mercy as he promised to our fathers,
 to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

31 posted on 08/15/2006 5:02:28 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
The Word Among Us


Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Meditation
1 Corinthians 15:20-27



Imagine how deep is the relationship between Mary and her Son—and the example she is for all of us. To prepare her for her role as Mother of God, God freed her from the stain of original sin at her conception and laid on her heart an unswerving desire to love him and his people. Faithful to the end, she was even given a special participation in Jesus’ resurrection when, at the close of her life, she was assumed body and soul into heaven.

Imagine—even after her earthly life came to a close, Mary continued to be our greatest example of the Christian life. Just as she took part in Jesus’ struggle with Satan, so too did she share in his triumph over death. She is the first Christian to experience what is destined for all Christians—to stand as a new creation before the throne of God and to share fully in his divine life.

Mary’s place in heaven now is a sign of hope to all of us who await our share in the resurrection when Jesus returns. We too will reign with Christ. We too will gaze face to face upon the beauty of God. We too will be surrounded by the heavenly host in all their glory and majesty—we will even outshine the angels because of our union with Christ. This is our hope. This is our heritage in Christ. This is what we all have to look forward to.

Today, as we aim at the goal that Mary has already attained, let us seek to live the kind of life she lived. Washed clean in the waters of baptism, let us reject sin and accept Jesus. Filled with the same Spirit that overshadowed Mary, let us embrace the power of the Spirit as we live by faith today. Encouraged by Mary’s assumption, let us keep our focus on loving and serving Jesus as we await his glorious return. Like Mary, let us magnify the Lord and say yes to whatever he asks us to do.

“Lord Jesus, we pray for all those who do not yet hope for the resurrection. May each person come to know that the reason we have been created is to live with you for all eternity.”

Revelation 11:19; 12:1-6,10; Psalm 45:10-12,16; Luke 1:39-56



32 posted on 08/15/2006 5:05:38 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 

<< Tuesday, August 15, 2006 >> Assumption
 
Revelation 11:19; 12:1-6, 10
1 Corinthians 15:20-26
Psalm 45
Luke 1:39-56
View Readings  
 
MASTERPIECE OF THE MASTER
 
"Blest are you among women and blest is the Fruit of your womb." —Luke 1:42
 

When God looked at all He had created, He called it "very good" (Gn 1:31). Creation was a masterpiece of perfect harmony. Then we sinned and disfigured the masterpiece. With sin, death entered the world, and we were barred from the tree of life (Gn 3:24).

Jesus hung on a tree (Acts 13:29) and restored life to a deadly world. He restored the masterpiece of creation. Just as Eve began the ruin of creation, Mary began the restoration of the masterpiece. By the grace of her Son, she was sinless, "holy and blameless in His sight" (Eph 1:4), and therefore not subject to death. She is like the original masterpiece of creation. She was "very good," "blessed among women." She is the new Eve, the true "mother of all the living" (Gn 3:20).

This does not glorify Mary at the expense of Jesus. Mary does not take glory away from Jesus anymore than a masterpiece draws attention away from the artist. The Master is praised because of the masterpiece. It focuses attention on the Master. Shout with Mary: "My being proclaims the greatness of the Lord" (Lk 1:46).

 
Prayer: Praise You, Jesus, for the miracle who is Mary! Praise You, Jesus, for a sinless one through whom You, the all-holy One, entered the world.
Promise: "A great sign appeared in the sky, a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars." —Rv 12:1
Praise: Mary was taken body and soul into heaven to join He Who first was glorified. "God Who is mighty has done great things for me, holy is His name" (Lk 1:49).
 

33 posted on 08/15/2006 5:08:37 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Compline -- Night Prayer

Compline (Night Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


This is an excellent moment for an examination of conscience. In a communal celebration of Compline, one of the penitential acts given in the Missal may be recited.

A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.


Psalm 142 (143)
A prayer in time of trouble
Lord, I trust you: do not hide your face from me. Alleluia.
Lord, listen to my prayer:
 in your faithfulness turn your ear to my pleading;
 in your justice, hear me.
Do not judge your servant:
 nothing that lives can justify itself before you.

The enemy has hounded my spirit,
 he has crushed my life to the ground,
 he has shut me in darkness, like the dead of long ago.
So my spirit trembles within me,
 my heart turns to stone.
I remind myself of the days of old,
 I reflect on all your works,
 I meditate once more on the work of your hands.
I stretch out my arms to you,
 I stretch out my soul, like a land without water.

Come quickly and hear me, O Lord,
 for my spirit is weakening.
Do not hide your face from me,
 do not let me be like the dead,
 who go down to the underworld.
Show me your mercy at daybreak,
 because of my trust in you.
Tell me the way I should follow,
 for I lift up my soul towards you.
Rescue me from my enemies:
 Lord, I flee to you for refuge.
Teach me to do your will,
 for you are my God.

Your good spirit will lead me to the land of justice;
 for your name’s sake, Lord, you will give me life.
In your righteousness you will lead my soul
 away from all tribulation.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Lord, I trust you: do not hide your face from me. Alleluia.

Reading 1 Peter 5:8-9
Be calm and keep watch. The Devil, your enemy, is circling you like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. Resist him, strong in faith.

Short Responsory ?
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

Canticle Nunc Dimittis
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.
Now, Master, you let your servant go in peace.
 You have fulfilled your promise.
My own eyes have seen your salvation,
 which you have prepared in the sight of all peoples.
A light to bring the Gentiles from darkness;
 the glory of your people Israel.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.

Prayer
Let us pray.
Of your kindness, Lord, dispel the darkness of this night, so that we your servants may go to sleep in peace and wake to the light of the new day, rejoicing in your name.
Through Christ our Lord, Amen.

May the almighty Lord grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
A M E N
An antiphon to Our Lady should be recited here.

34 posted on 08/15/2006 5:10:22 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Lk 1:39-56
# Douay-Rheims Vulgate
39 And Mary rising up in those days, went into the hill country with haste into a city of Juda. exsurgens autem Maria in diebus illis abiit in montana cum festinatione in civitatem Iuda
40 And she entered into the house of Zachary and saluted Elizabeth. et intravit in domum Zacchariae et salutavit Elisabeth
41 And it came to pass that when Elizabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the infant leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost. et factum est ut audivit salutationem Mariae Elisabeth exultavit infans in utero eius et repleta est Spiritu Sancto Elisabeth
42 And she cried out with a loud voice and said: Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. et exclamavit voce magna et dixit benedicta tu inter mulieres et benedictus fructus ventris tui
43 And whence is this to me that the mother of my Lord should come to me? et unde hoc mihi ut veniat mater Domini mei ad me
44 For behold as soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in my ears, the infant in my womb leaped for joy. ecce enim ut facta est vox salutationis tuae in auribus meis exultavit in gaudio infans in utero meo
45 And blessed art thou that hast believed, because those things shall be accomplished that were spoken to thee by the Lord. et beata quae credidit quoniam perficientur ea quae dicta sunt ei a Domino
46 And Mary said: My soul doth magnify the Lord. et ait Maria magnificat anima mea Dominum
47 And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour. et exultavit spiritus meus in Deo salutari meo
46 And Mary said: My soul doth magnify the Lord. et ait Maria magnificat anima mea Dominum
47 And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour. et exultavit spiritus meus in Deo salutari meo
48 Because he hath regarded the humility of his handmaid: for behold from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed. quia respexit humilitatem ancillae suae ecce enim ex hoc beatam me dicent omnes generationes
49 Because he that is mighty hath done great things to me: and holy is his name. quia fecit mihi magna qui potens est et sanctum nomen eius
50 And his mercy is from generation unto generations, to them that fear him. et misericordia eius in progenies et progenies timentibus eum
51 He hath shewed might in his arm: he hath scattered the proud in the conceit of their heart. fecit potentiam in brachio suo dispersit superbos mente cordis sui
52 He hath put down the mighty from their seat and hath exalted the humble. deposuit potentes de sede et exaltavit humiles
53 He hath filled the hungry with good things: and the rich he hath sent empty away. esurientes implevit bonis et divites dimisit inanes
54 He hath received Israel his servant, being mindful of his mercy. suscepit Israhel puerum suum memorari misericordiae
55 As he spoke to our fathers: to Abraham and to his seed for ever. sicut locutus est ad patres nostros Abraham et semini eius in saecula
56 And Mary abode with her about three months. And she returned to her own house. mansit autem Maria cum illa quasi mensibus tribus et reversa est in domum suam

35 posted on 08/15/2006 8:39:29 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex


Madonna of the Magnificat (Madonna del Magnificat)

Sandro Botticelli

1480-81
Tempera on panel, diameter 118 cm
Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

36 posted on 08/15/2006 8:41:16 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex

One to see in person. It is quite splendid. The Botticelli Room in the Uffizi of Florence is one where you can spend all day. Thankfully, there are benches in the middle of the room so that you can sit and meditate while looking at the paintings and the museum regulates how many people can be in the room at one time.


37 posted on 08/16/2006 7:32:19 AM PDT by Carolina
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